Showing posts with label Mixerr Reviews. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mixerr Reviews. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

El Paso Congressman Beto O’Rourke to run against Ted Cruz for Texas Senate.

In early 2018, Congressman Beto O’Rourke from El Paso, Texas publicly announced he would be running against Senator Ted Cruz for Texas Senate. Beto O’Rourke is also running for US Senate against Ted Cruz. However Beto O’Rourke is mainly shifted his focus on primarily running for Texas Senate.

In this past year alone, Beto has managed to gain Hispanic vote across the State of Texas. He plans to gain the Hispanic vote across the United States. In early 2018, Beto O’Rourke ran a 10k race from US to Mexico as a symbol of unity. All this was to gain the Hispanic vote across the United States.

David Ewalt Community Center in limbo after residential bid.

Pontiac resident Demetra Leonard made a $120,000 winning bid on buying out the David Ewalt Community Center in 2013. She bought the property from the City of Pontiac. It is now under private ownership. It is now October 2018 and nothing has happened. The building is sealed and now vacant.

(Ref: https://www.theoaklandpress.com/news/pontiac-receives-in-high-bids-in-auction-of-city-owned/article_3f20007d-d978-5712-be28-f44ce2b5ef63.html)

David Ewalt Community Center is located at 1460 North Perry Street, Pontiac, Michigan US 48340.

Saturday, October 13, 2018

History of Tablito School rediscovered and revealed.

Tablito School was named after a place called La Tablita. Governor Manuel Salcedo and Governor Herrera along with his 12 other officers were escorted from San Antonio de Béxar under an armed guard. They were executed near the site of the battlefield at a place called “La Tablita” in 1813. The killing of Governor Manuel Salcedo and his officers in 1813 was by some of the revolutionaries. A declaration of independence was adopted on April 6, 1813, establishing the First Independent State of Texas of the Mexican Republic, with José Bernardo Gutiérrez de Lara as president. (Ref: Castaneda, 1950, p. 99)

Tablito School was built in the area of La Tablita on January 1st, 1917 for Common School District No. 23 aka Elemndorf School District. Bexar County Common School District was responsible for financing and maintaining this school. J. C. Schulz was appointed by a county judge and commissioners to hold an election for increased special school tax and issuance of school bonds.

Tablito School was once located at the intersection of Streich Road & Old Corpus Christi Road just 3½ miles west of Elmendorf. Tablito School was also known as Tablito Elementary School. (Ref: East Central Independent School District Museum map of 1949)

Talbito School had a high percentage of Hispanic students many of whom were Mexican. Over 70% of its student population was Hispanic. It was a “Mexican school” for Hispanic students enrolled in the Elemndorf School District which is why it was called the “Mexican school”. Children spoke Spanish freely while attending Tablito School.

In 1949, the East Central Independent School District was formed and 15 rural schools were united into that one school district. Tablito School was consolidated into East Central Independent School District in 1949. Tablito School was closed in 1951. The Tablito School building was moved about a mile east on Goliad Road.


Today Tablito School is now the David Crocket Grange located at 14309 Old Corpus Christi Road, Elemendorf, Texas, US 78112. David Crocket Grange is a grange hall.

History of Coushatta Indian Village School of Livingston, Texas.

Coushatta Indian Village School is one of the forgotten of few Indian schools of the State of Texas. Only so much information is known about this school in particular. This news article will explain the history behind Indian Village School in Livingston, Texas.


Coushatta Indian Village School as an “Indian school” for Native American Indian students living within the confines of the Alabama-Coushatta Indian Reservation beginning in 1906.

School was taught in a wooden shack that was constructed out of pine wood. Coushatta Indian Village School operated under the Coushatta Indian Village School District No. 17 located in Livingston, Texas. The Coushatta Indian Village School was not eligible for rural aid since the school district did not levy a tax. Languages taught at the school were English, Spanish, and Koasati (Coushatti).

Up until 1916 all of the teaching was done by Mrs. C. W. Chambers for six months each year. The school term was only a six month period. Mrs. C. W. Chambers was the main teacher for this school and she was well respected. Teacher for this school were Mr. J. H. Wilbanks, Mrs. J. H. Wilbanks, and Mrs. C. W. Chambers. Mr. W. Chambers served as principal.

60 scholastics enumerated the 1924-1925 school year. Over 50 students were counted for daily attendance.

At the beginning of the 1927-1928 school year is when the State of Texas made the Coushatta Indian Village School District eligible to receive rural aid. Appropriations of $1,035 were given in state apportionment. Industrial aid was $256 dollars. By 1928 two small frame buildings compromised the Coushatta Indian Village School. One building was specifically for the primary school grades (elementary school grades).

State administration for the Alabama-Coushatta Indian Reservation began in 1930. The state began making appropriations for the reservation and designated the Texas State Board of Control as the supervising agency. The Board for Texas State Hospitals and Special Schools (now TXDADS) managed the Alabama-Coushatta Indian Reservation between 1949 and 1965.

The wooden shack was removed from the site by 1960 leaving Coushatta Indian Village School with the original building in tact. Appropriations were used to build an equipped modern school building sometime during the 20th century. In its place is a new modern school building.


Coushatta Indian Village School is located 1082 Colabe Road, Livingston, Texas, US 77351.

Sunday, October 7, 2018

History of San Juan School in San Antonio, Texas explored.

San Juan School was one of the many forgotten schools of San Antonio and Bexar County next to Berg’s Mill School. Not much is known about the San Juan School in San Antonio, Texas. What is known is that San Juan School was a rural school located way out in the county in San Antonio, Texas. Many historians have not covered this school written in books. Many citizens of San Antonio seemed to have forgotten about this school’s existence or its presence.

San Antonio Independent School District established San Juan School sometime during the mid-to-late 19th century. Its exact year of establishment is unknown. What is known is that San Juan School was an elementary school that was known as San Juan Elementary School and was a co-ed school. Students in grades 1 through 6 were educated here. 7th grade was added later. 

School attendance boasted a small bumbling population. Attendance rate was very high. Student enrollment never went past 300. Most of the pupils were children of Mexican descent. 70% percent of the student population was Mexican.


As early as 1884, San Juan School had faced structural problems and health concerns. A San Antonio Light newspaper article had highlighted the issue in their newspaper that year. Citizens of San Antonio were protesting against San Antonio Independent School District dumping sewage into the San Antonio River. Many of whom were upset.

“The citizens below San Antonio assembled and met at San Juan School House for the purpose of protesting against throwing the sewerage into the San Antonio River. Such interference with the health and use of the water for their household purposes.

The meeting was called to order by Captain D. M. Poor. Ed Braden was appointed Chairman, and Frank Ashley Secretary. The following named gentlemen were appointed to draft a resolution and report the same next Saturday in the San Juan School House at 3 o'clock p.m. for a protest against throwing the filth of the city into the river and that a committee meet on Thursday in the County court room at 10 o'clock a.m.”

(Ref: San Antonio Light, Page 1, Tuesday, January 29, 1884)


School attendance in the 1930s boasted a bumbling population. On average, 30 students attended this school daily. In the 1930s, San Juan School educated students in grades 1 through 6. 7th grade students attended school elsewhere.

Over 60% of the student population was Mexican by 1932. The PTA was very involved with the quality of education upon its students. Manual training and sewing were taught at this school. Boys were taught manual training while girls were taught sewing. Girls learned sewing at a young age. Girls held an intense interest in sewing. Classes in dancing were held. (Ref: San Antonio Express, February 13, 1932)

The 1940s is when 7th grade was added to the school. By the end of the 1960s, over 70% of the student population was Hispanic. Over 200 students had attended this school during that time. 7th grade classes were discontinued.

In 1952, parents complained to the school district and city council that students were being deprived and denied of outdoor activities due to air traffic and noise pollution from Brooks City Air Force Base. Students were deprived of outdoor activities by playing indoors due to air traffic. However nothing happened. The school continued classes and remained open.


San Juan School closed in 1970 after the school building was found to be too closely located within the flight path of Brooks City Air Force Base. This led students to relocated to different schools across the school district.

It was at the suggestion of Frank Tejeda of the Southside Neighborhood Association who requested the school board consider leasing San Juan Elementary School at $1 per year. San Juan Society offered to become a tenant and use the property on a lease from the school district.

San Juan Society began using this building on a lease in 1970. San Juan Society used the San Juan School building as a community center for a year with a lease of $1 a year. The San Juan Society received legal permission from the board to lease the old San Juan School building for community meetings, recreational and educational activities. San Juan School was is the third retired school in the district (SA ISD) to be leased out in 1970 for such purposes. (Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 55, August 28, 1970)

In 1971, San Juan Society requested its lease be cancelled for some apparent reason. The school district delayed the lease. However San Juan Society pulled away slowly from the lease and took business elsewhere. This left the building to sit vacant for a few years until 1975. (Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 3, February 12, 1971)

By 1975, San Antonio Express referred to the school property as improved land for sale by San Antonio Independent School District offers. The school building and property was up for sale. The building was still extant then.
(Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 3, February 18, 1975)
(Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 19, February 18, 1975)

San Antonio Independent School District sold the property to Barthold Gilbert in 1976. The school bundling was demolished in 1977. Barthold Gilbert would own this property until his death in 1981. The lot was sold to a woman named Fay A Kiln in 1982. (Ref: http://bexardata.com/property/id/eBkP3iQ4j)


Restrictions were put on the property as part of the special warranty deed issued on December 14, 1992. The pretty was not to be used for educational purposes meaning that a school could not be operated on such property. $3,000 dollars was paid to Fay A Kiln. A quorum was present. (Ref: Bear County Public Records Doc No. 2372965)

Many people have lived address over the years especially during the beginning of the 2000s. However Fay A Kiln remained on record as property owner. Many people have had their mailing address located at this location.

The school building is no longer extant. No remains of the school are left. Today Fay A Kiln owns the property. She leases the property to various people in San Antonio and of Bexar County.
(Ref: http://bexardata.com/property/id/eBkP3iQ4j)


San Juan School was located at 8630 Old Corpus Christi Road, San Antonio, Texas, US 78223. Its other known address was 8632 Old Corpus Christi Highway San Antonio, Texas, US 78223.
Today its current address is located at 8638 Old Corpus Christi Road, San Antonio, Texas, US 78223.


Berg's Mill School history long forgotten revisited.

Berg’s Mill School is one of the many forgotten schools of San Antonio and Bexar County. The Berg’s Mill School was a rural school located way out in the county in San Antonio, Texas. Not much is known about the Berg’s Mill School or its history. Many historians have not covered this school written in books. Many citizens of San Antonio seemed to have forgotten about this school’s existence or its presence.

Berg’s Mill School was constructed believably as a one room schoolhouse in the year of 1896. The one room schoolhouse was probably built as a single story structure. 1896-1897 is the first school year the Berg’s Mill School operated from. By then Berg’s Mill School was considered both as a rural school and a “county school”. This school was a co-ed school. Most of the pupils were children of Mexican descent.

Student enrollment never went past 100. School attendance boasted a bumbling small population. Despite a small bumbling population of students, attendance seemed not to be very high. School attendance in the 1930s boasted a bumbling population.

Manual training and sewing were taught at this school. Boys were taught manual training while girls were taught sewing. Girls learned sewing at a young age. Girls held an intense interest in sewing.

In 1940, Berg’s Mill School closed. In 1940 when Berg’s Mill School closed, most of its students were transferred over to schools in San Antonio Independent School District. Other students who attended Berg’s Mill School were transferred and redistricted to Harlandale ISD and Southside ISD. Berg’s Mill School pupils were then transferred to San Juan School. Berg’s Mill School closed due to the curbed growth of San Antonio growing southbound and grown in the San Juan neighborhood. Post World War II growth absorbed the population.

Today no trace of Berg’s Mill School remains. The school has been long demolished.

History of Webster School in Pontiac, Michigan explored.

Elmer Webster Elementary School (Webster School) was built in 1920. It was designed by Perkins, Fellows, & Hamilton. This school would open in 1921 and served students from Kindergarten up to 6th grade.

It was an unusual building as it had an innovative combination cafeteria located in the center of the school. An auditorium and gymnasium located in the center of the school as well. The basketball court had a stage. The building was just one story in height.

The school closed in 2006 due to low enrollment. Pontiac School District had lost students due to other school closures. The building has been vacant for more than 10 years.

Pontiac School District sold the property to developer Micah 6 Community in 2015. A neighborhood group worked out an agreement after the sale. This neighborhood group was looking at buying the building and property at the time. The reason why is because this neighborhood group was looking into preserving the history of this school.

Renovations had started in the summer of 2016. There have been plans to turn this school into a small business, garden, and playscape.

Webster School is located at 640 West Huron Street, Pontiac, Michigan, US 48341.

History of Oak Island School in San Antonio, Texas explored.

Oak Island School is one of the many forgotten schools of San Antonio and Bexar County. The school itself has somewhat of an interesting history.


Oak Island School was established in 1852 inside a church called Oak Island Methodist Church (then Oak Island Methodist Episcopal Church) organized by Reverend John Wesley DeVilbiss. The school and church were located on Oak Island Drive near where Loop 1604 and Devilbliss Lane intersect. Official provisions for this school had been instituted in 1854. 2 more teachers were hired in 1856. (Ref: Fehrenbach 1968:303)

Oak Island School was a “field school” - a school which families had established by providing a building and hiring a teacher. Most rural schools in San Antonio and Bexar County had “field schools”. At this time Oak Island School was a rural school which educated students in grades 1 through 8.

(Ref: Chipped Stone and Adobe: A Cultural Resources Assessment of the Proposed Applewhite Reservoir, Bexar County, Texas)
(Ref: http://oakislandchurch.org/history)

However it was not until 1868 did the Texas State Constitution call for a centralized state public school system. That is when Oak Island School began receiving state funding. Oak Island School was still located in the church. Classes for school were held in Oak Island Methodist Church for a while until a school could be built.


Around 1880 is when a single story wooden-frame schoolhouse was built to house the Oak Island School. This wooden-frame building was located west of Oak Island Methodist Church on Oak Island Drive.

In 1918, it was decided the old school needed to be replaced with a new 3 room school. By then Oak Island School was operated as a Bexar County School and was financed by the county. Bexar County was responsible for the finances of Oak Island School. (Ref: http://oakislandchurch.org/history)

The summer of 1919 is when Oak Island School received a new school building. Its new school building was built at a cost of $5,000. This building was a c-shaped building. (Ref: San Antonio Evening News, Page 12, Wednesday, June 11, 1919)

Oak Island School educated students in grades 1 through 10 during the 1920s. When students graduated from this school, they would attend high school in Somerset or Poteet. Some students went to Brackenridge High School and South San Antonio High School in San Antonio.

In 1926, the new school building was painted white. Extra half windows were placed above the present window's on the south of each classroom in order to give sufficient light. (Ref: Sikeston Herald, Page 11, Thursday, May 18, 1939)

Oak Island School was consolidated into Somerset ISD in 1950. The community voted to consolidate their school with Somerset which resulted in the school being shut down immediately. Oak Island School sat vacant for many years with no purpose.

Overtime the school needed much repair work done. The church could not afford to keep the school building due to maintenance costs which led to the building being torn down. Oak Island School was demolished in 1970. No trace remains of the school today.

The teacherage was rented and leased for a while but the church could not afford to maintain it. So it was sold by the church to a private owner and moved onto a private residence. (Ref: http://oakislandchurch.org/history)


Oak Island School was located near Devilbliss Lane & Oak Island Drive, San Antonio, Texas, US 78624.

Friday, October 5, 2018

What was Lucy’s Thrift Shop in Lockhart, Texas? A blast from the past!

Ever wonder what Lucy’s Thrift Shop was? You know. The building located on Borchert Loop off of Texas Highway 142 in Lockhart, Texas? Well this news article will explain a brief summary on history of what this building once was.

Lucy’s Thrift Shop was in 1966 as a grey single story square building by Harvey Schultz for his electrical business. Harvey Schultz sold the building to a female named Lucy Serrato in 1977. This building sat vacant for a couple of years before any plans were by Lucy. Lucy Serrato would eventually turn this building into a thrift shop which she would later run by herself.

Lucy Serrato converted the building into a thrift shop called Lucy's Thrift Shop in 1983. Lucy Serrato ran Lucy's Thrift Shop as she served as both CEO and founder. The building was painted a bright white color. (Ref: Lockhart Post, Page 7, Thursday, September 29, 1983)

The thrift shop closed sometime in 2006. It was abandoned in 2008. Today the building is now vacant. Its current use is unknown. Plans regarding the future of this building are unknown as well.

Lucy’s Thrift Shop is located on 1802 Borchert Loop, Lockhart, Texas, US 78644.

Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Surreal interesting history of Juno School.

Juno School was an elementary school/junior high school that served the community of Juno, Texas. It was a community school and rural school. Juno Common School District No. 4 (Juno Common School District) operated this school from 1891 to 1992.


Juno School was established in 1891 as an elementary school that was a one-room schoolhouse. Juno Common School District No. 4 (Juno Common School District) was the school district which operated this school.

Juno School had a combined enrollment of over 115 students by 1901. Instead of building separate schools by race, Juno Common School District had segregated schools in the same building. That is what was interesting about this rural school.

Many teachers at this school believed in grassroots education on a personal level. Its teachers were very much involved with its it students and how they learned.

By the 1970s, junior high school classes were discontinued and Juno School became an elementary school once again. Junior high school students would attend school in Ozona or Comstock. Some even went as far as Del Rio. The student population was 13 students at the time. The student population was 8 students on average with 10 students at the most.

First grade bilingual education became implemented at Juno School as part of a state required program. Several elementary school students from Del Rio and Juno School would learning to speak basic Spanish (Ref: Del Rio News Herald, Page 1, Wednesday, June 26, 1974)


Juno Common School District No. 4 was only common school district in Val Verde County by 1976. The County School Superintendent was in charge of the rural schools in the county. The duty of the County School Superintendent was write up the budget for the Juno Common School District. The County School Superintendent was to provide transportation for students living out in the country.
(Ref: Del Rio News Herald, Page 13, November 24, 1976)

Many residents in the area argued that it would be costly and impractical for the school district to bus its elementary school students 43 miles each day to the closest grade school at Ozona. They would have to travel two hours a day along Texas Highway 163, which sometimes is impassable when it rains. Some of the pupils attending Comstock and Juno are taken to school by bus and from more remote areas are handled by private transportation.

(Ref: Del Rio News Herald, Page 12, November 23, 1976)
(Ref: Seguin Gazette Enterprise, November 30, 1980)


In 1992, Juno Common School District was consolidated into Comstock ISD. Students would now attend Comstock School for classes. Juno School closed its doors for good in 1992 which was many decades later than most one-room schools around the state. Juno School was 101 years old when the school district dissolved. The property and school had a fence put up after closing. A lock was later installed.
(Ref: Texas Escapes, Juno Texas)

As of 2018, the property belonging to Juno School is still fenced and locked. The playground equipment has been removed.

Reviving history of Davis Airport. A forgotten airport of San Antonio, Texas.

Davis Airport is one of the many forgotten airports of San Antonio, Texas that has been long forgotten. Not much is known about this airport or its history. Not much else can be found out about this airport whether online or offline. Much of its history remains forgotten and unknown.

Davis Airport was built in 1936 where the modern day Crown Hill Park neighborhood is located today. The City of San Antonio owned the airport as it was a public airport nearly 2 miles adjacent to San Antonio International Airport.

Its runways were a small sod field built on rolling hills. The rolling hills accommodated the lower altitude. Davis Airport was considered to be out in the country by Bexar County residents. It was located north of San Antonio on I 410. Davis Airport served as an auxiliary airport for San Antonio International Airport. Sometimes airport traffic from San Antonio International Airport was diverted to Davis Airport. However that was only during rare instances.

1960 is when the City of San Antonio closed Davis Airport down and operations were merged with San Antonio International Airport. The airport was closed down to meet demands for accommodation of population growth. Construction for the Crown Hill Park neighborhood began in 1961. Construction for the Crown Hill Park neighborhood was near completion by 1963. Only one airplane hangar remained in 1963. This airplane hangar was located south where McCulloch Avenue is today.

The airplane hangar located south of the runway near I 410 was converted into a supermarket and later a store in 1964. In 1966, the building moved further north of the Loop 410 (I 410). The building was demolished sometime in the 1980s. Today no trace of Davis Airport remains.


*Loop 410 is I 410.
*The south airplane hangar was located 20 feet near I 410.

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Exploring news about the Elroy Oil Field.

Elroy Oil Field is an oil field that is located in the small community of Elroy, Texas. Elroy Oil Field is one of the few operating oil fields in Travis County and Austin next to the Santa Rita Oil Field and Oil Well on Trinity Street & 19th Street. Only a handful of oil fields in Travis County exist. Not that many oil fields in Austin or Travis County exist. 


Elroy Oil Field was built and established after oil was discovered in 1950 by Electragas, Inc. on land property owned by Martha Golden Cooper and Douglas Kay Cooper. This oil field started out as a minuscule mining and fracking operation with 2 oil wells and 2 oil tanks. Mining and fracking involves pumping huge amounts of wastewater deep underground in order to drill for oil. The oil is placed inside of oil tanks.

(Ref: Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2004)
(Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 47, Sunday, November 16, 1952)

Elroy Oil boasted a total of 6 oil tanks and 8 oil wells in 1956. Petroleum was found on the property while digging for oil in 1959. 4 wells were reportedly found to have been drilling for petroleum during oil production. (Ref: Report of Investigations, Issues 78-87)

Sometime in the 20th century is when the more oil rigs were installed. The number of oil wells and oil tanks remained the same throughout the 1960s. 8 oil wells were reportedly found on the property of Douglas Kay Cooper.

Elroy Oil Field was reduced to just down to 4 oil tanks and 7 wells by 1987. 1988 is when Elroy Oil Field was reduced even further down to just 2 oil tanks and 5 wells. Elroy Oil Field is the only oil field which still reports brine production inside of Travis County.

(Ref: Report 276  OCCURRENCE, AVAILABILITY, AND QUALITY OF GROUND WATER IN TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS)
(Ref: Report - Texas Department of Water Resources, Issue 276)


In 2011, Martha Golden Cooper sold 247 acres of land to Butler Interests LTD and to the Martin Butler Trust. Butler Interests LTD and the Martin Butler Trust have been managing the 247 acres worth of land property since then.

shalexp has reported 305 BBLs of natural oil had been produced in March 2018. The total gas production for Elroy Oil field was 40 MCF. There had been no gas production from this oil field for the year of 2018.

(Ref: https://www.shalexp.com/texas/travis-county/east-elroy-unit/815322)
(Ref: http://www.texas-drilling.com/travis-county/leases/east-elroy-unit/004137)

In April 25, 2018, Motor Sports Magazine cited that the moveable bumps at F1 Austin racetrack had something to do with seismic activity in the local area, some of which is caused by mining and fracking. Mining and fracking involves pumping huge amounts of wastewater deep underground in order to drill for oil. The oil is placed inside of oil tanks. The Elroy Oil Field is situated less than 2 miles from the track.

(Ref: https://www.motorsportmagazine.com/opinion/motogp/motogp-mutterings-grand-prix-americas)


Today Elroy Oil Field is now currently operating 15 oil wells and 5 oil tanks on 493 acres worth of land.
owned by Martha Golden Cooper and Electragas Inc. from Houston, Texas. All 15 oil rigs continue to dig for oil in the Elroy community and Travis County. Mining and fracking still continues at Elroy Oil Field.

Electragas, Inc still owns the property today along with Martha Golden Cooper, Douglas Kay Cooper, and Eileen Moore Cooper. A portion of the land tract for Elroy Oil Field is now part of the Martin Butler Trust.


Elroy Oil Field is located on Williford Lane, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.

Old Browning Hangar in Austin, Texas now revitalized and open.

An airplane hangar called the Browning Hangar in Austin, Texas has now been revitalized. For much of 2018 the old Browning Hangar was under construction. Work on revitalizing the Browning Hangar was completed in early August 2018.

Today the Browning Hangar has now been revitalized while maintaining its historic design and is now serving as a mixed use structure. As of September 2018, the hangar is now open to the public.

Browning Hangar still stands strong as 1 of the 3 remaining structures from the former Robert Mueller Municipal Airport including the control tower. Only a few airport hangars from the Robert Mueller Municipal Airport are in existence today.

Browning Hangar was once in service for the Robert Mueller Municipal Airport from 1945 to 1999. In 2000 the airplane was abandoned. Architectural Engineers Collaborative revitalized the airplane hangar in 2007. The sides and doors were removed in the same year. A protective roof cover was added. Restoration was started in 2007 and had ended in 2008. By 2017, the airplane hangar was completely open to both the public and private.

Mystery behind the house on 56 Hoy Green Acres Circle in Laurel, Mississippi.

This news article will explain some brief history regarding the house on 56 Hoy Green Acres Circle in Laurel, Mississippi. A single story house located at 56 Hoy Green Acres Circle in Laurel, Mississippi currently sits vacant and possibly abandoned. The house is covered in graffiti tags and vandalism.

This house was built in 1976 as a single story brick house of 1,367 square feet over a slab foundation. Carpet flooring came with this house. The house was built with a total of 5 rooms including a studio bedroom according to Zillow.com. Its lot size was 9,000 square feet. (Ref: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/56-Hoy-Green-Acres-Cir-Laurel-MS-39443/216744627_zpid/)

This house was built as a single family home in the Hoy Green Acres neighborhood. A majority of the houses in the Hoy Green neighborhood near Laurel Housing Authority were built in the mid-1970s specifically in the year 1976. The Hoy Green Acres neighborhood was built, planned, and plotted in 1975. This house is no exception. (Ref: https://www.spokeo.com/MS/Laurel/56-Hoy-Green-Acres-Cir)

Kevin Lyons purchased the house in 1976. Him, his family members, and relatives lived in that house for nearly 3 decades. Kevin Lyons became the owner of that house and property during the same year after he had purchased it.


When Kevin Lyons passed away in 2001, D Wintergreen took over control for property rights as part of an estate deed. D Wintergreen would take ownership of the house for a few years before putting it for auction at an estate sale.

Kenneth Lyons Jr purchased this house from an estate sale from one of his relatives on the date of 8/26/2004. It was that same date when Kenneth Lyons Jr took full ownership and rights to the property as part of an estate deed and trust deed.

According to a 2009 aerial map, the house had apparently burned in part of a mysterious fire that occurred from a house fire at 52 Hoy Acres Circle just 1 yard over. Exact causes for this fire are unknown. What is known is all that was left of the home next door was portions of brick walls and a slab foundation after the fire. This house was not as severely affected. (Ref: 2009 aerial map of Laurel, Mississippi on NETR Historic Aerials website)

Today the house is vacant and appears to be abandoned. The front lawn has overgrown grass that needs to be mowed. Parts of wiring for utilities seems to be missing. Some wiring has been scrapped by vandals. The electric meter has been destroyed by vandals.

The house is covered in graffiti tags and vandalism on the right side facing eastbound. One graffiti tag reads “HBG” in bright yellow letters and another graffiti tag read “HOY” with an arrow pointing to the ‘H’ on the right side of the house facing eastbound. The graffiti tag “HOY” is painted in a red color. Possibly reddish-brown.


Today Kenneth Lyons Jr and Shavonda Lyons own this house. D Wintergreen is named sole proprietor as part of the estate deed and trust deed. Shavonda Lyons and Kenneth Lyons Jr are its known residents.

The address for this home is 56 Hoy Green Acres Circle in Laurel, Mississippi, US 39443.

Mystery behind a single story house in Laurel, Mississippi.

This news article will explain some brief history about the single story house on 52 Hoy Green Acres Circle. What is now a just a concrete foundation on vacant land was once home to a single story brick house. Today nothing else remains besides debris and trash.

This house was built in 1978 as a single story brick house that was 1,066 square feet. The house was built over a slab foundation. No basement ever existed. The lot size was 11,250 square feet. A majority of the houses in the Hoy Green Acres neighborhood near Laurel Housing Authority were built in the mid-1970s specifically in the year 1976. This house was no exception. (Ref: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/52-Hoy-Green-Acres-Cir-Laurel-MS-39443/78029730_zpid/)

Zillow.com claims the house was last sold in June 2006 for $10. However according to the listings for Hoy Green Acres Circle on beenverified.com, the house last sold for $6,000 dollars and the property tax was $116.6 per year. This home had been owned by 8 residents according to the listing for Hoy Green Acres Circle on the Spokeo website and database.

(Ref: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/52-Hoy-Green-Acres-Cir-Laurel-MS-39443/78029730_zpid/)
(Ref: https://www.beenverified.com/property/ms/laurel/hoy-green-acres-cir-residences/)
(Ref: https://www.spokeo.com/MS/Laurel/52-Hoy-Green-Acres-Cir)


This house appeared to be in dilapidated condition due to patches on the roof according to a 2007 aerial map. It is possible the house was already abandoned by 2007. (Ref: 2007 aerial map of Laurel, Mississippi on NETR Historic Aerials website)

According to a 2009 aerial map, the house had apparently burned down to the ground in a mysterious fire. Exact causes for this fire are unknown. What is known is all that was left of this home was portions of brick walls and a slab foundation after the fire. Whatever structures left were apparently demolished during the same year. (Ref: 2009 aerial map of Laurel, Mississippi on NETR Historic Aerials website)

All that remained in 2010 was the slab foundation that was used to support this home. Scattered debris and nature now take place of the lot. Vegetation has grown over the brick walls. Debris left over from demolition still remains. Chunks of brick can be found lying around this vacant lot.

All that remains today is a slab foundation and the lot itself. A person named R. Jones currently owns the vacant lot. (Ref: https://www.spokeo.com/MS/Laurel/52-Hoy-Green-Acres-Cir)

Address for this vacant lot is 52 Hoy Green Acres Circle, Laurel, Mississippi, US 39443.

Some history of Southton School in San Antonio, explored.

Southton School was established as an elementary school in the early 1900s south of San Antonio, Texas in the Southton community on the junction of Whitney Avenue & Arkansas Avenue. The school building was established in the Southton community.

Southton School was a 1-6 school that educated elementary school grades 1 through 6. Southton School consisted of three rooms total with one teacher and two grades in each room. Both 5th grade and 6th grades were in the third room. The principal was Ms. Hays who was also one of the teachers as well. (Ref: https://devinenews.com/southton-tx-by-many-believed-to-be-haunted/)

Many of the students rode bicycles or walked to school. After 6th grade, students either finished school in Floresville ISD or East Central ISD. Ironically East Central ISD operated Southton School.  Interestingly enough there was never a Southton High School or a Southton Middle School.

Southton School was in operation through the 1960s. Around 1970 is when the school closed. Exactly when and why Southton School closed is currently unknown. The school had stopped appearing on maps by 1971. By 1973 the school building was no longer extant. (Ref: 1973 aerial map of Southton, Texas on NETR Historic Aerials website)

Some interesting history about Kreutzberg School in Boerne, Texas.

The Kreutzberg School was a one-room wood-frame building built on the Zoeller property on 20 Kreutzberg Road in 1878. Average daily attendance was 32 students. In 1898, the school expanded to add more subjects such as grammar, reading, writing, and physiology. JP Corley was the teacher in 1898. (Ref: Kendall County Historical Commission, A History of Kendall County, Texas, 1984)

During the 1905-1906 school year, Kreutzberg School had one teacher and 28 students. In 1906 the school had 30 students. Kreutzberg School served a tiny portion of Kendall County throughout much of its history. (Ref: Handbook of Texas Online, Vivian Elizabeth Smyrl, "KREUTSBERG, TX)

Kreutzberg School was also granted its own school district called Kreutzberg School District. By the early 20th century is when Kreutzberg School District operated both a white school and a colored school for African American students.

The Kreutzberg School District was divided between Boerne ISD and Kendalia School District in 1952. Kreutzberg School closed down the following year. The school was used as a community center in the 1980s. Sometime during the late 20th century is when Kreutzberg School became abandoned. Today Kreutzberg Shooting Club and Kreutzberg School share the same property.


*Kreutzberg School was also known as Kreutsberg School.

Kreutzberg School is located at the address of 20 Kreutzberg Road, Boerne, Texas, US 78006.

Short history of Curry Creek School in Kendalia, Texas.

W. B. Edge donated acreage for a school sometime in the 1800s during the 19th century. Curry Creek School was located on lower Curry's Creek in Kendalia, Texas and had operated from 1896 to 1945.

The original Curry Creek school was a one room building large enough to accommodate at least 21 students that were in the first school year listing. Water was provided by a water well and hand pump on the property. Student population never went past 30 students.

W.W. Short was the first teacher for Curry Creek School during the 1896-1897 school year. Sue E. Wright was the headmistress and head teacher in charge. Helen Wallace became the third teacher of this school in 1906. Ella Ranzau was hired as another new teacher in 1910. Leila Kate Short replaced Sue E. Wright as teacher in 1921.

Curry Creek School closed in 1945 and merged into Boerne ISD. The school closed when use of automobile transportation became cheaper and more efficient letting students attend classes in Boerne. Today the property is currently owned by a descendent of W. B. Edge.

(Ref: Boerne Star,  Edge Family reunion gives descendants a look back in time, Thursday, August 27, 2009)
(Ref: https://www.kendalia.org/kendalia/kendalia_schools/curry_creek/curry_creek.html)
(Ref: http://www.kendalia.org/kendalia/kendalia_schools/sheppard_creek/sheppard_creek.html)

History of former Del Valle Middle School in Del Valle, Texas revealed and revisited.

On the date of January 16, 1964, Edward Thomas Flow and Ruby Kieke Flow deeded land on a warranty deed to the Colorado Common School District (Now Del Valle ISD) for schools to be built on. New schools were much needed for the school district.

Another building program was passed during the 1964-1965 school year and resulted in the construction of a new junior high school and a new middle school. 1965 is when Del Valle Middle School was constructed. Del Valle Middle School opened in August 1965. Grades 6 through 8 were taught at this school.

Prior to 1965, Del Valle Middle School students and Del Valle Junior High School students were educated at the 1948 Popham School (Popham Elementary School) campus. Del Valle Junior High School and Del Valle Middle School shared the same building as Popham School prior to 1965.

Del Valle Middle School was built next to the then Del Valle Junior-Senior High School (which would later become Del Valle High School) and had shared the same campus just less than a block away. Both schools shared the Panther Fieldhouse and Cardinal Baseball Field.

Separate utilities services were such as plumbing, water taps, and electrical wiring were remodeled at Del Valle Middle School in 1986. New lights for the cafeteria and baseball field were installed 4 years later.


In 1993 when Bergstrom Airforce Base closed due to military budget cuts, Del Valle Middle School was selected as one of the 5 schools to be relocated and demolished by the Airport Noise Mitigation Program. Airport Noise Mitigation Program was initiated by Austin Bergstrom International Airport.

The Airport Noise Mitigation Program verified that Del Valle Middle School was located in the flight path of the ABIA Airport. The Airport Noise Mitigation Program required Del Valle ISD to relocate 5 to 6 of their then present schools alongside the Colorado River. These schools could not be sound proofed due to high maintenance costs and lack of funding. Also the schools would be too close to the flight path for classes to be unaffected by the noise pollution.

1996 is when the land of the 5 Del Valle ISD schools were sold to the US Government and City of Austin on a memorandum contract for grand total of $45.6 million dollars. Schools were being slowly relocated at that time.

By 1999, Bergstrom Airforce Base was converted into the now present day Austin Bergstrom International Airport (ABIA). Del Valle Middle School relocated to the location of 5500 Ross Road in 2000.

Del Valle Middle School was demolished in 2001. As part of the agreement with City of Austin and Del Valle ISD, the associated buildings pavement and building slabs would not be disturbed. This condition was made due to environmental concerns and saving on costs.


The only visible remains of Del Valle Middle School are the driveway and building slabs which are still extant today. The district offices, a couple of maintenance sheds, and Del Valle Panther Fieldhouse are the only other remaining structures left of Del Valle Middle School. Half of those buildings are in use currently. The sheds remain abandoned in a field of overgrown grass.

Del Valle ISD leases out Panther Fieldhouse and Cardinal Baseball Field to filming companies & production teams for recording movies or TV series. Del Valle ISD is still responsible for maintaining and upkeep for Panther Fieldhouse and Cardinal Baseball Field.


Del Valle Middle School was located at 2404 Shapard Lane, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.

History of Colorado Hall in Austin, Texas explored.

There is quite some interestingly complicated history of the Colorado Hall in Austin, Texas. The Colorado Hall is now home to Montopolis Friendship Community Center. Colorado Hall served as a dance hall for the Montopolis community.

A large sign over the entryway to Montopolis Friendship Community Center reads: “Colorado Hall.” One might think this building was once home to a dance hall. That is correct. However that is not only the case. The Colorado Hall was also home to Colorado School on 507 Vargas Road before being moved to Citivan Park in 1955.


History for Colorado Hall began in the early 1950s. Colorado Hall was built as a wooden building with central heating in 1951. Colorado Hall served as the Colorado School located on 507 Vargas Road where Citizen Park is located. Its windows were different from the current ones you see today. The school was painted yellow.

The land for Civitan Park was purchased by the Austin Parks and Recreation Department in 1953 after the City of Austin had annexed the Montopolis neighborhood. (Ref: Austin American Statesman, History built on history at Montopolis Friendship Community Center, Wednesday, October 11, 2017)

The first 3 grades of the Colorado White School (Colorado School) were moved to the site on Vargas Road in 1954 where Allison Elementary School and Citivan Park are located today. This was because the Colorado School was located dangerously close to Bergstrom Air Force Base. The dangers of being closely located near the Bergstrom Air Force Base runway made an unsafe learning environment. 

As cited from an Austin American-Statesman news article written by Bill Brammer from 1954, the “first three grades of the school were moved to another site about two miles away on Vargas Road.”
(Ref: Austin American-Statesman, 1954)

In 1955 when Allison Elementary School was built, students from the Colorado School were sent to attend Allison Elementary School. Colorado School was shut down immediately after construction for Allison Elementary School was completed. Colorado School and Colorado Hall were vacant by 1955. However Colorado Hall was still open and served as a community dance hall.

The Colorado Hall was moved to Citivan Park in 1955. Montopolis Friendship Community Center began using Colorado Hall in January 1956 when it was organized by the Women’s Societies of Christian Service of the Methodist Churches of Austin. The initial effort provided financial and volunteer help to the Emmanuel Methodist Church kindergarten.

They found that the Montopolis neighborhood was an area isolated from most agency services despite being served by several agencies. Montopolis was an area lacking community services.

Austin Public Schools (Austin ISD) allowed them to use the old Colorado School building where the first bilingual kindergarten program in Austin starting in 1957. Colorado School was then used as a kindergarten. A thrift store was opened adjacent to the school to finance this effort. The thrift store offered used goods to the community. Montopolis Friendship Community Center officially opened on September 6, 1957.

In addition, 2 single story World War II-era barracks were purchased for $1 in 1957 and refashioned into three rooms on the east end of Civitan Park. 2 of these buildings were indeed former barracks from military surplus.


Colorado Hall would continued to be used as a school for kindergarten until 1961. Montopolis Friendship Community Center acquired title to the school building when park property was turned over to Austin Parks and Recreation later that year. After 1961, Colorado Hall would no longer continue to house a school. The kindergarten program was moved into another building on the same property to all additions and expansion of other buildings.

Colorado Hall no longer served as a school but a dance hall and community center instead. Preteens from Allan Junior High School, O. Henry Middle School, and University Junior High School jolted the dance hall with square dancing during the 1960s. By the 1960s, Colorado Hall was a popular dance hall in the Montopolis neighborhood.

A 1,100 square foot health clinic and community room were added to the school in 1965. The health clinic was not only vital but was essential to the neighborhood of Montopolis.

Leaders Velma Miles and Oliver Sponberg led a campaign in 1982 to add more space and plumbing. They spent all of $12,500. More and more groups met at the facility after these upgrades were completed. A second building for two new classrooms was built in 1982. (Ref: http://www.mfccaustin.org/history-1.html)


The buildings that make up the center today were part of the Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle ISD) before Montopolis was annexed by Austin. Colorado Hall is now located 2 blocks away from Allison Elementary School. Today Colorado Hall is located at 403 Vargas Road, Austin, Texas, US 78741.