Showing posts with label Mixerr Reviews. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mixerr Reviews. Show all posts

Saturday, June 16, 2018

2 university shootings every month recorded as new average in the United States.

There are at least 2 university shootings every single month that occur with the confines in the United States. On average, there have been 2 university shootings every month in the United States. We're already halfway into 2018, and there already have been 24 school shootings where people are hurt or killed for that matter.

A portion of all the school shootings that have occurred this year have occurred college campuses and at universities. 25% of school shootings have taken place or took place at a university or a college campus. Most school shootings occurred on school grounds involve at least one person being shot.

It is not uncommon for 2 university shootings to occur during the same month. For instance, the Norfolk State University shooting at Norfolk, Virginia during February 27, 2018 and the Mississippi Valley State University shooting incident in Itta Bena, Mississippi that happened on the same day during February 27, 2018. And let’s not forget the Alabama University shootings of March 7, 2018.

In rare cases, a university shooting can last up to 2 days. For instance, read about the Alabama University shootings of March 7, 2018 and March 8, 2018. 2 shootings were reported at Alabama University on the date of March 7, 2018.

Friday, June 15, 2018

Bob Ward and May Schmidt of Save Austin Cemeteries discover former foundations of Longview School at Longview Cemetery.

One the date of March 12, 2014, Bob Ward and May Schmidt of Save Austin Cemeteries uncovered foundations of the long lost old Longview School building where Longview School was one located. Longview School was located inside the perimeter of Longview Cemetery.

Cleanup was performed at the 5 acre cemetery and park on Saturday, March 29, 2014. There are remains of old sections of fencing that were uncovered along with the remains of the Longview School.

Save Austin Cemeteries is currently involved in a project to document, protect and preserve Longview Cemetery located inside Longview Park located in southwest Austin, Texas.The project began with a request from Save Austin’s Cemeteries very own Dale Flatt to the city to secure and define the cemetery portion of the site and develop a long term preservation plan.

Both Longview Cemetery and Longview Park were donated to the city years ago and have been part of the city park system for many years now. The cemetery portion was never adequately defined and today the boundaries were encroached upon by trails near a basketball court. The concern was inadequate protection and definition.


Longview School was established and opened in 1897 near Longview Cemetery. The school started appearing on maps in 1898. Travis County Common School District (Travis County Public Schools) operated the school from 1898 until 1922. Longview School was located where 7609 Longview Road is today. Longview School was also known as Longview Schoolhouse or Longview School House.

Although Longview School was a 1-10 school, Longview School primarily taught grades 1-8. Students left school upon graduating 10th grade. Most of its students were enrolled in grades 1 through 8.

Sadly Longview School was destroyed by a tornado in 1922. Two members of the Bargsley family were killed in the tornado. After the tornado, nothing was left of the Longview School. Longview School was never rebuilt. It was a total loss for the Longview community.

Instead of rebuilding the school, Travis County Public Schools sent its students to Manchaca School in Manchaca, Texas, St. Elmo School, or simply to Austin ISD schools.

Its foundation was the only structure remaining in 1923. Travis County Public Schools discontinued services for the school during the same year. At the same time, the school and cemetery became abandoned.

Both Longview Cemetery and Longview Park were donated to the city in 1985 and have been part of the city park system for many years now.

Patti Hansen of Travis County Historical Commission reported there were no Mexican-American schools (Mexican Schools) west of I-35. Many of the schools were north, south, and east of town. No Hispanic children are known to have attended Longview School.


Longview School and Longview Cemetery are located inside of modern day Longview Park. Today Longview Cemetery is one Austin’s forgotten cemeteries and is still one of Austin’s many cemeteries.

Longview School and Longview Cemetery are 7609 Longview Road, Austin, Texas, US 78745.

History of Creedmoor Mexican School long forgotten.

Creedmoor Mexican School is one of the many forgotten schools of Austin and Travis County. Not much is known or can be found out about the Creedmoor Mexican School. The school was operated by what is considered today as Del Valle ISD.


Creedmoor Mexican School was built and established in 1920 just 1 block near the intersection of FM 1327 & FM 1625 in Creedmoor, Texas. Address for the Creedmoor Mexican School was 12307 SH 29, Creedmoor, Texas. Creedmoor Common School District operated this school from 1920 to 1950.

Creedmoor Mexican School educated Hispanic students living in the town of Creedmoor. There was one teacher for every 20 students. There were 10 to 20 students in each classroom. Most of the students ages ranged from 7 to 12 at average. It is unknown if the school was a 1-12 school or either a 1-6 school.

In 1921 during the 1921-1922 school year, a soccer field was laid out. A field of grass was plotted around the school.


Creedmoor Mexican School was shut down in 1950 as mandated by the 1948 court case Delgado v. Bastrop ISD and Brown vs. the Board of Education decision ruling segregation in public schools illegal. LULAC brought suit against several school districts in Texas for denying Hispanic students the use of school facilities and educational services. The lawsuit claimed Hispanic students were separated and segregated from white students even though under state law they were considered "White" or "Caucasian".

A man named Stephen Richard Griffin bought the schoolhouse from Creedmoor Common School District for $11,510 dollars in 1950. Stephen Richard Griffin and his son Billie L Griffin Griffith lived in the house for more than 30 years.

By 1985, Stephen Richard Griffin was the only person recorded to be living in that house. His son had already moved out by then. 

On the date of 11/17/2005, Stephen Richard Griffin sold the house and property to Austin based CLAF CO LLC via a warranty deed. Stephen Richard Griffin moved in 2006. The house was posted to the internet using loopnet on the date of 02/06/2006. The house sat vacant from 2006 to 2007.

The house was demolished by CLAF CO LLC in 2007. All that remained by 2008 was the gravel driveway that connected to the house. Stephen Richard Griffin was the last person to have been recorded living at this residence.


Today the gravel driveway is the only remnant left of Creedmoor Mexican School remaining intact with the property along with the grass field. The house has since been removed and leveled.

Creedmoor Mexican School was located at 12307 FM 1625, Creedmoor, Texas, US 78610.

Grove Trailer Court of Austin, Texas forgotten revisited.

Grove Trailer Court is one of the many forgotten trailer parks of Austin, Texas. Not much at all is known about the Oak Grove Trailer Court. Very few Austinites know of or have whereabout of knowledge regarding Oak Grove Trailer Court itself. Only older Austinites know about this trailer park. This news article will attempt to explain the history behind Grove Trailer Court.


Grove Trailer Court was established as a trailer park in 1950 by Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. and his wife Joyce L. Grove. They both owned land that was a part of their own farmland and decided to establish a trailer park that would become Grove Trailer Court. Dr. Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. was a private practitioner from Austin, Texas. Grove Trailer Court was established at the address of 6200 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741. Which located near the intersection of Grove Drive & Montopolis Drive.

They used 11 acres out of 13.11 acres to create the trailer park. The scenic riverside view of the Colorado River made the trailer park an idea location for people to live there. Grove Trailer Court was located less than an acre away from the Colorado River.

Grove Trailer Court began show up on maps by 1956. On the 1956 topographical map for Montopolis Quadrangle, “Grove Trailer Court” appeared under the name “Trailer Park”. A gaging station appeared west of Montopolis Bridge.

The trailer park would later grow to expand up to 13.11 acres by 1961. 2 new gaging stations were installed in 1970. Grove Trailer Court grew up to expand towards 15 acres by 1973.


Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. sold the land for Grove Trailer Court to the City of Austin on the date of 5/6/1981 on a warranty deed. By agreement on the warranty deed, the city could take over the land when Vernon and his wife Joyce were deceased.

By 1994, Grove Trailer Court was demolished and discontinued due to the location being located in a 25 year floodplain. 2 times every 25 years or so, it would flood. Or at least when Austin received heavy amounts of rain. This would flood the trailer park and cause heavy amounts of damage.

The City of Austin made part of the Grove Trailer Court become the Lakeshore Park in 1995. City of Austin replanted glass plats over the roads from the former trailer park.

The road that once connected to Grove Trailer Court continued onto Montopolis Bridge. The road was called Grove Drive. Grove Drive was named after Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. and his wife Joyce L. Grove. An actual road past the trailer park connected to Montopolis Bridge.

By 2003, all 32.53 acres of the property belonging to Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. had beed demolished. The land became vacant land by 2004 as the City of Austin took control over the Estate of Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. at the time from an executor deed and a special warranty deed.


Grove Trailer Court has been mention and reported on in the Austin American-Statesman newspaper a number of times over the years. For instance in 2015 about if Spanish missions really existing in Austin. (Ref: Austin American-Statesman, Did Spanish missions really exist on Austin bluffs in 1730?, Steven Gonzales keeps an eye out for evidence in the Montopolis hills., June 25, 2015)

Today in the 21st century, Grove Trailer Court remains one of the many forgotten trailer parks of Austin, Texas. A weathered sign for the Grove Trailer Court is all that remains of this trailer park enclave.


Grove Trailer Court was located at the address of 6200 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741. Grove Trailer Court Headquarters were located at 6218 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741.

Whatever happened to Circle B Homes?

Circle B Homes has to do with the housing industry. Circle B Homes was a manufactured home sales lot located at 6610 East Ben White Boulevard in Austin, Texas from 1998 to 2006 that was owned by Sam P. Bath, Jr., and Larry Cousins. Sam P. Bath was president for Circle B Homes and Larry Cousins was a salesman for Circle B Homes.
(Ref: Austin American Statesman, Circle C, Circle B: What's in a letter?, December 8, 1999)

Some might remember the “Top Dollar on Trade'' sign out by the highway and a couple of wire palm trees by the entrance covered the front. Some might even remember seeing the pink Circle B Homes sign right outside of State Highway 71.

Circle B Homes provided a minuscule effort for the housing industry in Southeast Austin and Montopolis. Only hundreds of mobile homes were manufactured a year at Circle B Homes. Home sales is what Circle B specialized in. Circle B Homes operated under the name Circle B Mobile Homes.


In 2004 when Alvie Campbell and Julia Campbell purchased a manufactured home from Circle B Homes is what led tot he decline of the business itself. Sam P. Bath and Larry Cousins never knew ahead of time when or if they were going to close their business.

Alvie Campbell and Julia Campbell purchased a manufactured home from Circle B Homes in 2004 and had also purchased the land on which the manufactured home was located. The home was manufactured by Cavco Industries, Inc. (Cavco). This led to an arbitration agreement dispute that would last up to 45 months from 2004 to 2006.

Over the next 45 months, the Campbells pursued their claims against these defendants (Circle B Homes, Cavco, and 967 among others) by serving discovery, responding to discovery requests, and responding to dispositive motions filed by Cavco, 967, and Cottonwood. Circle B's litigation activities during that time included responding to the Campbells' discovery requests, responding to limited discovery from co-defendant Cavco, serving the Campbells with requests for disclosure. Cavco noticed two depositions that ultimately were not taken.

Alvie Campbell and Julia Campbell were subject to a valid arbitration agreement and Circle B did not waive the right to arbitration. The two depositions were not taken as noticed by a co-defendant participating in depositions of Alvie Campbell and Julia Campbell.


In August 2006, the Campbells filed suit against Circle B Homes asserting causes of action arising out of the negotiation and sale of the home and land. Specifically, the Campbells alleged causes of action for violations of the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act, breach of contract, promissory estoppel, trespass to chattel, negligence, negligence per se, common law fraud, fraud in a real estate transaction, and civil conspiracy which were among the several charges brought against them.

Circle B faced financial hardships stemming from a lawsuit in 2006. Sam P. Bath Jr. and Larry Cousins were found guilty for breach of contract and cited for violations of the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act. 2006 is when Circle B Homes closed down.


All the mobile homes and trailers that once resided at the location have now been relocated. Any permanent structures were destroyed. The only remains left are the roadways, entrance, parking lot, and sign for Circle B Homes out by TX 71 (State Highway 71).

Circle B Homes was located at 6610 East Ben White Boulevard, Austin, Texas, US 78741.

Friday, June 8, 2018

2 school shootings every day recorded as new average in the United States revisited.

There are at least 2 school shootings a day that occur with the confines in the United States. On average, there have been 2 school shootings every day in the United States. We're already halfway into 2018, and there already have been 24 school shootings where people are hurt or killed for that matter.

On average at least 2 school shootings occur 2 days out of 1 week. That’s 2 days out of a 7 day period. It is not uncommon for 2 school shootings to occur during the same day. For instance, the Alabama University shootings of March 7, 2018, the school shootings in both Jackson, Mississippi and Birmingham, Alabama that occurred on the same day of March 7, 2018, or the shootings at Norfolk, Virginia and Itta Bena, Mississippi that happened on the same day during February 27, 2018, 

Nearly all of the school shootings that have occurred this year have occurred at high school campuses more so than at college campuses or at universities. 75% of school shootings have taken place or took place at a high school campus. Most school shootings occurred on school grounds involve at least one person being shot.

In rare cases, a school shooting can last up to 2 days. For instance, read about the Alabama University shootings of March 7, 2018 and March 8, 2018. 2 shootings were reported at Alabama University on the date of March 7, 2018.

YNN reports there has been 1 school shooting every week on average for this year. Things are getting more violent with each passing year. Something has changed and NOT for the better!

History of Sunmount Developmental Center overlooked.

Sunmount Developmental Center was built in 1922 on a typical cottage plan common for institutions of that time period. Its architectural style is Classic Revival. Construction for Sunmount Developmental Center was a 2 year period from 1922 to 1924.

Sunmount Developmental Center opened up as Sunmount Veterans Administration Hospital for treatment of veterans with tuberculosis in 1924. Sunmount Veterans Administration Hospital had operated as a tuberculosis hospital from 1924 to 1965. In 1924, tuberculosis cases among veterans of World War I was extremely high. Previously many veterans had been housed by contract with the Veterans Administration in private hospitals.
(Ref: asylumprojects.org)


Sunmount Veterans Administration Hospital closed as a tuberculosis hospital in 1965. The hospital was renamed to Sunmount State School and was turned into a private hospital ending its tenure as a public hospital. (Ref: asylumprojects.org)

Sunmount State School reopened as private nonprofit facility on the date of September 1, 1965 for people with developmental disabilities as an immediate care facility for the mentally retarded. Sunmount State School started admitting patients by transfer from other State Schools in New York State on the date of September 20, 1965. Most staff, attendants, and doctors, no previous experience with the mentally retarded but the period of transitioning was smooth with much cooperation.

Dr. Oleh Wolansky was the first director of Sunmount State School. Richard L. Francis, M.D was director for the entire school. Both Dr. Oleh Wolansky and Richard L. Francis, M.D were in charge of this State School. Its medical consisted staff of 40 specialists in practically all the fields of medicine known to humankind. The school provided full rehabilitation services for the residents of any age.

The population was 511 residents in March 30, 1967. Its 511 residents consisted of 233 females and 278 males. 10% percent of the residents have been permanently placed in the community in March 10, 1967. Patients long considered to be bedridden thanks to intensive physical therapy, were now beginning to walk. By 1967, Sunmount State School was full 'open door' facility and had enjoyed excellent relations with the community. A garment textile factory was constructed in 1967. (Ref: Buffalo Times)



However it was not all good with parents of the residents that resided in this institution. There have been cases of abuse reported at Sunmount Developmental Center that have gone unsolved over the years. Abuse is a contentious issue. In many cases, cases of abuse go unsolved. Sunmount Developmental Center is no exception.

Sunmount Developmental Center suffers from a high amount of injury from staff onto residents. Staff often assaults the residents that live here. There is also a high injury rate amongst residents. Many residents aren’t adequately fed. The mentally and physically disabled go through enough on their own.

In the 1970s, a handful of cases regarding abuse appeared in newspapers such as Rochester Times, The Tribune, Buffalo Times, and Watertown Daily Times (Watertown Daily). Parents raised concern about questionable treatment practices on residents.


During an interview with Watertown Daily Times in June 1973, former resident John Boyer recalled the only  marked abuse he saw was when he lining up with his ward mates to get their teeth brushed. “When they'd line us up to brush our teeth. If anybody was talking, the attendant would come down the line slapping us all in the face." 

The routine punishments consisted of "walking the halls" by having the residents walk in a long continual line about the wards until they were quiet. Attendants would get the noisy residents "walking the halls" by having the residents walk in a long line around the wards until they were quiet. This way attendants could assure residents kept quiet.

John Boyer witnessed residents being straight-jacketed to air heaters along ward walls. Slaps to the face occurred on a monthly basis. Dental care was poor and skin infections were rampant.

In another case of abuse, the parents of Pat Burns noticed the body of their own son had questionable scars and bruises when visiting him at Sunmount State School. They began noticing scars on Pat’s neck. No official answers were ever give as to how Pat obtained scars on his neck. How the bruises got there are questionable.  "They told us Pat was not a 'fighter' and other boys picked on him." Mrs. Burns said.

The Burnses photographed their son's neck and complained to the school authorities. After his parents complained, Pat was put into isolation as administration at the school decided this was a solution. He remained in an isolation ward for an extended period of time.

Pat's parents also noticed their son had developed a fear of older men, which led Mrs. Burns to suspect he may have been abused by school attendants. They also noticed he had a fear of stairs. Now 65 years old, Pat Burns is still afraid of stairs and unable to walk down them. 
(Ref: Watertown Daily Times, Page 13, June 1973)



Doctors reported on July 20, 1972 that Sunmount State School was in dire need of a good used portable sewing machine. Richard L. Francis, M.D requested for a good sewing machine to be installed.

Richard L. Francis, M.D requested programs for mentally retarded crippled children at Sunmount State School in 1973. In 1973, programs for mentally retarded crippled children were initiated at the Sunmount State School, specifically at the “crippled ward”.

Sunmount Developmental Center has been a private nonprofit facility that has been a Medicad participant since 1975. Sunmount State School was renamed to Sunmount Developmental Center in 1976. Sunmount Developmental Center received between $70,000 and $80,000 per year for each person in 1976.

Sunmount Developmental Center later assumed the added responsibilities of coordinator of client programs by hiring more qualified staff during the 1980s.

Today the population of Sunmount Developmental Center is 105 residents. Sunmount Developmental Center receives between $80,000 and $120,000 per year for each person. Most of which is through Medicaid money.


Sunmount Developmental Center is located in Tupper Lake, New York, US.

Cases of abuse at Sunmount Developmental Center overlooked by secrecy.

There have been cases of abuse reported at Sunmount Developmental Center that have gone unsolved over the years. Abuse is a contentious issue. In many cases, cases of abuse go unsolved. However with Sunmount Developmental Center, this is no exception.

The code of silence is just part of the culture as it is at many such institutions. Secrecy is common place in private institutions. Many staff will not talk to news reporters about the issues of this institution. Secrecy and cover-ups of abuse are what plague private institutions such as Sunmount Developmental Center.

Sunmount Developmental Center suffers from a high amount of injury from staff onto residents. Staff often assaults the residents that live here. There is also a high injury rate amongst residents. Many residents aren’t adequately fed. The mentally and physically disabled go through enough on their own.


For instance, take a look at the reports of abuse below for cited examples.:

According to Adkins family and from an internal report provided to The Times by the family,
Sunmount Developmental Center resident Eddie Adkins was set upon by several staff members after he grew upset that he was not allowed to go to the bathroom. A melee soon ensued by four state four state employees punching Eddie Adkins while he was sitting on a couch.

A deaf resident nearby told state investigators that he saw four state employees punching Eddie Adkins while he was sitting on a couch. He was so disturbed that he turned his hearing aid off during the melee. The assault took place in October 2011 when the staffers took down a male resident in the dining hall.


Two former employees of the Sunmount Developmental Center were sentenced to jail stemming from an October 2013 cover-up on the date of December 6, 2016. Jessica Rice and Suzanne Decheine assaulted an 18-year-old resident and gave him a head injury, which resulted into a seizure and a concussion. Both Jessica Rice and Suzanne Decheine covered this up from their superiors.

Prosecutors said neither sought immediate medical assistance for the victim. The Justice Center alleges the trio intentionally covered up the facts and circumstances surrounding the victim’s injuries along with co-workers Jeff Defayette.

All of the employees were fired following the incident with the exception of Norton who was suspended without pay.


Sunmount Developmental Center reopened as private nonprofit facility in 1965 for people with developmental disabilities as an immediate care facility for the mentally retarded. Sunmount Developmental Center is a private nonprofit facility that has been a Medicad participant since 1975. Sunmount Developmental Center receives between $80,000 and $120,000 per year for each person. Most of which is through Medicaid money.
Sunmount Developmental Center is located in Tupper Lake, New York, US.

Bancroft Orchard in Burnaby, Canada forgotten revisited.

Bancroft Orchard was an orchard house located on 25 acres of land built in 1923. It was built without a bathroom surprisingly. A pioneer couple owned Bancroft Orchard until they were deceased. There was also a farm. An old craftsman farmhouse was found on this site.

The kitchen used to be in adjoining room towards the house. The current kitchen and a bedroom were added sometime in the 1940s. The original sink from the 1920s was added on and not salvaged.

They sold a sizable portion of land to the City of Burnaby to be used as a community park sometime during the 20th century. This park still bears numerous trees from the original orchard. They later subdivided their property to support a large housing complex. The large housing complex was built using the same colours as the old home.

Bancroft Orchard used well water until the mid-1980s. The house finally received indoor plumbing in 1984. Other buildings had been connected to plumbing by 1985.

The then-widowed wife of the Bancroft Orchard passed away in this home back in 2001. Noort Developments took control of ownership of the property in 2001. Surrounding neighborhood development and urban development made the area a desirable location. The Bancroft Orchard house was demolished in 2006.

Bancroft Orchard was located at 6801 Rumble Street, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.

Gold Dredge #8 now an active museum revisited.

An urban exploration website from Canada called uer.ca reports on their urban exploration database that Gold Dredge #8 in Fairbanks, Alaska had been converted into a museum in 2009. The abandoned buildings are now off limits due to safety reasons. The abandoned are the easy to access off limits areas. Many equipment is still scattered across the property where debris lays.
(Ref: uer.ca)

Gold Dredge #8 was used to dig for gold. Machinery and equipment for Gold Dredge #8 was built by Bethlehem Steel in Pennsylvania. However Gold Dredge #8 was shut down sometime in the 20th century for using chemicals such as cyanide and mercury. The site sat abandoned much of the early 21st century until the year 2009. In 2009, Gold Dredge #8 was converted into a museum. Few buildings were demolished since then. uer.ca made the recommendation to check it out if you're nearby.

Gold Dredge #8 is located at 1755 Old Steese Highway North, Fairbanks, Alaska, US 99712.

Short history of Hoelscher Elementary School in San Antonio, Texas overlooked.

Hoelscher Elementary School is one of the many schools of San Antonio, Texas where its history has been overlooked. This news article explores the history of Hoelscher Elementary School.


Regina Hoelscher Elementary School opened in 1961 just adjacent to Brentwood Middle School in Thompson Field. Prekindergarten classes were offered at this school. Hoelscher Elementary School was named for Regina Hoelscher who was an educator for 47 years.

During the 2000s is when Virginia Kinney served as the principal for Regina Hoelscher Elementary School. She would serve as its principal until the school closed in the spring of 2005. The school's mascot was the Little Rockets and its colors were green and white.

Edgewood Independent School District closed Hoelscher Elementary School in the spring of 2005 due to high maintenance costs. Its low declining enrollment is another factor that led to the school’s closure. At the time of the closure, Hoelscher Elementary School was a K-5 school which operated from 1961 to 2005 in the Edgewood Independent School District. 97% of the student body was Hispanic.

After Hoelscher Elementary School closed, the school merged into Brentwood Middle School to accommodate more room for class space in summer of 2006. The school district used portions of the building as office spaces.

Today the building still stands and has now been merged into Brentwood Middle School. Edgewood ISD officials now use the building as office space.

Hoelscher Elementary School is located at 1602 Thompson Pl, San Antonio, Texas, US 78226.


*[Hoelscher Elementary School is Regina Hoelscher Elementary School.]

History of Goliad School in Galveston, Texas forgotten.

Goliad School is one of the few forgotten schools of Galveston, Texas that was operated by Galveston ISD. Not very much is known about this Galveston ISD school. Its own history seems to have been forgotten.


Goliad School was built in 1890 during the 1880-1881 school year. The Goliad School would open in 1881 during the 1880-1881 school year. The 1880-1881 school year was the first school year Goliad School would operate on.

The Goliad School started appearing on topographical maps in the 1890s as “Goliad School”. Goliad School would start appearing on topographical maps for Galveston County as “Goliad School” in 1891. (Ref: Galveston County 1891 Wall Map)

Goliad School was first known as the 3rd District School before being renamed to Goliad School. Goliad School operated as an elementary school called Goliad Elementary School.


The installation of a boiler was added at Goliad school on a bid of $15,985 in 1962. A roof was installed and repaired at Goliad Elementary School in 1963. Goliad School was renamed to Morgan Elementary School sometime in the 1970s. From then on, the school would operate as Morgan Elementary School until 1978. Jewell Banks was principal of Morgan Elementary School until 1978.

A report of the education committee includes a discussion of the proposed closing of Goliad School was reported in the Galveston Daily in 1973. However nothing happened. Goliad School still continued to operate. (Ref: Galveston Daily, Page 6, Saturday, March 17, 1973)

Goliad School was deemed inferior physically and academically by the Galveston ISD school board in 1975. The school was replaced in with L. A. Morgan Elementary School in the year 1975.
Goliad School was 94% black before closing. Racial imbalance is why Goliad School closed as mandated by the Brown vs. the Board of Education decision.
(Ref: Galveston Daily, Page 2, Thursday, May 28, 1981)

Goliad School was sold at the closing end of 1978. The Galveston ISD School Board accepted the high bids for the sale of Lovenberg Junior High School and Goliad Elementary School on the night of Wednesday, December 6, 1978. Thomas J. Green, of Green's Funeral Home, had the highest bid of $62,000 for the Goliad School.
(Ref: Galveston Daily News, Page 1, Thursday, December 7, 1978)


Sometime before 1994 is when Goliad School was demolished. By 1995, all that was left was a vacant field of grass.

In 1997, Galveston Housing Authority's Hoskins Square low-cost home development/subdivision was built and developed on the old Goliad Elementary School site at 31st Street and Avenue K. Funding was through the Public Housing Assistance Corp. of the Galveston Housing Authority. Nearly 21 homes were built on the site at the one-block area.

Today nothing remains of the former Goliad School site. All remnants have been paved over and removed from vicinity.

Goliad School was located at 30th Street and Avenue L, Galveston, Texas, US 77550.

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

2 school shootings every day recorded as new average in the United States.

There are at least 2 school shootings a day that occur with the confines in the United States. On average, there have been 2 school shootings every day in the United States. We're already halfway into 2018, and there already have been 24 school shootings where people are hurt or killed for that matter.

On average at least 2 school shootings occur 2 days out of 1 week. That’s 2 days out of a 7 day period. It is not uncommon for 2 school shootings occur during the same day. For instance, the school shootings in both Jackson, Mississippi and Birmingham, Alabama that occurred on the same day of March 7, 2018 or the shootings at Norfolk, Virginia and Itta Bena, Mississippi that happened on the same day during February 27, 2018.

Nearly all of the school shootings that have occurred this year have occurred at high school campuses more so than at college campuses or at universities. 75% of school shootings have taken place or took place at a high school campus. Most school shootings occurred on school grounds involve at least one person being shot.

Most of the school shootings have taken place in states such as Alabama, California, Maryland, Florida, and Texas. Most notable cases of school shootings have taken place in states such as Alabama, California, Florida, Texas.

Human rights activists claim we need more gun control and stricter gun laws to prevent school shootings from happening. Human rights activists push lobbyists for more stricter gun laws. Activists argue if the gun-free zones were eliminated, then gun violence at schools would drop. However people claims flaws in that argument. 

Something has changed and NOT for the better! Things are getting more violent with each passing year.

Short history of Onion Creek School in Doss, Texas forgotten.

Onion Creek School was established and opened in 1881 in Doss, Texas just right outside of Fredericksburg, Texas. The first Onion Creek School building was in a temporary building near the stone building that served as the third Onion Creek School building. The stone building that served as the third Onion Creek School building is still standing. Onion Creek School operated in School District No. 1 as recorded in the Gillespie County Commissioners Court Minutes of 1890.

Onion Creek School was consolidated into Doss Consolidated Common School District (Doss Common School District) in 1947. The school has maintained its small student-teacher ratio well throughout the years before consolidating with Doss Common School District.

Jim Faught purchased the property in 1948. Jim Faught later sold the property to Kad Gilbert sometime during the late 20th century. During the late 20th century is when Kad Gilbert began using the property for storage. Kad Gilbert used the building for storage of hay and wood.

Today Kad Gilbert owns the building and is using the Onion Creek School building for hay storage.

Onion Creek School is located at 2053 Salt Branch Loop, Doss, Texas, US 78618.

*[Onion Creek School was never a “district school”. It operated under School District No. 1.]
*[Doss Consolidated Common School District has gone under the names of Doss Common School District and Doss Independent School District.]

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Lil Eddie plans to release his new album sometime in 2018.

We at Mixerr Reviews have an update! Updates from Lil Eddie were sent to us.

A US singer living in Japan named Lil Eddie plans to release his fifth album sometime in 2018. The album has yet to be titled. 16 tracks are expected to appear on his upcoming album. His vocal range has clearly improved since his last album, Emotional, was released in 2013. His music never disappoints. 

Since then, Lil Eddie says he has been improving his voice. Well that makes sense as he is a vocal coach for the TV show The X Factor currently. Lil Eddie also has a songwriter deal with EMI Publishing as he is a songwriter. Lil Eddie is now a Japan Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter!

[Edwin "Lil Eddie" Serrano is a singer/songwriter from the streets of Spanish Harlem in Manhattan, New York City, New York.]

Former Butter Krust Company building in Corpus Christi, Texas now up for sale!

As of May 30, 2018, the building is up for both sale and lease at a price of $1,100,000. The former Butter Krust Company now sits vacant and is owned by the City of Corpus Christi. The city is selling the land for re-development opportunities. The City of Corpus Christi is currently seeking out adaptive reuse for this old building.

Since then the city had installed CCTV monitored cameras on the premises. The city has been closely keeping an eye on this building for more than 21 years. The city keeps a close eye on this building despite vacancy.

The former Butter Krust Company building is located at 2002 Ayers Street, Corpus Christi, Texas, US 78404.

Grove Trailer Court of Austin, Texas forgotten.

Grove Trailer Court is one of the many forgotten trailer parks of Austin, Texas. Not much at all is known about the Oak Grove Trailer Court. Very few Austinites know of or have whereabout of knowledge regarding Oak Grove Trailer Court itself. Only older Austinites know about this trailer park. This news article will attempt to explain the history behind Grove Trailer Court.


Grove Trailer Court was established as a trailer park in 1950 by Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. and his wife Joyce L. Grove. They both owned land that was a part of their own farmland and decided to establish a trailer park that would become Grove Trailer Court. Grove Trailer Court was established at the address of 6200 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741. Which located near the intersection of Grove Drive & Montopolis Drive.

They used 11 acres out of 13.11 acres to create the trailer park. The scenic riverside view of the Colorado River made the trailer park an idea location for people to live there. Grove Trailer Court was located less than an acre away from the Colorado River.

Grove Trailer Court began show up on maps by 1956. On the 1956 topographical map for Montopolis Quadrangle, “Grove Trailer Court” appeared under the name “Trailer Park”. A gaging station appeared west of Montopolis Bridge.

The trailer park would later grow to expand up to 13.11 acres by 1961. 2 new gaging stations were installed in 1970. Grove Trailer Court grew up to expand towards 15 acres by 1973.


Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. sold the land for Grove Trailer Court to the City of Austin on the date of 5/6/1981 on a warranty deed.

By 1994, Grove Trailer Court was demolished and discontinued due to the location being located in a 25 year floodplain. 2 times every 25 years or so, it would flood. Or at least when Austin received heavy amounts of rain. This would flood the trailer park and cause heavy amounts of damage.

The City of Austin made part of the Grove Trailer Court become the Lakeshore Park in 1995. City of Austin replanted glass plats over the roads from the former trailer park.

The road that once connected to Grove Trailer Court continued onto Montopolis Bridge. The road was called Grove Drive. Grove Drive was named after Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. and his wife Joyce L. Grove. An actual road past the trailer park connected to Montopolis Bridge.

By 2003, all 32.53 acres of the property belonging to Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. had beed demolished. The land became vacant land by 2004 as the City of Austin took control over the Estate of Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. at the time from an executor deed and a special warranty deed.


Grove Trailer Court has been mention and reported on in the Austin American-Statesman newspaper a number of times over the years. For instance in 2015 about if Spanish missions really existing in Austin. (Ref: Austin American-Statesman, Did Spanish missions really exist on Austin bluffs in 1730?, Steven Gonzales keeps an eye out for evidence in the Montopolis hills., June 25, 2015)

Today in the 21st century, Grove Trailer Court remains one of the many forgotten trailer parks of Austin, Texas. A weathered sign for the Grove Trailer Court is all that remains of this trailer park enclave.


Grove Trailer Court was located at the address of 6200 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741. Grove Trailer Court Headquarters were located at 6218 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741.

Monday, June 4, 2018

Danville School history of New Braunfels, Texas explained.

Danville School is one of the most widely known schools of Comal County and rural New Braunfels, Texas. Nearly everyone in Comal County can recall Danville School. Danville School operated from 1863 to 1946.


Danville School is an original one-room schoolhouse built in 1863 in New Braunfels, Texas. The building is 865 square feet. The school had porches on all four sides of a 24’ x 36’ classroom. Danville School was originally established at the location of 7030 FM 482, New Braunfels, Texas, US 78132. Danville School was operated by Solms School District. (Ref: History of New Braunfels and Comal County, Texas, 1844–1946, Oscar Haas)

In the 1870s, Danville School was a 1-8 school educating students in grades 1 through 8. Students attended their first eight grades at Danville School before attending high school in New Braunfels. 

Later in the 19th century, Danville School became a 1-12 school. Although Danville School was a 1-12 school throughout its history, Danville School primarily focused on educating students in grades 1 through 8. The original one-room Danville School building was part of the original Comal Settlement area which was established in the mid-1840s.


Danville School operated until after World War II, when it was consolidated with other school districts in the area to form Comal Independent School District (then Comal Rural High School District aka Comal Rural School District) in 1956. 1956 is when Danville School shut down and was consolidated into Comal Independent School District and New Braunfels Independent School District. Students attending Danville School would now attend Comal Elementary School.

Comal Rural High School District approved and voted on November 12, 1956 to consolidate the schools of Bulverde, Danville, Davenport, Fischer, Goodwin, Mountain Valley, Sherwood and Solms to become a part of the new Comal Rural High School District.

The Danville School building and a storage shed that used to be part of the Solms School District were moved to Comal Elementary School in 1956. Those buildings are still in use today.
(Ref: New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung, Page 4,  November 14, 1996).

The school was consolidated along with Solms School District. Solms School District would no longer operate Danville School as it had for 93 years. Danville School was a 1-8 school at the time of school district consolidation. A portion of attended the New Braunfels ISD schools.

The Comal Rural High School District was renamed to Comal Independent School District in 1958. 1958 is when Danville School consolidated with Davenport School which was also consolidated into Comal Independent School District to form Comal Elementary School.

After 1958, the former Danville School building had been serving as a music room for several years since it had become obsolete for classes.


In 1989, New Braunfels Conservation Society approached New Braunfels city council about the possibility of its leasing the old Danville School building as a place to have their monthly meetings and activities. Sandy Schlameus gave a presentation of the proposed Danville School moving and restoration. 1989 is when New Braunfels Conservation Society made an effort to clean the building in an attempt of restoration.

The Danville School building was purchased at an auction in 1990 by Margaret “Margy” Waldrip at a price of $1,600 was moved to a ranch property 12 miles north of New Braunfels. It costed Margy $6,800 to move it to her property.

1990 is when the schoolhouse was restored. A clear glass window was restored along with the sink and copper countertop.2 beautifully restored oval glass front doors can be seen when entering the building. The kitchen was restored. It became the Historic Kuebler Waldrip Haus Bed and Breakfast in the same year.

(Ref: Kuebler Waldrip Haus Bed and Breakfast website)


Today Danville School is now located at 1620 Hueco Springs Loop, New Braunfels, Texas, US 78132. The Danville School retains the beautiful original wood ceiling, walls, and floor. It presently serves as Historic Kuebler Waldrip Haus Bed and Breakfast.

*[Comal Rural High School District also went under the names Comal Rural School District, Comal County Rural High School District No. 705, and Comal County Rural High School District before being renamed to Comal Independent School District in 1958.]

History of Brewton Springs School in Austin, Texas explained and explored.

Brewton Springs School was one of the many forgotten educational institutions of Austin/Travis County that have been long forgotten. In fact, Brewton Springs School was one of the many Travis County rural schools. As a school, Brewton Springs School operated from 1879 to 1950. Brewton Springs School was devoted to education.

Brewton Springs School was also called Bruton Springs School which that school was sometimes referred to as. Brewton Springs School went under several names over the years as its time operating as a school such as Snuff Box School, Snuff Box, and Bruton Springs School.


Brewton Springs School was established in 1879 as a 1-12 school which taught grades 1 through 12. School was taught in an old picket house located on the Allen Farm taught by Miss Annie Gambee. Miss Annie Gambee was the first teacher. Students sat on benches made of elm logs. Each bench furnished seats for 5 to 6 students. Its earliest school trustees were Herbert H. Allen, Joe Hutson, and Pate Patterson.

The school was granted its own school district in 1879. Although Brewton Springs School was within bounds of present day Eanes ISD boundaries, Brewton Springs School had its own school district called School District #50 that was not connected with Eanes School or to the Eanes School District #48 (now known as Eanes ISD) at that time.

Brewton Springs School was a completely autonomous school operated as cited in the book Eanes: Portrait of a Community. Brewton Springs School instead operated as a “county school” under Travis County Public Schools for the Travis County Common School District.

(Ref: Eanes: Portrait of a Community, Linda Vance, 1986)
(Ref: Eanes: A History of the School and Community, Linda Vance, 1976)


In 1881, the first school was built as a 15’ x 10’ foot box square building designed as a one-room schoolhouse located on the Jim Brewton farm. Hence the name Brewton Springs. The school only had one door. By 1881 Brewton Springs School had county funding and state funding allocated towards the school.

The architectural design of the school building was built as a snuff box. Because the school was shaped similarly to a snuff box, students called the school Snuff Box. However the name Snuff Box did not derive from the architecture of the school building itself. The name Snuff Box came about because so many of its students chewed tobacco and dipped snuff.

The old picket house reverted back to the Allen Farm in 1881 as part of their agreement in terms of ownership. No deeds were created. The school district gave the house back to Jack Allen.

As cited in the book Lone Star Travel Guide to Texas Hill County, Brewton Springs School was also known as Snuff Box. The Brewton Springs School was located east of Bee Cave. Brewton Springs School was located east of Bee Cave and west of Cuernavaca Drive near Patterson Road less than 0.2 miles of the junction of Cuernavaca Drive & FM 2244.
(Ref: Lone Star Travel Guide to Texas Hill County, 2011)

During its earliest years when tax funds ran low and there was not enough money to pay a teacher, students from Brewton Springs School attended school at Bee Caves School, Teck School, Cox Springs School, and Eanes School. It was only on occasion that Brewton Springs School students were sent to Bee Cave to attend the Bee Cave School.

In 1888, the State of Texas closed down Brewton Springs School because when tax funds ran low, there was not enough money to pay a teacher or 2 teachers. This was only temporary. Brewton Springs School students were sent to Bee Cave to attend the Bee Cave School until 1890. The school reopened in 1890. This time the school had 3 teachers. Enrollment was 80 students.

A split caused by a change and shift in scholastics resulting in a small house to be built at Walnut Springs. 2 houses in the school district proved to be too many. School terms were split. One term was taught half at one house and half at the other. So the school moved back to the Allen farm and away from the Jim Brewton farm. Brewton Springs School moved a series of several times during its history throughout the 19th century and 20th century.

1892 is when the Walnut Springs house had burned. It is unclear how the school burned. It could have been antics by local children or its students. This fire had no documentation or produced leads as to who had done it.

Around 1896 is when Brewton Springs School was moved to the Thomas Riley Place. At this point the school moved several times. The school district hired 3 more teachers to teach at the school.

(Ref: The Defender, 1936)
(Ref: Eanes: Portrait of a Community, Linda Vance, 1986)
(Ref: Eanes: A History of the School and Community, Linda Vance, 1976)


Brewton Springs School was moved again in 1904. During the same year, the school was remodeled with more lumber from leftover donations. Benches were donated. 14 teachers were hired throughout the 1904-1905 school term. 34 students attended this school during the 1904-1905 school term.

Even in the 1920s when most schools were 1-8 schools, Brewton Springs School was a 1-12 school unlike Eanes School were school stopped at 7th grade. From the 1920s on, Eanes School did not go beyond the 7th grade. The 1920s is when Eanes School began changing its scholastics by primarily teaching elementary school grades.

(From the 1920s on, Eanes School did not go beyond the 7th grade. The 1920s is when Eanes School began changing its scholastics by primarily teaching elementary school grades. 8th grade students were bussed to Allan Junior High School. Although Eanes School did not go beyond the 7th grade, Eanes School still taught middle school students and high school students until 1943. After 1943, high school students attended Austin High School and Allan High School. Middle school students attended Allan Junior High School and later O. Henry Middle School. Some had remained at Eanes School as the school had taught middle school grades until 1950.)

(Ref: Eanes: Portrait of a Community, Linda Vance, 1986)
(Ref: Eanes: A History of the School and Community, Linda Vance, 1976)


1936 is when the school district began making plans to tear down and rebuild the then-current Brewton Springs School building. Meetings were held with the Superintendent of Travis County Public Schools.

In 1937 the school was torn down and rebuilt on John Teague’s property located on FM 2244 (Bee Cave Road) near Cuernavaca Drive by Patterson Road near Patterson Ranch. Homer Teague moved into the old schoolhouse afterwards. The other old schoolhouse remained as a private residence. While the school was being moved, classes were held in Watson Springs Baptist Church. Watson Springs Baptist Church was a single-room frame church. The church was also nicknamed “Snuff Box Church” because members of the congregation used to spit tobacco juice out of the window during services.


In 1948, Brewton Springs School began attempting to merge and consolidate into Eanes School District #48. Some Brewton Springs School students began attending the Eanes School. Eanes School District then operated both Eanes School and Brewton Springs School.

In 1949, both Brewton Springs School and its school district were consolidated into Eanes ISD under Gilmer-Aiken Law. Gilmer-Aiken Law consolidated many rural school districts, including Brewton Springs & Bee Cave, had reformed many Texas public schools. Eanes School students who wanted to continue their education past 7th grade either went to Brewton Springs School or to Allan Junior High School and Austin High School in Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD). However Brewton Springs School continued to operate under Eanes ISD until 1950.

1950 was the year the Travis County Schools Superintendent and State of Texas closed down Brewton Springs School and its school district during the 1950-1951 school year. The school district itself was consolidated and abolished during the same year. Brewton Springs School students were merged with Eanes School and to Bee Cave School. Brewton Springs School students were merged to both Cox Springs School, Dripping Springs School, and Lago Vista School as well. Brewton Springs School shut down due to lack of enrollment.

In 1950, Brewton Springs School was shut down by the State of Texas due to Gilmer-Aiken Law after Bill No. 116 of the 50th legislature was passed. After Brewton Springs School shut down, its students were transferred to Eanes School. Eanes School then had 80 students. A third room to the two-room rock building of Eanes School was constructed in the same year to relieve overcrowding. Classes were now held at the Eanes School.

In 1950, Homer Teague and his two sons, Robert Teague and Jackson Teague, lived in the building under rough conditions. They would live their until they moved. In 1960, the building was abandoned on the Teague Land next to Commons Ford Ranch.

It is unknown and unclear whether or not anyone else besides the Teague family lived in the original Brewton Springs School building after consolidation with Eanes ISD whereas the other school building became a private residence.


In 1985, Robert Teague gained ownership of the property from a handwritten gift deed produced in 1942 by the wife of Homer Teague.

In 1988, the (old) 5th Brewton Springs School building was moved to the Commons Ford Metropolitan Park in the Cuernavaca neighborhood by Robert Teague. Robert Teague donated Brewton Springs School to the City of Austin as an attempt of historic preservation. No known further work or renovations were done or made to the old Brewton Springs School building after 1988.

By 1990, the former school building fell victim to rural decay. Its windows were boarded up with plywood. No use was made.

Today the 5th Brewton Springs School building sits at the entrance of Commons Ford Metropolitan Park. Its windows are boarded up with plywood. A chimney was added to the building as an extra. It is highly possible that Homer Teague built the chimney.


Although the original school building of Brewton Springs School may no longer be extant or the memories of the Brewton Springs School may have been forgotten, Brewton Springs lives on as a historic name under the street name of Bruton Springs Road located in the Cuernavaca neighborhood.

Brewton Springs School was located near FM 2244 & Cuernavaca Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78733. Brewton Springs School is now located at 614 North Commons Ford Road, Austin, Texas US 78733.

Lil Eddie plans to release new album in 2018.

A US singer living in Japan named Lil Eddie plans to release his sixth album sometime in 2018. The album has yet to be titled. His vocal range has clearly improved since his last album, Emotional, was released in 2010.

Since then, Lil Eddie says he has been improving his voice. Well that makes sense as he is a vocal coach for the TV show The X Factor currently. Lil Eddie also has a songwriter deal with EMI Publishing as he is a songwriter. Lil Eddie is now a Japan Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter!

[Edwin "Lil Eddie" Serrano is a singer/songwriter from the streets of Spanish Harlem in Brooklyn, New York.]