Showing posts with label Mixerr Reviews. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mixerr Reviews. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Hurricane Harvey destroys 100 year old building in Elgin, Texas.

Hurricane Harvey destroyed the roof a 100 year old building located at 217 Central Avenue in Elgin, Texas and has destroyed the interior structure of the building. As of now, the roof is completely missing. The roof has collapsed from destruction of wind currents during Hurricane Harvey. The building is a former shell of what it once was before Hurricane Harvey weather hit the small town of Elgin, Texas.

The building that was destroyed what was once a Thai food restaurant. From 2010 to 2017 is when  Katie's Catering Thai Cuisine operated at the corner of Avenue B & Central Avenue in Elgin, Texas.

POLLEN ARCHITECTURE is planning to turn this 100 year old building into a new vision. As of two months ago, the first day of restoration and cleanup began. The removal and stabilization alone is estimated to be a total cost of $6,000. Possibly $8,000 including fees. However more work needs to be done to get completed. Margo Sawyer wanted to thank everyone who has already so generously donated! Any help would be greatly appreciated!

This building is zoned in C-2 Commercial District with Zone 2 Overlay which allows more than 50% residential on the ground floor. This building is also located in the Elgin Local Historic District and Elgin National Register Historic Commercial District. The parcel number is R12232.
The building is located at 217 Central Avenue, Elgin, Texas, US 78621.

A GoFundMe page has been set up to revitalize the building that was once a Thai food restaurant. You can help by sending donations here to this link.:https://www.gofundme.com/Transform-Harveys-destruction-into-Sawyer-Art-Garden

Updated history of Pleasant Valley School in Austin, Texas.

Pleasant Valley School was a school in Austin, Texas that operated from 1864 to 1968. The school building was located where modern day intersection FM 2222 & Loop 360 is now located. Pleasant Valley School first served as an elementary school serving grades 1 through 5. Later Pleasant Valley School became a 1-11 school serving grades 1 through 11.

Pleasant Valley School served as school for students living in the neighborhoods of Northwest Hills, Allandale, West Austin, Courtyard, Spicewood, Pleasant Valley, Spicewood Mesa, and Twin Mesa neighborhoods. Even students from the Eanes School District attended Pleasant Valley School despite living in Westlake at one point in the latter half of the 19th century.


Thomas Hughell Walden donated land to Travis County Appraisal District for a school in 1864 located on land which owned called Old Walden Place where the modern day intersection FM 2222 & Loop 360 is now located. Pleasant Valley School opened up as a schoolhouse where school was held inside a log cabin built in 1864. Classes would be held for this school inside of the log cabin from 1864 to 1867.

Hughell Walden, Ewan Williams, and Fendrick Smith were the first school trustees. Miss Jennie Parrish, Mrs. Munn, and Mr. Stringer were the teachers. Ewan Williams gave 1½ acres of land to the school. Pleasant Valley School was also known as Bull Creek School on several topographical maps from the 1880’s to the 1910’s as the school was located near Bull Creek.

The old school building was outmoded and outdated by 1866. So a new log cabin was built in 1867. School was held in this log cabin from 1867 until 1919. The first school year for this school building was the 1867-1868 school year. Funding was tight as money was scarce during the Reconstruction era after the American Civil War. Grades 1 through 5 only were taught at this school. Students wanting to continue towards 6th grades and onwards went to Oak Grove School on Spicewood Springs Road.

The 1867 Pleasant Valley School log cabin building burned down to the ground in 1885. This led to a dispute in land titles over who owned the land where Pleasant Valley School was located. The school itself was located on a flat. Although Pleasant Valley School was on land owned by Thomas Hughell Walden, the school building moved several times. Eventually the school itself was rebuilt in 1885.

Classes continued in the school year of 1885-1886. Grades 6 through 11 were added in 1886. One side of Pleasant Valley School served grades 1 through 5 and the other side served grades 6 through 11. The side that served grades 1 through 5 switched to serve grades 1 through 6.


In 1918, the Travis County Schools superintendent deemed the school building to be outdated and overcrowded. This led to a demand for aa new school building to be built. However that area of town suffered from extreme poverty at that time and receiving a new school building would be a difficult task.

The land was considered to be very poor by county and city officials as the Northwest Hills neighborhood and Allandale was sparsely settled due to the mountainous hills alongside the rocky limestone formations. Lands were used for farming and ranch. Most of the citizens living in the Northwest Hills neighborhood and in Allandale were very poor back then. The flat yet somewhat mountainous hills alongside the rocky limestone formations alongside Northwest Hills was a perfect ideal location for a school to be built on.


1919 was the year Pleasant Valley School District was formed. Although Pleasant Valley had its own school district by 1919, Travis County Public Schools (Travis County Common School District) operated and oversaw the school. The Travis County Schools superintendent was responsible for helping allocate funding to several rural schools and school district in Travis County.

 The Pleasant Valley School District had a 50¢ cent school tax which produced only $91.83 per year, which in turn was only $4.84 per student of free-school age. The Travis County Schools superintendent was responsible for helping allocate funding to Pleasant Valley School.

During the summer of 1919, people from the Allandale and Northwest Hills neighborhoods voted bonds within an amount of $2,000 dollars build a new modern two-room schoolhouse. The vote was unanimous due to their desires for a better school. It was a cry for help. A cry for better educational facilities. Thomas Hughell Walden was the man instrumental in getting Austin Public Schools (Austin ISD) to establish the new Pleasant Valley School building. He and several other petitioned city officials and county officials to build a new schoolhouse in the Pleasant Valley/Northwest Hills community.

When the bonds reached the Attorney General's office for inspection, they could not be approved.  The bonds to build a new school were rejected. Only $500 dollars in bonds could be legally issued for construction of Pleasant Valley School. The tax base of the district was simply too small. The new schoolhouse was not built. Instead an old was provided with a new roof and a new floor along with 2 extra windows.

Pleasant Valley School later opened up as a schoolhouse for Austin ISD (then known as Austin Public Schools) and Travis County Public Schools (Travis County Common School District) in 1919 as a one story two-room wooden-framed schoolhouse that would be later on converted into a three-room wooden-framed schoolhouse in what was considered then as rural Travis County. Years of operation for this school were from 1919 to 1968.


Unfortunately the one story school would face another tragedy. The school burned down again in the year of 1931. The school burned down to the ground. Everything was destroyed by the fire. Books, desks, educational material, sports equipment, and several other items were never recovered. It was a total loss for Pleasant Valley School District. Students were sent to Oak Gove School in the Oak Grove School District (School District No. 5) temporarily until a new school building could be built.

Fortunately however, the school was able to be rebuilt in 1932 after being burned down to a flat surface. 1932 was also the same time where the school became accredited receiving accreditation from the State of Texas. Later Pleasant Valley School became a 1-11 school. The State of Texas accredited Pleasant Valley School with high acclaim for their educational standards.

On the 1932 Topographic and Road Map of Travis Count, the school appears as Pleasant Valley School. Pleasant Valley School was no longer referred to as Bull Creek School any maps from the 1930s onwards.


The school would not live on forever. It too would be moved as the city of Austin grew around it.
Pleasant Valley School District was closed in 1968 when the school property reverted by sale to Mrs. C.C. Champion as provided in the original deed, Pleasant Valley School District was closed and consolidated into Summitt School District and later Austin ISD. Austin ISD sending the remaining students to continue their education in nearby schools in the Austin school district.

The other reasons why the Pleasant Valley School and Pleasant Valley School District closed was due to declining enrollment and imminent domain. Shortly after sale to Mrs. C.C. Champion as provided in the original deed, Pleasant Valley School sat abandoned for 2 years until 1970.


In 1970, Pleasant Valley School was relocated and made into a private residence on the Champion family land. This was done in order to prevent demolition. The Champion family donated land to TXDot for Loop 360 and have donated huge portions of their land to real estate development during the latter half of the 20th century.

Imminent domain would make right of way for a new Loop 360 and the Pleasant Valley School building was in its route (right of way). That Loop 360 route that would eventually become a highway to serve West Austin neighborhoods such as Courtyard, Allandale, Spicewood, Pleasant Valley, and Northwest Hills. City of Austin used imminent domain to construct Loop 360 where Pleasant Valley School was at.


As of December 2017, the Pleasant Valley School building is now a private residence on land owned by the Champion family. The school building has been repainted a white color which was the original color for this school building.

However the land is being rezoned by the Champion family for a hotel and is slated for demolition. The Champion family isn't keen on getting historical status or a Texas Historic Landmark marker for the school building as they want to proceed with building the hotel. No, the Champion family has not gotten the City of Austin to initiate historic zoning to keep the building in tact. So far nothing has been done yet. Only time will tell certainly.


Pleasant Valley School was located at the intersection of Loop 360 & FM 2222, Austin, Texas, US.

Hudson Bend School history long forgotten revisited.

The Hudson Bend School in Bee Cave, Texas and its history have been long forgotten with time. Many people do not know of the history of this school or are aware of existence. Hudson Bend School is one of the many early schools of the Lake Travis community, Travis County, Austin, and Bee Cave of course.


Wiley Hudson and his family settled in Hudson Bend near the Colorado River (now Lake Travis) in 1830. In 1860, men from the community built a one-room schoolhouse. Lumber was donated from nearby. Albert Kendrick Stewart was responsible for building the Hudson Bend School. A man named Mr. Watson was hired to be the teacher by the school.

By 1890, Hudson Bend community boasted 2 schools called Hudson Bend School and Hurst Creek School aka Hirsh Creek School. What was once a one-room schoolhouse was later rebuilt into a two-room schoolhouse. Hudson Bend School expanded to having two rooms and gradually grew to three rooms by the end of the 19th century.

Hudson Bend School was never a district school nor did the Hudson Bend community have its own school district as several other communities around had their own school districts at that time. (Hudson Bend never had its own school district.)


In 1901, both Hudson Bend School, Lone Ives School, and Hurst Creek School were consolidated into Teck School via Teck Common School District in 1901. Hudson Bend School Hudson and Hurst Creek School consolidated into each other with Lone Ives School consolidating in 1902. Although Bend School still operated however. Hudson Bend School would continue to operate from 1901 to 1911.

Hudson Bend School stopped operating in 1911. The building was sold off to a private homeowner in the same year. Hurst Creek School was demolished. Both schools no longer exist.Hudson Bend School, Lone Ives School, and Hurst Creek School were consolidated into Teck Common School District.


In 1985, a new middle school was opened by Lake Travis ISD. Lake Travis ISD officials decided to name the new middle school Hudson Bend Middle School after the former Hudson Bend School in an effort to remember their 19th century historic roots. After all, the name “Hudson Bend Middle School” originated from “Hudson Bend School”. The first school term Hudson Bend Middle School operated on was the 1985-1986 school year.

Today the legacy and name of Hudson Bend School live on at Hudson Bend Middle School at the location of 15600 Lariat Trail, Austin, Texas, US 78734. This middle school proudly boasts a high school graduation rate of 96.5% (96 ½ percent).

History about the Highland School in Pflugerville, Texas way long forgotten revisited.

Highland School in Pflugerville, Texas is one of the many Austin/Travis County institutions that have been long forgotten which has faded away with time and history. Most local citizens have forgotten about  Highland School in Pflugerville, Texas. In fact, most have never knew about this school’s existence.

For those who didn’t remember and for those who did not know, Highland School was a public school that operated from 1873 to 1942. Highland School was located near the intersection of Vision Drive & Foothill Farms near I 35 (IH 35) out on the rural countryside.


In early 1873, Highland School was built as a one room school building. At one point Highland School was built as a log cabin before becoming a modern one room school building. 1880 was the year Highland School was rebuilt and modernized into a one room school building. Overall Highland School was a rural school that grades 1st through 10th. 11th grade was later added.

Year of 1882 is when the Highland School District aka Highland School District No. 56 (School District No. 56) was established. Highland School had its own school district (as many rural schools in Travis County/Austin did during that time. Highland School District operated as a school district from 1882 to 1936 for Pflugerville and Austin before consolidating into Pflugerville ISD in 1936.


Beginning in 1900, Highland School added 11th grade classes to their school. Highland School then taught grades 1st through 11th. 10th grade and 11th grade classes were held in a separate room. The Highland School expanded from being a one-room school with one teacher into a three-room school with three teachers in 1901.

1902 is when some children from Merrilltown School in the Merrilltown School District were transferred to Highland School. Students were transferred from Merrilltown School (also known as Merrilltown Elementary School) and Merrilltown High School as an effort to relive overcrowding in rural schools of Round Rock, Travis County, Austin, and Pflugerville.

In 1908 is when Richland School consolidated into Highland School as was later consolidated by Plfugerville ISD shortly after.  During the 1908-1909 school year is when Pflugerville ISD began having Highland School admitting students from Richland School as the Pflugerville School District consolidated Richland School in 1908. Despite Richland School being consolidated into Pflugerville ISD, Richland School continued to operate until 1938.


Highland School never went past 11th grade until the 1934-1935 school year. 1935 is when Highland School began accepting 12th grade students from schools in the Pflugerville School District and neighboring school districts. This practice continued through 1940 until the school closed for good.

Prior to 1935, Pflugerville ISD did not have buses as a method of transportation for students. Most students, including those who lived in town, walked to school. Some students walked more than 2 miles to school everyday. Highland School was no exception. By the 1935-1936 school year, Pflugerville ISD had their own transportation with buses now provided. However Pflugerville ISD only operated on bus route. Despite this improved method of transportation, everyone had their own transportation.

In 1936, Pflugerville ISD was about to lose state certification and accreditation because the school district did not have a sufficient amount of students for their tax base. Travis County Schools Superintendent Irvin W. Popham held many meetings and the solution was to consolidate the surrounding schools and its school districts into Pflugerville ISD. Consolidation saved Pflugerville ISD.

Highland School met its fate as most rural school across the United States did. The school was consolidated into a larger school district. Highland School and its school district were consolidated into Pflugerville ISD (Pflugerville Independent School District) in 1936.

Pflugerville ISD continued to let Highland School operate until 1942 due to lack of state funding as funds were going to soldiers fighting in World War II. So Highland School closed down in 1942. Its students were moved to the Pflugerville School.

The building was moved onto to the site of where Timmerman Elementary School is now located in 1943. The building was destroyed by a tornado that hit Pflugerville in 1957. Highland School is no longer extant today as the building has been demolished.


The location of Highland School was Vision Drive, Pflugerville, Texas, US 78660.

Sunday, December 3, 2017

Georgia teacher on administrative leave after threatening student now fired.

A Georgia teacher is on paid administrative leave after threatening a student verbally. On November 8, 2017, April Carr sent a video to FOX 5 in Atlanta, Georgia which shows that a teacher threatening her 11th grade son. April Carr has admitted her son’s behavior in the classroom at Rockdale Career Academy sparked the incident which had ultimately led to the threat.

The teacher was later identified as Paul Hagen by the Rockdale County Sheriff’s Office identified the teacher as Paul Hagen. FOX 5 News reported the incident live on the 5 o’clock news the following night.

Teacher Paul Hagen stated in his threat: “I’m serious, dude.” “If you screw with me, you’re going to get in big [expletive] trouble.” “Don’t smile at me, man. That’s how people like you get shot. I got a bet. I bet by the time you’re 21 somebody is going to put a bullet in your head. OK? And it might be me, the one who does it.”

April Carr believes that is enough punishment for the teacher. She wants the teacher to be fired from his job. April Carr has since posted the video on Facebook.

A school spokesperson has reported that incident remains under investigation. A criminal investigation has been launched. Teacher Paul Hagen has been fired from his position as science teacher at Rockdale Career Academy. He is now currently unemployed.

Why we need to remember Willowbrook State School.

We need to remember Willowbrook State School. Because Willowbrook State School was a breeding ground for all sorts of human rights violations. Many clients were mentally, emotionally, and physically abused during their stay there. Many were neglected and mistreated by direct care staff and head doctors. Clients were left to fend for themselves.

Willowbrook State School opened in 1947 as a state school operating as a state-supported institution for mentally disabled children in New York City, New York on Staten Island. In its first years of operation, the quality care began to slowly decline. Disease spread rampantly. Hepatitis was common amongst state school residents. In 1955, Willowbrook had a resident population of 4,000.

By 1963, the institution was overpopulated at 6,000 clients over its original capacity of 4,000. By 1965, Senator Robert F. Kennedy left touring the facility and called it a "snakepit". Residents were injected with Hepatitis A for science experiments. Luckily then news reporter Geraldo Rivera exposed Willowbrook State School in 1972 on a news broadcast called “Willowbrook : The Last Great Discgrace”. Geraldo Rivera’s expose prompted the State of New York to launch several investigations of their state schools, state hospitals, and other institutions. Carey vs. NYARC lawsuit is what led to many state institution such as Willowbrook State School to close down and receive the community based services we have today. But luckily the institution was shut down for good and put out of its misery for good by September 1987.

Travis Peak School history not forgotten revisted.

Travis Peak School is one of the many forgotten schools of Travis County in the State of Texas. The history of Travis Peak School has been long forgotten and erased away with time. Only longtime residents and citizens of Travis County know about Travis Peak School. Those who were born prior to the 1930s will know what exactly this news article is explaining in historical context.


In the hot July summer of 1880, a school called Travis Peak School was built out of native stone and brick. The roof was covered with hand-made shingles. All building materials were donated by Mr. W. L. Hensel. W. L. Hensel, Bob Turner, and Geo. West were the selected trustees as appointed by the Travis Peak School District. Mr. W. L. Hensel was the chairman of Travis Peak School and the Travis Peak School District . The Travis Peak School District was established the following year.

Travis Peak School opened in the autumn fall of 1880 as Travis Peak School No. 1 at the intersection of Singleton Bend Road & FM 1431 in 1880 on the Hensel property at the location of 7890 Singleton Bend Road, Marble Falls, Texas, US 78654.

Travis Peak School (later Travis Peak School No. 1) taught 1st grade through 10th grade. Students in both 11th grade and 12th grade went to attend Marble Falls Senior High School (now Marble Falls High School) to complete their high school education. At first Travis Peak School No. 1 only taught grades 1 through 10. 11th grade was added later.

In 1886 is when the original Travis Peak School building became Travis Peak School No. 1. Improvements were made to the building thanks to funding from local property taxes. Sports fields were installed on the Hensel property.

Herman Ludwig Hensel gave property to the Travis Peak School District in 1888 for another new school to be built. In 1889, a wood structure that was moved from Turkey Bend Road to Bee Creek and was reorganized as Travis Peak School No. 2. Travis Peak School No. 2 was located on the Turner Ranch on a “35 yard by 35 yard square piece of land”. A cemetery was located next to Travis Peak School No. 2. Travis Peak School No. 2. was located FM 1431 which is a road that connected to Leander.

Although Travis Peak School No. 1 taught grades 1 through 11, 12th grade students had to complete their senior year at Marble Falls High School or at Marble Falls Senior High School. Mostly grades 11 and 12 would attend Marble Falls High School in Marble Falls, Texas.


Later in the 1920s, what specific schools taught what grades were rearranged. For instance, Travis Peak School No. 1 taught grades 8 through 10 while Travis Peak School No. 2 taught grades 1 through 7. At one point Travis Peak School No. 1 taught grades 1 through 7.

At some point in time, Travis Peak School No. 2 moved on the property next to Travis Peak School No. 1 which was on the Hensel property. This had to have been between the years of 1930-1933  because that is when Travis Peak School No. 2 moved.


1941 is when Travis Peak School and Travis Peak School District were consolidated into Marble Falls ISD. High school students went to attend Marble Falls High School in Marble Falls, Texas. All the other students attended Marble Falls ISD schools. High school students went to attend Marble Falls High School and Marble Falls Senior High School.

After the end of the 1940-1941 school year in June 1941, both the Travis Peak School No. 1 and Travis Peak School No. 2 were consolidated into Marble Falls ISD. Travis Peak School District was abolished thereafter in 1941.


Travis Peak School No. 1 is located on the Hensel property where Hensel Youth Camp is today located at 7890 Singleton Bend Road, Marble Falls, Texas, US 78654 and 7891 Singleton Bend Road, Marble Falls, Texas, US 78654. The school building for Travis Peak School No. 1 has been restored by the Hensel family. The interior structure of Travis Peak School No. 1 has been restored by the Hensel family.

Today the Travis Peak School No. 2 building has been revitalized and renewed into the Travis Peak Church of Christ located at 7893 Singleton Bend Road, Marble Falls, Texas, US 78654. Travis Peak School sits at its original location of Singleton Bend Road & FM 1431.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Georgia teacher on administrative leave after threatening student.

A Georgia teacher is on paid administrative leave after threatening a student. On November 8, 2017, April Carr sent a video to FOX 5 in Atlanta, Georgia which shows that a teacher threatening her 11th grade son. April Carr has admitted her son’s behavior in the classroom at Rockdale Career Academy sparked the incident which had ultimately led to the threat.

The teacher was later identified as Paul Hagen by the Rockdale County Sheriff’s Office identified the teacher as Paul Hagen. FOX 5 News reported the incident live on the 5 o’clock news the following night.  A school spokesperson has reported that incident remains under investigation. A criminal investigation has been launched.

Teacher Paul Hagen stated in his threat:

“I’m serious, dude.” “If you screw with me, you’re going to get in big [expletive] trouble.” “Don’t smile at me, man. That’s how people like you get shot. I got a bet. I bet by the time you’re 21 somebody is going to put a bullet in your head. OK? And it might be me, the one who does it.”

April Carr believes that is enough punishment for the teacher. She wants the teacher to be fired from his job. April Carr has since posted the video on Facebook.

Friday, November 3, 2017

Mopac toll road halfway completed.

The northern portion of the Mopac toll road, located north of Colorado River, is already completed as of November 2017. Construction crews have already begun cleaning up. However construction equipment and vehicles are still present from public view on Mopac. Construction on Mopac toll road going southbound has been rather moving slow at a sluggish pace. Construction for the Mopac toll road always begins at nighttime.

The Mopac toll road is expected be completed by the year 2019. By 2019, construction will have been completed and the toll road will be totally functional by then going both directions northbound and southbound. Mopac toll road will merge in those regular lanes on Mopac Highway (Loop 1) north of the Colorado River.

St. Matthew’s Missionary Baptist Church history nearly long forgotten revisited.

St. Matthew’s Missionary Baptist Church is one of the many forgotten religious institutions and churches of Pflugerville, Texas as well as the Austin/Travis County area. Only historians and long time residents of Pflugerville know about this religious institution.

St. Matthew’s Missionary Baptist Church was organized in 1920 inside the small town of Pflugerville, Texas. Land was sparsely developed as Plfugerville was considered by most to be “out in the country”. According to the TSHA Handbook Online, the Pflugerville community built St. Matthew's Missionary Church by 1920 at Caldwell Lane. This church building was constructed out of native stone and red brick. Although St. Matthew’s Missionary Baptist Church was mostly constructed out of native stone.

The church congregation met at Pflugerville Negro School (Pflugerville Colored School) before the church was completed. Several Baptist congregations of Travis County have met here over the years. In 1922, the church received improvements and renovations.

St. Matthew’s Missionary Baptist Church had a cemetery through St. Mary Missionary Baptist Church. Some graves date back to the 1930s. Many graves appear to be unmarked. However 40 burials have been identified by the Austin Genealogical Society. St. Matthew’s Missionary Baptist Church closed in 1973 and the St. Matthew’s Missionary Baptist Church structure no longer remains as the structure has been long demolished. Lack of membership led to the church closing.

St. Matthew’s Missionary Baptist Church was located at Caldwell Lane, Pflugerville, Texas, US 78660.

Trinity University dubbed as one of the oldest universities in the State of Texas.

San Antonio Express claims that Trinity University is one of the oldest universities in the State of Texas. San Antonio Express verified Trinity University was established in 1869 which was founded by a former Texas State congressman. Three smaller schools were combined into what would become known today as Trinity University.

Today Trinity University is a private school located in San Antonio, Texas with a small student population of 2,500 surrounded on 117 acres of campus. Its accounting students have enjoyed internships via accredited accounting degree programs in Texas. A special 5-year program was added as Master of Science in Accounting to the standard Bachelor of Science in Accounting program.

Travis Peak School history not forgotten.

Travis Peak School is one of the many forgotten schools of Travis County in the State of Texas. The history of Travis Peak School has been long forgotten and erased away with time. Only longtime residents and citizens of Travis County know about Travis Peak School. Those who were born prior to the 1930s will know what exactly this news article is explaining in historical context.


In the hot July summer of 1880, a school called Travis Peak School was built. Travis Peak School opened in the autumn fall of 1880 as Travis Peak School No. 1 at the intersection of Singleton Bend Road & FM 1431 in 1880 on the Hensel property.

Travis Peak School was built out of native stone and brick. The roof was covered with hand-made shingles. All building materials were donated by Mr. W. L. Hensel. W. L. Hensel, Bob Turner, and Geo. West were the selected trustees. Mr. W. L. Hensel was the chairman. The Travis Peak School District was established the following year.

At first Travis Peak School No. 1 only taught grades 1 through 10. 11th grade was added later. Although Travis Peak School No. 1 taught grades 1 through 11, 12th grade students had to complete their senior year at Marble Falls High School or at Marble Falls Senior High School. Mostly grades 11 and 12 would attend Marble Falls High School in Marble Falls, Texas. Later 7.


Herman Ludwig Hensel gave property to the Travis Peak School District in 1888 for another new school to be built. In 1889, a wood structure that was moved from Turkey Bend Road to Bee Creek and was reorganized as Travis Peak School No. 2. Travis Peak School No. 2 was located on the Turner Ranch on a “35 yard by 35 yard square piece of land”. A cemetery was located next to Travis Peak School No. 2. Travis Peak School No. 2. was located FM 1431 which is a road that connected to Leander.

At some point in time, Travis Peak School No. 2 moved on the property next to Travis Peak School No. 1 which was on the Hensel property. This had to have been between the 1930-1933 because that is when Travis Peak School No. 2 moved.

Later in the 1930s, what specific schools taught what grades were rearranged. Travis Peak School No. 1 taught grades 8 through 10 while Travis Peak School No. 2 taught grades 1 through 7.

1941 is when Travis Peak School and Travis Peak School District were consolidated into Marble Falls ISD. High school students went to attend Marble Falls High School in Marble Falls, Texas. All the other students attend Marble Falls ISD schools. Both the Travis Peak School No. 1 and Travis Peak School No. 2 after 1941.


Travis Peak School No. 1 is located on the Hensel property where Hensel Youth Camp is today located at 7890 Singleton Bend Road, Marble Falls, Texas, US 78654 and 7891 Singleton Bend Road, Marble Falls, Texas, US 78654. The school building for Travis Peak School No. 1 has been restored by the Hensel family The interior structure has been restored by the Hensel family.

Today the Travis Peak School No. 2 building has been revitalized and renewed into the Travis Peak Church of Christ located at 7893 Singleton Bend Road, Marble Falls, Texas, US 78654. Travis Peak School sits at its original location of Singleton Bend Road & FM 1431.

History of Manda School/Manda Community Center explained in hindsight.

The Manda School is one of the most well known schoolhouses of Austin/Travis County. Manda School has truly stood the test of time by still being in existence for the past 137 years located northeast of Manor, Texas. What was once a school became a community center shortly after. Both the Manda School and Manda Community Center have a unique interesting history that sets it apart from all the other schoolhouses in the area.

There were 32 rural school houses with similarity to the one in Manda at one point in time, but the Manda Schoolhouse is the only one that remains in all of Travis County/Austin. (Minus the Eanes School and Montopolis School.) Manda School is the only remaining two room school house in Travis County in Austin, Texas from the 20th century and 1910s decade.

Every single year the Friends of Manda School hold meetings here at the Manda Community Center. Mainly meetings are about future regards of Manda Community Center and funding for historic preservation toward this building which are held by the Board of Directors for Friends of Manda School. Community functions, social gatherings, programs, and various meetings are still held inside this building. Friends of Manda School plans to keep the Manda School open as the Manda Community Center in Manda, Texas which is near the town of Manor, Texas.

Every single year the Friends of Manda School clean the school building and land property by mowing the grass and terminating insects from hidden corners. Flooring has been resurfaced by volunteers from Friends of Manda School.

The Manda Community Center is a fine example of historic preservation done right. We need to urge commissioners of the Travis County Historic Commission to preserve historic buildings such as the Manda School. With help from both local citizens and volunteers, we can keep and preserve buildings such as this one. To this day, the Manda School operates as the Manda Community Center. The school building now serves as the reminder of the early settlement of Manda, Texas.



Manda School began its cycle as a school and community center in 1880 in the settlement of Manda, Texas. It is very unclear in what exact type of building structure Manda School taught classes in its pupil stages. The school building structure is probably presumed to have been located in a 2-room log cabin. At first the Manda School did not operate as a district school. Manda School operated as a 1-10 school teaching grades 1st through 10th.

In 1888 is when 1st grade through 10th grade was taught at Manda School. Daily enrollment was 10 to 15 students a day. In 1890, 1st grade through 10th grade was taught at Manda School with a daily attendance rate of 20 to 25 students per day. 1890 truly saw an increase in student enrollment. And just by 15 students!

By 1898, the Manda School had operated under New Sweden School District No. 24 and also as Manda School District No. 24. In 1898 is when New Sweden School District hired a teacher named Miss Zena Slaughter to teach grades 1st through 8th at Manda School.

From 1898 to 1901 is when a teacher named Miss Zena Slaughter taught elementary grades 1st and 8th. A teacher named Miss Edna Slaughter taught high school grades 9th through 11th.

The 1898-1899 school semester is when 11th grade was added with Manda School teaching 1st grade through 11th grade. Miss Zena Slaughter taught elementary grades 1st and 8th along with high school grades 9th through 11th whenever the other teacher was unavailable. Later in 1899 is when Miss Edna Slaughter taught elementary grades 1st and 8th. Miss Edna Slaughter is one the schools earlier teachers to have taught at this school. H. C. Albert and J. Carlson were trustees of Manda School during the school year of 1899-1900.


April 24, 1900 is when Miss Zena Slaughter became the teacher in charge of Manda School. She was appointed as a head teacher by school trustee H. C. Albert in 1900. H. C. Albert appointed P. Carlson from Carlson School as another trustee for Manda School on the date of April 27, 1900. J. Carlson and P. Carlson eventually oversaw trustee duties.

In 1901, school trustee H. C. Albert appointed Miss Edna Slaughter as the head teacher for Manda School if anything were to happen to Miss Zena Slaughter. Both Miss Edna Slaughter and Miss Zena Slaughter served as head teachers for the Manda School.

Paul Albert and Otto Larsson were one of the notable pupils who attended Manda School. Paul Albert was a relative of H. C. Albert, a New Sweden School and Manda School trustee.


Citizens from the Manda community urged commissioners from the Travis County Public Schools (Travis County Common School District) to build a new schoolhouse in the Manda community in 1914. Superintendents and commissioners were receptive to their demanding a new school be built.  Commissioners from the Travis County Public Schools agreed to allocate funding construction of a schoolhouse in Manda, Texas. 


The Manda School was built as the New Sweden School in 1915 to serve students in New Sweden School District #22. Exact first school year that the Manda School operated on was the 1914-1915 school semester at the zenith peak of 1915. Though the school did fully start operating until 1916, students from Manor and the nearby surrounding communities attended. Manda School operated possibly in a 2-room log cabin until sometime during the 1915-1916 school year. Exact dates are unclear.

By 1915, the Manda community voted on a one issue to construct a new school building that was during the spring of that year. Construction for the Manda School building lasted from the summer to the fall of 1915. Although the construction for the Manda School building mostly operated during the summer, it continued in the fall season. School was held in the New Sweden Lutheran Church on New Sweden Church Road during construction. Construction was completed later in that year.

1915 was the first full year altogether that Manda School operated on as under the name “New Sweden School” for which it operated as under at first. The New Sweden School sign located on the top roof of the school building faced front towards Manda - Carlson Road.

The Manda School was named after Amanda Bengtson Gustafson who was sister of the settlement’s postmaster the same year. Manda is a short diminutive for Amanda. The name Manda was shortened from the name Amanda. Many students who had attended this school had Swedish ancestry in their family background and came from Swedish families. Most of the students were children of Swedish sharecroppers on the ranch or Swedes who owned farms in the area.    

The name New Sweden/Manda Schoolhouse has given to the school by local historians. Sometimes historians have labeled the Manda School as “New Sweden/Manda Schoolhouse”, “New Sweden Schoolhouse”, “New Sweden Schoolhouse No. 2”, “New Sweden School No. 2”, and “New Sweden/Manda School”. The name of the school has changed over the course of several years however.

From a February 26, 1933 radio program ran by Texas Extended School and Community Health Education Program for New Sweden School states the following.:  “The first pupil school in this community was held in the old New Sweden Lutheran Church (the church that was is where the cemetery is now at FM 973 and New Sweden Church Road)…… the present two room school was erected in the summer and fall of 1915…. this building was made possible by a bond issue voted by the community in the spring of that year.”


1916 is when the Manda School was opened as a two-room schoolhouse which was a single story building structure for the Manda Common School District in the settlement of Manda, Texas. Manda School was spread out into a 2 room plan incorporated in the school building structure.

Prior to 1916 the Manda School building was used as the New Sweden School building in the New Sweden School District. The New Sweden School sign located on the top roof facing Manda - Carlson Road had been changed to Manda School. The Manda School eventually became known as the Manda Schoolhouse to locals in 1916.

1916 is the year when Manda School and New Sweden School swapped buildings. The then-present New Sweden School building became the Manda School with the New Sweden School being relocated by moving into a church building located on 12178 New Sweden Church Road in Manor, Texas near the New Sweden community and settlement. Manda School was located inside the former New Sweden School building built in 1915. Historians have agreed that the Manda School was the original New Sweden School building. Many historians claim this statement as a fact.

1916 was the same year the community of Manda, Texas was granted its own school district by the State of Texas and Travis County Public Schools which was called Manda Common School District with Manda School separating from New Sweden School District. Manda Common School District included students from neighboring communities such as Manor, New Sweden, Littig, Kimbro, Carlson, and Elgin.

1917 is when the Manda School had an attendance rate of 30 students per day. 2 teachers taught 30 students with 15 students on the lefthand side of the school building and 15 students on the righthand side of the school building. One side taught elementary grades and the other side taught middle school grades and high school grades.


By 1920, the attendance rate had dropped to 20 students per day. However in the middle of the 1920-1921 school year is when the attendance rate had started beginning to pick up with a rate of 25 students per day in daily attendance.

12th grade was added in 1923. Manda School operated as a 1-12 school by then with Manda School teaching 1st grade through 12th grade in that two-room schoolhouse. This was unusual as most schools in the state of Texas either stopped at 10th grade or either 11th grade. Even high schools never went past 10th grade level or the 11th grade level.


The Manda School District had a negro school called Manda Colored Public School which also went under the names Manda Colored School, Manda Negro School, and Kimbro Negro School. According to Manda School Board Records 1947-1963, the Manda Negro School went under several names. The Manda Negro School was located next to Manda School. The Manda Negro School was jointly operated by the Kimbro School District even after 1947 when the Kimbro School District consolidated into the Manda Common School District. 

Once Kimbro School District consolidated into the Manda Common School District, both Kimbro White School and Kimbro Negro School were operated by the Manda School District including the Kimbro School on FM 1100 as well. The Manda Negro School was the former Kimbro Negro School. Kimbro Negro School became the Manda Negro School in 1948 as the Kimbro Negro School was consolidated into Manda Common School District in 1947. Not much is known about the Manga Colored Public School or its history, but county records indicated this school certainly existed.

From the 1947-1948 school year up until 1963 is when the Kimbro Negro School was operated by Manda School District. Walter Banks was elected as principal for the Manda Negro School in 1959. The Manda School Board made a motion to move Manda Negro School into one building with telephone service included in the year of 1960. 1960 is when the former Kimbro Negro School relocated next to Manda School (Manda White School). Manda Negro School consolidated into Elgin ISD in 1963. Sometime after 1963 is when the Manda Negro School was demolished.


In 1942, the Austin American-Statesman newspaper credited and condemned Henry Munson, Albert Munson, Victor Bengston, Martin Anderson, Albin Holmburg, and Edwin Berggren as active pallbearers from New Sweden Lutheran Church. They were active in church services and the New Sweden School Board as well as Manda School Board.

The Austin American-Statesman newspaper had credited and condemned Henry Munson, Albert Munson, Victor Bengston, Martin Anderson, Albin Holmburg, and Edwin Berggren as honorary pall bearers from New Sweden Lutheran Church the same year. They served on the Board of Deacons of the Church.

New Sweden School was consolidated into the Manda Common School District in 1947. New Sweden School students attended school in Manor or Manda School. When New Sweden School was consolidated with the Manda School in the Manda Common School District, New Sweden School was a K-7 school. Kindergarden was added to Manda School and New Sweden School in 1945 prior to consolidation. As a result of school district consolidation, the tax rate was raised from 47¢ to 50¢.

In 1947, Manda Common School District became School District No. 25 for a short time. New Sweden School District No. 22 was dissolved into Manda School District No. 25 by then. Harry Lind of Lund School became vice principal of Manda School.

More schools and school districts were consolidated into the Manda Common School District over time and in the same year as well. Gregg School, Carlson School, Kimbro School, Willow Ranch School, and several other schools along with school districts were consolidated into the Manda Common School District

A vocational building was built next to the school in 1949. The vocational building is where students learned skills and crafts for the workplace. Woodcraft was taught inside this vocational building. Farming and sewing were taught here.


From an Austin American-Statesman newspaper article written in June 3, 1950 under the headlines of “Board To Close School At Merrilltown”, Travis County Public Schools Superintendent Irvin. W. Popham said, “The 13 students in the Merrilltown School will be distributed between the Pflugerville ISD Schools and New Sweden Schools. He said the school was closed because the enrollment had dropped too low.”

As a result overall, 13 students were distributed to Pflugerville ISD Schools, Round Rock ISD schools, and New Sweden Schools. Most students from Merrilltown School were distributed to New Sweden School and Manda School as a result of Merriltown School District consolidation with Round Rock ISD and Pflugerville ISD in 1950. By the 1950-1951 school year, Merrilltown School closed due to a lack of enrollment.

Merrilltown School was an elementary school that served grades 1 through 7. Merrilltown School was known as Merrilltown Elementary School. The Merrilltown School was no longer the 1-12 school it was once known as.

In 1951, the Manda School contributed $20,000 towards the Travis County polio campaign and program. Half of the monetary amount of $20,000 was sent to the national foundation (Polio Foundation) which performed the research for a cure to polio. A news article from the February 01, 1951 edition of the Austin American-Statesman newspaper argued that the monetary amount the amount contributed in the drive won’t even pay their salaries.

Transfers to Elgin High School began in May 1958 at a cost between $20 to $25 dollars at a rate of $248.85 per student. High school students transferred to Elgin ISD to attend Elgin High School. Walter Banks was elected as principal for Manda Negro School. Sid Carwright was appointed as school board trustee in 1959.


The Manda Common School District was dissolved in 1960 during the school district consolidation movement of the 1960s in Texas in an effort to save taxpayers cost. Most students who attended the Manda School were bussed to Elgin ISD though due to proximity towards Elgin. Some students were bussed to Manor ISD.

Manda School had 1,394 students during the 1962-1963 school year. Cost per pupil was $303.46 a year at the balance of $54.61 per pupil raised from local sources. Transfer cost per each student was $54.61 raised from local sources.

During the December 3, 1962 Elgin ISD board meeting, it was established “tuition charged for transfer students in the Elgin Public Schools will be the actual cost as calculated from the budget of last preceding school year.” The State was to furnish $346,896 dollars for each student at a rate of $248.85 per student. $423,627 was divided among the 1,394 students during the 1962-1963 school year. Transfers would begin next year. Transfers to Elgin High School started at 9th grade or 10th grade.

Although the Manda Common School District was dissolved permanently in 1960, the Manda School continued operate until 1963. 1963 is when Manda School was finally closed and stopped operating. Students were sent to schools in Elgin or Manor based where they resided. Elgin ISD permanently closed down Manda School in 1963.

1963 is the same year Manda Community Club was formed. Despite the Manda Community Club being formed, the Manda School building more or less sat abandoned. Manda Community Club tried their hardest to preserve the historic Manda Schoolhouse but ultimately the organization dissolved in 1968. From 1968 onwards, the Manda School more or less sat abandoned with no meaningful use.


The school building still stood in 1969. In 1969 the Manda School was more or less abandoned with no purpose for almost 40 years falling into a state of disrepair. That was until the Friends of Manda School (Friendship of Manda School) decided to make the former Manda School building into a community center which would become the Manda Community Center in 2006. David E Erickson Jr became the trustee for Manda Community Center as of 2009.


From 2016 to 2017, the Friends of Manda School have began maintenance and upkeep of the former Manda School building as an attempt of historic perseveration. Several window panels have been replaced and window screens have been added to all windows of this school. All wooden floors have been flattened and resurfaced to be up to code for building standards and code standards. Central AC heating is now connected to this building.

Today the Friends of Manda School and David E Erickson Jr. own and maintain the Manda Community Center. David E Erickson Jr is the trustee for Manda Community Center as of no. David E Erickson Jr is responsible for the finances and maintenance of the Manda School.

Manda School is now operated, owned, and preserved by the Friends of Manda School (Friendship of Manda School). Friends of Manda School is responsible for the upkeep and maintenance of this school building. Every single year the Friends of Manda School clean the school building and land property by mowing the grass and terminating insects from hidden corners. The Manda community along with several volunteers have been restoring the Manda School building to its original condition as found decades earlier.

Every single year the Friends of Manda School hold meetings here at the Manda Community Center. Mainly meetings are about future regards of Manda Community Center and funding for historic preservation toward this building which are held by the Board of Directors for Friends of Manda School. Community functions, social gatherings, programs, and various meetings are still held inside this building. Friends of Manda School plans to keep the Manda School open as the Manda Community Center in Manda, Texas which is near the town of Manor, Texas.

Manda School/Manda Community Center is located at 16717 Manda Carlson Road, Manor, Texas, US 78653. The other address for the Manda Community Center is 16306 Manda Carlson Road, Manor, Texas, US 78653.

Webberville School history revealed by Michael Mixerr.

Webberville School history of Webberville, Texas has been long forgotten and nearly erased with time. Not many people knew Webberville had schools or even had its own school district. Webberville held it school classes often in churches such as the Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church or First Baptist Church on FM 969. Webberville School operated from 1870 to 1967.

White landowner Matthew Duty donated one acre of land for a church and school for the recently freed African Americans in the year of in 1868 shortly after emancipation. Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church was established on the property the same year.  His handwritten deed indicated that “as long as there are any members of the church, the land cannot be sold.”.  Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church was  organized that year as a mission church of the St. John Regular Missionary Baptist Association.

Webberville School and Webberville School District began in 1870 in Webberville, Texas as one-teacher school consisting of grades 1 through 7 and later grades 9 through 11. Webberville School originated in the Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church in 1870 where both church and school were held. Black students used one side of the church and white students used the other. The school had no indoor plumbing or lunchroom facilities.

Webberville had its own school district called Webberville School District which was known as School District No. 32. Students from the Hornsby-Dunlap School and Bastrop County often attended Webberville Schools after completing 5th grade.

1878 is when 8th grade was added to the Webberville School. In 1880, high school grades 9 through 11 were added to the Webberville School. Both church and school were held at Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church.


At one point Webberville Negro School and Webberville White School there were on the same property as Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church. Things would remain this way until the year of 1911. In 1911, the Webberville School District saw an increasing need for a new school. Specifically a new white school.

Owners of Colorado Lodge #96 offered a lease to the Webberville School District for a fair price where the Webberville White School would continue classes for students to get their education. Colorado Lodge #96 was a Masonic Lodge. Class was held on the first floor. From then on, only Webberville Negro School operated inside Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church.

By the early 1920s, Webberville School had a baseball team. The baseball even had “husband and wife teams”. Teachers even participated in the baseball team. By the 1920s, Webberville Schools had 200 to 300 students attend school each year.


The Hornsby-Dunlap School and Hornsby-Dunlap School District consolidated into the Webberville School District in 1952 with students now attending both Webberville Schools including Webberville School. Hornsby-Dunlap School continued to operate under Colorado Common School District #36.

After the consolidation of Hornsby-Dunlap School in 1952, a fundraiser was held to purchase visual-aid equipment and a movie projector. A bus was purchased to transport the children to Webberville from the Hornsby-Dunlap community in the same year. However the school still had no indoor plumbing or lunchroom facilities.

The Webberville School was integrated for a short period of time. However Webberville Schools were segregated by choice and by law. By the 1956-1957, school year, Webberville School became slowly integrated.


Sometime in the 1960s is when Webberville White School moved into the Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church which housed Webberville Negro School.  Webberville White School moved into a school building located southwest of the church. The schools were located on the same property once again. Another school building was built for Webberville Negro School housing grades 1 through 8. That other school building.

In 1967, the Webberville School and Webberville School District were consolidated into Del Valle Independent School District (Del Valle ISD). Due to racial integration and school district consolidation, the Webberville School closed down during the 1967-1968 school year.

The Webberville Negro School building was sold to the church the following year. The Webberville Negro School building was a separate structure southwest of Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church until after 1973. The original school building of Webberville Negro School was added to the church in 1973. The side-gabled wing of church building was the original school building of Webberville Negro School. The other school building was demolished prior to 1973.


To this day, the Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church in Webberville, Texas remains an active congregation. The church building stands in its original location at 1314 Weber Street, Webberville, Texas, US 78653. Today Colorado Lodge #96 and Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church remain in tact.



Webberville Schools were segregated by choice and by law. This led to the creation of Webberville Negro School and Webberville White School. The Webberville Schools of Webberville School, Webberville White School and Webberville Negro School were divided into three departments: Primary (grades 1 through 4),  Intermediate (grades 5 through 8), and Secondary (grades 9 through 11).


Webberville Negro School was held in the Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church on 1314 Weber Street in Webberville, Texas from 1880 to 1967. By the end of the 1950s is when Webberville Negro School (Webberville School) ended as a two teacher school. At one point, there were two schools on the property.

The Webberville Negro School was divided into three departments: Primary with Mrs. Lydia Scales as the teacher for grades 1 through 4;, Intermediate with Mrs. Effie R. Edwards as the teacher for grades 5 through 8 for the Webberville School; and Secondary with Mr. Roosevelt H. King as the teacher for grades 9 through 11.

The Webberville Negro School became a K-8 school in the 1930s. School stopped after 8th grade. Students who wanted to continue onto high school were sent to attend Manor Colored High School in Manor, Texas, Littig High School in Littig, Texas, or simply attended high school in Austin, Texas.

During the 1934-1935 school year,  Webberville School (Webberville Negro School) had 67 students with an average daily attendance of 40 students. There was one teacher for 67 students. The cost per year for each student was $659 with an average of $16.25 per student per year. The teacher taught grades 1 through 7, and later 8th, for 146 days.

Webberville Negro School (Webberville School) closed in 1967 ending as a two teacher school. The school was given back to Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church. The Webberville Negro School building was a separate structure southwest of Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church until after 1973. The original school building of Webberville Negro School was added to the church in 1973. The side-gabled wing of church building was the original school building of Webberville Negro School.


Webberville White School was held in Colorado Lodge #96 located on 19011 FM 969 from 1911 until sometime in the 1960s. In 1923, the Webberville White School (Webberville School) grew to incorporate high school grades 10 through 12. School enrollment grew to 200 to 300 students by the 1922-1923 school year. This school had no indoor plumbing or lunchroom facilities.

Sometime in the 1960s is when Webberville White School moved into the Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church which housed Webberville Negro School. Webberville White School moved into a school building located southwest of the church. Another school building was built for Webberville Negro School housing grades 1 through 8.

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Future for old Don’s Grass property in Austin, Texas remains unknown.

The future for Don’s Grass property remains unknown currently as of November 2017. Many citizens, activists, council members, and preservationists from both Austin and Oak Hill wonder about the future of the old site.

However Don Farmer plans to demolish the old Oak Hill School so he can build a new modernized storefront for his business Don's Grass & Landscape Inc. But nothing has materialized yet. All buildings have remained in tact. He has not made comment to the public regarding the future outcome for his business or those 2 buildings. Don Farmer and his landscape business Don’s Grass occupied the former site from 2005 to 2012.

The building Don’s Grass occupied was none other than the old Oak Hill School located at 6240 West US 290, Austin, Texas, US 78735. The Oak Hill School was the old Oak Hill Elementary School that taught grades 1 through 7 operated by Austin ISD from 1923 to 1985.

The former Oak Hill School and its school buildings remain in tact leaving many Austin and Oak Hill citizens to wonder about the future of the Don’s Grass site. Future for the former Don’s Grass property or its buildings is unknown.


The old Oak Hill School has gone through a series of landowners and has operated as a front for several businesses. Once the former Oak Hill School operated as a grocery store that sold pumpkins during autumn, a mail department, once as a hardware store, and once as an automobile repair station.

Austin 1825 Fortview Inc owned the property prior to Don Farmer who purchased the property through a warranty deed on the date of 6/4/2005. Don Farmer sold the property back to Austin 1825 Fortview Inc on the date of 1/16/2012.

Bulldozers occupy the property site of the old Oak Hill School which was Don’s Grass. The buildings have permit papers attached indicating improvements are being made. There are building permits for interior non-structural demolition around the vacant school buildings. It is unlikely that the former Oak Hill School will be demolished as the City of Austin has zoned the Oak Hill School property as a historic property back in 2001.


It’s last tenants was Don Farmer and Austin 1825 Fortview Inc. Don Farmer has not occupied the property since 2012. Don’s Grass has not been in business since 2012.

The future January 12, 2012 Austin City Council meeting regarding Don Farmer violations were reported in the December 30, 2011 edition of Austin Chronicle and again in another issue of the Austin Chronicle. A foreclosure notice was filed to the Travis County Courthouse on January 14, 2012.

Back in January 12, 2012, the City of Austin shut down Don’s Grass by giving Don Farmer a citation for alleged violations of failure to install a water meter and failing to accurately record & submit monthly reports of groundwater withdrawals from a permitted Middle Trinity water well.

On January 12, 2012, City of Austin council members held a public hearing related in reference towards alleged violations that Don Farmer failed to install a water meter and for failing to accurately record & submit monthly reports of groundwater withdrawals from a permitted Middle Trinity water well. District Rules required the permittee to appear before the District’s Board of Directors and show cause why it should not be subject to an enforcement action by the Board.


Bulldozers occupy the site of the old Don’s Grass. Piles of dirt can be seen from road-view off of US 290 visible to the public eye. As of now, BGSIX Holdings LLC and City of Austin own the property. Both BGSIX Holdings LLC and City of Austin are keeping an eye on the property for any potential buyers willing to purchase the property.

For now the former Don’s Grass sits vacant and unoccupied at 6420 West US 290, Austin, Texas, US 78735.

Oak Hill School history touched by Mixerr Reviews.

Oak Hill School history and Oak Hill in Austin, Texas have been reported in the local news time and time again. Well here is an in-depth look at the history of Oak Hill School and the Oak Hill School District none with similarities to other new reports about Oak Hill School.

The Oak Hill School served as an elementary school where grades 1 through 7 from 1856 to 1985 for the students that lived or resided in the Oak Hill neighborhood. Oak Hill School was operated by Austin Independent School District. The old Oak Hill School building was the former building for Oak Hill Elementary School prior to 1985.


In 1856 Oak Hill School was started a log cabin school  called Live Oak Springs. The school was named after the community. This name was used for 9 years from 1856 to 1865 when the Civil War ended. Mr. George Hirsner was the first teacher of this school.

In 1865, the Shiloh School was built a log cabin to replace the Live Oak Springs School. Although the Shiloh School was built to replace the Live Oak Springs School, the Shiloh School remained right next to Live Oak Springs School as an annex building if overcrowding occurred.

Major landowner named B. F. Oatman had settled in Oak Hill around 1869. The area and the school and community were renamed Oatmanville. Which is where Oatmanville School came from.

A wooden frame building built by Williamson Creek replaced the Shiloh School in 1879. This one-room schoolhouse was enlarged to two rooms simply by hanging a curtain across the center.

On the date of August 16, 1897, the first trustees for the Oatmanville School were elected and charged with building a new school. Trustee Peter Thompson gave two acres of land and Columbus Patton, supervised the construction of a one room building which served as both the new Oatmanville School as well as a church on Sundays.


In 1920, a vote was held for construction of a new school building to replace the Shiloh School, Live Oak Springs, and Oatmanville School buildings. Citizens of Oak Hill were adamant for a new school to be built. Land for the present school was donated by James A. Patton and limestone donated by Norwall Mowinkle. James Andrew Patton and Norwall Mowinkle helped build the Oak Hill School building.

The Oak Hill School District was created in 1922. James Andrew Patton held a position as school trustee. Norwall Mowinkle was made secretary and assistant trustee.

The “new” Oak Hill School was built in 1923 as an elementary school for grades 1 through 7. The Oak Hill School was a 1-7 school. Each class consisted of 6 to 7 students. Three teachers were employed at Oak Hill School. The school was located in the middle of farmland.

Oak Hill School got its second school building as enrollment expanded in 1933. The large room on the west side of the building was added in 1933 and used for the cafeteria. A stage and library were installed in the same year.

Enrollment was 200 students in the 1932-1933 school year. By the 1932-1933 school year, Oak Hill School was a 1-8 school (K-8 school) that taught grades 1 through 8. Students continued high school at Austin High School. Five teachers were employed at Oak Hill School.

According to the Statistical Study of Travis County Schools, Oak Hill School listed 59 students and 3 teachers in the 1934-1935 school year. By 1935, 60 students attended this school.

At one point in the 1940s, Oak Hill School reverted back to a 1-7 school after being a 1-8 school. After finishing 7th grade, students were bussed to Fulmore Junior High School (now Fulmore Middle School) in the Austin Public Schools District (now Austin ISD) to finish their junior high school/middle school education. High school continued high school at Austin High School.


Cedar Valley School was closed and its school district was consolidated with the neighboring Oak Hill School into the Oak Hill School District in 1953. Oak Hill School then expanded the same year as a result of school consolidation.

Cedar Valley School was closed down and consolidated was due to lack of funding directly from dwindling property taxes in direct attribution also by Oak Hill School District consolidating various schools in the Oak Hill community and Cedar Valley community. Students who attended Cedar Valley School were bussed to Oak Hill School on US 290.

In 1957, Oak Hill School became a 1-6 school teaching grades 1 through 6 permanently which Oak Hill Elementary School does today. School never went past 6th grade by then.


In 1960, Oak Hill School District and Manchaca School District formed a rural school district called “Manchaca - Oak Hill Rural High School District“ bka “Manchaca - Oak Hill School District“. An attempt to form a short-lived school district that lasted from 1960 up until 1967 in a 6 to 7 year timespan.

1967 is the year when Austin ISD annexed the Oak Hill School District and Manchaca School District along with the Manchaca - Oak Hill School District itself. Oak Hill School was now operated by Austin ISD.


There were nine teachers in the school by 1971. A tenth teacher was employed in 1972. Only one school bus picked up and dropped off students. The one school bus was the only method of transportation for Oak Hill School.

In 1974, land was donated to Austin ISD by the James A. Patton family to build a newer modern elementary school where Oak Hill School would relocate on 6101 Patton Ranch Road. During construction of the newer modern Oak Hill Elementary School, grades Kindergarden through 5th along with 6th were housed at the old Oak Hill School. 5th and 6th grade students were housed in the building northeast of the school less than a stones throw a way.

From 1974 to 1985, the former Oak Hill School building continued to operate. Only this time, grades 5 and 6 occupied the two buildings. This practice would last until 1985 when the property was sold.

1975 is the year when the newer modern Oak Hill School opened. The first school year Oak Hill Elementary School operated on was 1975-1976. Oak Hill Elementary School was then a K-6 school.


In 1985 is when Austin 1825 Fortview Inc bought the property and school building from Austin ISD for $200,000. From 1985 to 1997 is when the old Oak Hill School building operated as a grocery store.

From the 1980s to the 1990’s, the old Oak Hill School had gone through a series of landowners and has operated as a front for several businesses. Once the former Oak Hill School operated as a grocery store that sold pumpkins during autumn, Pizza Garden, Stone Garden, Cherry Tree Farm LTD, Austin Ballet, a mail department, once as a hardware store, and once as an automobile repair station.

Oak Hill School became Oak Hill Elementary School in 1986. Additional buildings were added on the same year. From 1986 onwards, Oak Hill Elementary School only taught grades K through 5 and no longer 6th grade. 6th grade attended middle school at Small Middle School down the road or elsewhere. Oak Hill Elementary School became a K-5 school which it still is to this day.


Don Farmer and his landscape business Don’s Grass occupied the former Oak Hill School building from 2005 to 2012. Don Farmer purchased the property from Austin 1825 Fortview Inc through a warranty deed on the date of 6/4/2005. Austin 1825 Fortview Inc owned the property prior to Don Farmer.

It’s last tenants was Don Farmer and Austin 1825 Fortview Inc. Don Farmer has not occupied the property since 2012. Don’s Grass has not been in business since 2012.


As reported in the December 30, 2011 edition of Austin Chronicle and again in another issue of the Austin Chronicle, the future January 12, 2012 Austin City Council meeting regarding Don Farmer’s violations were referenced and reported on.

On January 12, 2012, City of Austin council members held a public hearing related in reference towards alleged violations that Don Farmer failed to install a water meter and for failing to accurately record & submit monthly reports of groundwater withdrawals from a permitted Middle Trinity water well. District Rules required the permittee to appear before the District’s Board of Directors and show cause why it should not be subject to an enforcement action by the Board. (A foreclosure notice was filed to the Travis County Courthouse on January 14, 2012.)

Back in January 15, 2012, the City of Austin shut down Don’s Grass for good by giving Don Farmer a citation for alleged violations of failure to install a water meter and failing to accurately record & submit monthly reports of groundwater withdrawals from a permitted Middle Trinity water well.

After Don’s Grass was shut down by the city for alleged violations for failing to accurately record & submit monthly reports of groundwater withdrawals, Don Farmer sold the former Oak Hill School property back to Austin 1825 Fortview Inc (from he purchased the property from 7 years prior) on the date of 1/16/2012 from a substitute trustee deed. Austin 1825 Fortview Inc sold the property to BGSIX Holdings LLC on a warranty deed basis.

According to the City of Austin, on April 2, 2014, the old Oak Hill Elementary School became a City of Austin Historical Landmark by ordinance 20010719-029. This meant the former school building could not be demolished.

Austin 1825 Fortview Inc sold the property to BGSIX Holdings LLC on a warranty deed basis on the date of 9/18/2015. BGSIX Holdings LLC has owned the property and school buildings since late 2015.


As of November 2017, bulldozers occupy the site of the old Oak Hill School. Piles of dirt can be seen from road-view off of US 290 visible to the public eye. As of now, BGSIX Holdings LLC and City of Austin own the property. Both Don Farmer, BGSIX Holdings LLC and City of Austin are keeping an eye on the property for any potential buyers willing to purchase the property.

For now the former Oak Hill School sits vacant and unoccupied at 6420 West US 290, Austin, Texas, US 78735. Oak Hill Elementary School now operates a K-5 school located on 6101 Patton Ranch Road, Austin, Texas, US 78735.


The Preservation Potential of Building states, “Historic stone school building appears to be in good condition, and can readily be adapted to a new commercial or office use. As a historic landmark building, the property would be eligible for an annual city property tax abatement equal to approximately 30 percent of the assessed taxes. A rehabilitation of the building could also be eligible for federal historic tax credits with a sales tax exemptions for labor costs of rehabilitation.”

Oak Hill School remains as one of the five surviving public buildings associated with development of Oak Hill and a prominent historic structure located centrally in the historic core of Oak Hill. School was the center of activity in the community for 62 years from 1923 to 1985.

Oak Hill School holds an important place in the history of Oak Hill and Cedar Valley community. Oak Hill School deserves a better fate than that of the Cedar Valley School.

Sunday, October 29, 2017

Future for old Oak Hill School in Austin, Texas remains unknown.

The future for the Oak Hill School, which once served as the old Oak Hill Elementary School which taught grades 1 through 7 operated by Austin ISD in Austin, Texas, remains unknown currently as of November 2017. Don Farmer and his landscape business Don’s Grass occupied the former Oak Hill School building from 2005 to 2012.

However Don Farmer plans to demolish the old Oak Hill School so he can build a new modernized storefront for his business Don's Grass & Landscape Inc. But nothing has materialized yet. He has not made comment to the public regarding the former Oak Hill School property or its buildings. The former Oak Hill School and its school buildings remain in tact leaving many Austin and Oak Hill citizens to wonder about the future of the old Oak Hill School site. Many activists, council members, and preservationists from both Austin and Oak Hill wonder about the future of the old site as well.

The old Oak Hill School has gone through a series of landowners and has operated as a front for several businesses. Once the former Oak Hill School operated as a grocery store that sold pumpkins during autumn, a mail department, once as a hardware store, and once as an automobile repair station. Austin 1825 Fortview Inc owned the property prior to Don Farmer who purchased the property through a warranty deed on the date of 6/4/2005.

Bulldozers occupy the property site of the old Oak Hill School. The buildings have permit papers attached indicating improvements are being made. There are building permits for interior non-structural demolition around the vacant school buildings. It is unlikely that the former Oak Hill School will be demolished as the City of Austin has zoned the Oak Hill School property as a historic property back in 2001.


It’s last tenants was Don Farmer and Austin 1825 Fortview Inc. Don Farmer has not occupied the property since 2012. Don’s Grass has not been in business since 2012.

The future January 12, 2012 Austin City Council meeting regarding Don Farmer violations were reported in the December 30, 2011 edition of Austin Chronicle and again in another issue of the Austin Chronicle. A foreclosure notice was filed to the Travis County Courthouse on January 14, 2012.

Back in January 12, 2012, the City of Austin shut down Don’s Grass by giving Don Farmer a citation for alleged violations of failure to install a water meter and failing to accurately record & submit monthly reports of groundwater withdrawals from a permitted Middle Trinity water well.

On January 12, 2012, City of Austin council members held a public hearing related in reference towards alleged violations that Don Farmer failed to install a water meter and for failing to accurately record & submit monthly reports of groundwater withdrawals from a permitted Middle Trinity water well. District Rules required the permittee to appear before the District’s Board of Directors and show cause why it should not be subject to an enforcement action by the Board.

After Don’s Grass was shut down by the city for alleged violations for failing to accurately record & submit monthly reports of groundwater withdrawals, Don Farmer sold the former Oak Hill School property back to Austin 1825 Fortview Inc (from he purchased the property from 7 years prior) on the date of 1/16/2012 from a substitute trustee deed. Austin 1825 Fortview Inc sold the property to BGSIX Holdings LLC on a warranty deed basis.

According to the City of Austin, on April 2, 2014, the old Oak Hill Elementary School became a City of Austin Historical Landmark by ordinance 20010719-029.

Austin 1825 Fortview Inc sold the property to BGSIX Holdings LLC on a warranty deed basis on the date of 9/18/2015. BGSIX Holdings LLC has owned the property and school buildings since late 2015.


Bulldozers occupy the site of the old Oak Hill School. Piles of dirt can be seen from road-view off of US 290 visible to the public eye. As of now, BGSIX Holdings LLC and City of Austin own the property. Both Don Farmer, BGSIX Holdings LLC and City of Austin are keeping an eye on the property for any potential buyers willing to purchase the property.

For now the former Oak Hill School sits vacant and unoccupied at 6420 West US 290, Austin, Texas, US 78735.

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Mixerr Reviews rediscovers Maple Run Cave in Austin, Texas.

On the date of October 15, 2017, Michael Mixerr of Mixerr Reviews discovered Maple Run Cave at Goat Cave Karst Preserve in Austin, Texas while during a caving outing. Maple Run Cave is one of the most known caves of Austin/Travis County connecting to the lesser known Wade Cave.

Maple Run Cave is difficult to enter group to due to the steep drop inside the cave and not just the steps. Bringing groups will be difficult to due to a steep drop inside the cave. Going in small groups is recommended when touring Maple Run Cave.

Maple Run Cave  is a cave with a subtle moist environment with a high level of moisture perfect for mosquitoes and bats. Mosquitoes and bats are the natural wildlife that inhabit Maple Run Cave. The moist environment is a subtle breeding ground ideal for mosquitos among other insects, spiders, flies, and other insects of course. Many insects inhabit Maple Run Cave as insects inhabit and compromise a huge portion of natural wildlife in the caves of Texas. The caves of Goat Cave Karst Preserve Park are no exception.

“Upon entering Maple Run Cave , I felt a sense of moisture the first 20 seconds I was down there. You can feel a sense of moisture down in that particular cave. The moist environment is a subtle breeding ground for mosquitos. I had noticed mosquitos had been swarming over me while I was 20 feet-30 feet into Maple Run Cave.” said Michael Mixerr.

At the entrance of Maple Run Cave, mosquitos among other insects can be found swarming around that area. The moist environment suites well as a breeding ground for mosquitos and other insects as well.

A hydrogeological study of Goat Cave, Maple Run Cave, and Wade Cave is anticipated to be completed in 2017.

Mackenzie High School could see new revitalized life.

The old Mackenzie High School at 9275 Wyoming Avenue could new life a newly built revitalized building in the future. A new modern school building could be built on the former site. However Detroit Public Schools crashed and burned due to the 2014 bankruptcy. As of 2017, nothing has happened yet. The old Mackenzie High School was demolished in June 28, 2012 so a new modern school building could be built.

The old Mackenzie High School was located at 9275 Wyoming Avenue, Detroit, Michigan, US 48204.

History of Lowell Junior High School revealed by Mixerr Reviews.

Lowell Junior High School served as both a junior high school and middle school in the city of Flint, Michigan. Lowell Junior High School had operated from 1929 to 2003. Lowell Junior High School went under the names Lowell Middle School and Lowell School during its time of operation.

Lowell Junior High School is where the former farmland owned by the Perry family was once formally. This land used to be farmland and also was a dairy farm owned by the Perry family. The Flint Community Schools had purchased the land where Lowell Junior High School is today from the Perry family back in 1900.

In 1927, Alice Moss Perry had a petition she had signed by local citizens of the community in order to have Lowell Junior High School built. Several local citizens were in favor of building a new junior high school in the Eastside Village.

1929 is the year Lowell Junior High School was built and opened less than 2 blocks from Lewis School with an enrollment of 200 students in 7th grade through 9th grade. In the 1929-1930 school year, the student population soared to 300 students.

In 1930, enrollment was 300 students in 7th grade through 9th grade. A new shop class building with a 40 foot long chimney was built. The shop class building had an underground tunnel that connected to Lewis School which served as a maintenance tunnel and as a fallout shelter during wartime. Both Lewis School and Lowell Junior High School shared this building with each other.


Prior to 1950, Lowell Junior High School was an all-white school even though black students lived just blocks away. Lowell Junior High School was originally intended for whites only as Eastside Flint was historically planned out to be by city planners and urban development. The year of 1950 is when Lowell Junior High School integrated allowing black students to attend. By then Lowell Junior High School had became an integrated school.

Lowell Junior High School was a feeder school for many elementary schools on the Eastside Village and also the Rollingwood area. Williams Elementary would later on feed into Lowell Junior High School as many elementary schools in the Eastside community would. That's how the Flint Community Schools had designed Lowell Junior High School.


In 1978 is when Flint Community Schools closed down Lewis School due to statewide budget cuts and lack of enrollment which led the remaining students to attend Williams Elementary School and the surrounding elementary schools. Lewis School was closed for good.

During that same year, Flint Community Schools later repurposed and renamed Lewis School to Lowell Junior High School Annex. Lewis School severed as an annex building for Lowell Junior High School. This lasted from 1978 to 1991.

In 1988, Lowell Junior High School closed down due to budget cuts by the Michigan Board of Education. Lowell Junior High School closed down as part of the largest school closing plan in Flint Community Schools district history at the time along with Northern High School.

In 1991, Lowell Junior High School would later be rezoned to be an alternative middle school for troubled students. Fights were common. Metal detectors were later on put in Lowell Junior High School. From 1991 to 2003, Lowell Junior High School served as an alternative middle school/junior high school for the Flint Community Schools district during that time. Lowell served as a high school for a shortened brief amount of time as well.

Due to the declining enrollment of students in the Flint Community Schools and financial budget cuts, the administration decided to close Lowell Junior High School in 2003. These actions made were also due to administrative decisions and budget cuts.


The school went through many land owners. First as a community center, alternative school, church, and a non-profit organization.

In 2005, Church of ROC - Flint rented Lowell Junior High School from Flint Community Schools on their lease. In 2008, Flint Community Schools found out that Church of ROC - Flint had failed to provide documentation on whether or not they were paying their rent lease.

In 2009, Lowell Junior High School was set on fire by a home barbeque pit that had spread from someones home from the area to the school. 2009 was also when an arsonist set fire to Lowell Junior High School. These drastic events alone made Flint Community School board up Lowell Junior High School all together thus leaving it abandoned for criminal activity to occur. By 2010, all of Lowell Junior High School was boarded up and still is.


As of right now currently, the entire property of the Lowell Junior High School building is boarded up by plywood to prevent theft and trespassing. The former educational institution known as Lowell Junior High School is constantly being vandalized and tagged with graffiti all over the property. Windows are missing. Doors inside are missing too.

The building now sits vacant as a former shill of itself with broken wood panels that line directly within the windows. The outside building structure is still intact. This building is a case of urban decay where the outside looks fine but the inside is deplorable.

Lowell Junior High School is located at 3301 North Vernon Avenue, Flint, Michigan, US 48506.