Showing posts with label Mixerr Reviews. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mixerr Reviews. Show all posts

Friday, August 17, 2018

Peter Nic to leave Australia to promote the Late Night Transmitter album in late 2018.

Peter Nic is planning on leaving the country of Australia later in 2018 in order to promote the Late Night Transmitter album. Peter has expressed desire to extend his roots in the United States as an effort of promoting his 4th studio album towards American audiences. He wants to push the details of this album over the internet. Late Night Transmitter will also be an internet album available online.

The album Late Night Transmitter has an R&B/pop vibe to it with a fairly deep level of production. The production and sound are very high definition. Australian artist Peter Nic is going on a different musical route for this album. Peter Nic is an artist from the country of Australia.

Lena Coleman. Protecting her child or a case of injustice? (Revisited)

Lena Renae Coleman aka female rapper Da Misses supposedly attempted to kill her ex-boyfriend, David Mitchell aka rapper Ballin’ A$$ Dame for trying to protect herself and her baby in an act of self defense in the year 2003. However that is not the case. Her friends and family state she was only trying to protect herself and her baby while defending her apartment. She was not in any way trying to kill her ex-boyfriend. Friends and family claim her being incarcerated is a case of injustice to her. They demand answers.

Yet, however, the United States District Court Eastern District of California charged Lena Coleman for attempted murder after having Lena Coleman attempted to kill her ex-boyfriend David Mitchell out of jealousy.



According to the US Supreme Court of Northern California, David Mitchell and Lena Renae Coleman began living together in an apartment, but then separated a few months later.  They eventually reconciled, but never lived together again.

However, Lena had moved some of David’s belongings back into her apartment. Eventually David decided to end the relationship with Lena and remove his belongings from her apartment. David asked his old girlfriend, Sherry Johnson, and her son, James Dixon, to help him move out of the apartment. David Mitchell dropped Sherry off at a nearby store.

David drove to Lena’s apartment with James. He feared Lena and Sherry would fight if the two met. They walked up to the landing outside the apartment. Lena answered the door and David told her things were not working out and he thought it would be best to move out. Angrily, Lena told James to leave before she did something. So he left. James Dixon left to wait with his mother as she waited at a nearby store.

Lena followed David and told him she did not want him to leave. When Lena tried to prevent him from retrieving his belongings, David pushed her out of the way and went into the bedroom to collect his clothes. Lena was angry boyfriends decision to move out of their apartment.

After David and Lena exchanged angry words at the doorway of their apartment, David pushed his way past her.  Lena pulled a gun from her pocket and pointed it at David. He told her he knew the gun was not real and he was leaving.  Lena pulled out a gun from her pocket and shot David in the chest after telling him, “If I can't have you, nobody can have you.” Mitchell had been shot in the stomach with a .22 then. David dropped his clothing and left the apartment.

David escaped to the store at which Sherry Johnson and James Dixon were waiting for him. Sherry had called 911 at the store. As he left, he heard another gunshot. He drove to the store where he had left Sherry, stopped the car, and laid down on the ground. David told Sherry he had been shot and asked her to call for an ambulance. Sherry Johnson told the dispatcher, “My husband got shot.” She said David Mitchell had been shot in the stomach with a .22.

After the dispatcher gave Johnson some instructions, the 911 operator asked Sherry Johnson who had shot David Mitchell. Sherry stated it was the woman who lived at Lena’s address and said “They call her Da Misses.”.

Dr. Mark Owens treated David Mitchell in the emergency room. David suffered a gunshot wound in his right chest and bleeding in his right lung. The bullet traveled through his right lung, diaphragm, liver, and stomach. The bullet missed his heart by half an inch. Had the bullet struck Mitchells heart, he would have died before reaching the hospital.

The path of the bullet was right to left and downward, from front to back. The trajectory was consistent with David facing Lena who shot him and bending slightly at the waist. David spent a week in the hospital, and Dr. Owens estimated it would take David around 3 months to make a full recovery.


Police arrived 20 minutes later at the apartment. Deputy Victor Jones went to her apartment to arrest her. Another police officer kicked in the apartment door. Nobody was present in the apartment, but the lights, television, and stereo were on.

During a search of this apartment, Deputy Abbott found the second bullet in the trim board of a window just outside the apartment door. Sheriffs Deputy John Lopes examined the bullet hole found at the crime scene. He determined that the bullet was fired from the living room of defendants apartment. Deputy Lopes did not determine the caliber of the bullet.

10 days after the shooting, Sheriffs Deputy Victor Jones went to the apartment to arrest her. Deputy Jones knocked on the door several times, identifying himself as a deputy. No one responded. The apartment manager gave Deputy Jones a passkey. When Deputy Jones attempted to use the key, he felt resistance on the other side of the door. As he turned the key, Deputy Jones felt it being turned back in the other direction. Deputy Jones called out a warning and kicked in the door. Deputy Jones found Lena Renae Coleman and a man inside the apartment, arrested her, and took her into custody.


During the trial David Mitchell testified that he and Lena Coleman became romantically involved in 2003. Mitchell moved into defendants apartment. It was an argument a few months later that Lena requested David to move out. While at trial, David Mitchell stated he was confused and disappointed about his relationship with Lena Coleman. David Mitchell admitted he was uncomfortable and did not want to testify at trial. He had also received a threat about testifying from one of the defendants relatives.

Sacramento County Sheriffs Deputy Kevin Mickelson testified that he asked David Mitchell who shot him. David Mitchell told him that Da Misses had shot him. David Mitchell had been shot in the stomach with a 22.

A transcript of the 911 call was entered into evidence. Now the 911 call involved only basic information about what had happened and who had committed violence – two topics about which emergency responders should inquire.

James Dixon testified about the shooting. When Lena answered the door, both her and David appeared kind of mad. Lena angrily told David, “You ain’t getting nothing.” She told James Dixon to leave. As James walked back to the store where his mother was, he heard a gunshot.

Deputy Abbott showed James Dixon a photographic lineup, and he identified either defendant or another woman as the person at the apartment. Deputy Abbott showed David a different lineup, and he selected her photograph.

Sheriffs Detective Michael Abbott interviewed David Mitchell in the hospital. David told Detective Abbott Lena had ordered a frightened James Dixon off the landing. Lena pulled a gun out of her pocket that David thought it was a toy. Lena shot David and he heard a second shot, which missed. David told Detective Abbott defendant was known by the nickname Da Misses. David also stated that after the shooting he received a phone call from Lena and was concerned for the safety of his ex-girlfriend and her son.

Further, the Constitution simply ensures that state court criminal proceedings are fundamentally fair and the category of actions which violate this standard is narrow. Because the second bullet did not affect the prosecution's basic argument that defendant shot Mitchell as he attempted to leave.

In 2003, a jury found Lena Coleman guilty of attempted murder and assault with a firearm. She was sentenced to 32 years to life in prison.

Lena accused the court by citing numerous alleged errors during the trial: (1) admission of a tape recording of a 911 call, (2) denying defendants motion for a new trial based on juror misconduct, (3) denying defendants motion for a new trial based on a claim that a ballistics test should have been performed, (4) limiting defendants cross-examination of the victim, (5) failing to instruct on self-defense or voluntary manslaughter, and (6) giving an instruction on evidence of flight. Her defense counsel argued defendant acted in the heat of passion and had not formed the intent to murder Mitchell. It was not out of malice

The trial court denied the defendants motion for a new trial and sentenced her to the middle term of seven years for attempted murder. For the section 12022.53, subdivision (d) firearm enhancement, the court sentenced defendant to a consecutive term of 25 years to life. The court also imposed the middle term of three years for assault with a firearm; a term of three years for the section 12022.5, subdivision (a) enhancement; and a term of four years for the section 12022.7, subdivision (e) enhancement. The sentences for assault were stayed pursuant to section 654. Defendants sentence in case No. 04F02937 is 32 years to life.

The trial court correctly decided not to grant Petitioner’s motion for a new trial. In sum, the trial court did everything constitutionally required in these circumstances because no federal issue
is alleged nor was any federal law violated.


In 2004, the district attorney filed a motion for an order revoking defendants probation. Lena admitted being on probation at the time of the offenses against David. The court found Lena in violation of probation and sentenced her to be served concurrently. Lena Coleman was admitted to Chowchilla Female Prison on the date of July 7, 2005 as inmate X12620.

A motion for a rehearing was denied by US District Judge Terry J. Hatter, Jr. on the date of  September 18, 2013 after finding she not presented the court with newly discovered evidence. She was unable to afford the costs of suit as a petitioner for her court case.

At this present moment, she is serving a life sentence in Chowchilla Female Prison in Chowchilla, California.

Remembering the Colorado Mexican School.

Colorado Mexican School is one of the many forgotten schools and institutions of Austin and Del Valle that have faded away with time and from people's memories. This news article explains the history behind Colorado Mexican School


The Colorado Mexican School was constructed in 1934 as a one-room  school facing south of the Colorado White School (Colorado School). The Colorado Mexican School was built on Old Del Valle Road near US 183 & Highway 71. Blacks student had sometimes attended the Colorado Mexican School. The school educated students in grades 1 through 7.

Average daily attendance was 26 to 30 students on daily basis. The attendance rate still remained low as it historically was and has been. Almost 100 students attended this school.

Prior to the opening of Colorado Mexican School, Hispanic students attended the Colorado White School before a separate school for Hispanics became available. Hispanic students were not required to attend school. Hispanic students had either attended the negro schools or white schools.

Of course racial segregation was implemented by law in Texas and southern United States, so schools were separated by race. Separate schools were built for white, black, and Hispanic students. Black students attended separate schools from white students. White students attended separate schools from black students. That is the reason why the "Colorado White School", "Colorado Mexican School", and "Colorado Negro School" existed.

Although the Colorado School had an Austin address, it served students from the communities of Del Valle, Austin, Montopolis, Bergstrom Village, Glenbrook, and Colton.


By the 1940s, the Colorado White School and Colorado Mexican School received indoor plumbing with 2 separate toilets inside the brick building. Water pipes were upgraded and fixed.

The Colorado Mexican School eventually became combined into one school by 1942. Roof replacement was installed in the same year. The Colorado Mexican School had a daily attendance rate of 100 students in 1944. 100 students was the average on a daily basis. A huge increase from the 1930s attendance rate. The rate remained the same even in 1945.

By the late 1940s, the segregated Colorado Mexican School experienced extreme overcrowding. Colorado Common School District was 1 of 4 school districts listed as a defendant in the 1948 court case of Delgado v. Bastrop ISD. Colorado School was listed as a prime example of racial segregation in the lawsuit against the state of Texas. LULAC brought suit against several school districts for denying Hispanic students the use of school facilities and educational services. The suit claimed Hispanic students were separated and segregated from white students even though under state law they were considered "White" or "Caucasian".

Although US Court found both the Colorado Mexican School and Colorado Common School District to be operating within the terms of the decree, overcrowding of the school witnessed would contradict the provision for “equal school instruction.”

By the late end of 1948, the school was closed due to overcrowding conditions. Travis County Schools Superintendent Irving W. Popham described conditions at Colorado Mexican School as “the worst Travis County has ever known.” Travis County Schools, Austin Independent School District (then Austin Public Schools which is now known as Austin ISD) and Colorado Common School District deemed the Colorado School unfit and inadequate for a learning environment due to overcrowding from a lack of space and growth in enrollment. Overcrowding was extreme. Travis County government officials determined the Colorado School deemed to be unfit and antiquated.

The Nuestra Senora La Luz Catholic Mission Church in Montopolis offered the use of its chapel for 53 first-grade students. The remaining 40 students stayed at the Colorado Mexican School until the school district finally closed down the school. Its students were shipped to other schools.

From 1948 to 1950, the Colorado Mexican School was used as a community center and church. As part of the land agreement with Travis County and City of Austin, the school was to be zoned as a church and community if in the event the school were to close down due to overcrowding, structural error, or declining enrollment. Colorado School held religious services during operation as a church.

(Ref: Austin American Statesman, Crowded Rural Schools Lack Pioneer Facilities, January 26, 1947)
(Ref: Austin American Statesman, Latin-American school segregation outlawed, June 15, 1948)
(Ref: Handbook of Texas Online, V. Carl Allsup, "Delgado v. Bastrop Isd”)


In 1950, the old Colorado Mexican School was all but abandoned by the school district. Grass was kept untrimmed. Windows and window panels were boarded with thin plywood. Vegetation had sprawled all over.

The Colorado Common School District along with Travis County Schools & TEA were consolidating school districts & schools in Southeastern Travis County in the 1950s in an effort to collect more on property taxes, declining enrollment, and lack of funding. Schools and school districts that were consolidated into Colorado Common School District were Elroy, Creedmoor, Pilot Knob, Dry Creek, Hornsby-Dunlap, Maha, and Garfield.

1950 is also when the Del Valle schools became slowly integrated. Some schools were no longer separated by race or ethnicity.

1952 is the year when the city of Austin began annexing portions of the Colorado Common School District in both Austin and Del Valle. The Colorado Mexican School was within the city limits causing confusion with Austin ISD and Del Valle ISD school district boundaries. Because the Colorado Mexican School was within he Austin city limits, the school district had to find a new location for its own schools.

In 1958, grass vegetation took over the driveways as Colorado Mexican School was totally abandoned. The buildings were still standing by then. 1958 is also the year when the Del Valle schools became integrated. Schools were no longer separated by race or ethnicity. Integration was slow to come to liberal Austin and Del Valle, but it came easy as the racial integration process went smooth with no trouble.

In 1958, Austin Public Schools (Austin Independent School District bka Austin ISD) sold the land to United States Government as the school was located dangerously close in a flight path being near Bergstrom Air Force Base. Davidson tract was located outside the former Bergstrom Air Force Base.

In 1964, the Colorado Mexican School was demolished after years of being abandoned. All that remained in 1965 was a gravel pit located on site of the former Colorado Mexican School. That gravel pits sat out there for years before becoming overgrown by vegetation. All outbuildings have been demolished. No traces of the school or cistern remain today.


Schools such as this one should be preserved as a museum, converted to a dance studio, bank, or revitalized into government offices. This can be listed as an example of priorities placed in the wrong place. Historic preservation should be a secondary priority for a school district.

Something needs to be done to commemorate the Colorado Mexican School as a part the 1948 Federal Court ruling on Delgado v. Bastrop ISD. People don't recognize how LULAC fought for equal school instruction, services, and facilities. Efforts of LULAC also need to be brought to attention.

Colorado Mexican School was located at 1601 Old Del Valle Road, Austin, Texas, US 78742.



*Colorado Common School District was known to Travis County Schools officials and civilians as Colorado Common School District No. 36 or as School District No. 36.
*The Colorado School was simply just called "Colorado School" at one point in history.
*Colorado School had an Austin address despite being zoned to Del Valle ISD.
*Colorado School was adjacent to 2 other schools before the schools became molded into one school called "Colorado School" due mainly to racial integration following 1948. Thus Colorado Mexican School and Colorado Negro School were eventually combined into the Colorado White School.
*Old Del Valle Road was also known as Old Austin-Del Valle Road, Austin-Del Valle Road, and Del Valle Road.

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

History pertaining to the small Colorado School long forgotten revisited.

History about the Colorado School in Austin, Texas has been long forgotten as the Colorado School is one of the many forgotten educational institutions of Austin that have faded away with time. Only longtime Austinites from generations ago may remember the Colorado School located in rural Travis County. Colorado School is one of the many schools in Austin/Travis County that did not receive a Texas Historic Landmark plaque or was revitalized to house school district offices. Colorado School is also historically significant and important because the Colorado School was listed as a defendant in the 1948 court case of Delgado v. Bastrop ISD regarding racial segregation in public schools. That court case declared segregation illegal in Texas public schools.


The Colorado School was one of Del Valle's earliest schools as it was the oldest school in the Del Valle ISD school district at one point in time dating back to 1874. Colorado School was the first school operated by Del Valle ISD. Years of operation for Colorado School ran from 1876 to 1948. The Colorado School itself was located at the present day intersections of US 183 & SH 71 near Austin Bergstrom International Airport (ABIA).

The Colorado Common School District in Austin was established in 1874. A school house was needed. Land where Colorado School was located on land owned by the Martin Family and Andrew M. Davidson. Enoch Martin, Sarah Elizabeth Martin, and Andrew M. Davidson deeded land to S.G. Sneed, Travis County, and the Colorado Common School District for a school house to be built on in the year of 1874 along with land for a city cemetery which would later become the Greenwood Cemetery. 5.6 acres of land were deeded to Colorado Common School District in the same year by F.A. Maxwell and Andrew M. Davidson. Colorado School was located on the Davidson tract named after Andrew M. Davidson.

Martin Family Cemetery had preceded the small school by a couple of years as their cemetery was plotted in 1874. The Colorado School was to be located north of the Martin Family Cemetery as a part of a land agreement with Travis County and City of Austin. Cemeteries called Martin Family Cemetery and Greenwood Cemetery were plotted south of the Colorado School.

A cistern was built in 1875 predating the school but not the cemetery. Water was gathered from a cistern from the years of 1875 to 1895 until the cistern got old and needed replacement. The 1875 cistern was built fairly well under a sturdy foundation.

Building a log cabin school was no easy task. It took a few months for the school to open after construction was completed. The log cabin was built and completed in 1876. Local citizens and several businesses donated wood for a log cabin school to be built. Colorado School was built in to serve as a public school which was operated under Colorado Common School District now known as Del Valle Independent School District bka Del Valle ISD. The Colorado School along with the Colorado Common School District itself were named after the Colorado River.

Colorado School was built as a single story log cabin in 1876. The log cabin School was located near Colorado River adjacent to a large group of live oak trees and a clear spring. The school itself was 12 feet tall at maximum height as the school was only 1 story tall. The school was a one room school. Originally grades 1 through 8 were educated there. Later on, grades 1 through 12 were taught at this school.

Average daily attendance was 26 to 30 students for the Colorado School. Some days 30 students attended school at best. Attendance was never very high due to the agricultural lifestyle. Students had to tend to family farms during harvesting season. Students had to pick cotton and work in the fields.

Students had to use outhouses located not too far away from the school as the Colorado School did not receive indoor plumbing until near mid-20th century. 2 separate outhouses were located outside the Colorado School. The wait to use these facilities was long and time consuming. Some students and teachers simply used the forest that surrounded the area.

Of course racial segregation was implemented by law in Texas and southern United States, so schools were separated by race. Separate schools were built for white, black, and Hispanic students. Black students attended separate schools from white students. White students attended separate schools from black students. That is the reason why the "Colorado White School", "Colorado Mexican School", and "Colorado Negro School" existed. The Colorado Mexican School was built adjacent to the Colorado White School.

Despite being racially segregated, black and white students shared the one room School with Hispanic students. Black students were taught alongside with white students here at this school. Some of the other schools were like this. Hispanic students had either attended the negro schools or white schools. Usually Hispanic students attended both the negro schools or white schools.

A new cistern was built to replace the old cistern in 1895. The school district decided to eventually to drill a new water well in 1895. The well had to be drilled away from the cemeteries for sanitary purposes. So this led to a controversy to where the school district would locate the new water well. Another new water well and a cistern were installed in 1905.


1921 was the year the log cabin school was demolished. In 1921, the Colorado School was built on top of a concrete cement slab foundation that was built over an old graveyard. A single story brick building at a height of 12 feet was constructed in to replace the log cabin school to accommodate growth in enrollment as the log cabin school became overcrowded due to lack of space in classrooms. A sign with the words "Colorado School" had been placed on top of the school painted in a blackish brown color.

The Colorado Mexican School was built next to the Colorado White School in 1934 which eventually became combined into one school. Black students had sometimes attended the Colorado Mexican School. Roof replacement was installed in the same year.

Prior to the Colorado Mexican School operating, Hispanic students attended the Colorado White School before a separate school for Hispanics became available. Hispanic students were not required to attend school. Hispanic students had either attended the negro schools or white schools. The Colorado Negro School was added as an additional building to accompany black students.

An additional room was added to the Colorado School in 1935. A number of additional rooms were later added to be expanded. Average daily attendance was 26 to 30 students on daily basis during the 1930s. But the attendance rate still remained low as it historically was and has been.


By the 1940s, the Colorado School received indoor plumbing with 2 separate toilets inside the brick building. Water pipes were upgraded and fixed.

By the late 1940s, both the Colorado Mexican School, Colorado Negro School, and Colorado White School had experienced extreme overcrowding. Extreme overcrowding was common for schools in the Colorado Common School District such as the Elroy School, the Garfield School, Lamar School, Cloud School, and Popham School unfortunately. The Colorado School had a daily attendance rate of 100 students in 1944. 100 students was the average on a daily basis. A huge increase from the 1930s attendance rate. The rate remained the same even in 1945.

Colorado Common School District was 1 of 4 school districts listed as a defendant in the 1948 court case of Delgado v. Bastrop ISD. Colorado School was listed as a prime example of racial segregation in the lawsuit against the state of Texas. LULAC brought suit against several school districts for denying Hispanic students the use of school facilities and educational services. The suit claimed Hispanic students were separated and segregated from white students even though under state law they were considered "White" or "Caucasian". Although US Court found both the Colorado School and Colorado Common School District to be operating within the terms of the decree, overcrowding of the school witnessed would contradict the provision for “equal school instruction.”

By the late end of 1948, the school was closed due to overcrowding conditions. Travis County Schools Superintendent Irving W. Popham described conditions at Colorado School as “the worst Travis County has ever known.” Travis County Schools, Austin Independent School District (then Austin Public Schools which is now known as Austin ISD) and Colorado Common School District deemed the Colorado School unfit and inadequate for a learning environment due to overcrowding from a lack of space and growth in enrollment. Overcrowding was extreme. Travis County government officials determined the Colorado School deemed to be unfit and antiquated.

From 1948 to 1950, the Colorado School was used as a community center and church. As part of the land agreement with Travis County and City of Austin, the school was to be zoned as a church and community if in the event the school were to close down due to overcrowding, structural error, or declining enrollment. Colorado School held religious services during operation as a church.

When the Colorado School was closed, elementary students attended the Popham School while the junior high students attended Del Valle Junior High School. The high school students had attended Del Valle Senior High School which was later Del Valle Junior-Senior High School which had eventually became Del Valle High School. Other students were sent to Austin ISD schools to relieve overcrowding.


In 1950, the old Colorado School was all but abandoned by the school district as students were being shipped to other schools as part the consolidation into Del Valle ISD on part of Texas Education Agency (TEA) and Colorado Common School District. Grass was kept untrimmed. Windows and window panels were boarded with thin plywood. Vegetation sprawled over Colorado School.

The Colorado Common School District along with Travis County Schools & TEA was consolidating school districts & schools in Southeastern Travis County in the 1950s in an effort to collect more on property taxes, declining enrollment, and lack of funding. Schools and school districts that were consolidated into Colorado Common School District were Elroy, Creedmoor, Pilot Knob, Dry Creek, Hornsby-Dunlap, Maha, and Garfield.

1950 is also when the Del Valle schools became slowly integrated. Some schools were no longer separated by race or ethnicity. Integration was slow to come to liberal Austin and Del Valle, but it came easy as the racial integration process went smooth with no trouble.

1952 is the year when the city of Austin began annexing portions of the Colorado Common School District in both Austin and Del Valle. The Colorado School was within the city limits causing confusion with Austin ISD and Del Valle ISD school district boundaries. Because the Colorado School was within the Austin city limits, the school district had to find a new location for its own schools. Although the Colorado School had an Austin address, it served students from the communities of Del Valle, Austin, Montopolis, Bergstrom Village, Glenbrook, and Colton.

Enrollment stood at 600 students in 1952 for the Colorado Common School District. That created a demand for new schools in Del Valle. The new renovated Popham School was open by then. Del Valle High School and Del Valle Junior High were underway.

In 1958, grass vegetation took over the driveways as the school was totally abandoned. The buildings were still standing by then. 1958 is also the year when the Del Valle schools became integrated. Schools were no longer separated by race or ethnicity. Integration was a smooth process for the large Del Valle school district with no hassle or race riots.

In 1958, Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD) sold the land to United States Government as the school was located dangerously close in a flight path being so close to Bergstrom Air Force Base. Davidson tract was located outside the former Bergstrom Air Force Base. The Colorado Common School District was renamed the Del Valle Independent School District in 1964.

In 1964, the Colorado School was demolished after years of being abandoned. All that remained in 1965 was a gravel pit located on site of the former Colorado School. That gravel pits sat out there for years before becoming overgrown by vegetation. Outbuildings sat in their positions. All outbuildings have been demolished. A portion of an outbuilding for the Colorado School was added to the Del Valle ISD district offices on Shapard Lane in Del Valle, Texas in 1967 which remains there today. To this day, the school district boundaries for Austin ISD and Del Valle ISD remain chaotic.


Colorado School is one of the many forgotten schools and institutions of Austin & Del Valle that have faded away with time and from people's memories unfortunately. Schools such as this one should be preserved as a museum, converted to a dance studio, bank, or revitalized into government offices. This can be listed as an example of priorities placed in the wrong place. Historic preservation should be a secondary priority for a school district.

Something needs to be done to commemorate the Colorado School as a part the 1948 Federal Court ruling on Delgado v. Bastrop ISD. People don't recognize how LULAC fought for equal school instruction and facilities. Efforts of LULAC also need to be brought to attention.

The old Colorado School is was located at 1601 Old Del Valle Road, Austin, Texas, US 78742.

*Colorado Common School District was known to Travis County Schools officials and civilians as Colorado Common School District No. 36 or as School District No. 36.
*The Colorado School was simply just called "Colorado School" at one point in history.
*Colorado School had an Austin address despite being zoned to Del Valle ISD.
*Colorado School was adjacent to 2 other schools before the schools became molded into one school called "Colorado School" due mainly to racial integration following 1948. Thus Colorado Mexican School and Colorado Negro School were eventually combined into the Colorado White School.
*Old Del Valle Road was also known as Old Austin-Del Valle Road, Austin-Del Valle Road, and Del Valle Road.
*The Martin Family Cemetery preceded the Colorado School.
*Popham School bka Popham Elementary School was built in 1948 to relieve overcrowding from other schools located in the Colorado Common School District. From 1952 to 1953, Popham School went under construction during an extensive renovation period. In 1953 the school was finally open to the public again.



As for the Martin Family Cemetery, the Martin Family Cemetery was plotted and constructed in 1874 by Enoch Martin and Andrew M. Davidson when they deeded land to Travis County for a school to be built on and a city cemetery. Many family members from the Martin Family were buried there. Last recorded burial in the Martin Family Cemetery was Walter Martin in 1909.

The Martin Family Cemetery is now behind a secure fence located southeast of the US 183 & SH 71 intersection near the northwest corner of Austin Bergstrom International Airport (ABIA). Martin Family Cemetery is located 140 feet north of Greenwood Cemetery also. Permission must be obtained to view the Martin Family Cemetery due to Homeland Security restrictions. Homeland Security restrictions require visitors to be escorted by ABIA staff to the site.


Enoch Martin, Andrew M. Davidson, and F.A. Maxwell deeded land to Travis County and City of Austin for another cemetery that was to become a city cemetery in 1907. Other acres were purchased in 1910. This cemetery would eventually become Greenwood Cemetery. Austin-Del Valle Road served as the northeast boundary between separating the Martin Family Cemetery from the Greenwood Cemetery. Martin Family members are also buried in Greenwood Cemetery.

Greenwood Cemetery operates as a public cemetery owned by the City of Austin to this day. ABIA staff and Homeland Security staff patrol both cemeteries on a daily basis. Greenwood Cemetery is located directly south of the Martin Family Cemetery adjacent near ABIA. Both Greenwood Cemetery and Martin Family Cemetery are located at 1927 Old Lockhart Road, Austin, Texas, US 78742.

*Martin Family Cemetery is located near Old Del Valle Road.
*Also Martin Family Cemetery is located less than 1 acre north of Greenwood Cemetery.

Sunday, August 12, 2018

Exploring the lost history of Colorado School No. 3 in Del Valle, Texas.

History about Colorado School No. 3 in Del Valle, Texas has been long forgotten as the Colorado School is one of the many forgotten educational institutions of Austin that have faded away with time. Only longtime Austinites from generations ago may remember the Colorado School located in rural Travis County.  Colorado Common School District operated Colorado School No. 3 from 1875 to 1957.


Colorado School No. 3 was established as Colorado Negro School No. 3 in 1875. The location for Colorado School No. 3 was located at the junction of where modern day Puebla Street is facing Falwell Lane. Falwell Lane once served as Bastrop Road aka Highway 71 (SH 71) before being realigned in 1960.

Colorado School No. 3 was a negro school that served black students in grades 1 through 8 living in the Del Valle area. The quality of school buildings and equipment followed racial lines. Rural schools for black children were typically between one-room frame buildings to three-room frame buildings.

Colorado School No. 3 went under the names and was referred to as the following names of Colorado Colored School No. 3, Colorado Negro School No. 3, Colorado Colored School #3, and Colorado School #3. (Ref: 1932 Travis County Map)


Colorado School No. 3 had  63 students with an average daily attendance of 48 students. There was one teacher for 63 students. The cost per year was $526 with spending expenditures of $12.52 for student per year. The teacher taught eight grades for 120 days.

On the date of September 9, 1937, a water well was dug by hand. The well was built using top concrete casing and the water well itself was built 2 cubic feet above the ground surface. Its rings were 36 inches in diameter. The water well was hand operated. Texas Water Development Board had the Colorado School water well recorded as Well Number 5851601. Texas Water Development Board has this water well recorded as a “Historical Observation Well”.
(Ref: Texas Water Development Board)

By 1957, Colorado School No. 3 was no longer needed as the Lamar School had a newly constructed building open across Highway 71. Colorado Common School District decided to demolish the school and its water well. Colorado School No. 3 was destroyed in 1958. Its students were sent to Lamar School (Lamar Elementary School) effectively.

No traces of Colorado School No. 3 remained by 1960. The water well was paved over and destroyed by TXDot after Highway 71 was realigned. The water well was plugged prior to realignment of Highway 71.


Colorado School No. 3 was located at the junction of Falwell Lane & Puebla Street, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.

History of Pilot Knob Negro School visited, explained, and explored.

Pilot Knob Negro School was constructed and built by Dee Gabriel Collins in 1910. The schoolhouse was a single one-story building. At that time Travis County did not want to provide any other schools or teachers to educate black children. African Americans called the school Pilot Knob Schoolhouse.

Pilot Knob Negro educated students in grades 1 through 7. School stopped after 7th grade. Students would attend either Elroy Negro School or transfer to Austin to continue 8th grade.

Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle ISD) operated Pilot Knob Negro School from 1910 to 1956.


The new Pilot Knob Negro School was built in 1930 on two acres of land  during the 1930–1931 school year. The Pilot Knob Negro School was a Rosenwald School that replaced a former one-room school house constructed and built by Dee Gabriel Collins. The new Pilot Knob Negro School included two classrooms, a library, and outhouses. The total cost was $3,600 dollars with insurance costing $2,000 dollars.

Pilot Knob Negro School had 41 students during the 1934-1935 school year. Weekly attendance was 30 to 32 students weekly. Daily attendance was 30 to 31 students on average per daily basis. There was one teacher for 41 students. The cost per year was $346. Average spending on each student was $11.53 for student each year. The teacher taught seven grades for 114 days to 120 days and got paid for six months tops.

Pilot Knob Negro School had 42 students during the 1935-1936 school year. The teacher taught all seven grades for 114 days.

Colorado Common School District (Del Valle ISD) closed down the school in 1956 and relocated its students into other schools across the school district. Colorado Common School District closed the school down as an attempt for racial integration of its public schools.

In 1966, Del Valle ISD sold the building and land property to famous Spanish singer Augustine Ramirez. The school had been converted into a residence in 1966. Augustine Ramirez and his family have lived there for years. Mary Ann Ramirez has lived in the house since 1967. (Ref: Daily Dispatch, 2016)


On the date of June 7, 2016, Austin firefighters worked for hours that Tuesday night, battling a two-alarm house fire. The fire began around 7:30 PM at 7902 Dee Gabriel Collins Road. 

According to an Austin Fire Department spokesperson, the home on fire was connected to an auto body shop called A & S BODY SHOP located at 8503 Dee Gabriel Collins Road.

Luckily no one was injured in the fired. Mary Ann Ramirez was present in the home when a man ran inside yelling that there was a fire. The smoke from the fire was visible from multiple directions around the city.

Austin Fire Department had to fill trucks with water to extinguish the blaze as hydrants were a good distance from the property.

As firefighters worked to extinguish the fire, the former Pilot Knob Negro School building had unfortunately burned to the ground. Nothing had remained after the fire. It was a total loss for the Ramirez family. The only reminder left of the school building that is visible is the brick chimney which is still standing. (Ref: KXAN, Heroic efforts save family from 2-alarm house fire, June 7, 2016)

Today only the chimney remains standing. Its concrete foundation remains visible from aerial view. Today Augustine Ramirez and Mary Ann Ramirez own the property and still do to this day.


Pilot Knob Negro School was located at 7902 Dee Gabriel Collins Road, Austin, Texas, US 78744.

History of Garfield Negro School in Del Valle, Texas revisited.

Garfield Negro School is one of the many forgotten “negro schools” of Travis County that educated African American students. Many negro schools such as this one were financially strapped and operated on a tight schedule. Not many people know about the Garfield Negro School or its entire existence.

Garfield Negro School was also known as Garfield Colored School and Garfield Col. School during its time of existence.  (Ref: 1932 Topographic and Road map of Travis County)


In 1892, Garfield Negro School was established and built as a white barrack shaped single story building that was a one-room school building similar to Sprinkle Negro School. Garfield Negro School was located 3 miles west of Garfield, Texas off Highway 71 near Richards Drive. Garfield Negro School had first went under the name of Devotion School and educated students in the Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle ISD). The one-room school building educated students in grades 1 through 7. 8th grade students and 9th grade students attended Kealing Junior High School (now Kealing Middle School) in Austin.

1900 is the year when Devotion School changed its name into Garfield Negro School. Its was changed to Garfield School later in honor of US President James A. Garfield. The Garfield Negro School itself was named for US President James A. Garfield. The citizens were well receptive to the idea of renaming the school.

Improvements were made to the school in 1902. More improvements followed in the year of 1903. Ratio for this school was 41 students per teacher. Later on the school district employed 2 teachers to teach at the Garfield Negro School.


Garfield Negro School counted 82 students in the 1934-1935 semester. The cost was $1,456 per year with an average of $32.35 per student a year. Average daily attendance for Garfield Negro School was 45 students at best. Two teachers split classes into a 120 day period. This teaching period was split in half.

Garfield Negro School counted 80 students in the 1935-1936 semester. Student enrollment during the Great Depression more or less stayed the same despite economic turmoil. Rural Travis County was hit hard by the Great Depression as was the rest of the country. Throughout its history, Garfield Negro School had served and educated students in grades 1 through 7.

A water well was dug in 1937 by O. H. Moreland. This water well was operated by a gasoline pump installed by J. H. Norwood. Water was retrieved from a nearby basin from the Colorado River. This water well is recorded as State Well Number 5852401. (Ref: Texas Water Development Board)

The Garfield schools and original Garfield Negro School itself was consolidated into Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle Independent School District) in 1954 following the school consolidation movement in Texas State. Classes continued in 1954 however. In 1956, the school received 3 new teachers.

In 1966, Garfield Negro School integrated into Garfield White School (Garfield School) and Garfield School had operated thereout until the 1967-1968 school year when Del Valle ISD decided to closed the school due to loss of property tax revenue and lack of funding.


On June 7, 2010, the Garfield Negro School building was merged into the original Garfield White School (Garfield School) building and was transformed into the Garfield Library.

Today the Garfield Negro School serves as Garfield Library and the Garfield White School serves as the Hit The Spot Cafe. The school has been split in half into 2 businesses with the left half being Hit The Spot Cafe and the right half being Garfield Library. Garfield Library operates under East Travis Gateway Library District.

Today Garfield Negro School sits at the location of 5121 Albert Brown Drive, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617 where Garfield Library and Hit The Spot Cafe are located.

Revisiting history of Waters Park School.

Waters Park School started its beginnings on 3807 Adelphi Lane in Northwest Austin, Texas in 1891. Waters Park School was built as a log cabin that was a one-room schoolhouse as many schools were at that time. Waters Park School was known as Waters Park Colored School and Summitt Negro School.

The school taught 1st grade through 8th grade. After 8th grade, students would drop out of school in order to help their families grow crops as agricultural lifestyle was prevalent in that area at the time.

The Waters Park School log cabin building burned down from a fire that had mysteriously started. After the school burned down, Waters Park School became Summit Negro School and relocated to 3605 Adelphi Lane at St. Stephen’s Church. It is unclear exactly what year and when the Waters Park School burned down. However Waters Park School had burned down from arson.

From then on out, school was conducted within St. Stephen’s Church (St. Stephen’s Missionary Baptist Church) on Duval Road in 1934 during the 1934-1935 school year. Summit Nero School shared the same building as St. Stephen’s School. When the school building burned down, another one was never built to replace the older building.

Waters Park School became Summitt Negro School and relocated to 3605 Adelphi Lane at St. Stephen’s Church in 1934 after the original school burned down. Summitt Negro School continued This permanent African-American school continued to exist at the church operating there until 1960 when the school was integrated into the old Summitt School on Burnet Road & Kramer Lane.

Waters Park School was originally located at 3807 Adelphi Lane, Austin, Texas, US 78727.

Saturday, August 11, 2018

Short history behind the 1933 building addition of the old Oak Hill School.

Oak Hill School got its second school building as enrollment expanded in 1933. The 1933 eastern addition was constructed during the Great Depression through work relief efforts. It was constructed out of stone masonry.  This small building addition served as an art room. It was also used for the cafeteria. There were restrooms installed for this building. The land for the former school was donated by James Andrew Patton. In December of 1993, the old Oak Hill School received city designation as an Austin Landmark and the property was zoned GR-CO.  

Ridgetop School history of Austin, Texas not forgotten revisited.

Ridgetop School was established in 1908 as an elementary school that had served grades 1 through 6 and was established at the location of 5005 Caswell Avenue in Austin, Texas. Ridgetop School had its own school district called Ridgetop School District (Ridgetop Independent School District) that was operated by Austin Public School (now Austin ISD) for Austin/Travis County from 1908 to 1950.

Ridgetop School was built as a hexagon shaped building in the year of 1908. This hexagon shaped building was two stories tall and had at least 3 chimneys. The school had 4 rooms at first and was later expanded to have 7 rooms to accommodate a growing student population. 1 outhouse served the entire school. During the 1908-1909 school year, students in grades 5 and 6 were all taught and educated in one room. Students in grades 5 and 6 were all taught and educated in one room with students in lower grades until 1910.

Grades 5 and 6 were no longer taught in a one room setting by 1910. Classes for grades 5 and 6 were held in separate rooms. One room educated 5th grade and one room educated 6th grade. By 1910, Ridgetop School received maintenance remodels to the school building to accommodate a then growing student population.

This school would eventually serve grades 1 through 7 by the mid-20th century. Although Ridgetop School taught 7th grade, school stopped after 6th grade. 7th grade students transferred to Austin ISD and attended school at Allan Junior High School, University Junior High School, Baker Junior High School (Baker School), Burnet Middle School, Lanier Junior High School (Lanier Junior/Senior High School which is now Lanier High School), or Lamar Middle School. However most 7th grade students from Ridgetop School attended Allan Junior High School, University Junior High School, Burnet Middle School, or Lamar Middle School.


1 outhouse served the entire school which later expanded to 2 outhouses by 1920. In 1920 the Ridgetop School had 3 outhouses. A fourth chimney was added to the school in 1929.

The school grew to have 50 students by 1930. Although Ridgetop School boasted an attendance roster of 50 students for the whole student population of Ridgetop School, the daily attendance on average was 30-40 students a day. Ridgetop School was a 1-6 school in 1930. The fourth chimney was renovated for the school in 1930. Ridgetop School received maintenance upgrades and building remodels to the school building to accommodate a then growing student population in the year of 1930.

In 1939, a new brick school building was constructed and Ridgetop School became a part of Austin ISD. This modern school building was built as a 1 story building. The old Ridgetop School building was demolished. The outhouses were filled with dirt from a local quarry.

Ridgetop Independent School District was abolished and merged into Austin ISD in 1939. The school district was shut down immediately. (Ref: Sebastian Wren, Ridgetop Elementary Celebrates 70 Years)

 
In 1950 during the 1950-1951 school is when the school building had gotten more improvements made. The school now had a full functioning plumbing system. Ridgetop School was renamed to Ridgetop Elementary School in 1969.

In 1980, AISD officials announced plans to reorganize Ridgetop School into an alternative school that would serve students with multiple handicaps. However plans were shot down due to parental opposition. Ridgetop School became a 1-5 school in 1980.

Today Ridgetop School is a K-5 school for students in Kindergarten through 5th grade. The school no longer educates 6th grade students. Ridgetop School is located at 5005 Caswell Avenue, Austin, Texas, US 78751.

History of Olive Street School in Austin, Texas explained and examined.

Olive Street School is one of the many forgotten schools of Austin, Texas from the 19th century and 20th century. Only old timers of Austin known about this school and history. Not many people today know about the history of this school.

Olive Street School was an elementary school called Olive Street Elementary School which operated from 1913 to 1947 by Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD). Black students attended this school. Olive Street School served this East Austin African American neighborhood for nearly 4 decades. The school itself was designated by Austin ISD as a “negro school”. (Ref: Austin Public Schools 1954, Volume II:7)


L.C. Anderson High School was the school that occupied the building before Olive Street School did for 6 years from 1907 to 1913.

L.C. Anderson High School moved to 1607 Pennsylvania Avenue in 1913 and the building was repurposed as Olive Street School for black elementary school students. 1913 is the year when Olive Street School opened as a school for black elementary school students.

In 1933, Austin school superintendent A.N. McCallum announced the district's grand plans to build a new campus on East 11th, but not to abandon the Olive Street school, which he pronounced "in good shape." The neighbors disagreed, wanting the "obviously worthless" campus torn down and a modern school built to replace it. (Ref: Austin Chronicle, Proud Roots, Friday, June 28, 2002)

Austin ISD shut down and had closed Olive Street School due to poor building conditions in 1947. The floors were somehow unsafe yet the wall structures were fine.

Olive Street School burned down in a fire in the year of 1947. It was a total loss for the school district. The school burned down due to red-hot coal in the old potbelly stoves. Heating for Olive Street School was still provided by old potbelly stoves and not central A/C heating as the white schools were. This proved to be a fire hazard as the school burned on several occasions in the past. The fire led to the school building being demolished in 1948.

On July 3, 1952, Dr. E. H. Givens came before the Austin City Council asked that the Olive Street School land be developed for a park. Councilman Long moved that the Olive Street playground be cleared real soon and developed for the children in that area. The motion was seconded by Councilman White.

The school site is now a neighborhood park known as Lott Park. The school property is now vacant. No structures remain today.

Olive Street School was located the junction of Olive Street & Curve Street, Austin, Texas, US 78702.

Brewton Springs School when it was the Snuff Box School on Bee Caves Road.

Brewton Springs School was called the Snuff Box School during the 19th century and early to middle 20th century because so many of its students chewed tobacco and dipped snuff. That is how the name Snuff Box came about. The architectural design of the school building was built as a snuff box. Because the school was shaped similarly to a snuff box, students called the school “Snuff Box School”. However the name Snuff Box did not derive from the architecture of the school building itself.


In 1881, the first school was built as a 15’ x 10’ foot box square building designed as a one-room schoolhouse located on the Jim Brewton farm. Hence the name Brewton Springs. The school only had one door. By 1881 Brewton Springs School had county funding and state funding allocated towards the school.

As cited in the book Lone Star Travel Guide to Texas Hill County, Brewton Springs School was also known as Snuff Box School. The Brewton Springs School was located east of Bee Cave. Brewton Springs School was located east of Bee Cave and west of Cuernavaca Drive near Patterson Road less than 0.2 miles of the junction of Cuernavaca Drive & FM 2244.
(Ref: Lone Star Travel Guide to Texas Hill County, 2011)

Even in the 1920s when most schools were 1-8 schools, Brewton Springs School was a 1-12 school unlike Eanes School were school stopped at 7th grade. From the 1920s on, Eanes School did not go beyond the 7th grade. The 1920s is when Eanes School began changing its scholastics by primarily teaching elementary school grades.

[From the 1920s on, Eanes School did not go beyond the 7th grade. The 1920s is when Eanes School began changing its scholastics by primarily teaching elementary school grades. 8th grade students were bussed to Allan Junior High School. Although Eanes School did not go beyond the 7th grade, Eanes School still taught middle school students and high school students until 1943.

After 1943, high school students attended Austin High School and Allan High School. Middle school students attended Allan Junior High School and later O. Henry Middle School. Some had remained at Eanes School as the school had taught middle school grades until 1950. In 1950, Eanes ISD sent its middle school students and high school students to Austin ISD. This would last until 1967.]

The school district surrounding Eanes School (the now Eanes Elementary School) and Brewton Springs School was considered a common school district that sent its high school students to Austin ISD. During that time only white families resided in the Eanes school district. Brewton Springs School was an all white school with a 97% white/caucasian student population.

(Ref: Eanes: Portrait of a Community, Linda Vance, 1986)
(Ref: Eanes: A History of the School and Community, Linda Vance, 1976)


1936 is when the school district began making plans to tear down and rebuild the then-current Brewton Springs School building. Meetings were held with the Superintendent of Travis County Public Schools.

In 1937 the school was torn down and rebuilt on John Teague’s property located on FM 2244 (Bee Cave Road) near Cuernavaca Drive by Patterson Road near Patterson Ranch. Homer Teague moved into the old schoolhouse afterwards. The other old schoolhouse remained as a private residence. While the school was being moved, classes were held in Watson Springs Baptist Church. Watson Springs Baptist Church was a single-room frame church. The church was also nicknamed “Snuff Box Church” because members of the congregation used to spit tobacco juice out of the window during services.


In 1948, Brewton Springs School began attempting to merge and consolidate into Eanes School District #48. Some Brewton Springs School students began attending the Eanes School. Eanes School District then operated both Eanes School and Brewton Springs School.

In 1949, both Brewton Springs School and its school district were consolidated into Eanes ISD under Gilmer-Aiken Law. Gilmer-Aiken Law consolidated many rural school districts, including Brewton Springs & Bee Cave, had reformed many Texas public schools. Eanes School students who wanted to continue their education past 7th grade either went to Brewton Springs School or to Allan Junior High School and Austin High School in Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD). However Brewton Springs School continued to operate under Eanes ISD until 1950.

1950 was the year the Travis County Schools Superintendent and State of Texas closed down Brewton Springs School and its school district during the 1950-1951 school year. The school district itself was consolidated and abolished during the same year. Brewton Springs School students were merged with Eanes School and to Bee Cave School. Brewton Springs School students were merged to both Cox Springs School, Dripping Springs School, and Lago Vista School as well. Brewton Springs School shut down due to lack of enrollment.

In 1950, Brewton Springs School was shut down by the State of Texas due to Gilmer-Aiken Law after Bill No. 116 of the 50th legislature was passed. After Brewton Springs School shut down, its students were transferred to Eanes School. Eanes School then had 80 students. A third room to the two-room rock building of Eanes School was constructed in the same year to relieve overcrowding. Classes were now held at the Eanes School.  Eanes ISD would continue busing its high school students to Austin ISD until 1967.

In 1950, Homer Teague and his two sons, Robert Teague and Jackson Teague, lived in the building under rough conditions. They would live their until they moved. In 1960, the building was abandoned on the Teague Land next to Commons Ford Ranch.

It is unknown and unclear whether or not anyone else besides the Teague family lived in the original Brewton Springs School building after consolidation with Eanes ISD whereas the other school building became a private residence.

In 1958, an election was held to change the status of the school from a common school district to independent.  Eanes ISD chose to continue busing its middle school students and high school students to Austin ISD. (Ref: EISD Monthly Newsletter, Eanes School 50 Years Ago, April 1984)


In 1967, Austin ISD informed Eanes ISD that it could no longer continue to accept the middle school students and high school students. Their schools were full and space was needed for Austin ISD students. Eanes ISD was given the choice of either giving up its independent school district status and joining AISD or building its own facilities.

If Eanes had combined with AISD, it would have been forced to integrate its school.  However, if the school chose to remain independent, it would only be required to integrate students within its district, and during that time only white families resided in the Eanes school district.  The Westlake community chose to build its own schools.

(Ref: The Westlake Picayune, Austin Crowding Greatly Expanded Eanes Independent School District, March 2, 1979)

In 1985, Robert Teague gained ownership of the property from a handwritten gift deed produced in 1942 by the wife of Homer Teague.

In 1988, the (old) 5th Brewton Springs School building was moved to the Commons Ford Metropolitan Park in the Cuernavaca neighborhood by Robert Teague. Robert Teague donated Brewton Springs School to the City of Austin as an attempt of historic preservation. No known further work or renovations were done or made to the old Brewton Springs School building after 1988.

By 1990, the former school building fell victim to rural decay. Its windows were boarded up with plywood. No use was made.

Today the 5th Brewton Springs School building sits at the entrance of Commons Ford Metropolitan Park. Its windows are boarded up with plywood. A chimney was added to the building as an extra. It is highly possible that Homer Teague built the chimney.


Brewton Springs School was located near FM 2244 & Cuernavaca Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78733. The old Brewton Springs School is now located at 614 North Commons Ford Road, Austin, Texas US 78733.

Short history of Hanna School in Hanna, Louisiana explained.

Hanna School was built in 1912 inside the small community of Hanna, Louisiana which is right outside of Shreveport. Red River Parish School District opened the school in 1912 for black students. Class sizes were often small. (Ref: Shreveport Times, Page 3, March 17, 1978)

Renovations to the school were made during the 1930s. Hanna School was segregated by race during the 1970s. Hanna School integrated in 1980 with black and white students in attendance. The school was considered by Red River Parish Board to be state of the art at the time.

Hanna School closed in 2001 due to asbestos. Asbestos was found in the walls and roof. By 2002, the school was abandoned. The school would soon fall into a state of decay. Reportedly several windows are missing and the second floor has collapsed into the first floor leaving a mess in a hallway. There is very little furniture remaining.

Red River Parish School District and Red River Parish Board have offered Hanna School for redevelopment in past years. However nothing has happened. Restoration is not an option due to high cost of asbestos removal and aging structural issues.

History of Brackenridge School in Austin, Texas explored.

Brackenridge School is one of Austin’s earliest schools for serving African American students. Austin ISD operated Brackenridge School as an elementary school for students in grades 1 through 7 from 1879 to 1965. Brackenridge School went under the names of South Side School, South Austin School, and Brackenridge Elementary School.

Austin ISD established Brackenridge School as a negro school for negro students in 1879 after an election bond. Its building was a single story white house and a 3 room schoolhouse. Contractors built this school out of wood. Paint was donated by residents. The school had a bungalow terrace. It was first known as South Austin School in the 19th century and then Brackenridge School during the 20th century. At first the school only educated students in grades 1 through 6 and later expanded to add 7th grade classes.

The school was named after John Thomas Brackenridge, a Confederate veteran in the American Civil War. John Thomas Brackenridge donated some of his land to Austin Public Schools (Austin ISD) for Brackenridge School.

School officials complained about the cost of maintaining Brackenridge School around 1900. Austin ISD refused to install new playground equipment citing maintenance costs. John Thomas Brackenridge donated an additional sum of his land to Austin Public Schools (Austin ISD) for Brackenridge School in 1905. Portable classrooms were added a decade later.

Austin ISD shut down and closed Brackenridge School in 1965 as a part of Austin’s desegregation efforts similar to what happened with Clarksville School and Kealing Junior High School. The building was demolished in late 1965. A new 2 story house sits on the site.

Baseball player Wille Wells was its most famous alumni to have graduated from Brackenridge School. He attended this school during his elementary school years from 1st grade to 7th grade.

Brackenridge School was located at 319 West Elizabeth Street, Austin, Texas, US 78704.

Hillcrest Farms history not forgotten revisited.

Hillcrest Farms is a name many Austinites have forgotten. The name “Hillcrest Farms” does not ring a bell to the current Austinites of today. Only a handful of few longtime Austinites are aware of the name Hillcrest Farms. Hillcrest Farms is a name many longtime Austinites have forgotten.

Inevitably Hillcrest Farms is one of Austin’s long forgotten institutions that has faded away with time. The Hillcrest Farms motto was “Stay where you are, we’ll bring it to you.”


In 1937, Harry L. Peterson started Hillcrest Farms in Del Valle, Texas less than a mile from the now Austin Bergstrom International Airport (ABIA). Hillcrest Farms Inc. started with just Harry L. Peterson and two employees in 1937. Hillcrest Farms had only one truck to work from and 22 cows and work with. Harry L. Peterson was the first milk producer to sell pasteurized milk instead of raw milk in the Austin, Texas area and in Travis County.

50 quarts of milk a day were produced by cows from the Hillcrest Farms in their early days of operation. In the early years, milk was poured into quart sized glass bottles for home delivery.

From a business standpoint, Hillcrest Farms originally intended to be a home delivery business in the beginning. Harry L. Peterson intended for Hillcrest Farms to be a home delivery business being that he already owned land set up in an agricultural setting in Del Valle, Texas. Hillcrest Farms was all home delivery.

Harry L. Peterson and Fred Barge became business partners in 1955. On June 1, 1956, Harry L. Peterson incorporated Hillcrest Farms as an agricultural business called Hillcrest Farms Inc. Hillcrest Farms was the first dairy operation in Texas to equip a truck with a “milk tank” instead of cans. From then on, all Hillcrest Farms milk processors were to equip a truck with a “milk tank” instead of cans. 1969 was a peak year for Hillcrest Farms as that was the year more than 14,000 customers were served.

In 1970, Harry L. Peterson sold Hillcrest Farms to Jim Dobson and Brodie Keene. Tay Bond pledged $27,000.00 commission to Harry Peterson to be earned on the sale of property known as Hillcrest Farms to purchasers Brodie Keene and Jim Dobson in 1970. In 1970, Hillcrest Farms was also sold to Pure Milk.

In 1984, Jim Dobson and Brodie Keene sold a portion of their land to Del Valle ISD to build a school for which Hillcrest Farms would be named after for donating land. Hillcrest Farms was one of the last dairies in town to use real cream.

A small portion of Austin landmarks were named in honor of Hillcrest Farms. A Del Valle ISD school and road were named after the Hillcrest Farms both by the City of Austin and Del Valle. Such as Hillcrest Elementary School and Hillcrest Farms Road for example in this case.

In 2008, the City of Austin purchased several acres of land which was formerly owned by Hillcrest Farms to build a parking garage for Austin Bergstrom International Airport (ABIA) which is currently operated by FastPark & Relax. This parking garage was built to meet the demand of additional parking for ABIA. By 2012, several more acres of land were purchased from the former Hillcrest Farms.

As an agreement with the City of Austin, US Government, Austin Bergstrom International Airport, Travis County, and Texas General Land Office (GLO), associated parties came to terms resulting in an agreement allowing former part of the dairy land to remain undeveloped in as attempt of historic preservation. As a part of this attempt for historic preservation enacted by the City Of Austin, tourists entering and exiting ABIA can get a feel of agricultural lifestyle from 20th century Del Valle in Travis County. By remaining undeveloped, the dairy land will continue to operate in its natural habitat which is why you see longhorns cattle as you exit ABIA.


A small portion of Austin landmarks were named in honor of Hillcrest Farms. A Del Valle ISD school and road were named after the Hillcrest Farms both by Del Valle, Travis County, and City of Austin. The Hillcrest name is spread over Southeast Austin and Southeast Travis County.

• For instance, take Hillcrest Farms Road for example.

In 1975, Hillcrest Farms got a road named after the dairy called Hillcrest Farms Road also known as Hillcrest Farms Rd. To the left of the road is additional parking for ABIA operated by FastPark & Relax. To the right is natural farmland with a herd of cattle. In 2012, Hillcrest Farms Road was renamed to Spirit of Texas Drive.

• For instance, take Hillcrest Elementary School as another example.

Hillcrest Elementary School (fka Hillcrest School) was named after the Hillcrest Farms. Hillcrest Elementary School was located on land Hillcrest Farms owned which is why the school has the name “Hillcrest”. In 1984, Hillcrest Farms sold land to Del Valle ISD to build a school. In 1985, after a bond program enacted by Del Valle ISD, Del Valle residents voted for the school district to build a new elementary school. 1985 was the year Hillcrest Elementary School opened.

The Hillcrest School sat in its original location from 1985 to 1998 on Crozier Lane right next to Baty Elementary School (fka Baty School). Hillcrest Elementary School was relocated to William Cannon Road in Southeast Austin in 1998 due to the City Of Austin’s Airport Noise Mitigation Program which was responsible for relocating 6 Del Valle ISD schools in order for the ABIA Airport to be built and to operate. In 1999 the school was demolished. Hillcrest Elementary School is owned and operated by Del Valle ISD.


The Hillcrest Farms were located at 736 Bastrop Highway, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617 now known as 2200 Spirit of Texas Drive, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.

History of Hillcrest School in Austin, Texas revealed.

In 1984, Jim Dobson and Brodie Keene sold a portion of their land to Del Valle ISD to build a school for which Hillcrest Farms would be named after for donating land. Hillcrest Farms was one of the last dairies in town to use real cream.

In 1985, after a bond program enacted by Del Valle ISD, Del Valle residents voted for the school district to build a new elementary school. 1985 was the year Hillcrest Elementary School opened.

Hillcrest School (aka Hillcrest Elementary School) was named after the Hillcrest Farms. Hillcrest Elementary School was located on land Hillcrest Farms owned which is why the school has the name “Hillcrest”. The Hillcrest School sat in its original location from 1985 to 1998 on Crozier Lane right next to Baty Elementary School (aka Baty Elementary School).

Hillcrest Elementary School was relocated to William Cannon Road in Southeast Austin in 1998 due to the City Of Austin’s Airport Noise Mitigation Program which was responsible for relocating 6 Del Valle ISD schools in order for the ABIA Airport to be built and to operate.

In 1999 the school was demolished. 1999 was the year Hillcrest School relocated to William Cannon Drive in Austin, Texas. The school was once located in Del Valle, Texas and now located in Austin, Texas. Hillcrest Elementary School is owned and operated by Del Valle ISD.

All that is left of the old Hillcrest School is the parking lot where Travis County Fire Department parks their vehicles.

Today Hillcrest Elementary School is located at 6910 East William Cannon Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78744.

Friday, August 3, 2018

Peter Nic to leave Australia to promote the Late Night Transmitter album in late 2018.

Peter Nic is planning on leaving the country of Australia later this year as of 2018 in order to promote the Late Night Transmitter album. Peter has expressed desire to extend his roots in the United States (US) as an effort of promoting his 4th studio album towards American audiences. He wants to push the details of this album over the internet. Late Night Transmitter will also be an internet album available online.

The album Late Night Transmitter has an R&B/pop vibe to it with a fairly deep level of production. The production and sound are very high definition. Australian artist Peter Nic is going on a different musical route for this album.

His plans for reaching American audiences are to extend his roots in the US, release Late Night Transmitter as an internet album online, and promote this album of his in the US as well.

History of 79th Street School. A “School Away from School”.

79th Street School located in Shreveport, Louisiana has very unique interesting history to it. It started off as a store, an office building, an elementary, and then an alternative school. Caddo Parish School Board operated this school for 20 years before closing. Read about the unique and interesting concept of School Away from School in this news article.


The school building itself was built in 1955 as a single story 14,080 square foot building on 2.17 acres worth of land. The building was built as a single story masonry building, set on a standard concrete foundations and a concrete slab. Both its interiors walls and exterior walls were constructed of concrete masonry unit blocks with a brick veneer. The exterior doors are a combination of either wood or steel units and are set on either wood or steel frames. 

This building was used as store, an office building, and a storage unit before being converted into a school.

Caddo Parish School Board purchased the building and converted into a school in 1977. 79th Street School was in operation as a public school from 1977 to 1992. From 1977 to 1982 is when 79th Street School operated as an elementary school.


In 1982, Caddo Parish School Board repurposed 79th Street School into an alternative school called School Away from School. This alternative school was set up as an alternative learning center operated by the school district.

The School Away from School took in students with disciplinary problems, special needs, behavioral problems, and attendance problems. These Caddo Parish students cannot make the grade or attend classes in regular school because of disciplinary and or behavioral problems. It served as a last chance for some students.

One of the first things you would see when you walked through the door at School Away from School was a bright yellow poster that reads: "School skippers are losers. Be a winner." The poster says a lot about the school and serves as a reminder to some of the students about why they were there. Administration, staff, and the students felt that the school served a worthwhile purpose.

Like most schools, this school also has some discipline problems, such as fighting and use of vulgarity. Students who do well at the school return to their regular school either at midterm or the end of the year. For those who remain at School Away from School, grades and earned credits are recorded on the student's transcript in the home school. Graduating students receive diplomas from their home school. (Ref: Shreveport Times, School Away from School)

As cited in the Shreveport Times,

“The students would determine their own daily time schedule and rate of work. Every hour the students were given 10-minute breaks in which they are permitted to smoke, relax and use the vending machines. Much of the school's success can be attributed to this flexibility and freedom. Students like the system and are particularly pleased with the individual attention they receive.”

The setting for School Away from School is as far removed from regular school as is the student. There are no traditional classrooms, no desks in a row, no tardy bells and no study periods. Teachers do not stand before the class and give lectures. Instead, the teachers sit in sections modular units divided by subject and work with the students on an individual basis. The students sit at tables or study cubicles and are free to move about. They work individually and at their own pace on a variety of instructional materials. Students attend one hour of class for each subject they take and attend either the morning or afternoon sessions. The school offered 24 subjects in the area.

The remaining 26% percent are students with a wide range of problems. These include potential dropouts who would otherwise quit school, pregnant girls who want to continue their education, dropouts who wants another chance, students who need to work but still want to graduate and students who might need only one credit to complete their education.

Most of the cases are discipline problems. 75% percent of the students who attend School Away from School do so because of discipline or behavior reasons according to Principal J.B. Harville.”

(Ref: Shreveport Times, Page 33, December 11, 1983)

“To attend School Away from School a student must have been enrolled in regular school and had some sort of problem there. The student is referred to the school by application, which the principal of the regular school and the parent must sign. At the time of enrollment, the student signs a contract with the school, pledging that he will attend classes, make progress and present no discipline problems. Any student who breaks the contract may be dropped from the program.”
(Ref: Caddo Parish School Board AEP handbook)


In 1986 during the 1986-1987 school year, School Away from School was renamed to J. B. Harville which was simply known as Harville School to Shreveport natives. The school would be referred to this name until closing.

1992 is the year when the school closed. It students were sent back to their former schools after this alternative school had closed.

Caddo Parish School Board advertised the school to be up for sale in the Shreveport Times newspaper in July, 2 1993. The school district would sell the school property to whatever lender on 5 year lease. (Ref: Shreveport Times, Page 31, Friday, July 2, 1993)

Here is a reference of the advertisement,

“July 2, 1993 FOR LEASE BID NO: 71L-93 BID TITLE: LEASE OF 103 EAST 79th STREET TO BE OPENED: 10:00 A.M., TUESDAY, JULY 13, 1993 Sealed bids to acquire the following described five year lease will be received In the Purchasing Office of the Caddo Parish School Board until 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, July 13, 1993, at which time bids win be opened and publicly read aloud. Late bids cannot be accepted. ALL BIDS MUST BE SENT VIA U. S. MAIL OR HAND DELIVERED The sealed envelope containing the bid shall be marked: LEASE - 103 East 79th Street Lots 561, 562, 563, 564, 565, 566, 577, 576, 579.”

(Ref: Shreveport Times, Page 31, Friday, July 2, 1993)
(Ref: Shreveport Times, Page 31, Saturday, July 3, 1993)


By 1997, Harville School aka 79th Street School was already abandoned and vacant for the most part. Everything salvageable was taken out of the building in 1998.

The Department of Environmental Quality ruled that all items in that school would have to be considered as asbestos-containing material and a complete demolition project would have to be done as an abatement job which is extremely expensive in 2016. Prior to any demolition, all asbestos-containing material must be removed. The complication with the 79th Street School property is that it is two connected buildings, one in which the roof collapsed into the structure allowing moisture resulting in additional environmental issues, mold and asbestos. The problem with 79th Street School is asbestos. (Ref; Shreveport Times, Page B9, Wednesday, March 9 2016)

Today as of 2018, the 79th Street School is now vacant and abandoned. A majority of the building has deteriorated over time and has been damaged by vandalism. The ceilings are in poor condition and damaged by rain weather. The roof has numerous leaks throughout the building. This school deteriorated beyond repair.

Now the School Away from School Program takes in youths with disciplinary problems, special needs, and attendance problems. It still is in operation by Caddo Parish School Board for Shreveport public schools.

79th Street School is located at 103 East 79th Street, Shreveport, Louisiana, US 71106.

Mysterious history behind the Worley Observatory explained in detail.

The Worley Observatory is a 1-story building located on Observatory Road which is located 1.2 miles north of the intersection of LA Highway 175 and Ellerbe Road in Shreveport, Louisiana.

What is unique and interesting about this astronomical observatory is that a public school district owns this observatory rather than a university, college, private corporation, conglomerate, or some sort of government entity. Yes an actual public school district owns this observatory.


Members from Shreveport-Bossier Astronomical Society looked for a site to build this observatory. Land was offered by a farmer named Mr. L. S. "Scrib" Frierson who owned a large cotton plantation. Mr. Frierson allowed them to use an abandoned corn crib that had been burned and abandoned the cotton plantation. Architect Joseph Schirer redrew the original plans to convert the corn crib into an observatory building.

Construction for Ralph A. Worley Observatory started in September 1963. Ralph A. Worley Observatory was opened in 1964 by the Shreveport-Bossier Astronomical Society and was later donated to the Caddo Parish School District. The Caddo Parish School District still owns the observatory to this day. Worley Observatory has had no known renovations or additions throughout its history.

The Worley Observatory was built as a 1-story masonry building, set on a standard concrete foundation and slab. The building is 2,176 square feet in size on approximately 0.17 acres. Its exterior walls are constructed of concrete masonry unit blocks.

The exterior windows are a combination of fixed and operating steel units. The exterior doors are a combination of either wood or steel frames. Its roof is constructed of supported concrete with steel J-beam and post structure. The roof is in fair condition. The metal dome of the astronomical observatory shows signs of aging.

Interior wall partitions are constructed of a combination of concrete masonry and wood. Interior wall finishes are a combination of painted masonry, gypsum board, and wood paneling.

The Ralph A. Worley Observatory is still in use today. Their address is 1 Astronomical Observatory Road, Shreveport, Louisiana, US 71115.

History of Pine Valley School in Rodessa, Louisiana revisited.

Pine Valley School is one of Louisiana’s forgotten schools. Not much is know about the Pine Valley School in Rodessa, Louisiana. The Caddo Parish School District operated Pine Valley School as a public school from 1920 to 1987.


Pine Valley School was built and opened as a “Rosenwald school” for African American students in 1920 during the 1920-1921 school year at a cost of $2,300. This Rosenwald school was built on land owned by Catherine Tippins Watson and Robert Tippins. Robert Tippins served as trustee of Pine Valley School in 1920.

The first building for Pine Valley School was built as a four room school building with two teachers teaching grades 1 through 12. One teacher taught elementary grade (1-6) and the other teach taught high school grades (7-12). There were no middle school grades or junior high school grades at the time. The first Pine Valley School building was expanded into a four room school building in 1922.

Catherine Tippins Watson and Robert Tippins relinquished their property on a quit claim to the Caddo Parish School District on March 7, 1936. Although the heirs never had or claimed an interest in said property, this property has always belonged to Caddo Parish School District. R.T. Tippins was named as trustee of Pine Valley School in said deed from Jeff Tyson to Pine Valley School, as recorded in Conveyance Book 116, Page 736, for Caddo Parish, Louisiana. (Ref: Caddo Parish Conveyance Book 116, Page 736)

1951 is when Caddo Parish School District officials decided making plans for a new school building to built. The old Pine Valley School building was overcrowded and too compressed for student population to expand. Its facilities could not accommodate the growth of the student population. By the 1952-1953 school term, 120 students were enrolled at Pine Valley School. Plans for a new school building were laid out and contracted in 1952.

The old Rosenwald School building for this school was sold to a private homeowner after the 1951-1952 school year.


Pine Valley School was originally rebuilt in 1953 for the Caddo Parish School District. The school building was 30,802 square feet on 13.15 acres of land. The building was built as a one story masonry building on standard concrete foundations. The architecture resembles Ellerbe Road School (aka George Washington Carver Primary School & George Washington Carver High School) a huge deal. The layout of the actual school is similar too as this school is conjoined in the middle by a breezeway.

The exterior walls and interior walls were constructed of concrete masonry blocks with a brick veneer. The exterior doors are a combination of wood and steel units with both mixed usage of wood and steel frames. Windows were held structurally by steel frames.

A basketball court was aligned behind the school in 1970. This basketball court was built on a 20 foot x 20 foot concrete slab. The basketball court was later converted into a tennis court in 1978.

Pine Valley School was closed in 1987. Pine Valley School was abandoned in 1988. Staff of school board then declared that Pine Valley School is not needed for school purposes. It is unclear as to why Pine Valley School shut down in the first place.


On October 3, 1998, Zion Human Services signed an agreement of lease to use the former school property on a lease plan for their business. Staff recommended the president of Zion Human Services to sign the Agreement of Lease. Staff recommended the resolution by approving the lease of its Pine Valley School property to Zion Human Services. Zion Human Services was a non-profit corporation.

In 2006, the school was abandoned again and has been since then. As to why the school was abandoned again after leasing the school to a non-profit corporation is unknown. What is known is that Zion Human Services left the property abandoned in 2006.

By 2008, Pine Valley School fell victim to rural decay from being abandoned for so long. Moss spread across classrooms. Vines grew over the hallways. Shrubs came about in certain areas.

The Department of Environmental Quality ruled that all items in that school would have to be considered as asbestos-containing material and a complete demolition project would have to be done as an abatement job which is extremely expensive in 2016. Prior to any demolition, all asbestos-containing material must be removed. The complication with the Pine Valley School property is that it is two connected buildings, one in which the roof collapsed into the structure allowing moisture resulting in additional environmental issues, mold and asbestos. The problem with Pine Valley School is asbestos. (Ref; Shreveport Times, Page B9, Wednesday, March 9 2016)


Today a fence has been put up around the perimeter of Pine Valley School. The school building is now filled with cows. All the plant life is somehow well trimmed. A man who lives near the former school campus fires off gunshot rounds with rock salt. So be careful when exploring this school.

Other sections of the school have been damaged by minor vandalism. Some areas of the roof deck have collapsed or are missing. Several areas of the exterior walls have missing, broken masonry. These walls are in overall poor condition. Most of Pine Valley School has deteriorated beyond repair and is in need of demolition.

Pine Valley School is located at 16535 Hosston Rodessa Road, Rodessa, Lousiana, US 71044. Its other known address is 16535 Hosston Rodessa Road North, Ida, Louisiana, US 70144.