Showing posts with label business. Show all posts
Showing posts with label business. Show all posts

Friday, July 13, 2018

Revisiting Grove Trailer Court of Austin, Texas.

Grove Trailer Court is one of the many forgotten trailer parks of Austin, Texas. Not much at all is known about the Oak Grove Trailer Court. Very few Austinites know of or have whereabout of knowledge regarding Oak Grove Trailer Court itself. Only older Austinites know about this trailer park. This news article will attempt to explain the history behind Grove Trailer Court.


Prior to 1948, a man named Vernon Eugene Grove owned 363 acres of what used to be called Grove Trailer Court. Vernon Eugene Grove owned the land since 1922. Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. lived on the same land since birth.

In 1948, Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. purchased land via a deed from his father Vernon Eugene Grove from his estate via an estate deed after he passed away. After Vernon Eugene Grove Sr. passed away, the land reverted to Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. and his wife on a estate deed and residuary trust.

A road called Grove Drive was laid out and plotted in 1948 at the exact time the first bridge was constructed. Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. and his wife Joyce L. Grove built a house on the property later. Dr. Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. was a private practitioner from Austin, Texas.

Grove Trailer Court was established as a trailer park in 1950 by Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. and his wife Joyce L. Grove. They both owned land that was a part of their own farmland and decided to establish a trailer park that would become Grove Trailer Court. They used 11 acres out of 13.11 acres to create the trailer park. A 2 story house was built in 1950.

Grove Trailer Court was established at the address of 6200 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741 located near the intersection of Grove Drive & Montopolis Drive.

The scenic riverside view of the Colorado River made the trailer park an idea location for people to live there. Grove Trailer Court was located less than an acre away from the Colorado River.


Grove Trailer Court began showing up on maps by 1956. On the 1956 topographical map for Montopolis Quadrangle, “Grove Trailer Court” appeared under the name “Trailer Park”. A gaging station appeared west of Montopolis Bridge. A second bridge was built in 1956 which still stands today.

The trailer park would later grow to expand up to 13.11 acres by 1961. 2 new gaging stations were installed in 1970. Grove Trailer Court grew up to expand towards 15 acres by 1973. Over 100 residents lived at Grove Trailer Court by 1973.


Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. sold the land for Grove Trailer Court to the City of Austin on the date of 5/6/1981 on a warranty deed. By agreement on the warranty deed, the city could take over the land when Vernon and his wife Joyce were deceased.

By 1994, Grove Trailer Court was demolished and discontinued due to the location being located in a 25 year floodplain. 2 times every 25 years or so, it would flood. Or at least when Austin received heavy amounts of rain. This would flood the trailer park and cause heavy amounts of damage.

The City of Austin made part of the Grove Trailer Court become the Lakeshore Park in 1995. City of Austin replanted glass plats over the roads from the former trailer park.

The road that once connected to Grove Trailer Court continued onto Montopolis Bridge. The road was called Grove Drive. Grove Drive was named after Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. and his wife Joyce L. Grove. An actual road past the trailer park connected to Montopolis Bridge.

By 2003, all 32.53 acres of the property belonging to Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. had been demolished. The 363 acres of 6200 Grove Drive became Roy G. Guerrero Park and Montopolis Sports Complex in 2003. The land became vacant land by 2004 as the City of Austin took control over the Estate of Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. at the time from an executor deed and a special warranty deed.


Grove Trailer Court has been mention and reported on in the Austin American-Statesman newspaper a number of times over the years. For instance in 2015 about if Spanish missions really existing in Austin. (Ref: Austin American-Statesman, Did Spanish missions really exist on Austin bluffs in 1730?, Steven Gonzales keeps an eye out for evidence in the Montopolis hills., June 25, 2015)

The property of 6218 Grove Drive became Grove Gardens in 2015. This vacant lot was once home to Grove Trailer Court. Matt Simon owns this property today along with City of Austin. Old bamboo has been cut down and new bamboo has been planted in place. Grove Gardens was not cleared of bamboo in a single weekend.

Grove Gardens is a riverside lot in the historic Montopolis neighborhood of Austin undergoing a permaculturally minded transition to an ecological campground. Matt Simon has plans to turn this vacant lot into a community garden similar to the Cherry Creek Community Garden on Bayton Loop near Westgate Boulevard.

Today in the 21st century, Grove Trailer Court remains one of the many forgotten trailer parks of Austin, Texas. A weathered sign for the Grove Trailer Court is all that remains of this trailer park enclave.


Grove Trailer Court was located at the address of 6200 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741. Grove Trailer Court Headquarters were located at 6218 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741.

Whatever happened to Four Seasons Mobile Home Park in San Antonio, Texas?

For those of you wondering whatever happened to Four Seasons Mobile Home Park in San Antonio, Texas, this news article will explain in brief detail about what happened to this San Antonio trailer park.Four Seasons Mobile Home Park was a trailer park located in San Antonio, Texas that operated from 1963 to 2008.

In 1998, an administrative law judge from Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission held alleged violations against Four Seasons Mobile Home Park, LLC for unauthorized discharge of wastewater into the adjacent Salado Creek and by failing to submit an application to obtain a discharge permit. Salado Creek was the waterbed creek that Four Seasons Mobile Home Park was alleged to have discharged wastewater into. For 2 years, Four Seasons Mobile Home Park did nothing to obtain a discharge permit or correct legal errors on their part.

An order was entered on March 10, 2000 for $15,000 in administrative penalties to Four Seasons Mobile Home Park by Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission. A payment of $15,000 dollars for Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission was due.

On the date of 8/30/2006, Four Seasons Mobile Home Park was mailed a $15,150 dollar penalty charge from Texas Commission on Environmental Quality via an earlier notice from Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission. The additional $150 dollar charge came from failing to obtain a water discharge permit and for failing to pay additional charges.

The reasons why Four Seasons Mobile Home Park closed in 2008 is because of failure to pay fines from for unauthorized discharge of wastewater and by failing to obtain a discharge permit.

The City of San Antonio moved its then residents during a 2008 city buyout plan where residents whom lived in trailer parks located in floodplains were relocated. City of San Antonio moved its then residents to trailer parks across San Antonio while its other residents simply moved themselves.

As of July 2018, 2 trailers remain on the property. Chuck Weekly still owns, maintains, and lives on the Four Seasons Mobile Home Park property. His family members, along with a woman named Sarah Flores, live on the property. Today the trailer park is a former shell of itself and what it once was. No Trespassing signs are posted all over the fences at front entrance. The trailer park is private property.

Four Seasons Mobile Home Park is now inactive and no longer in business.

History behind Four Seasons Mobile Home Park in San Antonio, Texas nearly forgotten.

Four Seasons Mobile Home Park was a trailer park located in San Antonio, Texas that operated from 1963 to 2008.

Four Seasons Mobile Home Park was founded by Chuck Weekly, Mary McKay Weekly, and Charles T Weekly in 1962. Chuck Weekly, Mary McKay Weekly, and Charles T Weekly were directors and owners of Four Seasons Mobile Home Park. The idea to establish a trailer came about when there was a lack of trailer parks that were geared towards senior living in San Antonio, Texas.

Groundwork for the roads inside of this trailer park in the following year. 6 trailers were moved onto the property in 1963. By the end of the year 1963 is when 10 trailers were hauled onto the property. A swimming pool for its residents was installed in 1966.

The trailer park expand southbound in 1973 by just a few acres. In 1973, a water tower was installed for the trailer park and its residents. 100 residents lived at the trailer park at the time, many of which were senior citizens.


Four Seasons Mobile Home Park, LLC was established as a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC) on the date of 12/03/1993. Over 200 residents lived at Four Seasons Mobile Home Park during that time. Many of which were senior citizens.

In September 1993, a state-county detention facility was proposed to be built at the site of Four Seasons Mobile Home Park. However its residents highly opposed the proposed plan for state-county detention facility was proposed to be built and protested against it at San Antonio City Hall. Several hundred residents attended a meeting on a Thursday night at Judson High School.

(Ref: San Antonio Express-News, Metro Briefs Hearing tonight targets planned detention facility, September 13, 1993)


In 1998, an administrative law judge from Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission held alleged violations against Four Seasons Mobile Home Park, LLC for unauthorized discharge of wastewater into the adjacent Salado Creek and by failing to submit an application to obtain a discharge permit. Salado Creek was the waterbed creek that Four Seasons Mobile Home Park was alleged to have discharged wastewater into. For 2 years, Four Seasons Mobile Home Park did nothing to obtain a discharge permit or correct legal errors on their part.

An order was entered on March 10, 2000 for $15,000 in administrative penalties to Four Seasons Mobile Home Park by Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission. A payment of $15,000 dollars to Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission was due.

Chuck Weekly sold the land to Ernest M Dyal on the date of 1/28/2001 with the sale being finalized on the date of 1/29/2001. Samual Casanova and Kimberley Casanova purchased the land from Ernest M Dyal on the date of 1/29/2002. The water tower was disassembled in 2002. Its concrete slab foundation is the only thing remaining.

On the date of 8/30/2006, Four Seasons Mobile Home Park was mailed a $15,150 dollar penalty charge from Texas Commission on Environmental Quality via an earlier notice from Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission. The additional $150 dollar charge came from failing to obtain a water discharge permit and for failing to pay additional charges.

Four Seasons Mobile Home Park closed in 2008 after failing to pay fines from the 2000 administrative penalties issued against them for unauthorized discharge of wastewater and by failing to obtain a discharge permit. City of San Antonio moved its then residents to trailer parks across San Antonio while its other residents simply moved themselves. The City of San Antonio moved its then residents during a 2008 city buyout plan where residents whom lived in trailer parks located in floodplains were relocated.


As of July 2018, 2 trailers remain on the property. Chuck Weekly still owns, maintains, and lives on the Four Seasons Mobile Home Park property. His family members, along with a woman named Sarah Flores, live on the property. Today the trailer park is a former shell of itself and what it once was. No Trespassing signs are posted all over the fences at front entrance. The trailer park is private property.

Front main office building, the single story house visible by the front entrance, and another trailer are now abandoned. Those are the abandoned structures on this property. The pool has been emptied out and is now inactive.

Four Seasons Mobile Home Park is now inactive and no longer in business. However the company's filing status is listed as “In existence” online. (Which is odd.)


The address for Four Seasons Mobile Home Park is 9613 South Presa Street, San Antonio, Texas, US 78223-4348. Their other mailing address is PO Box 33713, San Antonio, Texas, US 78265-3713. The landline for Four Seasons Mobile Home Park is +1-210-633-3535. For those living in the United States and Canada, call 210-633-3535.

Short architectural history behind Queen Victoria School in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada explored.

Queen Victoria School was built for the Hamilton-Wentworth School District during 1964 in the middle of Corktown neighbourhood of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The school would open in 1965. Hamilton-Wentworth School District operated Queen Victoria School from 1965 to 2007.

Queen Victoria School was an elementary school (primary school) that also went under the name Queen Victoria Elementary School. At first it was known as Queen Victoria School and later Queen Victoria Elementary School.

The 1964 Queen Victoria School building was noted for its interesting architecture. All of its classrooms were built in trapezoid form in the shape of trapezoids. Parts of the school building were similar to a toblerone candy bar. The school had a unique parking lot layout. The parking lot was located underneath the school building itself. The building can be noted for its googie architecture.

Queen Victoria Elementary School used as a filming location for the movie Hairspray in 2005. The filming company used the site for 9 months to record school scenes for the movie Hairspray.

Queen Victoria School was closed in 2007. Plans were made by Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board to demolish Prince of Wales School and Queen Victoria school in May 2007. The school was demolished in July 2007. (Ref: Hamilton Spectator, Plan to demolish Prince of Wales and Queen Victoria schools, Spring 2007)

A new school building was rebuilt in place of the original school in September 2007. In 2009, the new Queen Victoria Elementary School opened and still operates today. Hamilton-Wentworth District School District takes credit for keeping their schools modern.


Architects and residents critiqued the old school building of Queen Victoria School as being built tough. Most local architects wanted the old school building to stand in place for continued use. Local architects claim “the school building could and would last hundreds of years if properly maintained”. Local architects criticized Hamilton-Wentworth District School for letting maintenance lapse just to have an excuse to get money from taxpayers.

Some residents criticized the school for its 60s architecture stating that the old Queen Victoria School was “built like a prison”. Some even criticized the roof and shape of its classrooms for built in form of trapezoids. Some residents have gone as far as to call the old Queen Victoria School building “ugly”. (Ref: uer.ca)

However most parents of students enrolled at Queen Victoria Elementary School are happy and satisfied with the new school building. A majority of parents and faculty supported the  construction of a new school building at the site of the original school building that was originally in place.

Queen Victoria School is located at 166 Forest Avenue, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Monday, July 9, 2018

Inside the extensive history of Austin State School - Farm Colony and Travis State School!

Travis State School (first known as Austin State School - Farm Colony) was a living center that was operated as a farm colony, work facility, and educational facility a farm colony becoming eventually a work facility and an educational facility for the mentally retarded citizens of Texas operating from 1934 to 1996. The institution taught the mentally retarded how to be self-sufficient.


Origins of the Austin State School - Farm Colony can be traced back to the location of Austin State School itself. Austin State School - Farm Colony was established on the campus of Austin State School itself in 1925 by Texas Board of Control and Dr. J. W. Bradfield. (Ref: State Board of Control, 1925).

Texas Government along Texas Mental Health Mental Retardation (TX MHMR) had felt a need to place mentally retarded citizens in a separate home away from the rest of society. The mindset of society was to place mentally retarded citizens far away from so they wouldn’t ever have a need to come into the metropolis as Austin State School was set up as an autonomous community. The ideology (idea) was for the mentally retarded to produce farm products for other ‘State Schools’ and institutions. This taught the mentally retarded how to be self-sufficient.


In 1930, Texas Governor Miriam A. Ferguson and Austin State School superintendent Dr. J. W. Bradfield proposed an idea to the Texas Board of Control along with Texas Mental Health Mental Retardation to create a farm colony, work facility, and educational facility for the mentally retarded citizens of Texas. This was because the farm colony on the Austin State School campus was running out of room and needed to be expanded elsewhere.

The Texas Government had purchased 241 acres of land from Greg Wilson, Annie LaRue Scott, and six other residents in the year of 1932 in the Decker neighborhood of East Austin. In 1933, the Texas legislature established Travis State School as the Austin State School - Farm Colony as an annex/branch of the Austin State School. (Ref: TXMHMR Public Information Office, 1989).

The farm colony itself was located at FM 969 and Decker Lane 8 miles east of Downtown Austin located near the Colorado River. East Austin, further away from US Highway 183 was all farmland with ranches which resulted in an ideal location for Austin State School - Farm Colony.

The farm colony started as a true farm community in 1934 when the first inmates were transferred from Austin State School to the Farm Colony in October 1934 which at the time had only one building. The first of several permanent dormitory buildings was erected in 1934. Austin State School - Farm Colony (Travis State School) was set up as an autonomous community.

At first, Austin State School - Farm Colony was just for men and eventually women. Children came later. ‘State School’ facilities were gender segregated due to a prevalent belief from the time period that associated mental retardation with promiscuity, alcoholism, and immoral behavior. However, there were female students even in 1934 despite the original intentions of the institutions for males only.

The Austin State School - Farm Colony was established for able-bodied, white males (including those who spoke Spanish), 8 years of age and older, who were unable to be “further  benefited” by the Austin State School, but who could “do manual work, help raise garden and farm products, care for livestock and poultry, and thus partially support themselves and the parent institution” (Ref: State Board of Control, 1936).

368 inmates were housed at Travis State School in 1938. 8 had grounds parole and were able to leave campus. The patients are all males. The buildings are two-floor brick and terrazzo construction and are well-equipped and furnished. (Ref: State Board of Control, 1938).

In 1939, student population was 450. Only 7-8 students had ground paroles. Salaries for farm work was $27 per month. Eventually due to inflation the pay rate was raised to $40 per month. Employees worked 12 hours a day. Dentists worked 8 hours a day. There were 45 female students working at the farm colony. A staff of 45 women employees and 90 male employees took care of 450 students on a daily basis. Conditions were not too primitive. (Ref: State Board of Control, 1939).

A graveyard was plotted by Texas Board of Control and was established where the water tower is today in the year of 1939. It was estimated that over 20 burials out of the dozens of residents and inmates were buried at this location.


However on January 14, 1941, the Texas Legislature and Texas Government were considering closing down the farm colony due to the fact that the farm colony was a total failure as the farm colony could not produce enough to maintain for the patients at the institution and other institutions run by the state. The Texas Legislature deemed Austin State School - Farm Colony as a “dismal failure”. However the farm colony continued operating and remained open. (Ref: State Board of Control, 1941).

By 1941, construction for the 6 two story buildings was completed. The farm colony then had around 480 inmates. The Texas Legislature deemed a need for Austin State School - Farm Colony to remain open during World War II in order to be self-sufficient.

By 1945, the farm colony had six buildings with offices. Small houses for the attendants and nurse were hauled in from other institutions across Texas.

1949 brought big changes to Travis State School.The farm colony became a separate institution from the Austin State School in 1949 despite having the name ‘Austin State School’ which it was always a part of. The farm colony was always called Austin State School - Farm Colony despite was others say. A plant nursery operated at Travis State School from 1933 to 1990. The school grew their own vegetables. Beef and pork were raised in the farm colony.

By 1955, TX MHMR had acquired an additional 195 acres from 8 more residents all of whom owned farmland. The Austin State School - Farming Colony campus eventually grew to encompass 68 buildings that spanned to the 436 acres you see today owned by KIPP Austin.

Austin State School - Farm Colony had a working farm and dairy in 1956. A cannery was built where the crops were canned and packaged for consumption for the other state institutions.


Farming operations at the facility slowly ceased in January 1961 due to the fact that the farm colony was a total failure. The farm colony could not produce enough to maintain for the patients at the institutions. The farming operations did not cease due to mental health care reforms in the 1960's from popular belief. To reflect this change, Austin State School - Farm Colony was renamed to Travis State School in January 1961.
(Ref: Handbook of Texas Online, Vivian Elizabeth Smyrl, TRAVIS STATE SCHOOL)

At this point is when the Austin State School - Farm Colony was limited to older, severely retarded males transferred from the Austin State School. Both mentally handicapped individuals and physically handicapped individuals lived at Travis State School. Mostly mentally handicapped individuals lived there. Most of the residents were non-verbal.

Travis State School is very similar in setup to Marbridge Foundation and Down Home Ranch. In fact, Marbridge Foundation was modeled after Austin State School and Travis State School itself.

A dairy was operated at Travis State School until 1965. The dairy herd was auctioned-off on October 5, 1965. The dairy farm was de-established and demolished in the same year. Austin State School - Farm Colony was intended to provide a home for mentally retarded male patients who could no longer further benefit from training at the Austin State School and who were able to do work.

In 1966, construction of a new workshop facility was planned and the site of the original cemetery plot was where the new building could be placed and utilized. The MHMR Board voted to formally “abandon” the old cemetery (which had not been used for interments for 25 years) and to remove the remains to the official long-established Travis State School Cemetery.

The water tower was constructed over the first cemetery (the old Travis State School Cemetery) and graveyard in 1966. In the process of relocation, the first cemetery had been partially destroyed. There are still burials intact beneath the water tower. The new Travis State School Cemetery was replotted and relocated in 1966. The water tower still remains standing today.

Travis State School had its highest peak of patient enrollment of 1,800 patients/students in 1968 all of whom had been transferred from other institutions. A swimming pool was installed at Travis State School in 1968. Travis State School was the first state school in Texas to have a swimming pool for therapeutic purposes. Later included was a sewing room, storerooms, more offices, and a carpentry shop.


In the year of 1970, Travis State School received a grant from the Hospital Improvement Project which made it possible for the use of a unit system of treatment. A new Vocational Evaluation and Training Center was opened and staffed through a grant from the Texas Rehabilitation Commission. Female students were first admitted in 1973 for the first time since the institution gradually opened in 1934.

The reasons why Austin State School - Farm Colony ceased operations was due to revisions in the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1974 and the oil recession of the 1970s that greatly effected the United States economy. Texas Government discovered the free labor residents and inmates provided was considered somewhat exploitive especially for the high functioning residents. High functioning residents were assigned to take care of low functioning residents. The State of Texas could not afford to pay residents and inmates as workers. So residents and inmates worked for free. This in turn was a violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1974.

The courts ruled in 1974 residents and inmates in these institutions run by the State of Texas (federal, state-run, or otherwise) were entitled to protections under the Fair Labor Standards Act. This was a tragedy for some of the residents and inmates residing in these institutions. They had no sense of purpose and had idle time sitting on the ward despite that state run programs were still readily available.

200 residents of the Travis State School lost their jobs and 266 more jobs were phased out at the Austin State School. Prior to the court ruling, state law prohibited the institutions from paying more than $5 a week to the patients who performed jobs. A federal court decision ordered the U.S. Department of Labor to begin enforcing wage and hour provisions in state-run mental institutions across the US. (Ref: Waxahachie Daily Light, Page 7, August 20, 1974)


The Texas Government and TX MHMR had began changing its focus from institutionalization to integrated placement in local communities as this trend was becoming nationwide in the United States in the 1980s. ‘State Schools’ began to see a decline in enrollment. This was a result from efforts in deinstitutionalization. By then, state officials began following this trend. The Texas Government and TX MHMR had began changing its focus from institutionalization to deinstitutionalization. (Ref: Handbook of Texas Online, Vivian Elizabeth Smyrl, TRAVIS STATE SCHOOL)

By 1981, all farming operations at the facility ceased for good. All what was left in its place was the institution and its shop buildings. The shop buildings became storage for maintenance utilities. Despite that, the nursery was still in operation until 1990.


The Travis State School functioned as an Independent School District (ISD) from 1981 to 1988. The school was mostly compromised of multi-handicapped students who were non-verbal. Several of them had suffered scoliosis. 25% percent of residents living at Travis State School were quadriplegic.

After the year of 1988 due to lack of enrollment and federal funding, Travis State School relied on the Manor Independent School District to provide academic instruction through its "mainstreaming" program instead. The Travis State School Independent School District and Austin State School Independent School District were shut down by the state due to lack of enrollment and deinstitutionalization.


In the 1990s, Travis State School was renamed to Austin State School Annex but still kept the name ‘Travis State School’ as many people referred to the institution by such name despite what others say. Texas has always historically been behind most US states to serve people with mental retardation within their own communities along with Alabama, Mississippi, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Illinois. 

The 1990s saw an even further decline in ‘State School’ enrollment due to deinstitutionalization and healthcare laws. Effects of deinstitutionalization became statewide. Statistics in newspapers, reports, and books showed otherwise. In 1992, Travis State School had 604 patients and 1,270 employees with a total of 86 buildings at its 436 acre property. In 1994, only 104 patients remained. They were unharmed.

In 1994, the State of Texas and City of Austin proposed a 1,000 inmate facility for a new state jail to alleviate crowding with the population in state jails. In 1996, the Travis County State Jail/Travis State Jail was built and completed. For a short while, Travis County State Jail/Travis State Jail was privately run by privatized prison industrial complex company Wackenhut Correctional Facilities from 1994 to 2001. The land where Travis County State Jail/Travis State Jail occupies is where the Farm Colony originally was for Austin State School - Farm Colony.

Due to an abuse case at Travis State School along with lawsuits such as Lelsz vs. Kavanagh and Ruiz vs. Estelle, Travis State School closed down as an agreement in a lawsuit settlement with the state of Texas and US Government in 1996. The lawsuit was both statewide and federal, thus resulting in the federal lawsuit of Lelsz vs. Kavanagh.

By 1996, Travis State School closed for good. By then all remaining 41 patients were relocated to nearby institutions such as the Austin State School (now Austin State Supported Living Center). Construction at Travis State School lasted from 1996 to 1998. Debris was left over from pervious construction teams who relocated nearly everything. Some items and various other objects were left onsite. Buildings fell into various states of decay and disrepair.

TX MHMR was involved in another lawsuit called Turner, Rona and EEOC (Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) vs. Travis State School in 1996 which alleged violations of the Equal Employment Act.

In 1996, local real estate developer Peter Barlin had bought the land Travis State School was located on from Texas Board of Control. The idea for Peter Barlin purchasing the Travis State School land and buildings was to create a private version of the public housing agency called Vision Village. His main intention was to create public housing. Vision Village was supposed to be a neighborhood for low income housing. The City of Austin gave him a $1 million dollar incentive for this land development. Organizers borrowed nearly $4 million from Austin, Travis County and a local bank in 1997.

However plans fell through when Vision Village lacked the management expertise and fund-raising ability to build the housing it promised. Local real estate developer Peter Barlin had been charged criminally with penalties such as embezzlement, conspiracy, money laundering, mismanagement, and fraud. More than $5 million had been poured into the project. Peter Barlin had owned the former Travis State School site that was once set aside for Vision Village, a project that never got off the ground despite more than $1 million from the city. The Vision Village costs had ran deeper than dollars however.

Travis State School sat abandoned and vacant for a period of time from 1997 to 2004. During that time is when the building became vandalized and squatted. Graffiti covered several buildings, some of which been demolished.


In 2004, KIPP Schools (KIPP Austin) had purchased the property from Peter Barlin and the State of Texas via TX MHMR from Texas Board of Control. Some buildings however were still abandoned. These buildings were renovated overtime. Only few buildings were demolished. The Travis State School Cemetery had fallen into disrepair. Security had not been set up to protect and secure property on a 24 hour basis yet. However most of the property still sat vacant and abandoned.

This made it easy for scrappers to steal and vandalize the buildings for copper metal in order to gain a profit. One famous example would be local criminal Reginald Dane Parker. Local criminal Reginald Dane Parker had apparently been stealing copper wire there from the location site before for years. The timeframe Reginald Dane Parker had been stealing copper wire from Travis State School was from 2001 to 2005. Reginald Dane Parker was arrested and jailed by law enforcement officials in 2005.

By 2011, KIPP Austin had fully settled onto the land of the former Travis State School site. However the 8 dorms that weren’t in use were boarded up and closed off. The 9 warehouses are in various states of disrepair. Austin Police Department had set up their Child Protective Services division there in the year of 2011 as well.

In 2015, KIPP Schools contracted with local business ASC Management to secure the property as an effort in security measures. Closed-Camera surveillance cameras are now present and 24 hour security is actively on sight. Gates now hover over the buildings. Unoccupied buildings that were boarded up or abandoned are now currently in use. These building have been upgraded by being renovated. Currently businesses such as KIPP Austin, Austin Discovery School, KIPP Cafe, Austin Police Department, and Child Protective Services now occupy the land property. A small handful of former warehouses are in various states of disrepair.



[Here’s why Travis State School really closed!]

[John Lelsz Sr. with his wife, Ruth Lelsz, had filed a lawsuit that claimed Texas ‘State Schools’ along with other institutions of this kind violated the constitutional rights of their residents in 1974. Abuse was rampant in these institutions. criminal negligence, Patients were living in unsanitary condition provided by extremely inadequate living conditions. The lawsuit was Lelsz vs. Kavanagh. The lawsuit was eventually settled in 1991.

Travis State School closed down due a federal lawsuit called Lelsz vs. Kavanagh. Complainant John Lelsz Sr. and his wife Ruth Lelsz alleged their son, John Lelsz Jr. was physically abused and overtly medicated. John Lelsz Jr. was housed at Travis State School and Austin State School. John Lelsz Jr. was a blind and retarded patient who was physically aggressive with others and prone to violent outbursts. As a result he was overmedicated by Travis State School and Austin State School staff and the medical faculty.

When his parents went to visit him at Travis State School and Austin State School, they notices bruises, scars, and various other lacerations on his body.John Lelsz Jr. had acquired a head gash requiring six stitches, a black eye and swollen face while at Austin State School. Austin State School staff had used cattle prods to administer electroshock therapy on John Lelsz Jr. was a very difficult patient. Both parents filed a lawsuit against the state of Texas. Such said lawsuit eventually reached Federal Court. This led to the closure of the Travis State School in 1996.

By 1998, Travis State School closed for good. By then all remaining 41 patients were relocated to nearby institutions such as the Austin State School (now Austin State Supported Living Center). By 1999, lawsuits of Lelsz vs. Kavanagh and Ruiz vs. Estelle were mostly settled with the fact most of the complainants, plaintiffs, defendants, defenders, lawyers, and attorneys, were somewhat not satisfied with the Texas Governments’ actions with some justice being unserved to the victims and those whom were harmed.

As a result of delayed justice, John Lelsz Jr. was removed from Austin State School to a psychiatric institution in Arkansas in 1997. Since then his family relocated him back to Texas. His parents have since passed away. John Lelsz Sr. passed away in June 1995.]


[As for the government properties of Austin State School - Farm Colony and Travis State School…]

[The Travis State School Cemetery still remains onsite hidden away from KIPP Austin campus. The cemetery has fallen into disrepair. Many graves, tombstones, and other identifiers such as markers remain untouched despite the future plans from the Texas Government to remove such graves. The Texas Government decided to leave the graves untouched. The Travis State School Cemetery has fallen into disrepair.]

[Austin State School - Farm Colony had moved back to its original location at the “original” Austin State School (now Austin State Supported Living Center) in 1998. Austin State School - Farm Colony has now been reduced to a garden to a size of 4 rows as of 2016. The farm colony is a former shill of what it once was. No longer are extreme amounts of tax dollars being poured into the farm colony. The farm colony no longer exists.]


Austin State School - Farm Colony and Travis State School was located at 8509 FM 969, Austin, Texas, US 78725.

Friday, June 15, 2018

Grove Trailer Court of Austin, Texas forgotten revisited.

Grove Trailer Court is one of the many forgotten trailer parks of Austin, Texas. Not much at all is known about the Oak Grove Trailer Court. Very few Austinites know of or have whereabout of knowledge regarding Oak Grove Trailer Court itself. Only older Austinites know about this trailer park. This news article will attempt to explain the history behind Grove Trailer Court.


Grove Trailer Court was established as a trailer park in 1950 by Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. and his wife Joyce L. Grove. They both owned land that was a part of their own farmland and decided to establish a trailer park that would become Grove Trailer Court. Dr. Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. was a private practitioner from Austin, Texas. Grove Trailer Court was established at the address of 6200 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741. Which located near the intersection of Grove Drive & Montopolis Drive.

They used 11 acres out of 13.11 acres to create the trailer park. The scenic riverside view of the Colorado River made the trailer park an idea location for people to live there. Grove Trailer Court was located less than an acre away from the Colorado River.

Grove Trailer Court began show up on maps by 1956. On the 1956 topographical map for Montopolis Quadrangle, “Grove Trailer Court” appeared under the name “Trailer Park”. A gaging station appeared west of Montopolis Bridge.

The trailer park would later grow to expand up to 13.11 acres by 1961. 2 new gaging stations were installed in 1970. Grove Trailer Court grew up to expand towards 15 acres by 1973.


Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. sold the land for Grove Trailer Court to the City of Austin on the date of 5/6/1981 on a warranty deed. By agreement on the warranty deed, the city could take over the land when Vernon and his wife Joyce were deceased.

By 1994, Grove Trailer Court was demolished and discontinued due to the location being located in a 25 year floodplain. 2 times every 25 years or so, it would flood. Or at least when Austin received heavy amounts of rain. This would flood the trailer park and cause heavy amounts of damage.

The City of Austin made part of the Grove Trailer Court become the Lakeshore Park in 1995. City of Austin replanted glass plats over the roads from the former trailer park.

The road that once connected to Grove Trailer Court continued onto Montopolis Bridge. The road was called Grove Drive. Grove Drive was named after Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. and his wife Joyce L. Grove. An actual road past the trailer park connected to Montopolis Bridge.

By 2003, all 32.53 acres of the property belonging to Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. had beed demolished. The land became vacant land by 2004 as the City of Austin took control over the Estate of Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. at the time from an executor deed and a special warranty deed.


Grove Trailer Court has been mention and reported on in the Austin American-Statesman newspaper a number of times over the years. For instance in 2015 about if Spanish missions really existing in Austin. (Ref: Austin American-Statesman, Did Spanish missions really exist on Austin bluffs in 1730?, Steven Gonzales keeps an eye out for evidence in the Montopolis hills., June 25, 2015)

Today in the 21st century, Grove Trailer Court remains one of the many forgotten trailer parks of Austin, Texas. A weathered sign for the Grove Trailer Court is all that remains of this trailer park enclave.


Grove Trailer Court was located at the address of 6200 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741. Grove Trailer Court Headquarters were located at 6218 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741.

Whatever happened to Circle B Homes?

Circle B Homes has to do with the housing industry. Circle B Homes was a manufactured home sales lot located at 6610 East Ben White Boulevard in Austin, Texas from 1998 to 2006 that was owned by Sam P. Bath, Jr., and Larry Cousins. Sam P. Bath was president for Circle B Homes and Larry Cousins was a salesman for Circle B Homes.
(Ref: Austin American Statesman, Circle C, Circle B: What's in a letter?, December 8, 1999)

Some might remember the “Top Dollar on Trade'' sign out by the highway and a couple of wire palm trees by the entrance covered the front. Some might even remember seeing the pink Circle B Homes sign right outside of State Highway 71.

Circle B Homes provided a minuscule effort for the housing industry in Southeast Austin and Montopolis. Only hundreds of mobile homes were manufactured a year at Circle B Homes. Home sales is what Circle B specialized in. Circle B Homes operated under the name Circle B Mobile Homes.


In 2004 when Alvie Campbell and Julia Campbell purchased a manufactured home from Circle B Homes is what led tot he decline of the business itself. Sam P. Bath and Larry Cousins never knew ahead of time when or if they were going to close their business.

Alvie Campbell and Julia Campbell purchased a manufactured home from Circle B Homes in 2004 and had also purchased the land on which the manufactured home was located. The home was manufactured by Cavco Industries, Inc. (Cavco). This led to an arbitration agreement dispute that would last up to 45 months from 2004 to 2006.

Over the next 45 months, the Campbells pursued their claims against these defendants (Circle B Homes, Cavco, and 967 among others) by serving discovery, responding to discovery requests, and responding to dispositive motions filed by Cavco, 967, and Cottonwood. Circle B's litigation activities during that time included responding to the Campbells' discovery requests, responding to limited discovery from co-defendant Cavco, serving the Campbells with requests for disclosure. Cavco noticed two depositions that ultimately were not taken.

Alvie Campbell and Julia Campbell were subject to a valid arbitration agreement and Circle B did not waive the right to arbitration. The two depositions were not taken as noticed by a co-defendant participating in depositions of Alvie Campbell and Julia Campbell.


In August 2006, the Campbells filed suit against Circle B Homes asserting causes of action arising out of the negotiation and sale of the home and land. Specifically, the Campbells alleged causes of action for violations of the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act, breach of contract, promissory estoppel, trespass to chattel, negligence, negligence per se, common law fraud, fraud in a real estate transaction, and civil conspiracy which were among the several charges brought against them.

Circle B faced financial hardships stemming from a lawsuit in 2006. Sam P. Bath Jr. and Larry Cousins were found guilty for breach of contract and cited for violations of the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act. 2006 is when Circle B Homes closed down.


All the mobile homes and trailers that once resided at the location have now been relocated. Any permanent structures were destroyed. The only remains left are the roadways, entrance, parking lot, and sign for Circle B Homes out by TX 71 (State Highway 71).

Circle B Homes was located at 6610 East Ben White Boulevard, Austin, Texas, US 78741.

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Former Butter Krust Company building in Corpus Christi, Texas now up for sale!

As of May 30, 2018, the building is up for both sale and lease at a price of $1,100,000. The former Butter Krust Company now sits vacant and is owned by the City of Corpus Christi. The city is selling the land for re-development opportunities. The City of Corpus Christi is currently seeking out adaptive reuse for this old building.

Since then the city had installed CCTV monitored cameras on the premises. The city has been closely keeping an eye on this building for more than 21 years. The city keeps a close eye on this building despite vacancy.

The former Butter Krust Company building is located at 2002 Ayers Street, Corpus Christi, Texas, US 78404.

Grove Trailer Court of Austin, Texas forgotten.

Grove Trailer Court is one of the many forgotten trailer parks of Austin, Texas. Not much at all is known about the Oak Grove Trailer Court. Very few Austinites know of or have whereabout of knowledge regarding Oak Grove Trailer Court itself. Only older Austinites know about this trailer park. This news article will attempt to explain the history behind Grove Trailer Court.


Grove Trailer Court was established as a trailer park in 1950 by Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. and his wife Joyce L. Grove. They both owned land that was a part of their own farmland and decided to establish a trailer park that would become Grove Trailer Court. Grove Trailer Court was established at the address of 6200 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741. Which located near the intersection of Grove Drive & Montopolis Drive.

They used 11 acres out of 13.11 acres to create the trailer park. The scenic riverside view of the Colorado River made the trailer park an idea location for people to live there. Grove Trailer Court was located less than an acre away from the Colorado River.

Grove Trailer Court began show up on maps by 1956. On the 1956 topographical map for Montopolis Quadrangle, “Grove Trailer Court” appeared under the name “Trailer Park”. A gaging station appeared west of Montopolis Bridge.

The trailer park would later grow to expand up to 13.11 acres by 1961. 2 new gaging stations were installed in 1970. Grove Trailer Court grew up to expand towards 15 acres by 1973.


Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. sold the land for Grove Trailer Court to the City of Austin on the date of 5/6/1981 on a warranty deed.

By 1994, Grove Trailer Court was demolished and discontinued due to the location being located in a 25 year floodplain. 2 times every 25 years or so, it would flood. Or at least when Austin received heavy amounts of rain. This would flood the trailer park and cause heavy amounts of damage.

The City of Austin made part of the Grove Trailer Court become the Lakeshore Park in 1995. City of Austin replanted glass plats over the roads from the former trailer park.

The road that once connected to Grove Trailer Court continued onto Montopolis Bridge. The road was called Grove Drive. Grove Drive was named after Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. and his wife Joyce L. Grove. An actual road past the trailer park connected to Montopolis Bridge.

By 2003, all 32.53 acres of the property belonging to Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. had beed demolished. The land became vacant land by 2004 as the City of Austin took control over the Estate of Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. at the time from an executor deed and a special warranty deed.


Grove Trailer Court has been mention and reported on in the Austin American-Statesman newspaper a number of times over the years. For instance in 2015 about if Spanish missions really existing in Austin. (Ref: Austin American-Statesman, Did Spanish missions really exist on Austin bluffs in 1730?, Steven Gonzales keeps an eye out for evidence in the Montopolis hills., June 25, 2015)

Today in the 21st century, Grove Trailer Court remains one of the many forgotten trailer parks of Austin, Texas. A weathered sign for the Grove Trailer Court is all that remains of this trailer park enclave.


Grove Trailer Court was located at the address of 6200 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741. Grove Trailer Court Headquarters were located at 6218 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741.

Monday, June 4, 2018

Danville School history of New Braunfels, Texas explained.

Danville School is one of the most widely known schools of Comal County and rural New Braunfels, Texas. Nearly everyone in Comal County can recall Danville School. Danville School operated from 1863 to 1946.


Danville School is an original one-room schoolhouse built in 1863 in New Braunfels, Texas. The building is 865 square feet. The school had porches on all four sides of a 24’ x 36’ classroom. Danville School was originally established at the location of 7030 FM 482, New Braunfels, Texas, US 78132. Danville School was operated by Solms School District. (Ref: History of New Braunfels and Comal County, Texas, 1844–1946, Oscar Haas)

In the 1870s, Danville School was a 1-8 school educating students in grades 1 through 8. Students attended their first eight grades at Danville School before attending high school in New Braunfels. 

Later in the 19th century, Danville School became a 1-12 school. Although Danville School was a 1-12 school throughout its history, Danville School primarily focused on educating students in grades 1 through 8. The original one-room Danville School building was part of the original Comal Settlement area which was established in the mid-1840s.


Danville School operated until after World War II, when it was consolidated with other school districts in the area to form Comal Independent School District (then Comal Rural High School District aka Comal Rural School District) in 1956. 1956 is when Danville School shut down and was consolidated into Comal Independent School District and New Braunfels Independent School District. Students attending Danville School would now attend Comal Elementary School.

Comal Rural High School District approved and voted on November 12, 1956 to consolidate the schools of Bulverde, Danville, Davenport, Fischer, Goodwin, Mountain Valley, Sherwood and Solms to become a part of the new Comal Rural High School District.

The Danville School building and a storage shed that used to be part of the Solms School District were moved to Comal Elementary School in 1956. Those buildings are still in use today.
(Ref: New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung, Page 4,  November 14, 1996).

The school was consolidated along with Solms School District. Solms School District would no longer operate Danville School as it had for 93 years. Danville School was a 1-8 school at the time of school district consolidation. A portion of attended the New Braunfels ISD schools.

The Comal Rural High School District was renamed to Comal Independent School District in 1958. 1958 is when Danville School consolidated with Davenport School which was also consolidated into Comal Independent School District to form Comal Elementary School.

After 1958, the former Danville School building had been serving as a music room for several years since it had become obsolete for classes.


In 1989, New Braunfels Conservation Society approached New Braunfels city council about the possibility of its leasing the old Danville School building as a place to have their monthly meetings and activities. Sandy Schlameus gave a presentation of the proposed Danville School moving and restoration. 1989 is when New Braunfels Conservation Society made an effort to clean the building in an attempt of restoration.

The Danville School building was purchased at an auction in 1990 by Margaret “Margy” Waldrip at a price of $1,600 was moved to a ranch property 12 miles north of New Braunfels. It costed Margy $6,800 to move it to her property.

1990 is when the schoolhouse was restored. A clear glass window was restored along with the sink and copper countertop.2 beautifully restored oval glass front doors can be seen when entering the building. The kitchen was restored. It became the Historic Kuebler Waldrip Haus Bed and Breakfast in the same year.

(Ref: Kuebler Waldrip Haus Bed and Breakfast website)


Today Danville School is now located at 1620 Hueco Springs Loop, New Braunfels, Texas, US 78132. The Danville School retains the beautiful original wood ceiling, walls, and floor. It presently serves as Historic Kuebler Waldrip Haus Bed and Breakfast.

*[Comal Rural High School District also went under the names Comal Rural School District, Comal County Rural High School District No. 705, and Comal County Rural High School District before being renamed to Comal Independent School District in 1958.]

Exploring the old Butter Krust Company in Corpus Christi, Texas.

Butter Krust Company is one of the many forgotten businesses of Corpus Christi, Texas. Butter Krust Company was a bakery and manufacturing company of some sort. Exactly not much is quite known about the Butter Crust Company.


Butter Krust Company was built in 1938 on a concrete slab foundation. The building was a 71,530 square foot building on 3.05 acres of land with a retro-architectural look. The office was built in 1938. Butter Krust Company served as a manufacturing company, bakery, and distribution facility.


Richter Baking Company purchased the property from Butter Krust Company in 1950. Butter Krust Company and Richter Baking Company occupied the same building from 1950-1952 for 2 years.

In 1952, Butter Krust Company moved their operations elsewhere and Richter Baking Company gained full control over rights for the property. At the very end of 1952, Richter Baking Company made a request for rezoning their property as cited in Corpus Christi Caller-Times. Their request seemed approval with help of city council. The lot was rezoned as industrial.

“One of the applications is Richter Baking Company's request for rezoning of 100 more feet of its lot bounded by Ayers Street, 17th Street, Cole Street, and 18th Street as light industrial.”

(Ref: Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Page 17, Wednesday, December 3, 1952)

Expansions and modifications were made to the building in 1967. The last known modifications were made in 1967. The retro-architectural look still remained present. It was only the insides of the interior design that was modified.


Richter Baking Company operated the building and property as Richter’s Bakery before selling the property to the city for more than 30 years. Expansions, modifications, and modernizations were made to the industrial building that once housed both Butter Krust Company and Richter Baking Company.

Richter Baking Company boasted of 62 modern trucks delivering fresh bread to grocers throughout Corpus Christi under the direction of J. R. Higgins. Six men were responsible for the up-keep and maintenance of the 62 trucks. Under the supervision of J, R. Higgins, maintenance engineer, the trucks are serviced daily to keep them in perfect condition.
(Ref: Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Page 50, Wednesday, April 10, 1957)


The whole entire property was foreclosed on in 1994 by the City of Corpus Christi. On May 21, 1994, Richter Baking Company sold the land to City of Corpus Christi on a deed after the building and property was foreclosed on by the city. The property was deeded to the City of Corpus Christi on that very date. The City of Corpus Christi assumed full ownership.
(Ref: Official Public Records of Nueces County, Texas, Document No. 912655)

Since then the city had installed CCTV monitored cameras on the premises. The city has been closely keeping an eye on this building for more than 21 years. The city keeps a close eye on this building despite vacancy.

The City of Corpus Christi held a property sale for the property on the date of April 3, 2018. However it is unknown if any purchasers, bidders, or buyers bought the property.
(Ref: Official Public Records of Nueces County, Texas, Document No. 2018870149)


As of May 30, 2018, the building is up for both sale and lease at a price of $1,100,000. The former Butter Krust Company now sits vacant and is owned by the City of Corpus Christi. The city is selling the land for re-development opportunities. The City of Corpus Christi is currently seeking out adaptive reuse for this old building.

Butter Krust Company is located at 2002 Ayers Street, Corpus Christi, Texas, US 78404.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Bancroft Orchard in Burnaby, Canada forgotten.

Bancroft Orchard was an orchard house located on 25 acres of land built in 1923. It was built without a bathroom surprisingly. A pioneer couple owned Bancroft Orchard until they were deceased. There was also a farm. An old craftsman farmhouse was found on this site.

The kitchen used to be in adjoining room towards the house. The current kitchen and a bedroom were added sometime in the 1940s. The original sink from the 1920s was added on and not salvaged.


They sold a sizable portion of land to the City of Burnaby to be used as a community park sometime during the 20th century. This park still bears numerous trees from the original orchard. They later subdivided their property to support a large housing complex. The large housing complex was built using the same colours as the old home.

Bancroft Orchard used well water until the mid-1980s. The house finally received indoor plumbing in 1984. Other buildings had been connected to plumbing by 1985.

The then-widowed wife of the Bancroft Orchard passed away in this home back in 2001. Noort Developments took control of ownership of the property in 2001. Surrounding neighborhood development and urban development made the area a desirable location. The Bancroft Orchard house was demolished in 2006.

Bancroft Orchard was located at 6801 Rumble Street, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.

Pleasantville Janeway Hospital in St. John’s, Newfoudland, Canada forgotten.

In 1966, Pleasantville Janeway Hospital was built as a 4 story children's hospital in St. John’s, Newfoudland, Canada. Pleasantville Janeway Hospital was originally named the Dr. Charles Alderson Janeway Child Health Centre after Charles Alderson Janeway. Dr. Charles Alderson was hugely responsible for helping establish this children’s hospital.

Pleasantville Janeway Hospital was established on the old US Military Base Hospital at Fort Pepperell. In fact, Pleasantville Janeway Hospital used to be the Fort Pepperell US Military Hospital, but was converted into a new children's hospital in 1966. Pleasantville Janeway Hospital operated as a children’s hospital for 30 years until 1996.

Pleasantville Janeway Hospital went under several names over the years when it operated as a children’s hospital such as, Pleasantville Janeway Hospital, Janeway Children's Health and Rehabilitation Centre, Dr. Charles Alderson Janeway Child Health Centre, Pleasantville Janeway Children’s Hospital, Pleasantville Janeway, Janeway Children’s Hospital, and Janeway Hospital.

This children's hospital helped children and infants who suffered from serious health conditions get better and continue a healthy lifestyle ever year when it was in operation.

However this hospital faced conditions of overcrowding but there was not enough room to house the parents of children admitted to the hospital. No hotels were located near the hospital. Travel prices were a burden for many visiting parents who needed to be close(r) to their children.

Because of this among several other issues, St. Johns Northwest Rotary Club raised $2.5 million dollars to build the Rotary-Janeway Hostel in 1982 to relieve overcrowding at the children’s hospital. Rotary-Janeway Hostel was located across the street from the hospital. The hostel provided parents and families with a cheap and close place to stay. Rotary-Janeway Hostel charged parents and family members the cheap price of $32 dollars a night for a room and could check in 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

In 1996 the hospital to be part of a health complex at a nearby university after much need to expand its space to a growing population in Canada. After that the hospital was abandoned.

There was a fire in one of the wings on the main floor in 1997. Several ceiling tiles collapsed inside after the fire. Many wires were found hanging down. Nobody exactly knows what exactly caused or started the fire to this building complex.

The building is no longer extant today. All that is left now is a vacant field of green grass.

Pleasantville Janeway Hospital was located in St. John’s, Newfoudland and Labrador, Canada forgotten.

Short history of Woodview School in Peterborough, Ontario, Canada forgotten.

Woodview School was built in 1956 as a rural school. The building was built shotgun style with a single hallway. The Woodview School was built as a 6,653 square foot, single story Masonry structure on 9.91 acres. Peterborough County Board of Education operated the school from 1956 to 1990. The school closed in 1990.

The Peterborough County Board of Education used it as a maintenance building and storage building. For years the school had sat abandoned and underutilized on the countryside of Canada. The school had been abandoned for 2 decades.

In 2011, Montessori School purchased the former Woodview School building from the board for $250,000 in 2011 as The Peterborough Examiner reported. Its owners donated the property. The building is home to Kawartha Montessori School currently.

Woodview School is located in Peterborough, Ontario, Canada.

Dredge #4 in Yukon, Canada found to be repurposed.

Dredge #4 has been found to be repurposed. What was once Dredge #4 is now a museum! Built in 1912, this dredge was built to mine out the gold located within Bonanza Creek inside of the Yukon providence of Canada. Many of the original pieces of equipment are intact such as the boat and building. The tours are very interesting many tourist claim. They generally let you wander around while the tour guide talks. Today Parks Canada operates and owns Dredge #4.

The location is Upper Bonanza Creek Road, Dawson City, Yukon Territory, Y0B 1G0, Canada. Other addresses for this location is Upper Bonanza Creek Road, Dawson City, Yukon, Canada and Upper Bonanza Creek Road, Dawson City, Yukon Territory, Canada.

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Asher Family Farms storage found to be underutilized in Kentucky.

The Asher Family Farms storage located just south of the tiny minuscule town of Beech Grove, Kentucky has found to been underutilized. Several pickup trucks and tractors can be seen from the roadside via public right of way. Farming equipment can be found scattered all over the property. This farming equipment has been collecting rust. However there is not too much rust. Traces of once extant buildings from satellite view can be found. The flat concrete foundation is found north on this property. The property is not abandoned but is underutilized.

Asher Family Farms storage is located on 9435 US Highway 41A North, Sebree, Kentucky, US 42455. Another address is 9435 US Highway 41A North, Poole, Kentucky, US 42455.

St. Louis Church in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin long faded away.

St. Louis Church is one of the many forgotten churches of Wisconsin that has faded away from time. Not too many people know the whereabouts on the St. Louis Church in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. This news article will explain the history of St. Louis Church. This news article will also explain how too many renovations, modifications, remodels, and additions can effect the historical integrity of buildings.


St. Louis Church has had a long history in Fond du Lac. The French speaking Catholics formed their own church congregation in 1868. However they did not own a church building but rented one instead. Church services were held using the French language instead of the English language. Holy Family Parish owned the church.

Construction began on the church building and was finished in 1871. This church is an example of Gothic Revival architecture with limestone walls, Gothic-arched openings, and two towers located upfront at the main entrance. On top of the Gothic-arched openings are tall steeple roofs. Most recognizable features are the limestone walls, gothic-arched openings, and the two massive towers. The two towers were finished later in 1891, decorated with stepped buttresses. The two towers were located upfront at the main entrance.

A school was established and constructed in 1957. The school wrapped around the east end of the original church building. Multiple changes and modifications were made to the east end of the church at that time to accommodate the addition.

Many modifications among other changes were also made to St. Louis Church over the years. For instance, the stairs in the towers received modification. Installation of aluminum framed doors were made. Certain areas had ramps installed to make the church handicap accessible.


Holy Family Parish vacated the church in August 2005 when they moved to a newly constructed facility. The buildings stood vacant for 10 months. Concerns had been raised regarding the structural integrity and the adaptability of the church building for future uses.

Excel Engineering was commissioned in June 2006 to provide architectural, historical surveying, and engineering services to address specific issues to the original church building. Surveyors found during the historical surveying that the amount of modifications made over the years hurt the historical integrity of St. Louis Church. Historical significance did not save this building due to the amount of modifications made over the years.

The building was purchased by Dave Haase, owner of Attitude Sports, in 2006. Dave Haase had the intention of turning the building into a business. However those intentions came to a halt when a fire started in the church during the remodeling process on the date of Monday, March 19, 2007. The cause of the fire was never determined. This could have been a mindless act of arson or faulty electrical wiring. Since then, both the church and school have been razed.

St. Louis Church was located in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, US.


St. Louis Church is an example of how too many renovations, modifications, remodels, and additions can effect the historical integrity of buildings. Too many modifications what hurt the historical integrity of this particular church building. Modifications are what hurt this building. For example, this would hurt the building’s chance of being eligible to be register on the National Register of Historic Places or meet NRPH requirements and guidelines.

Modifications are what also hurt structural integrity from a historic point of view. Modifications to buildings over 100 years old are not necessarily the brightest idea due to aging and safety. Aging and safety are key issues of structural integrity. Historical significance did not save this building due to the amount of modifications made over the years.

Exploring Shoreham Yards in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Shoreham Yards was built in the late 1800s by the grain millers for the grain millers to transport grain from its mills to the city of Minneapolis. General Mills and Pillsbury used these rail yards. Steam locomotives were built at the site and tools were invented at the site. The Shoreham Yards site would eventually become an all-encompassing self-contained rail village. A greenhouse for train table decor was established. It is now used as a rail container transfer station.

Shoreham Yards is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota, US.

Butte Knit Plant first double-knit garment operation for world's largest women's apparel manufacturer lost with time.

Butte Knitting Mills (Butte Knit Plant) was a division of Jonathan Logan Inc. which at the time the world's largest women's apparel manufacturer. Jonathan Logan Inc operated Butte Knit Plant.

Back in 1959, when double knit and the garments made from it were already popular in European women’s wear, very few people in the United States believed in it. Very few people in the United States believed its popularity would soar or take off in charting numbers.
(Ref: Herald-Journal, page D3, Feb. 10, 1967)

Butte Knit Plant was the first double-knit garment operation in the United States which had opened in January 1960. Not only for the world, but Butte Knit Plant was the first double-knit garment operation for world's largest women's apparel manufacturer in the United States. It was a great place to work and well respected among mill workers in the textile industry.

Initial production space for Butte Knit Plant had grown from about 40,000 square feet to about 1.5 million square feet with more than 2,000 employees. Jonathan Logan Inc operated Butte Knit Plant. Butte Knit Plant eventually became its own separate business. (Ref: Herald-Journal, 1972)

Today Butte Knit Plant has been more or less forgotten away with time. Only a handful of people knew about this textile mill.

Butte Knit Plant is located at Business I-85, Spartanburg, South Carolina, US.

Fostoria Glass Plant of West Virginia forgotten.

The Fostoria Glass Company began operations in Fostoria, Ohio on December 15, 1887. This site was chosen because natural gas at a recently opened field in the area had been offered at a very low cost to attract new industries. However that was short-lived. Fostoria Glass Company moved to Moundsville, West Virginia in 1891. An abundance of gas, coal, and other needed materials were close by.

Fostoria was the largest maker of handmade glassware in the United States at one time employing nearly 1,000 people. Over 8 million pieces of glass were manufactured in 1950. Fostoria bought the Morgantown Glass Company in 1965. Fostoria discontinued most of their line in 1971. In 1983, Lancaster Colony purchased the factory in 1983. The factory closed again in 1986.

Fostoria Glass Plant was located in Moundsville, West Virginia, US.