Showing posts with label Mixerr Reviews. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mixerr Reviews. Show all posts

Friday, November 30, 2018

Copper sediment found in Texas HHSC water supply.


On the date of 10/4/2018, an employee of Texas HHSC found copper sediment in the water coming from a water fountain. The copper sediment sample was recorded and documented on the date of 10/4/2018. It was then that an employee taped the copper sediment sample on top of said water fountain. This was an attempt to warn and inform Texas HHSC employees along with contractors about copper in their water supply coming from a particular water fountain.

Copper sediment sample from 10/4/2018.
Copper sediment sample from 10/4/2018.
Sticky notes were posted on the water fountain with the captions of “Mmm… copper” and “Can we drink this or nah”. One sticky note has a humorous remark poking fun at this situation with a caption saying “Enjoy a glass of water. Have a copper more while you’re at it”. The grammar found on those sticky notes has atrocious grammar errors.
Sticky notes with humorous remarks.
Sticky notes with humorous remarks.


















The Texas HHSC has had some major plumbing issues over the years it’s been open. However this is not surprising considering there was a rat infestation which caused a $60,000 vermin infestation last year in 2017 at the Texas HHSC building. Sewer rats were found in water pipes causing damage. (Ref: https://www.texastribune.org/2017/11/29/texas-health-regulators-overrun-several-hundred-rats/)

Any exact plans as to how the removal of copper in the Texas HHSC water supply have not been confirmed or made public yet.


Copper sediment found in a water bottle.
Copper sediment found in a water bottle.





History of Lower Balcones School in Boerne, Texas explored and examined.

Lower Balcones School was a county school operated by Kendall County Common School District in Boerne, Texas from 1890 to the 1940s. Lower Balcones School was one of the many country schools built in the United States during the late end of the 19th century. Not much is known about the Lower Balcones School or its history. This news article will explain and examine the history behind Lower Balcones School.


Lower Balcones School was built as a one-room schoolhouse built as a wooden frame building in 1890 during the 1890-1891 school year for Kendall County Common School District. Lower Balcones School was located on the Boerne Stage Road serving as the main road from Boerne to San Antonio at the time. The school building for Lower Balcones School is located next to Balcones Creek which serves as the boundary line between Kendall County and Bexar County.

The school term started in October and ended in March. The last day was usually around Memorial Day. Its school bell did not start ringing until the day after Labor Day. (Ref:https://conradsstories.com/2011/09/09/lower-balcones-school)

Kendall County Common School District was responsible for funding the school through county finances as it was for all of its schools. Grades 1 through 8 were taught at the school the first 10 years starting in the 1890-1891 school year. Grades 9 and 10 were added in 1901.

40 students attended Lower Balcones School in 1890 during the 1890-1891 school year. This school used 20 double desks which seated 2 students. All of its 40 students were in elementary grades. 41 students in grades 1 through 8 attended Lower Balcones School in 1891.


Beginning in 1901 during the 1900-1901 school year is when grades 9 and 10 were included into the school. Grades 9 and 10 were in the same room.

In 1909, the school building burned down in a fire. The school building perished afterwards. Nothing could be salvaged. This would require Kendall County Common School District to allocate funding for a new school building to be constructed. Students attended school elsewhere where they could continue classes. The fire had occurred in 1909 during the 1909-1910 school year.

A new two-room school building was established in 1910. Classes were continued in 1910 during the 1910-1911 school year. Beginning in 1911, classes for grades 9 and 10 were held in a separate room away from students in grades 1 through 8. The average daily attendance for the 1930s decade was 36 students.

It was sometime during the 1940s when Lower Balcones School was consolidated into Boerne ISD. This was due to the availability of automobiles becoming more affordable and road improvement. The advent of transportation led students to attend school in town with no further need for country schools or county schools.


Today Lower Balcones School serves as a multi-use facility by serving as Unity Church of Boerne and as a meeting hall. The meeting hall is in the other room of the school building. Unity Church of Boerne now owns the school building of Lower Balcones School.

Address for Lower Balcones School is 121 Scenic Loop Road, Boerne, Texas, US 78006.

History of the Cove School in Orange, Texas discovered.

Not much history is known about the Cove School. Information regarding Cove School is quite vague. This news article will attempt to find out the history of Cove School in Orange, Texas.


Mr. David Bland and Mrs. Bland moved to Orange, Texas in 1881. Both them and their children lived in a 1 story house. The couple saw an urgent need for a school in the community. So both of them built a school that would become the Cove School located south of Orange, Texas. Mrs. Bland began teaching again in 1881. She used a room in their house as a classroom while Cove School was being built. The school being conducted in their house was a private school. Grades 1 through 8 were educated here.

Cove School was established and opened in 1882 on land that was owned by Mr. David Bland and Mrs. Bland. This was in order to have educational facilities for children living in Orange, Texas. Mrs. Bland was its first teacher already having several years of teaching experience.  (Ref: Gateway to Texas - Orange County, page 200)

Mr. David Bland donated more land for the school in 1884. It was then that Mr.s Bland would continue to teach at Cove School for 7 years until 1891. She was succeeded by her daughter Allie Bland. D. B. McKinley was the school trustee.
(Ref: Gateway to Texas - Orange County, page 200)
(Ref: Orange County Official Public Records, Volume 1344, Page 200)

David Bland conveyed the land to Adams Bayou Community School District No. 6 of Orange County on the date of January 12, 1893. It was then that the Cove School would become part of Adams Bayou Community School District No. 6. (Ref: Orange County Official Public Records, Volume P, Page 298)

Sometime in the 1900s is when Adams Bayou Community School District No. 6 was renamed to Cove Independent School District. (Ref: Orange County Official Public Records, Volume 3, Page 593)

Paul A. Nash and his wife Sarah Thornhill Nash donated a tract of land to Cove Independent School District in 1946. Over time, more land owners would donate acres from their tracts of land to Trustees of Cove Independent School District. Grades K through 8 were served in one building.

The first Cove School building was torn down in 1947. The gym and 2 story building serving as Cove School were built and constructed in 1947. Cove School would be rebuilt again in 1954. This time the 80% of the school building was a one story building. Grades K through 8 were educated here. (Ref: http://www.wosaf.org/history.html)


In 1965 when Cove Independent School District was merged into Orange ISD to form West Orange-Cove ISD, the Cove School was closed for whatever reason.  The property was transferred from Cove Independent School District to West Orange-Cove ISD. West Orange-Cove ISD would own the property from 1965 to 1972.

West Orange-Cove ISD formed from West Orange Independent School District, Cove Independent School District, and Orange Independent School District shortly after West Orange ISD and Cove Independent School District consolidated in 1965 during the 1965–1966 school year.  The new West Orange-Cove ISD was forced to by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) absorb Orange Public Schools fka Orange ISD and operated through the City of Orange. The school district’s name upon consolidation was West Orange-Cove Independent School District. (Ref: http://www.wosaf.org/history.html)

Bosie Southern Company and Lutcher and Moore Lumber Company removed the rails of the railroad siding next along a shed southwest on the property on August 25, 1971. Moore Lumber Company removed wooden beams from said railroad. (Ref: Orange County Official Public Records, Volume 411, Page 63)

On July 12, 1972, West Orange-Cove ISD sold the property and buildings to William M. Boiter. (Ref: Orange County Official Public Records, Volume 420, Page 532)


On the date of 2/16/2007, William M. Boiter sold the land to Ruben Dorantes on a special warranty deed. The school sat vacant. (Ref: Orange County Official Public Records, Number 309865)

One the date of 1/19/2012, Ruben Dorantes sold the property to a man named Terry T. White, Sr. on a general warranty deed. Since then the school has been sitting abandoned. No further use of this school has been recorded. Ref: Orange County Official Public Records, Number 381937)


The Cove school saw at least three buildings in its duration. One built in 1882, another one built in 1947, and the other 2 built in 1954.

Cove School is located at 1220 Dupont, Orange, Texas, US 77660.

Monday, November 19, 2018

Adams School of Beaumont, Texas to be demolished.

A Pre-Bid Conference was held on Wednesday, November 14, 2018 at 9:00 A.M at the Adams School in Beaumont, Texas. All bids were opened and publicly read by City Council Chambers. The Conference was in regards to the commercial asbestos abatement, demolition, and debris removal of the 3 structures of the Adams School. City Clerk Tina Broussard says closing date for this bid is Thursday, December 6, 2018.

The Adams School is going to be demolished soon. So it may be lights out for good on the old Adams School. The gymnasium will be demolished along with the school itself.

Commercial asbestos abatement will be performed before any of the demolition process occurs as the school building was built in 1930. Any debris left will be removed and salvaged from the property. It is unknown if Beaumont ISD or City Council Chambers will keep any salvage from the debris removal.

Adams School is located at 1250 Cedar Street, Beaumont, Texas, US 77701.

History behind Creedmoor Gin Company explained.

Creedmoor Gin Company was established in 1878 as Creedmoor Co-op Gin by W. R. Davis on 110 acres of land owned by L. B. Rector. Creedmoor Co-op Gin was located on FM 1625. Creedmoor Co-op Gin was a cotton gin that served the Creedmoor community. A. D. Dye was its investor responsible for capital stocks. The business started off as a small local operation and then expanded to serve Travis County.

Creedmoor Cotton Gin was destroyed by fire on December 9, 1897. 100 tons of cotton seed and 17 bales of cotton perished in the fire. E. I. Davis and T. H. Davis reported this news to the Austin Weekly Statesman. (Ref: Austin Weekly Statesman, Page 4, Thursday, December 9, 1897)

On January 30, 1899, 110 acres were deeded to L. B. Rector by W. J. Montgomery. According to Travis County Deed Records, the John Ash tract was part of the co-op gin. Several other acres were merged or absorbed onto the property. Part of the Creedmoor Gin Company property was on the Click land which was owned by Joseph Allen Click. Creedmoor Gin Company was also known as Creedmoor Co-op Gin and Creedmoor Gin Co


Creedmoor Gin Company was incorporated on the date of February 23, 1907 with $10,000 capital stock by W. R. Davis and A. D. Dye. Creedmoor Gin Company was incorporated as a domestic for-profit corporation. (Ref: Daily Bulletin of the Manufacturers Record, Volumes 17-18)

In the year of 1919, Creedmoor Gin Company was involved in a bankruptcy case. However the cotton gin continued operations. A. D. Dye became in charge of the cotton gin and company.
(Ref: American bankruptcy reports, Volume 43)
(Ref: The Southwestern Reporter, Volume 210)

A few bankruptcies hit the cotton gin and company hard during the 20th century which slowed down business, but did not ultimately hurt W. R. Davis and A. D. Dye. Over time, several of the original structures for the original Creedmoor Gin Company were demolished excluding the ones remaining  from the 1897 fire.

In 1961, Creedmoor Gin Company closed down and the land was sold to Fannie Hunt Montgomery. On the date of 10/30/1992, Fannie Hunt Montgomery transferred the property to Lindsay Lucy Montgomery on a business quit claim deed. Lindsay Lucy Montgomery sold the property to Village of Creedmoor (City of Creedmoor) on a warranty deed on the date of 12/27/1996. (Ref: Deed Records of Travis County, 12/27/1996)


Today the only remnant left of Creedmoor Gin Company itself is a 1 story hay barn building which is now surrounded by trees, grass, and other natural vegetation. Today Village of Creedmoor (City of Creedmoor) owns the property and land. Some of the property turned into the Creedmoor Community Center & City Hall on FM 1625.

The only other remnants left are 2 barn sheds left on the Click land which today is owned by Lee Allen Click. The 2 barns serve as hay barns and storage. One barn shed has completely collapsed into the ground from overtime neglect and rural decay. The Click land is now agricultural farm land where cattle are being raised.

Much of the land has already been cleared out by TXDOT due to the construction of the SH 45 toll road located horizontally south of the property.

Creedmoor Gin Company was located at 12513 FM 1625, Creedmoor, Texas, US 78610.

World Trade Building in Port Arthur, Texas sits vacant and abandoned after suffering extensive damage from Hurricane Harvey.

After suffering extensive damage from Hurricane Harvey, the World Trade Building located at 448 Austin Avenue in Port Arthur, Texas now sits vacant and abandoned with many glass window panels missing. As of November 2018, plywood has been used to cover entrances and fill in any front windows damage by the hurricane of last year.

The World Trade Building is located at 448 Austin Avenue, Port Arthur, Texas, US 77640.

History of the Federal Building in Port Arthur, Texas.

For those who didn’t know, the locally well known “Federal Building” in Port Arthur, Texas is better known as US Post Office and Federal Building. What happened to the “Federal Building” in Port Arthur, Texas? Nobody exactly knows why or how this US Post Office building became abandoned and let it decay overtime. This news article will explain the history of the “Federal Building” in Port Arthur, Texas.


US Post Office and Federal Building was built in 1900 by Tom & Sons to serve as a post office for the public and government. James K. Taylor served as the architect. Its property is a 5,271 square foot lot. The basement was finished a year later in 1901. The construction period was from 1900 to 1903. Construction for this building was completed in 1903. This building housed government offices at point.

Historical significance of “Federal Building” is its Classical Revival architectural style. The design and construction stand out in notability the most. Its Classical Revival architecture was highly praised by NRHP officials.

US Post Office and Federal Building was admitted to the National Register of Historic Places on May 12, 1986 as #86001099. (Ref: https://nationalregisterofhistoricplaces.com/tx/jefferson/state.html)

The “Federal Building” was abandoned in 1994. Reasons why are unknown. The post office moved to a new location across town into a newer “state of the art” building.

According to a news article from Port Arthur News dating back to 2002, property of the US Post Office and Federal Building was in violation of Chapter 10 of Code of Ordinance of the CITY OF PORT ARTHUR. Excess grass, weeds, and/or brush was found growing on said property. (Ref: Port Arthur News, Page 30, Sunday, November 10, 2002)


On the date of 6/21/2008, the building was listed for sale by its owner on Zillow.com for an amount of $659,000 dollars, but later removed the building from real estate listings on the date of 3/23/2011. To set the record straight, the owner removed the building from real estate listings and not the realtor. The property has listed for sale many times over the years.

(Ref: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/500-Austin-Ave-Port-Arthur-TX-77640/2143939217_zpid/)
(Ref: https://www.loopnet.com/Property-Record/500-Austin-Avenue-Port-Arthur-TX-77640/JZH0xKi4w/Owner-Mortgage/)

On April 4, 2011 the property was put up for a minimum bid of $46,611.07 dollars in a NOTICE OF SALE listed inside The Examiner. On April 3, 2012, the property was listed yet again for bid inside The Examiner under “SHERIFF SALE April 3, 2002”. The minimum starting bid of $500 dollars and a current year value of $59,580. The property was sold to Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office later in 2012.

(Ref: The Examiner, Vol. 16, No. 6, April 21, 2011)
(Ref: The Examiner, Vol. 16, No. 52, March 15, 2012)

The property was resold to Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office again in 2013. In 2015, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office transferred and sold the property with all rights to a private owner. A private owner assumed full ownership and all rights of the property that year.

Today the building is now privately owned and still sits vacant & abandoned. No further use has been attempted or made.


The “Federal Building” aka US Post Office and Federal Building is located at 500 Austin Avenue, Port Arthur, Texas, US 77640. Its alternate address is 500 6th Street, Port Arthur, Texas, US 77640.

What happened to the Klan bookstore in Vidor, Texas?

Many wonder what had happened to Klan bookstore in Vidor, Texas. Many people state Vidor had a Klan bookstore on their main street. This news article will explain in detail what happened to the Klan bookstore in Vidor, Texas.

Vidor, Texas was the national headquarters for the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) along with Dallas, Texas, Pulaski, Tennessee, and a handful of other American cities which were home to several other klaverns.
A Klan bookstore welcomed shoppers on Main Street back when the Texas KKK (Texas Knights of the Ku Klux Klan and White Camellia Knights) was headquartered in Vidor. The Klan catered local functions at this bookstore for many years for the communities of Vidor and Beaumont. 



Vidor’s Klan bookstore opened first opened in the year of 1974 and was called & referred to as Knights of the Ku Klux Klan Bookstore. It was housed inside of a single story house that was built for a single family in 1948 owned by John Hardy. The single story house was a 1,152 square foot structure on 0.48 acres worth of land. Interiors and exteriors were constructed out of wood. Many modifications and alterations were made overtime. (Ref: Orange County Official Public Records, Volume 195, Page 699)

Prior to the structure becoming the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan Bookstore, it was a pharmacy. The building had been a burned-out pharmacy which had burned in a fire. The Vidor KKK and White Camellia Knights cleaned up the burned out pharmacy and converted it into a bookstore.

Steve Gibbs and John Hardy were the owners of the property. Ray Booker was the owner and operator of Knights of the Ku Klux Klan Bookstore. He was one of the two Grand Titans of Texas for Texas Knights of the Ku Klux Klan with Louis Beamer. Knights of the Ku Klux Klan Bookstore was an exclusive bookstore that only Ku Klux Klan members could browse or purchase from when it first opened. The general public was not permitted inside until 1976. (Ref: Patsy Sims, The Klan)


Vidor’s Klan bookstore opened to the public on June 5, 1976. This Klan bookstore was called the “Knights of the Ku Klux Klan Bookstore” and was located right next to City Hall. Only white customers were allowed. Knights of the Ku Klux Klan Bookstore was located at the address of 146 Main Street, Vidor, Texas. Its phone numbers were 409-749-7173, 409-769-7873, and 409-749-7873.
(Ref: Port Arthur News, Page 18, June 10, 1976)

It was advertised in Port Arthur News under the caption of “KNIGHTS OF THE KU KLUX KLAN Bookstore now open to the public”. (Ref: Port Arthur News, Page 26, June 5, 1976)

The building itself was painted white all around. Steps to the storefront were painted patriotic colors of red, white and blue. The building had a sign on top saying "Knights of the Ku Klux Klan Bookstore, 146 Main Street, Warehouse of Godly good!” (Ref: http://www.michaelcorcoran.net/archives/1688)

Inside the store was a booth that sold “nigger hunting” licenses for 50¢ cents. “KKK Kountry” and “Klan Kountry” signs were sold here for purchase. Books containing racist memorabilia and propaganda were sold at this bookstore. T-shirts for the price of $8 dollars were sold at a booth inside. A sign that warned “Nigger, don’t let the sun set on you in Vidor.” was placed inside the store. The Klan bookstore often had marketed racism towards blacks.

In 1978, the White Camellia Knights moved their Klan bookstore to Pasadena, Texas as a business move and after a series of legal maneuvers by the local District Attorney. There was more demand for Ku Klux Klan activity in Pasadena than there was in Vidor. Its interior was stripped of everything and its belongings moved with the Klan down to Pasadena. By 1979, the storefront had been sitting abandoned and vacant before being demolished.


John Hardy sold the property to Lillian McElroy in 1982. Lillian McElroy would own this property for 11 years. Water Necessities established their company on the property in 1982. She had the building demolished in 1985.

By 1987, the storefront was either demolished or moved. All that remained of the Klan bookstore structure were three red, white and blue steps that front the sidewalk. (Ref: http://www.michaelcorcoran.net/archives/1688)

On the date of 11/08/1993, Lillian McElroy sold the property to Larry Brewer. He was the grantee that purchased said property. (Ref: Orange County Official Public Records, Volume 924, Page 731)

A new house structure was hauled in by Larry Brewer in 2014 for his Vidor Realty Inc. real estate business. The steps were destroyed and leveled making the entrance more handicap accessible for those who are physically disabled.

Today Vidor Realty Inc. operates where the storefront of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan Bookstore was once located. Larry Brewer now owns the property.


Knights of the Ku Klux Klan Bookstore was located at 1020 North Main Street, Vidor, Texas, US 77662.

Friday, November 16, 2018

Parking lots for pet friendly hotel of Austin, Texas now in operation!

As of 2018, 2 mega-sized parking lots have now been built inside the property of Austin Bergstrom International Airport for a pet friendly hotel called Bark & Zoom. The 2 mega-sized parking lots are now in operation after much needed construction work.

Central parking in front of the main hotel building cannot accommodate the demand for need of pet friendly hotels in Austin, Texas. This resulted in the building of 5 acres worth of parking lots near the entrance of Austin Bergstrom International Airport. After many delays, their parking lots are now open for business. Bark & Zoom’s largest parking lot is located on Austin Bergstrom International Airport property.

What is interesting and unique for this pet friendly hotel is that the address for the Bark & Zoom parking lots located on the Austin Bergstrom International Airport property has an Austin address while Bark & Zoom has a Del Valle address.

Monday, November 12, 2018

What happened to freak shows? Where the freak shows went.

Freak shows and the circus were a mainstream form of entertainment during the pre-internet era. Freak shows were at their peak during the 19th century and 20th century. However these forms of entertainment and amusement would not be around forever. They soon would fall into decline while facing harsh times.

Enter into the 21st century where freak shows and the circus have been replaced with the internet and television. Modern day freak shows are on the internet. Replace the barker with the person recording the video(s), replace the tent with YouTube or Facebook, have a blog(s) or vlog(s), set up a GoFundMe account, and you’re set. The price of admission is losing your dignity, respect, and privacy. The gain is international exposure and 15 minutes of fame.

Some examples of modern day freak shows are Toddlers N Tiaras, Dr. Phil, Bizarre ER, Jerry Springer, Maury, Jeremy Kyle Show, John & Kate Plus 8, 16 & Pregnant, SNL, and The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon. Other examples of modern day freak shows are the Hartley Hooligans, Hillary Clinton, Sarah Palin, and The Kardashians.

Some people hosting freak shows have a huge martyrdom complex. It’s the glorification of martyrdom they want to receive. It gets their message out for whatever they have to say regardless of what anyone else thinks or believes. Our human culture rewards this sort of behavior and it is quite sickening. They use it for financial gains and emotional support. Freak shows thrive off drama.

To sum it all up… the freak shows have gone onto the internet and television. The internet is a modern version of the circus and so is television. What kind of life is this?

Dangers of the Zika virus in Brazil rehashed.

Did you know that there is an epidemic of the Zika virus spreading around in Brazil? 1 out of every 50 children born in Brazil today are born with the Zika virus. The Zika virus is from the airborne Zika mosquito and can be sexually transmitted. The Zika virus is like the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.

In 2015, the occurrence of Zika virus was 20 times higher than usual. Although less than 1% of infants in Brazil are born with microcephaly, the chances of them getting the Zika virus are much higher than average compared to other countries. United Nations (UN) had begged all tropical countries along the equator to make abortion legal for medical defects.

This whole Zika virus thing is scary. It remains unsafe to conceive babies for a few months after you recover from the Zika virus. Signs of contracting Zika virus are vomiting and frequent seizures. The other signs include small heads and small brains. One way to get rid of the Zika virus is to kill the kill Zika mosquitoes or insects carrying the virus in order to prevent the Zika virus. Another way is by teaching dangers of Zika virus through sexual education. Brazil is attempting to kill Zika mosquitoes in order to prevent the Zika virus from happening.

Why pro-lifers crave drama.

Pro-lifers want drama. They are martyrs. They crave the attention regardless of what is best for the child or not during pregnancy. It doesn’t matter what is best for the child. The person who gets the credit is the parent in said situation. Not the child. It’s almost abuse to the child.

A significant portion of pro-lifers have a tremendous martyrdom complex which can be considered unrealistic, irrational, and cruel by many. You see this a lot with conservative Christians and backwards extremist Islamics. Our human culture rewards this sort of behavior and it is quite sickening. They use offspring as ransom for financial gains.

More or less to them pro-lifers, it gets their message out for whatever they have to say. It’s the glorification of martyrdom they want to receive. There's already a huge lack of resources in this world as the entire planet is living in limited resources.

Finding the history about Del Valle Gin.

Not much history is known or can be found out about the Del Valle Gin Co. of Del Valle, Texas. This news article will attempt to explain the history behind Del Valle Gin Co.

Del Valle Gin Co was established by Albin Carl Jacobson sometime during the mid-to-late 19th century. It was established inside the Glenbrook subdivision of Del Valle which is located on TX 71. Del Valle Gin Co was a cotton gin that provided cotton for the Del Valle community. (Ref: Deed Records of Travis County, Volume 1950, 224)

Del Valle Gin Company competed in the agricultural business of cotton farming with other local cotton gins of Travis County. Del Valle Gin Co closed in 1957. Albin Carl Jacobson deeded the land to Milton Cockrum in February 26, 1959. (Ref: Deed Records of Travis County, Volume 2013, 107)

A portion of land from the former cotton gin located on Meldrum Road was deeded to Robbie Lee Ellis on November 11, 1972. Today nothing remains of Del Valle Gin.

(Ref: Deed Records of Travis County, Volume 4501, 1870)
(Ref: Deed Records of Travis County, Volume 5, 30)

History of Brewton Springs School in Austin, Texas rehashed.

Brewton Springs School was one of the many forgotten educational institutions of Austin/Travis County that have been long forgotten. In fact, Brewton Springs School was one of the many Travis County rural schools. As a school, Brewton Springs School operated from 1879 to 1950. Brewton Springs School was devoted to education.

Brewton Springs School was also called Bruton Springs School which that school was sometimes referred to as. Brewton Springs School went under several names over the years as its time operating as a school such as Snuff Box School, Snuff Box, and Bruton Springs School.


Brewton Springs School was established in 1879 as a 1-12 school which taught grades 1 through 12. School was taught in an old picket house located on the Allen Farm taught by Miss Annie Gambee. Miss Annie Gambee was the first teacher. Students sat on benches made of elm logs. Each bench furnished seats for 5 to 6 students. Its earliest school trustees were Herbert H. Allen, Joe Hutson, and Pate Patterson.

The school was granted its own school district in 1879. Although Brewton Springs School was within bounds of present day Eanes ISD boundaries, Brewton Springs School had its own school district called School District #50 that was not connected with Eanes School or to the Eanes School District #48 (now known as Eanes ISD) at that time.

Brewton Springs School was a completely autonomous school operated as cited in the book Eanes: Portrait of a Community. Brewton Springs School instead operated as a “county school” under Travis County Public Schools for the Travis County Common School District.

(Ref: Eanes: Portrait of a Community, Linda Vance, 1986)
(Ref: Eanes: A History of the School and Community, Linda Vance, 1976)


In 1881, the first school was built as a 15’ x 10’ foot box square building designed as a one-room schoolhouse located on the Jim Brewton farm. Hence the name Brewton Springs. The school only had one door. By 1881 Brewton Springs School had county funding and state funding allocated towards the school.
The old picket house reverted back to the Allen Farm in 1881 as part of their agreement in terms of ownership. No deeds were created. The school district gave the house back to Jack Allen.

The architectural design of the school building was built as a snuff box. Because the school was shaped similarly to a snuff box, students called the school “Snuff Box School”. However the name Snuff Box did not derive from the architecture of the school building itself.

Brewton Springs School was called the Snuff Box School during the 19th century and early to middle 20th century because so many of its students chewed tobacco and dipped snuff. That is how the name Snuff Box came about. (Ref: Lone Star Travel Guide to Texas Hill County, 2011)

Brewton Springs School was located east of Bee Cave and west of Cuernavaca Drive near Patterson Road less than 0.2 miles of the junction of Cuernavaca Drive & FM 2244. The roads were unpaved.

During its earliest years when tax funds ran low and there was not enough money to pay a teacher, students from Brewton Springs School attended school at Bee Caves School, Teck School, Cox Springs School, and Eanes School. It was only on occasion that Brewton Springs School students were sent to Bee Cave to attend the Bee Cave School.

In 1888, the State of Texas closed down Brewton Springs School because when tax funds ran low, there was not enough money to pay a teacher or 2 teachers. This was only temporary. Brewton Springs School students were sent to Bee Cave to attend the Bee Cave School until 1890. The school reopened in 1890. This time the school had 3 teachers. Enrollment was 80 students. A majority of its students were white.

A split caused by a change and shift in scholastics resulting in a small house to be built at Walnut Springs in the Walnut Springs Baptist Church. 2 houses in the school district proved to be too many. School terms were split. One term was taught half at one house and half at the other. So the school moved back to the Allen farm and away from the Jim Brewton farm. Brewton Springs School moved a series of several times during its history throughout the 19th century and 20th century.

1892 is when the Walnut Springs Baptist Church house had burned. It is unclear how the school burned. It could have been antics by local children or its students. This fire had no documentation or produced leads as to who had done it. (Ref: The Defender, 1936)

Around 1896 is when Brewton Springs School was moved to the Thomas Riley Place. At this point the school moved several times. The school district hired 3 more teachers to teach at the school.
(Ref: Eanes: Portrait of a Community, Linda Vance, 1986)
(Ref: Eanes: A History of the School and Community, Linda Vance, 1976)


Brewton Springs School was moved again in 1904. During the same year, the school was remodeled with more lumber from leftover donations. Benches were donated. 14 teachers were hired throughout the 1904-1905 school term. 34 students attended this school during the 1904-1905 school term.

Green Hudson owned a ranch and gave 5 acres of land for a school in 1922. It was at this that Brewton Springs School was moved onto Patterson Road (then Patterson Lane) near Patterson Ranch. Edna Patterson donated .02 acres of land to the school. Brewton Springs School was located on top of a hill near Patterson Ranch. Brewton Springs School was an all white school with a 97% white/caucasian student population. 2% of the student population was Mexican (Hispanic).

Brewton Springs School was a one-room schoolhouse when it was located on top of a hill near Patterson Ranch on Patterson Road. Sometime in the 1920s is when the school building was later expanded to become a two-room schoolhouse.

Even in the 1920s when most schools were 1-8 schools, Brewton Springs School was a 1-12 school unlike Eanes School were school stopped at 7th grade. From the 1920s on, Eanes School did not go beyond the 7th grade. The 1920s is when Eanes School began changing its scholastics by primarily teaching elementary school grades.

(Ref: Eanes: A History of the School and Community, Linda Vance, 1976)
(Ref: Eanes: Portrait of a Community, Linda Vance, 1986)

(From the 1920s on, Eanes School did not go beyond the 7th grade. The 1920s is when Eanes School began changing its scholastics by primarily teaching elementary school grades. 8th grade students were bussed to Allan Junior High School. Although Eanes School did not mainly go beyond the 7th grade, Eanes School still taught middle school students and high school students until 1943. After 1943, high school students attended Austin High School and Allan High School. Middle school students attended Allan Junior High School and later O. Henry Middle School. Some had remained at Eanes School as the school had taught middle school grades until 1950. Eanes ISD would continue busing its high school students to Austin ISD until 1967.)


1936 is when the school district began making plans to tear down and rebuild the then-current Brewton Springs School building. Meetings were held with the Superintendent of Travis County Public Schools. It was decided that the old log cabin school be sold to land owner Homer Teague.

In 1937, the school was torn down and rebuilt on John Teague’s property located on FM 2244 (Bee Cave Road) near Cuernavaca Drive by the Teague land. John Teague and Homer Teague moved into the old schoolhouse afterwards. The other old log cabin schoolhouse remained as a private residence on the Teague land.

While the school was being moved, classes were held in Watson Springs Baptist Church. Watson Springs Baptist Church was a single-room frame church. The church was also nicknamed “Snuff Box Church” and “Snuff Box Baptist Church” because members of the congregation used to spit tobacco juice out of the window during services. (Ref: Eanes: Portrait of a Community, Linda Vance, 1986)

By 1938, Brewton Springs School was yet again a fully functioning school with a small school district overseen by Travis County Common School District aka Travis County Public Schools. Brewton Springs School hardly ever had over 100 students. School was the only place and way students were able to take a bath and take care personal hygiene among other needs. A water well was established.


In 1948, Brewton Springs School began attempting to merge and consolidate into Eanes School District #48. Some Brewton Springs School students began attending the Eanes School. Eanes School District then operated both Eanes School and Brewton Springs School. At the time Eanes School was a 1-9 school which educated students in grades 1 through 9. (Ref: Eanes: A History of the School and Community, Linda Vance, 1976)

During that time only white families resided in the Eanes School District. Brewton Springs School was an all white school with a 100% white/caucasian student population as was Eanes School and Eanes Elementary School.

In 1949, both Brewton Springs School and its school district were consolidated into Eanes ISD under Gilmer-Aiken Law. Gilmer-Aiken Law consolidated many rural school districts, including Brewton Springs & Bee Cave, had reformed many Texas public schools. Eanes School students who wanted to continue their education past 9th grade either went to Brewton Springs School or to Allan Junior High School and Austin High School in Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD).

However Brewton Springs School continued to operate under Eanes ISD until 1950. Brewton Springs School still operated as a 1-12 school.

(Ref: Eanes: Portrait of a Community, Linda Vance, 1986)
(Ref: EISD Monthly Newsletter, Eanes School 50 Years Ago, April 1984)


1950 was the year the Travis County Schools Superintendent and State of Texas (TEA) closed down Brewton Springs School and its school district during the 1950-1951 school year. The school district itself was consolidated and abolished during the same year. Brewton Springs School shut down due to lack of enrollment. (Ref: Eanes: A History of the School and Community, Linda Vance, 1976)

Brewton Springs School was shut down by the State of Texas (TEA) due to Gilmer-Aiken Law after Bill No. 116 of the 50th legislature was passed in 1950. After Brewton Springs School shut down, its students were transferred to Eanes School. Eanes School then had 80 students. A third room to the two-room rock building of Eanes School was constructed in the same year to relieve overcrowding. Classes were now held at the Eanes School. (Ref: Eanes: A History of the School and Community, Linda Vance, 1976)

Brewton Springs School students were merged with the Eanes School and some were sent to Bee Cave School. Brewton Springs School students were sent to both Cox Springs School, Dripping Springs School, and Lago Vista School as well.

In 1950, Eanes went from being a 1-9 school that educated students in grades 1 through 9 to a 1-6 where students in grades 1 through 6 were educated. The school district surrounding Eanes School (the now Eanes Elementary School) and Brewton Springs School was considered a common school district that sent its high school students to Austin ISD. (Ref: Eanes: Portrait of a Community, Linda Vance, 1986)

1950 was the year Homer Teague and his two sons, Robert Teague and Jackson Teague, lived in the building under rough conditions. Winters and summers inside the home proved to be brutal. They would live there until they moved in 1960.

When Brewton Springs School closed in 1950, TEA condemned the school building and the water well. The water well plugged and later destroyed.


In 1960, the building was abandoned on the Teague Land next to Commons Ford Ranch. Overtime the small building became covered with vegetation. It is unknown and unclear whether or not anyone else besides the Teague family lived in the original Brewton Springs School building after consolidation with Eanes ISD whereas the other school building became a private residence.

In 1985, Robert Teague gained ownership of the property from a handwritten gift deed produced in 1942 by the wife of Homer Teague.

In 1988, the old log cabin building of Brewton Springs School was moved to the Commons Ford Metropolitan Park in the Cuernavaca neighborhood by Robert Teague. Robert Teague donated Brewton Springs School to the City of Austin as an attempt of historic preservation. No known further work or renovations were done or made to the old Brewton Springs School building after 1988.

By 1990, the former school building fell victim to rural decay. Its windows were boarded up with plywood. No other known uses were made or have been documented and recorded.

Today the 5th Brewton Springs School building sits at the entrance of Commons Ford Metropolitan Park. Its windows are boarded up with plywood. A chimney was added to the building as an extra. It is highly possible that Homer Teague built the chimney.


Although the original school building of Brewton Springs School may no longer be extant or the memories of the Brewton Springs School may have been forgotten, Brewton Springs lives on as a historic name under the street name of Bruton Springs Road located in the Cuernavaca neighborhood.

Brewton Springs School was located near FM 2244 & Cuernavaca Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78733. Brewton Springs School is now located at 614 North Commons Ford Road, Austin, Texas US 78733.

History behind Creedmoor Gin Company explained and dissected.

Creedmoor Gin Company was established in 1878 as Creedmoor Co-op Gin by W. R. Davis on 110 acres of land owned by W. J. Montgomery. Creedmoor Co-op Gin was located on FM 1625.

Creedmoor Co-op Gin was a cotton gin that served the Creedmoor community. A. D. Dye was its investor responsible for capital stocks. The business started off as a small local operation and then expanded to serve Travis County. The land was owned by W. J. Montgomery.

Creedmoor Cotton Gin was destroyed by fire on December 9, 1897. 100 tons of cotton seed and 17 bales of cotton perished in the fire. E. I. Davis reported this news to the Austin Weekly Statesman.
(Ref: Austin Weekly Statesman, Page 4, Thursday, December 9, 1897)

On January 30, 1899, 110 acres were deeded to L. B. Rector by W. J. Montgomery. According to Travis County Deed Records, the John Ash tract was part of the co-op gin. Several other acres were merged or absorbed onto the property.


Creedmoor Gin Company was incorporated on the date of February 23, 1907 with $10,000 capital stock by W. R. Davis and A. D. Dye. Creedmoor Gin Company was incorporated as a domestic for-profit corporation. (Ref: Daily Bulletin of the Manufacturers Record, Volumes 17-18)

In the year of 1919, Creedmoor Gin Company was involved in a bankruptcy case. However the cotton gin continued operations. A. D. Dye became in charge of the cotton gin and company.
(Ref: American bankruptcy reports, Volume 43)
(Ref: The Southwestern Reporter, Volume 210)

A few bankruptcies hit the cotton gin and company hard during the 20th century which slowed down business, but did not ultimately hurt W. R. Davis and A. D. Dye. Over time, several of the original structures for the original Creedmoor Gin Company were demolished excluding the ones remaining  from the 1897 fire.

In 1961, Creedmoor Gin Company closed down and the land was sold to Fannie Hunt Montgomery. On the date of 10/30/1992, Fannie Hunt Montgomery transferred the property to Lindsay Lucy Montgomery on a business quit claim deed. Lindsay Lucy Montgomery sold the property to Village of Creedmoor (City of Creedmoor) on a warranty deed on the date of 12/27/1996. (Ref: Deed Records of Travis County, 12/27/1996)

Today the only remnant left of Creedmoor Gin Company is a 1 story hay barn building which is now surrounded by trees, grass, and other natural vegetation. Today Village of Creedmoor (City of Creedmoor) owns the property. Some of the property turned into the Creedmoor Community Center on FM 1625.


Creedmoor Gin Company was located at 12513 FM 1625, Creedmoor, Texas, US 78610.

*Creedmoor Gin Company was also known as Creedmoor Co-op Gin and Creedmoor Gin Co.

History of Masterson Elementary School in Laredo, Texas revealed.

Not much history is known or can found out about the Masterson School (Masterson Elementary School) in Laredo, Texas. It appears as if Masterson School is one of the few forgotten schools of Laredo, Texas in tact. This news article will attempt to explain the history behind Masterson Elementary School.


Dr. Lawrence Wright and Norman Clark were among prominent landowners of Webb County who donated land for some of the earliest school campuses. Masterson School was established on some of that land own by them.

Masterson School was first called Johnson School aka Johnson Elementary School and was operated by Johnson Common School District. Johnson Common School District was a former common school district in south Laredo responsible for operations and funding of this school. Johnson School was located on US 83 of what was considered the outskirts of South Laredo.

In the very beginning, Johnson School only educated students in grades 1st through 6th. Grades 7th and 8th were added during the mid-20th century. However Johnson School primarily educated students in grades 1st through 7th.


However it was not long until Johnson School would be consolidated. Representatives of Johnson Common School District held meetings in regards to being consolidated into Laredo ISD at during the very beginning of the 1960s.

The beginning of United Independent School District (United ISD) grew out of a meeting May 3, 1961 at the Johnson School. (Ref: Laredo Morning Times, Things are going well for UISD, Saturday, September 25, 2010)

Attorney George Byfield served on the Laredo ISD school board. George Byfield warned representatives of the then-three common school districts (Cactus, Johnson, and Nye) of the state’s recommendation that the Laredo Independent School annex unless the common districts organized into an independent school district.
(Ref: Laredo Times, April 1 School Election Ballots To Be Impounded, March 23, 1961)

After citizens voted for Johnson Common School District to be consolidated and after the state’s recommendation, Johnson School became a part of Laredo ISD. Johnson Common School District was consolidated into Laredo ISD on April 2, 1961. (Ref: Laredo Times, Page 1, Monday, April 03, 1961)

A small portion of Johnson Common School District was consolidated into United ISD. The end result was one half of Johnson Common School District being consolidated into Laredo ISD and the other half being consolidated into United ISD.


At some point during the 20th century, Johnson School aka Johnson Elementary School was renamed to Masterson School aka Masterson Elementary School. Although this school is now known as the Masterson School, many longtime residents of Laredo refer to the school as Johnson School.

Sometime during the latter end of the 20th century is when Masterson School was abandoned by United ISD. Exactly when is unknown. Today the school is now abandoned. Some of its windows are missing.

Masterson Elementary School is located at Cielito Lindo Boulevard & US 83, Laredo, Texas, US 78046.

History of Gravel Hill School in Manor, Texas explored.

Gravel Hill School is one of the many forgotten schools of Manor and Travis County. Very little is known about the Gravel Hill School except for the fact that it was a “rural negro school”. This news article will explain the in-depth history about Gravel Hill School.


Gravel Hill School was built as a two-room schoolhouse in 1928 on 2 acres of land in Manor, Texas. Gravel Hill School was built under the 1928-1929 county budget, application number 39-H for a total cost of $2,559. The Manor community contributed $700, the public contributed $1,650, and Julius Rosenwald contributed $200. It was a two-teacher school. (Ref: 1928-1929 county budget, application number 39-H)

Gravel Hill School was a white building with small classrooms and very few windows. Conditions were often crowded. Lighting was provided by oil lamps. For the winter, heat was provided by coal heaters. Wood was used for fires. The drinking water was in buckets and barrels. Gravel Hill School had a large playground. 

The school was located south of Wilbarger Creek on Parsons Road by Parsons Meadows. The school was located west of Parsons Road. The exact address for this school is unknown.

In the beginning, Gravel Hill School only educated students in grades 1st through 7th. 8th grade students would attend school in Manor or Littig depending on what was closer to them.

Travis County Common School District (Travis County Public Schools) operated the school from 1928 to 1937. Gravel Hill School had 70 students with an average daily attendance of 50 students. The cost per year was $951 with an average of $19.81 per student per year. The 2 teachers taught school for 160 days and were paid for 8 months. Teachers often had four or more grades in one room.


Grades 8th through 11th were added in the 1930s thus making Gravel Hill School a 1-11 school. Gravel Hill School was among the 42 rural negro schools that had been established in Travis County and Austin by the mid-1930s. (Ref: Austin American-Statesman, D1, Sunday, January 11, 2015)

Students learned a lot of the same material at Gravel Hill School. “We had to study hard, and the teachers expected a lot," said Lois Earls Daniels. “It was expected that we attend school as much as possible.” (Ref: Austin American-Statesman, January 14, 2015)

In 1937, Gravel Hill School was closed and its students were sent to Manor to attend Manor ISD schools such as Manor Negro School (Manor Colored School), Clayton Vocational Institute, and Manor Colored High School. Some students attended school in Littig in schools such as Littig Negro School No. 1, Littig Negro School No. 2, and Littig High School. 

When the school closed in 1937, it became abandoned. It could have been possible that Travis County Common School District sold the building to a private owner where it became a private residence. Exactly what happened to Gravel Hill School after 1937 is unknown. Not much has been written or documented about Gravel Hill School after the school had closed.


Blue Bonnet Coop reports that the Gravel Hill School is abandoned. (Ref: https://www.bluebonnetelectric.coop/Community/News/articles/2017/Magazine-Stories/THE-OTHER-HILL-COUNTRY-Our-regional-high-points)

However according to satellite aerials of the area from 1984 provided by HistoricAerials.com, the school had been either demolished or moved to a different location. (Ref: Travis County aerial map of 1984 online at NETR Historic Aerials)


Gravel Hill School was located on Parsons Road, Manor, Texas, US 78653.

The forgotten history of Elroy High School reviewed.

Elroy High School served as a school for the Elroy School District and Colorado Common School District of Del Valle, Texas from 1901 to 1961.

Elroy High School was built and established in 1901 on FM 812 just 2 miles west of Elroy, Texas on 2 acres of land. The school was a 2 story brick house. An outbuilding was established on the west corner of the main building.

 The school was a high school for white students who completed 10th grade at the original Elroy School on Elroy Road as Elroy School only educated students in grades 1 through 10. Elroy High School taught grades 11 and 12. African American students attended Elroy Negro School or had attended school in Austin.

In the 1950s, 10th grade classes were added to the high school. Mexican student were becoming allowed to attend this high school. Some of the Mexican students came from Elroy School (Elroy White School) and Elroy Mexican School. Another outbuilding was established on the west corner of the main building.

Elroy High School was closed in 1961 and was sold to Travis County. The outbuilding was demolished in 1964. Some of the land had been machine-cleared out by then. It is exactly unknown what activities may have occurred on the property during the 1960s.

In 1982, Sara Hilgers bought the 2 acres of land. A nonprofit company called Elroy Community Library Association was established in that time period. Bricks from the old high school building were used to build Elroy Library for East Travis Gateway Library District. In 1983, the dedicated building became open to the public. (Ref: (Ref: Deed Records of Travis County, 13512 FM 812, 1/12/1983)

Today, the former Elroy High School building now serves as East Travis Gateway Library District - Elroy Library.

Elroy High School was located at 13512 FM 812, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.

*It is exactly unknown what activities may have occurred on the property between 1961 and 1982. Not much can be found through internet research.

History of Moore’s Crossing School long forgotten rehashed.

Moore’s Crossing School is one the many forgotten schools of Austin, Del Valle, and Travis County. It is one of those schools that has faded away with time and away from peoples memories. Moore’s Crossing School now only exists in county deeds and state records in an office operated the bureaucracy of Texas Government.

It is stated from Travis County Deed Records, Vol. 48: 573-574 that the Moore's sold a half-acre as a parcel of land on Onion Creek at the low water crossing to Travis County for $1 to erect a school building. That school building would become Moore’s Crossing School which was a simple wood frame building was erected by Travis County Schools after the land transfer in 1881. Members of the Moore family had donated land for a school to encourage commercial business at the crossing. (Ref: Travis County Deed Records, Volume 48, Pages 573-575)

There were no schools within walking distance of the Moore property at that time as stated from the Travis County Public Schools : The Defender Yearbook of 1936. From the years 1881 to 1909 Moore’s Crossing School was operated by Travis County Common School District. (Ref: The Defender, 1936)

Moore’s Crossing School was also used as a church during its time of operation. Of course this was after school hours. Moore’s Crossing School was used as a church from 1900 until 1904. 16 people were baptized at the church in 1900. The church broke no traditions of doing so. G.W. Stewart was pastor of Onion Creek Baptist Church in the year 1900 was a a pastor here as well. Brother R.C. McCullough was a visiting preacher. Pastor G.W. Stewart and Brother R.C. McCullough baptized many people. Moore's Crossing also supported a Methodist congregation that used the school as its meeting place.


Moore’s Crossing School served the Moore's Crossing community for nearly 30 years from 1881 to 1909. However, After 20 years of use, the at Moore's Crossing School did not meet county standards. In 1905, the Travis County Superintendent condemned the school at Moore's Crossing in the Travis County School Annual repertoire. The Moore School was looked upon with distaste as a relic of the area's past. Meetings were held at the school about future plans for use of this school.

“The Moore School is on the very edge of the district, on the very edge, indeed, of the bank of Onion Creek, which marks the boundary line. Meetings were held last year to agitate the building of a new schoolhouse near the center of the district and a special tax carried for that purpose, which, however, was defeated by a few opponents, on account of defective election retums. So, school will continue to be kept in a hulk of a house by the side of the creek The children will continue to shiver in the cold when the board shutters are opened to let in the light or to ruin their eyes in the semi-darkness when the shutters are closed to keep out the cold.”

The property returned to the Moore’s as per the original deed stipulation as stated in the Travis County Deed Records, Volume 238: 405-406 from 1905. School taxes in 1905 ranged from 10 cents to 20 cents depending on the support of the community. (Ref: Travis County Deed Records, Volume 238: Pages 405-406)

The Travis County School Annual of 1905 claims the Moore’s Crossing School was “perhaps the worst physical plant for white students in the county”. (Ref: Travis County School Annual of 1905, p. 63)


By 1909, the Moore’s Crossing School was all but abandoned. Later the Moore’s Crossing School was torn down in 1909 by Moore’s Crossing community residents. Only an outbuilding or 2 survived from the vicious demolition by local residents.

In 1910, Robert J. Moore replaced the school with a cotton gin on land he donated to W.T. Caswell. No traces of the school remained as after demolition everything was gone. Travis County Schools officials declared the school in inadequate by 1910. After Moore's Crossing School white students went to attend school at Pilot Knob (Pilot Knob Elementary School), Dry Creek School, or Elroy School off FM 812.


Today only a dilapidated outbuilding that was an outhouse for the Moore’s Crossing School survives, but exists in ruin on the Michalk property less than 1 block away from Michalk Grocery. Today the Michalk family owns the building.

Moore’s Crossing School was located at 12237 Moore’s Crossing Road, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.

History of Colorado Negro School No. 1 explored in detail.

Only so much is known and can be found out through extensive research about Colorado Negro School No. 1. This news article will attempt to explain the lost history of Colorado Negro School No. 1 in such detail. Colorado Negro School No. 1 operated from 1867 to 1950.


Colorado Negro School No. 1 (Colorado School No. 2) in 1867 after the American Civil War around the time the Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle ISD) was established. It was built as a wooden square box building located where Capitol Feed & Milling Company is located today near the junction of Thompson Lane & US 183. Colorado Negro School No. 1 educated black students in grades 1 through 7.

This school was built to serve only African American students living Austin and Del Valle. Most of the students came from both Del Valle, Montopolis, and Austin. (Ref: Austin American Statesman, p. 3, March 19, 1917)

Colorado Negro School No. 1 was also known as Colorado School No. 1 as identified on a 1932 Travis County Topographic and Road Map. (Ref: 1932 Travis County Topographic and Road Map)

During the 1934-1935 school year, Colorado School No. 1 had 36 students with one teacher educating the entire class. Average daily attendance was 21 students. School terms were six months. The cost per year was $495 with $23.57 a student each year.

In 1939, the school had faced a delayed opening as Mexican School and Negro School openings were delayed due to political issues. Not enough funding was allocated towards these schools. (Ref: The Austin American, County Schools Get Year's Work Started: Mexican and Negro School Openings Are Delayed, October 1, 1939)

In 1950, the school closed due to integration. This led the students to be transferred elsewhere. The school building was demolished in 1951 after Callahan’s Store was built on site.

Colorado Negro School No. 1 was located on Thompson Lane, Austin, Texas, US 78742.