Showing posts with label business. Show all posts
Showing posts with label business. Show all posts

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Manda Community Center : A fine example of historic preservation done right.

From 2016 to 2017, the Friends of Manda School have begun maintenance and upkeep of the former Manda School building as an attempt of historic perseveration. Several window panels have been replaced and window screens have been added to all windows of this school. All wooden floors have been flattened and resurfaced to be up to code for building standards and code standards. Central AC heating is now connected to this building.

Every single year the Friends of Manda School clean the school building and land property by mowing the grass and terminating insects from hidden corners. Flooring has been resurfaced by volunteers from Friends of Manda School.

Every single year the Friends of Manda School hold meetings here at the Manda Community Center. Mainly meetings are about future regards of Manda Community Center and funding for historic preservation toward this building which are held by the Board of Directors for Friends of Manda School. Community functions, social gatherings, programs, and various meetings are still held inside this building. Friends of Manda School plans to keep the Manda School open as the Manda Community Center in Manda, Texas which is near the town of Manor, Texas.


Citizens from the Manda community urged commissioners from the Travis County Public Schools (Travis County Common School District) to build a schoolhouse in the Manda community in 1914. Commissioners from the Travis County Public Schools agreed to allocate funding construction of a schoolhouse in Manda, Texas.

By 1915, the Manda community voted on a one issue to construct a new school building that was during the spring of that year. Construction for the Manda School building lasted from the summer to the fall of 1915. Although the construction for the Manda School building mostly operated during the summer, it continued in the fall season. School was held in the New Sweden Lutheran Church on New Sweden Church Road during construction.


The Manda School was opened in 1916 as a two-room schoolhouse which was a single story building structure for the Manda Common School District in the settlement of Manda, Texas. Manda School was spread out into a 2 room plan incorporated in the school building structure sitting on piers. 1st grade through 12th grade were taught in this two-room schoolhouse. Manda School is the only remaining two room school house in Travis County in Austin, Texas from the 1900s era and 1910s decade.

Manda School was named after Amanda Bengtson Gustafson who was sister of the settlement’s postmaster the same year. Manda is a short diminutive for Amanda. The name Manda was shortened from the name Amanda. Many students who had attended this school had Swedish ancestry in their family background and came from Swedish families.

The Manda School eventually became known as the Manda Schoolhouse in 1916. 1916 was the same year the community of Manda, Texas was granted its own school district by the State of Texas and Travis County Public Schools which was called Manda Common School District. Manda Common School District included students from neighboring communities such as Manor, New Sweden, Littig, and Elgin.

Historians have agreed that the Manda School was the original New Sweden School building. Prior to 1916, the Manda School building was used as the New Sweden School building in the New Sweden School District. There were 32 rural school houses with similarity to the one in Manda, but the Manda Schoolhouse is the only one that remains in all of Travis County/Austin. The name New Sweden/Manda Schoolhouse has given to the school by local historians.


New Sweden School, Gregg School, Carlson School, Kimbro School, Willow Ranch School, and several other schools along with school districts were consolidated to form into the Manda Common School District in 1947. More schools and school districts were consolidated to form into the Manda Common School District.

In 1951, the Manda School contributed $20,000 towards the Travis County polio campaign and program. Half of the monetary amount of $20,000 was sent to the national foundation (Polio Foundation) which performed the research for a cure to polio. A news article from the February 01, 1951 edition of the Austin American-Statesman newspaper argued that the monetary amount the amount contributed in the drive won’t even pay their salaries.


The Manda School District was dissolved in 1960 and was divided among Manor ISD, Pflugerville ISD, and Elgin ISD. Most students who attended the Manda School were bussed to Manor ISD though due to proximity towards Manor. When Manda School District was dissolved in 1960, this permanently closed down Manda School.

1960 is the same year Manda Community Club was formed. Despite the Manda Community Club being formed the Manda School building more or less sat abandoned. Manda Community Club tried their hardest to preserve the historic Manda Schoolhouse but ultimately the organization dissolved in 1968. From 1968 on, the Manda School more or less sat abandoned with no meaningful use. The school building still stood in 1969.


Manda School slowly but surely fell into a state of disrepair. That was until the Friends of Manda School (Friendship of Manda School) decided to make the former Manda School building into a community center which would become the Manda Community Center in 2006.

Manda School is now operated and preserved by the Friends of Manda School (Friendship of Manda School). Friends of Manda School is responsible for the upkeep and maintenance of this school building. Every single year the Friends of Manda School clean the school building and land property by mowing the grass and terminating insects from hidden corners. The Manda community along with several volunteers have been restoring the Manda School building to its original condition as found decades earlier.

The Manda Community Center is a fine example of historic preservation done right. We need to urge commissioners of the Travis County Historic Commission to preserve historic buildings such as the Manda School. With help from both local citizens and volunteers, we can keep and preserve buildings such as this one. To this day, the Manda School operates as the Manda Community Center. The school building now serves as the reminder of the early settlement of Manda, Texas.


Manda School/Manda Community Center is located at 16717 Manda Carlson Road, Manor, Texas, US 78653.

Blue Banjo dubbed as one of the worst restaurants in Austin, Texas by Mixerr Reviews.

Blue Banjo has to be one of the worst restaurants in Austin, Texas. Overall, Blue Banjo is a 2/5** restaurant. The food is horrible, staff are unprofessional, and service is lagging at a rather slow pace. If you are looking for good food to eat to your desire, then Blue Banjo is not the place for you.

The staff and owners of the Blue Banjo restaurant business fail to keep up with their own schedule making it difficult to attract customers for commerce. Staff fail to keep up with their schedule making it difficult for customers to eat at the establishment during the daytime or even the nighttime. Timing in their schedule in terms of operating hours as a business is very unpredictable. It's hard to get enjoy a refreshing meal because of this. The timing for this business is off. These business practices are unprofessional.

Inconsequently the staff are rude and unprofessional. They take their own sweet time took cook or prepare a desired said meal for the customer(s). Their service is lagging at a rather slow pace as stated above.

On top of that, the food tastes horrible. The beef fajitas taste charred as if they have been burnt to a crisp. The fajitas don't taste like authentic fajitas. Ingredients for food there tasted pretty bland. Not too good. The lack of real palates made it a poor choice for a weekend lunch. Lack of decor really drives customers and business away.

The Blue Banjo restaurant is located at 3301 Steck Avenue Suite 105, Austin, Texas, US 78757.

St. Matthew’s Missionary Baptist Church history nearly long forgotten.

St. Matthew’s Missionary Baptist Church is one of the many forgotten institutions and churches of Pflugerville, Texas. Only historians and long time residents of Pflugerville know about this religious institution.

St. Matthew’s Missionary Baptist Church was organized in 1920 inside the small town of Pflugerville, Texas. A church building was constructed in 1920 at Caldwell Lane. Land was sparsely developed. The church congregation met at Pflugerville Negro School before the church was completed. Several Baptist congregations of Travis County have met here over the years.

St. Matthew’s Missionary Baptist Church had a cemetery through St. Mary Missionary Baptist Church. Some graves date back to the 1930s. Many graves appear to be unmarked. However 40 burials have been identified by the Austin Genealogical Society. St. Matthew’s Missionary Baptist Church closed in 1973 and the St. Matthew’s Missionary Baptist Church structure no longer remains

History of the Barton Springs Baptist Church in Austin, Texas nearly forgotten.

Barton Springs Baptist Church started birth out as a church in 1882 which was a wooden frame building constructed out of wood. African American citizens attended this church. Barton Springs Baptist Church served as both a church and school. The church was incorporated into the Austin City Limits in 1937. In 1945, the Barton Springs Baptist Church burned down in a fire. 1946 is the year when the church was replaced with a wooden building that sits on cinder blocks today.

Both City of Austin and Barton Springs Baptist Church began preserving the cemetery and church building in 1993. During the same year the city of Austin zoned the church as historic. Barton Springs Baptist Church became an Austin Historical Landmark in 1993.


The school that operated in this church was the St. Elmo Negro School in the St. Elmo School District.

Students who were enrolled in the St. Elmo School District attended St. Elmo School No. 2 located at 2109 Goodrich Avenue in the Barton Hills neighborhood. Grades 1st through 8th were taught at this school. Both 9th grade and 10th grade were later added during the late 19th century. But St. Elmo School No. 2 was a K-8 school overall.

St. Elmo Negro School along with the St. Elmo School District incorporated into Austin Independent School District in 1937. In 1938, the former St. Elmo Negro School became Barton Springs Baptist Church. St. Elmo Negro School is one of the last few reminders of the former St. Elmo city and community. Today St. Elmo Negro School is under the entity of Barton Springs Baptist Church.

The location of Barton Springs Baptist Church is 2109 Goodrich Avenue, Austin, Texas, US 78704.

Mopac toll road expected to be completed by 2019 revisited.

The Mopac toll road is expected be completed by the year 2019. By 2019, construction will have been completed and the toll road will be totally functional by then. Going directions northbound and southbound, Mopac toll road will merge in those regular lanes on Mopac Highway (Loop 1) north of the Colorado River. However due to budget cuts enacted by the Texas State Legislature, construction for the Mopac toll road has been delayed slightly. Thus moving Mopac toll road completion date to 2019.

Construction on Mopac Highway alongside Mopac toll road has been rather moving at a sluggish pace. Progress remains slow as usual. Rain weather from previous months in 2017 have delayed construction for the Mopac toll road as well other factors. Rain weather from May 2017 delayed construction the most. Construction for the Mopac toll road always begins at nighttime. The latest Mopac toll road is expected be completed by the year 2020 or at least by 2019 at most.

Pleasant Grove School history almost nearly forgotten.

Pleasant Grove School began its life as Cat Hollow School in the Cat Hollow community of Lake Travis in 1890. The Cat Hollow School lasted from 1890 to 1901. In 1901 is when the school was renamed to Pleasant Grove School. The Pleasant Grove school taught 1st grade through 7th grade. Students who wanted to continue beyond 7th grade would have to attend school in Bee Cave, Hamilton Pool, or Dripping Springs. Travis County Public Schools operated the school before Pleasant Grove was granted its own school district. By 1910 student enrollment stood at 30.

However the school building was deemed inadequate by Travis County Public Schools officials sometime during the early dawn of the 20th century. A new one needed to be built. Community leaders begged for a new schoolhouse to be built.


1916 is the year when people from the Mud community built another schoolhouse. The Cat Hollow School was for $10 dollars in 1916. Lumber was hauled from wagons that came from Lake Travis community. Lumber was hauled out from Austin. The school building was completed in 3 weeks. 1916 is the same year Pleasant Grove School was granted its own school district by the State of Texas. The name of the school district would be Pleasant Grove School District #10.

$300 dollars were donated to Pleasant Grove School in 1917. Ms. Bessie Bohman was the first teacher to teach at Pleasant Grove School for the 1917-1918 school year.  Enrollment later increased to 40 students. The average daily attendance was 35 students a day.


More students attended this school in 1921 in part to state aid funding. Pleasant Grove School received state aid from 1921 to 1936. The school was rebuilt and improved in order to meet state requirements in 1929. Several improvements were made before the Great Depression.

School enrollment declined slowly during the 1930s mostly in part due to the Great Depression. 15 students were enrolled during the 1935-1936 school year. That was a 140% drop in enrollment rate from the begging of the century. A $1,000 dollar bond was voted on by residents of the community in 1935. The school was repainted in 1936. Several repairs were made to the school building.
More improvement was made by painting the school with several coat and layers of paint.

In 1941, Pleasant Grove School was renamed to Mud School. That is when the small schoolhouse became the Mud Schoolhouse (Mud School). Mud School when it was named after the former small community of Mud, Texas. Later that year Pleasant Grove School was moved to the small community of Mud, Texas. The school was renamed to Pleasant Grove - Mud Schoolhouse in 1946. The school was rebuilt and improved in 1947.

In 1948, Pleasant Grove School and Pleasant Grove School District #10 were consolidated into the Teck Common School District and eventually later into Dripping Springs ISD in 1950.


Apparently the Pleasant Grove School building sits just inside the entrance of Pace Bend Park off of Highway 71 & FM 2344. However the school operated as a small restaurant called Moon River Bar & Grill (UMJO LLC) on 2002 Pace Bend Road North, Spicewood, Texas, US 78669 from 2002 to 2016. In January 2016, the former Pleasant Grove School building was moved relocated offsite to an unknown location. Future of the former Pleasant Grove School building remains unknown presently speaking.

History of Willow Ranch Negro School of Elgin, Texas forgotten.

Willow Ranch Negro School began life after the Willow Ranch School was established in 1890 where grades 1st through 6th were taught. The school was a one-room building that was long and narrow with many windows and the front of this building had a small front-gable. Willow Ranch Negro School also went under the name Wells School. Willow Ranch Negro School operated from 1890 to 1938.

Subjects such as Texas history, geography, writing, mathematics, and art were taught here. Students learned basic skills and elementary instruction. Much Texas history was taught inside of this school. Mainly writing, mathematics, and art were taught at Willow Ranch Negro School.

13 students were enrolled at Willow Ranch Negro School in the 1934–1935 school semester. 1 teacher taught 13 students in one room. The school remained open until 1938. In 1938, Willow Ranch Negro School and Willow Ranch School consolidated into Elgin ISD. Students were then transferred to Elgin ISD.

In 1980, St. Paul Christian Ministries bought the former Willow Ranch Negro School building from Elgin ISD. The former Willow Ranch Negro School become St. Paul Kimbro Baptist Church in 1980. 1985 is when more improvements to this church were made. The building received central AC heating. Several air condition units were placed at windows.

Today the school exists under the entity of St. Paul Kimbro Baptist Church operated by St. Paul Christian Ministries. The building is currently vacant. However the building seems to have AC units still intact at several windows.

Willow Ranch Negro School is located at 15618 Wells School Road, Elgin, Texas, US 78621.

History of the St. Elmo Negro School in Austin, Texas forgotten.

St. Elmo Negro School started life out as St. Elmo School No. 2 in the St. Elmo School District in 1882. (St. Elmo School No. 2 was St. Elmo Negro School.) The school building was located in a church that was a wooden frame building constructed out of wood. African American students who were enrolled in the St. Elmo School District attended St. Elmo School No. 2 located at 2109 Goodrich Avenue in the Barton Hills neighborhood. Grades 1st through 8th were taught at this school. Both 9th grade and 10th grade were later added during the late 19th century. St. Elmo School No. 2 was a K-8 school overall.

St. Elmo Negro School along with the St. Elmo School District incorporated into Austin Independent School District in 1937. In 1938, the former St. Elmo Negro School became Barton Springs Baptist Church. In 1945, the Barton Springs Baptist Church burned down in a fire. 1946 is the year when the church was replaced with a wooden building that sits on cinder blocks today.

Both City of Austin and Barton Springs Baptist Church began preserving the cemetery and church building in 1993. During the same year the city of Austin zoned the church as historic. Barton Springs Baptist Church became an Austin Historical Landmark in 1993.

St. Elmo Negro School is one of the last few reminders of the former St. Elmo city and community. Today St. Elmo Negro School is under the entity of Barton Springs Baptist Church.

The location of St. Elmo Negro School is 2109 Goodrich Avenue, Austin, Texas, US 78704.

Friday, September 8, 2017

Mopac toll road expected to be completed by 2019.

The Mopac toll road is expected be completed by the year 2019. By 2019, construction will have been completed and the toll road will be totally functional by then. Going directions northbound and southbound, Mopac toll road will merge in those regular lanes on Mopac Highway (Loop 1) north of the Colorado River. However due to budget cuts enacted by the Texas State Legislature, construction for the Mopac toll road has been delayed slightly. Thus moving Mopac toll road completion date to 2019.

Construction on Mopac Highway alongside Mopac toll road has been rather moving at a sluggish pace. Progress remains slow as usual. Rain weather from previous months in 2017 have delayed construction for the Mopac toll road as well other factors. May rain weather delayed construction the most. Construction for the Mopac toll road begins at nighttime. News reports that construction on Texas highways and roads move at a rather slow sluggish pace. That is nothing new. The latest Mopac toll road is expected be completed by the year 2020 or at least by 2019 at most.

Monday, September 4, 2017

Carmelita's business in Lago Vista, Texas reported to be up for sale with an update!

Carmelita Hanley started the Carmelita's business as a restaurant in the city of Lago Vista, Texas in 1995. What started as a restaurant became apartments. Carmelita's later became a bar. The bar was located on 5905 Lohman Ford Road on the same property. Carmelita's was located on one of Lago Vista’s busiest streets, Lohman Ford Road. No, Carmelita's was never a hotel.

The buildings themselves were built in 1995. The buildings themselves look much older than any buildings that would have been built in 1995. The buildings resemble buildings that were constructed and built pre-1965 based on the architectural appearance. The 2 story house at the front entrance next to Lohman Ford Road looks very similar to a pre-1965 house. In fact, the house located up front on Lohman Ford Road looks very similar to a vernacular 19th century house rather than a house that was built or constructed in 1995. 

Building units far away from Lohman Ford Road resemble units for apartments or a hotel. Those building units far away from Lohman Ford Road resemble units for an apartment complex. Carmelita's had a small town hotel feel hence the small building styled architecture.


Over the years, Carmelita Hanley leased the property and buildings to several businesses and owners such as Lago Tacos, 5905 Lohmans Ford Road LLC, Lago Music Hall, Butch Y West, Alternative Hair Solutions, Taha Custom Homes Inc., and lukepages. loopnet.com had reported this property originally sold for the price of $380,000 dollars in 2006. According to loopnet.com apparently the owner has decided to liquidate.

In 2011, Carmelita's was shut down by City of Lago Vista building code enforcement. Reasons why Carmelita's was shut down was due to poor construction and code violations. Carmelita's was cited with numerous code violations by City of Lago Vista for poor construction and several structural errors in such buildings. Some buildings were not structurally safe although floorplans were fine.

Over the years, the Carmelita's buildings sat abandoned. Rooms in several building remain vacant. There are no signs of squatters or homeless life inside these buildings. Rats have taken hostage of one building north of the 2 story house. All rooms and buildings are empty. All are vacant. In 2016, Sandy Le and Gary Hudson sold the buildings and property to a business called Taha Custom Homes Inc. which is a local business. Sandy Le abandoned everything in 2016.


As of Semptembet 2017, Carmelita's buildings and property are up for sale after being abandoned for several years to any buyers who are business owners interested in commercial property to sale or lease out. Today Carmelita’s buildings sit vacant and remain unoccupied.


•The property is zoned as commercial property by City of Lago Vista.
•Property type is retail.
•Property size is 2 acres of land. Lot size and building size are as per Travis County Appraisal District.

•Contact landlord leasing representatives Kennedy Wilson, Sandy Le, Gary Hudson, and Butch West at 512-402-7581 extension 394 for more information. Owner Carmelita Hanley can be contacted at 512-267-0611.


The location for Carmelita's was 5905 Lohman Ford Road, Lago Vista, Texas, US 78645.

Plans for former EZ's Brick Oven & Grill restaurant building remain unknown.

EZ's Brick Oven & Grill restaurant burger had closed down in January 2016 after a gas line broke resulting in uncontrollable fire. The fire did $400,000 dollars worth of damage to the restaurant building. It was a total loss. Especially for EZ's Brick Oven & Grill business owners.

It is unknown what the plans are for this building. However Austin CultureMaps has confirmed that the EZ Burger restaurant will be demolished in the near future. However that has not happened as of yet. No plans have been announced publicly as to what will happen to this building. The former EZ Burger restaurant building currently sits abandoned. Only time will tell us what happens next.

Over the course in the timespan of a year, the restaurant building has been graffitied on. Several graffiti taggers have made their mark on this building here. “No Trespassing” signs have been put up all over the restaurant. However the “No Trespassing” signs have not kept away vandals, criminals, vagrants, and taggers. Signs of homelessness and vagrancy have taken place. Trash has been scattered all over. Mail, posters, and paper lay near the door of the front entrance.

Longtime Austinites feel that they have lost an Austin icon. Still many former patrons and unsuspecting customers use their parking lot for patronage as EZ's Brick Oven & Grill is on the same commercial property along with 2 to 3 other businesses in the same commercial complex.

Summitt School history of Austin, Texas forgotten.

The history of Summitt School itself has been long forgotten having faded away with time away from people’s minds. Summitt School was one of the many schools historians never wrote a book about. Most never really heard or seen the old Summitt School.


The first Summitt School was probably built in 1875 on the Northeast corner of what is now the Balcones Research Center operated by the University of Texas at Austin. Summitt School was first built as a log cabin which served as a one room schoolhouse in the beginning of 1875. What was a one room schoolhouse eventually became a two room schoolhouse.

The Summitt School was remodeled in 1880 with a second additional room added. A second room was needed to accommodate growth. The 1880-1881 school year saw an increase in growth. The assistant teacher taught 1st grade through 4th grade. The principal taught 5th grade through 8th grade and 9th grade.

Several families donated land for this school to be built on upon. The Summers family donated the original acre of land for Summitt School. The Bell family donated of land for the Summitt School as well. (It was the custom at that time for families to donate land for schools where they were needed with the understanding that the land would be returned to them if the school was closed.)


School semesters only last 4 ½ months due to the agricultural lifestyle surrounding the area. Students had to work in the fields to plow crops during harvest season. Food had to be sold. School hours in those days went from 9 AM to 4 PM. School semesters operated on a tight schedule due to budgetary concerns.

There was not always enough money to operate on a 4 month semester schedule. Both schools had students attending 2 ½ months at Waters Park School and then 2 ½ months at Summitt School. The school year was increased 3 months at both schools later on.


Summitt School had its own school district called Summitt Common School District (Summitt School District). Schools that were zoned to the Summitt School District were Waters Park School, Summitt School, Fiskville School, and Esperanza School.
[The school districts Fiskville School District (Fiskville Common School District), Esperanza School District, and Waters Park School District were later consolidated to Summitt School District following a series of school consolidations from the 40s to the late 50s.]

The Summitt School District was a very large school district. Almost as large as Colorado Common School District, Austin ISD, Pflugerville ISD, and Round Rock ISD. The boundaries for the Summitt School District were Anderson Lane (south), Lamar Boulevard (east), Howard Lane (north), and Mountain Pacific Railroad (west).


Summitt School history itself has a less than an excellent account of history. Racism and segregation were law of the land in Texas. So the Summitt School had separate schools for white students and black students. For instance there was Summitt White School and Summitt Negro School.

•White students would attend Summitt White School located at the intersection of Burnet Road and Kramer Lane. White students would attend Austin High School after finishing 8th grade.

•Black students would attend Summitt Negro School at 3807 Adelphi Lane (near Duval Road and Burnet Road). Black students would attend Anderson High School after finishing 8th grade. (Of course both Summitt Schools taught 9th grade as well. This was depending on availability of space.)

When it came to school funding, racial segregation came into place. Texas State Legislature often gave more money to white schools than to black schools. Nonetheless both schools ran on a tight fiscal budget. The Summitt White School was more well funded than the Summitt Negro School. Negro schools got less funding than their white counterparts. Thus negro schools operated on a tighter schedule than white schools.


In 1914 the Summitt School log cabin was demolished. The Bird family donated 2 acres of land of what is now IBM property that same year. (Additional land was bought from the Bird family for a new school.) This time the school building was located at what is now the intersection of Burnet Road and Kramer Lane.

In 1915, Summitt School went from being a K-9 school to a K-8 school. If students wanted to go on to high school, they went in carpools to attend Austin ISD high schools. The Summitt School District paid their tuition.Round Rock ISD and Pflugerville ISD let high school students attend their schools for free in hopes the Summitt School District would eventually join them. 1915 is when Waters Park School was closed and consolidated with Summitt School District. The Waters Park School District consolidated with Summitt School District as well.


World War II was a period the Summitt School District was in its prime during its peak as World War II brought a lot of tax revenue to the school district and area. Summitt School Districts was one of the richest school districts in northern Travis County next to Pflugerville ISD. It was due to the high taxes paid by the Magnesium Plant during World War II.

After the Magnesium Plant property was sold to The University of Texas in 1948, tax revenue decreased and the district found it harder and harder to pay the tuition for all the students enrolled in Austin high schools.


The 1950s brought forth some new changes. Fiskville School consolidated with Summitt School District in the 1950s. Summitt School went from being a K-8 school to a K-6 school. In 1954, a new building that was a two-wing structure was opened. A 3rd wing was added that same.

A petition was finally circulated and a vote was taken on joining Austin ISD. The first vote went against joining Austin ISD. Many residents residing in the Summitt School District were afraid of much higher property taxes if they joined with Austin. The petition was recirculated and when the second vote was taken, residents voted in 1960 to become part of Austin ISD. People along the Lamar Boulevard chose to consolidate with Pflugerville ISD.

In 1960, Summitt School and Fiskville School became a part of Austin ISD. Both schools consolidated into the school district. The community pursued intense efforts to keep the school open.


In 1980, the Summitt School located at Burnet Road and Kramer Lane became a K-3 school as part of Austin ISD's desegregation plan mandated the same year as ordered by US Court. Students in grades 4th, 5th, and 6th were bussed to Webb Elementary School on East St. John's Avenue. (Webb Elementary School shares the same campus as Webb Middle School.)


1986 was a year brought forth much needed new change for both Summitt School and Austin ISD. Summitt School opened in its current facilities on September 2, 1986, as a 66,263 square-foot building complex constructed on a 14.4 acre site on 12207 Brigadoon Lane. Enrollment was 580 students. Summitt School became Summitt Elementary School in September 2, 1986. The original school name plate was brought over from the old Summitt School and placed it in the new entrance hall of Summitt Elementary School.


An additional eight classroom wing was constructed during 1990. In the 1990-1991 school year, grades 4th, 5th, and 6th were brought back. 4th grade and 5th grade were brought back first. By 1990, the Summitt School was deemed outmoded and outdated by Austin ISD officials. The school had no central heating system. Though it continued use as an alternative school.

In 2003, the Summitt School at Burnet Road and Kramer Lane was demolished. In 2004, all of what was left of the former school building was gravel in a vacant green field. In the year of 2008, land property of the Summitt School at Burnet Road and Kramer Lane was built as a shopping center, Firehouse Subs, and a Freebirds restaurant.

Today the history of Summitt School lives on at 12207 Brigadoon Lane, Austin, Texas, US 78727 for where it is located at.

Saturday, August 26, 2017

How vocalist Patsy Cline set the standard for women artists in country music.

In America's prosperous year of 1957, female country musician vocalist Patsy Cline set a new standard for women artists in country music. Patsy Cline influenced women in country music such as Reba McEntire, Loretta Lynn, Dottie West, Abra Moore, and many other female vocalists. Many other female vocalists followed Patsy Cline after she set the bar standard in country music for women.

Patsy Cline was the first female vocalist country music to receive national recognition with her iconized beehive hairstyle and short hair. The fact she had short hair made her stand out as a vocalist in country music. Patsy Cline stayed true to her traditional country roots as she was climbing her way up the Pop Charts on the BillBoard. Patsy Cline was really the first national female vocalist in country music ever.

Patsy Cline had landed a recording contract in 1954. Although Patsy Cline was molded into the Nashville sound, she still kept with her iconized beehive hairstyle with her short haircut. This was during the 1950s at the start of her career.

Patsy Cline's career hit a turning point in 1957. Her hits began in 1957 with Walkin' After Midnight, Crazy, and I Fall to Pieces. In 1957, Cline recorded honky tonk song Fingerprints. That song, I Fall to Pieces, Crazy, and Walkin' After Midnight made her become a recognized female vocalist. She then broke down the gender barrier in country music.

Patsy Cline had made herself as a female vocalist icon in country music with her signature darkened lipstick and her beautiful lips of course along with her iconized beehive hairstyle and short hair. You see, Patsy Cline helped break down the gender barrier in country music. She was supportive of other female country artists.

That's how Patsy Cline set the standard for women artists in country music.

Saturday, August 12, 2017

US President Donald Trump to declare war on Korea.

It’s official! As of August 10, 2017, Donald Trump has declared war on Korea. Donald Trump has declared the US is running out of patience with Korea over its nuclear drive. Trump claims its ballistic missile programs have gotten out of hand. United States calls on other regional powers in other countries from across the globe to implement sanctions against Korea. Sanctions will be employed in a phased and comprehensive approach. He wants all “responsible nations” to join in. So does the US.

“Today we are facing the threat of the reckless and brutal regime of Korea. The Korean dictatorship has no regard for the safety and security of its people, for its neighbors, no respect for humanity, and has no respect for human life.” said Trump.

Things have gone out of hand. Donald Trump has made declaring war on Korea a top priority over nearly everything else in politics. He warns that the Korean dictatorship regime “better choose a better path do it quickly”. Russia is ready to do whatever they can to help United States against Korea. Russia is ready to render aid to the United States.

City of Lago Vista plans to preserve Cox Springs School building.

City of Lago Vista is currently working on plans to preserve the Cox Springs School building in a better more efficient manner. North Shore Heritage & Cultural Society and former students are working with the City of Lago Vista, City of Jonestown, and Travis County Historical Commission to move the school building onto a permanent location into the city of Lago Vista, Texas.

North Shore Heritage & Cultural Society wants to save this building in an attempt of historic preservation so students of today can see how students who lived in Lago Vista and Jonestown during the early 20th century received their education. Both commissions plan to keep the old school in tact. North Shore Heritage & Cultural Society and former students are working to restore the former school building.

Both the City of Lago Vista and City of Jonestown consider Cox Springs School to be a historical building despite no Texas Historic Landmark marker. Although there is no Texas Historic Landmark marker, a brown metal sign about the school’s history is located behind the school building facing Old Burnet Road. Cox Springs School is one of the oldest buildings in Lago Vista next to the Lago Vista School which is commonly known as “the little red schoolhouse” to local citizens and historians.


Cox Springs School was built in 1908 as a one-room building for Lago Vista Common School District No. 2 better known as Lago Vista Common School District. Cox Springs School was known as Cox Springs School House when the school district first opened this school. Grades 1 through 11 attended this school with Grade 12 eventually being included. Cox Springs School had its own school district called Cox Springs School District (District #2) from 1908 to 1950 before being consolidated into Lago Vista Independent School District.

Originally the Cox Springs School was located closely near the intersection of Lohman Ford Road & Sylvester Ford Road in Lago Vista, Texas from 1908 to 1940. In 1940, the school relocated to Old Burnet Road in Jonestown, Texas in a modern day neighborhood called The Bluffs. Although the Cox Springs School is considered to be in Lago Vista, Texas, the actual location the school building is currently located at is 18842 Old Burnet Road, Jonestown, Texas, US 78645. The alternate address is 18842 Old Burnet Road, Leander, Texas, US 78645.

In 1940, the Cox Springs School building was moved from the intersection of Lohman Ford Road & Sylvester Ford Road in Lago Vista, Texas to Old Burnet Road in Jonestown, Texas. Grade 12 was added in 1949 due to Gilmer-Aiken Law mandated by the State of Texas. More funds went towards the school district that following year. 1950 is when Cox Springs School District was abolished and consolidated into Lago Vista Independent School District (Lago Vista ISD).

In 1960, the last group of students from grades 1st through 12th were moved to Lago Vista School which was known then to Lago Vista citizens and locals as the “the little red schoolhouse” on 7610 Lohman Ford Road. Lago Vista School was a K-12 school then.

Sunday, August 6, 2017

Carmelita's business in Lago Vista, Texas reported to be up for sale.

Carmelita Hanley started the Carmelita's business as a restaurant in the city of Lago Vista, Texas in 1995. What started as a restaurant became apartments. Carmelita's later became a bar. The bar was located on 5905 Lohman Ford Road on the same property. Carmelita's was located on one of Lago Vista’s busiest streets, Lohman Ford Road. No, Carmelita's was never a hotel.

The buildings themselves were built in 1995. The buildings themselves look much older than any buildings that would have been built in 1995. The buildings resembles buildings that were constructed and built pre-1965 based on the architectural appearance. The 2 story house at the front entrance next to Lohman Ford Road looks very similar to a pre-1965 house. In fact, the house located up front on Lohman Ford Road looks very similar to a vernacular 19th century house rather than a house that was built or constructed in 1995. 

Building units far away from Lohman Ford Road resemble units for apartments or a hotel. Those building units far away from Lohman Ford Road resemble units for an apartment complex. Carmelita's had a small town hotel feel hence the small building styled architecture.

Over the years, Carmelita Hanley leased the property and buildings to several businesses and owners such as Lago Tacos, 5905 Lohmans Ford Road LLC, Lago Music Hall, Butch Y West, Alternative Hair Solutions, Taha Custom Homes Inc., and lukepages. loopnet.com had reported this property originally sold for the price of $380,000 dollars in 2006. According to loopnet.com apparently the owner has decided to liquidate.

In 2011, Carmelita's was shut down by City of Lago Vista building code enforcement. Reasons why Carmelita's was shut down was due to poor construction and code violations. Carmelita's was cited with numerous code violations by City of Lago Vista for poor construction and several structural errors in such buildings. Some buildings were not structurally safe although floorplans were fine.

Over the years, the Carmelita's buildings sat abandoned. Rooms in several building remain vacant. There are no signs of squatters or homeless life inside these buildings. Rats have taken hostage of one building north of the 2 story house. All rooms and buildings are empty. All are vacant.

In 2016, Sandy Le and Gary Hudson sold the buildings and property to a business called Taha Custom Homes Inc. which is a local business. Sandy Le abandoned everything in 2016.

As of August 2017, Carmelita's buildings and property are up for sale after being abandoned for several years to any buyers who are business owners interested in commercial property to sale or lease out. The property is zoned as commercial property by City of Lago Vista. Property type is retail. Property size is 2 acres of land. Lot size and building size are as per Travis County Appraisal District. Contact landlord leasing representatives Kennedy Wilson, Sandy Le, Gary Hudson, and Butch West at 512-402-7581 extension 394 for more information. Owner Carmelita Hanley can be contacted at 512-267-0611.

The location for Carmelita's was 5905 Lohman Ford Road, Lago Vista, Texas, US 78645.

History about the Elroy School in Del Valle, Texas nearly long forgotten.

Elroy School was built in the community settlement of Elroy located in Del Valle, Texas in summer of 1894. Lumber to construct the Elroy School was donated by citizens in the community. Many citizens in the community helped build this school. Elroy School was a K-12 school which primarily operated as a K-9 school although older students attended. Mainly Elroy School operated as a K-9 school under the school districts of Elroy School District and Colorado Common School District. Older students often went into town to continue their education.

Mr. Daniel Ross was the first trustee for the Elroy School then. Mr. Daniel Ross then hired Mrs. A Pettis to teach at the Elroy School in 1894. Mrs. A Pettis was the first teacher to teach at Elroy School. Mr. Daniel Ross was in charge of Elroy School at the time.

Semesters were run in a six month time period. It was an agreement with Travis County Common School District superintendents that the rural school districts semesters were to run on a minimum of six months yearly per school term. Elroy School was one of the many Travis County rural schools than operated in such fashion.

Elroy School was a K-12 school which primarily operated as a K-9 school although older students attended. Sometimes students who wanted to continue their high school education had to transfer into school districts such as Creedmoor Common School District, Garfield School District, Del Valle Independent School District, or go the largest school district in town called Austin Independent School District. Sometimes students had to transfer to other school districts to continue their high school education depending on the availability of such said school districts stated above.


Two teachers were employed to the Elroy School in 1901. These two teachers had to teach in the same room. After 1903, the school term was extended to 7 months instead of the average 6 months most school districts in Texas had at that time. Elroy School was described as “one of the prettiest schoolhouses in the county” in the 1905 Travis County School Annual. A second room was added the summer of 1906. The third room was added in 1909. A third teacher was added that same year. The 1911 school term was lengthened to 8 months. In 1916, the wooden Elroy School was demolished and replaced as red brick schoolhouse which still stands today. That was when Elroy School was a three room schoolhouse.


The Elroy School on 9019 Elroy Road was the “main school”. For a while, the Elroy School on 9019 Elroy Road served primarily as an elementary school. Swing sets out in the front indicated that Elroy School was an elementary school. When Elroy School was an elementary school, grades 1 through 9 were taught and older students had to go into town to continue their education.
That Elroy School served primarily as an elementary school called Elroy Elementary School from where grades 1 through 9 were taught. Later the Elroy School only taught grades 1 through 8 even though older students attend this school when there was no open space available in other schools.


The Elroy School District had its own segregated schools which were separated by race. Such as the Elroy Negro School, Elroy White School, and Elroy Mexican School for instance. Segregation law of the land in Texas State. Small community settlement Elroy, Texas was no exception to this case.

The Elroy White School was the Elroy School located on 9019 Elroy Road which still stands today. The Elroy White School was the “main school”. This is the school that served as the Elroy Community Center from years 1965 to 1988. Elroy White School had a ratio of 2 teachers to 107 white students with the ratio being 2:107 in the year of 1907.

Elroy Negro School served as a school for black/African-American students who lived in the Elroy community located on 14107 FM 812. Elroy Negro School had a ratio of 2 teachers to 61 black students with the ratio being 2:61 in the year of 1907. Elroy Negro School taught elementary grades primarily. Elroy Negro School was converted into Elroy Elementary School in 1950. From 1950 to 1963, Elroy Elementary School was taught here. In 1963 after consolidating with Del Valle ISD, the Elroy Negro School was demolished. No traces of Elroy Negro School exist today.

These schools were eventually consolidated into Colorado Common School District in 1961 which eventually was restructured into Del Valle Independent School District (Del Valle ISD) in 1963. The schools separated by race were demolished, shut down by Del Valle ISD, auctioned off, or sold to private homeowners.

In 1961 Elroy School and Elroy School District were consolidated into Colorado Common School District in 1961 and consolidated & restructured into Del Valle Independent School District (Del Valle ISD) in 1963.


1963 is when Elroy School was closed. In 1965, the Elroy School became the Elroy Community Center. From 1965 to 1988 the Elroy School operated as a community center. In 1980, the school building received a series of renovations from Del Valle Independent School District bond elections. For a short time in the 1980s, Y Knot Ranch owned and leased the building to various businesses and organizations. Both Y Knot Ranch and Del Valle ISD own the property together through a joint venture.

In late 1988, Travis County Fire Rescue purchased the Elroy School from Del Valle Independent School District and Y Knot Ranch. In 1989, the former Elroy School building became a fire station for Travis County. Fire station Travis County Fire Rescue ESD #11 currently serves a majority of southeastern Travis County. In recent years buildings were added onto Elroy School. 2 buildings were added next to the former Elroy School building.

In an August 24, 1989 edition of the Austin American-Statesman newspaper explains the red brick schoolhouse has been converted to a fire station. (The red brick schoolhouse is Elroy School.)

On the date of September 21st, 2016, an upgrade to existing electric services was made and added on.
Only the existing fire house received an eud. A couple of more renovations were added on approval from Travis County commissioners. On this date, the building was declared up to code by Travis County commissioners.


Today Travis County Fire Rescue owns the former Elroy School building and property operating under the name of Travis County Fire Rescue ESD #11. The school is located at 9019 Elroy Road, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617. The alternate addresses are 9019 Farm to Market Road 812, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617 and 9019 FM 812 Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.

Sunday, July 2, 2017

FM 973 expanding into 4 lane road.

As of July 2017, FM 973 along Austin Bergstrom International Airport is going to be expanding from a 2 lane road to a 4 lane road. Yes FM 973 is being expanded from 2 lanes into 4 lanes. Construction companies already began tearing up the left side of FM 973 all the way from the intersection of FM 973 & Burleson Road up to the intersection of FM 973 & Pearce Lane in Del Valle, Texas. Construction work at the intersection of SH 71 & FM 973 has been completed. Lane expansion on FM 973 is a part of the Highway Improvement Program implemented by the City of Austin.

Friday, June 23, 2017

How Armadillo Art Glass benefits the community revisited!

Armadillo Art Glass is a collection of local artists from the Austin, Texas community who sell their crafts by using their skills in glass blowing. With local artists coming together to form a community, such artists can sell their crafts and artworks for profit which will gear to generate money into the community. These artists are helping the community with their works of art. With these profits, 100% of proceeds go to all nonprofit organizations including Meals on Wheels. Meals on Wheels sponsors events held by  Armadillo Art Glass.

“They make art. There’s live paintings. It’s just a really chill event. Local artists come together to build a community and share art. Meals On Wheels raised $150,000 dollars last year for this charity event.” said Meg Stahl.

Armadillo Art Glass raised $150,000 dollars for Meals On Wheels last year in 2016. The average amount of donations Armadillo Art Glass receives for their charity events are $150,000 dollars a year. In some years, Meals On Wheels raises $300,000 dollars from sales at their charity events. 100% of proceeds go to all nonprofit organizations and partner sponsorships involved inside this charity event sponsored by Meals On Wheels.

Saturday, June 17, 2017

Why the US government needs to take away corporate subsidies in yearly taxes revisited!

The United States pays more in taxes in corporate subsidies taxes more than any other countries scattered across the world. US citizens pay too much in corporate subsidies taxes. Corporations get a lot of handouts from the government as Phillip from the TheAdviseShow pointed out. Corporate subsidies are considered as entitlement. No more handouts!

Privatization is a business form of outsourcing. Privatization and outsourcing go hand in hand with each other in economic terms of free market economics along with free market trade. These jobs are being sent offshore and are never coming back at all! To sum it all up, privatization really means "outsourcing"! Watch out for that!

Is it possible to get a tax extension? No it's not always possible for a person to get an extension for their taxes. That's just not the reality in the world of accounting and finance. Taxes are due when they are due. Tax extension is only possible in very special unique circumstances. A tax extension is only given to certain people at certain times basically. Other than that, no, people don't get a tax extension. That's just not the reality.