Showing posts with label business. Show all posts
Showing posts with label business. Show all posts

Monday, November 12, 2018

Finding the history about Del Valle Gin.

Not much history is known or can be found out about the Del Valle Gin Co. of Del Valle, Texas. This news article will attempt to explain the history behind Del Valle Gin Co.

Del Valle Gin Co was established by Albin Carl Jacobson sometime during the mid-to-late 19th century. It was established inside the Glenbrook subdivision of Del Valle which is located on TX 71. Del Valle Gin Co was a cotton gin that provided cotton for the Del Valle community. (Ref: Deed Records of Travis County, Volume 1950, 224)

Del Valle Gin Company competed in the agricultural business of cotton farming with other local cotton gins of Travis County. Del Valle Gin Co closed in 1957. Albin Carl Jacobson deeded the land to Milton Cockrum in February 26, 1959. (Ref: Deed Records of Travis County, Volume 2013, 107)

A portion of land from the former cotton gin located on Meldrum Road was deeded to Robbie Lee Ellis on November 11, 1972. Today nothing remains of Del Valle Gin.

(Ref: Deed Records of Travis County, Volume 4501, 1870)
(Ref: Deed Records of Travis County, Volume 5, 30)

History behind Creedmoor Gin Company explained and dissected.

Creedmoor Gin Company was established in 1878 as Creedmoor Co-op Gin by W. R. Davis on 110 acres of land owned by W. J. Montgomery. Creedmoor Co-op Gin was located on FM 1625.

Creedmoor Co-op Gin was a cotton gin that served the Creedmoor community. A. D. Dye was its investor responsible for capital stocks. The business started off as a small local operation and then expanded to serve Travis County. The land was owned by W. J. Montgomery.

Creedmoor Cotton Gin was destroyed by fire on December 9, 1897. 100 tons of cotton seed and 17 bales of cotton perished in the fire. E. I. Davis reported this news to the Austin Weekly Statesman.
(Ref: Austin Weekly Statesman, Page 4, Thursday, December 9, 1897)

On January 30, 1899, 110 acres were deeded to L. B. Rector by W. J. Montgomery. According to Travis County Deed Records, the John Ash tract was part of the co-op gin. Several other acres were merged or absorbed onto the property.


Creedmoor Gin Company was incorporated on the date of February 23, 1907 with $10,000 capital stock by W. R. Davis and A. D. Dye. Creedmoor Gin Company was incorporated as a domestic for-profit corporation. (Ref: Daily Bulletin of the Manufacturers Record, Volumes 17-18)

In the year of 1919, Creedmoor Gin Company was involved in a bankruptcy case. However the cotton gin continued operations. A. D. Dye became in charge of the cotton gin and company.
(Ref: American bankruptcy reports, Volume 43)
(Ref: The Southwestern Reporter, Volume 210)

A few bankruptcies hit the cotton gin and company hard during the 20th century which slowed down business, but did not ultimately hurt W. R. Davis and A. D. Dye. Over time, several of the original structures for the original Creedmoor Gin Company were demolished excluding the ones remaining  from the 1897 fire.

In 1961, Creedmoor Gin Company closed down and the land was sold to Fannie Hunt Montgomery. On the date of 10/30/1992, Fannie Hunt Montgomery transferred the property to Lindsay Lucy Montgomery on a business quit claim deed. Lindsay Lucy Montgomery sold the property to Village of Creedmoor (City of Creedmoor) on a warranty deed on the date of 12/27/1996. (Ref: Deed Records of Travis County, 12/27/1996)

Today the only remnant left of Creedmoor Gin Company is a 1 story hay barn building which is now surrounded by trees, grass, and other natural vegetation. Today Village of Creedmoor (City of Creedmoor) owns the property. Some of the property turned into the Creedmoor Community Center on FM 1625.


Creedmoor Gin Company was located at 12513 FM 1625, Creedmoor, Texas, US 78610.

*Creedmoor Gin Company was also known as Creedmoor Co-op Gin and Creedmoor Gin Co.

Sunday, November 4, 2018

Parking lots for pet friendly hotel of Austin, Texas in operation!

As of 2018, 2 mega-sized parking lots have now been built inside the property of Austin Bergstrom International Airport for a pet friendly hotel called Bark & Zoom. The 2 mega-sized parking lots are now in operation after much needed construction work.

Central parking in front of the main hotel building cannot accommodate the demand for need of pet friendly hotels in Austin, Texas. This resulted in the building of 5 acres worth of parking lots near the entrance of Austin Bergstrom International Airport. After many delays, their parking lots are now open for business. Bark & Zoom’s largest parking lot is located on Austin Bergstrom International Airport property.

What is interesting and unique for this pet friendly hotel is that the address for the Bark & Zoom parking lots located on the Austin Bergstrom International Airport property has an Austin address while Bark & Zoom has a Del Valle address.

Friday, November 2, 2018

Remembering Lek’s Little Thailand trailer restaurant.

Lek’s Little Thailand is one of the many forgotten restaurants of Austin and Travis County. Not many people remember Lek’s Little Thailand. Soldiers stationed at Bergstrom Air Force Base knew about the restaurant. It had a sizable reputation among Air Force members of Bergstrom Air Force Base.


Lek’s Little Thailand was Thai food restaurant that first opened in 1982 and operated out of a trailer on 10800 Pearce Lance in Del Valle, Texas. Lek’s Little Thailand was located where FM 973 & Pearce Lance intersect into crossroads. The owner and chef was  Noopin Simcoe who had an American husband named Leland R. Simcoe.

Beginning in 1983, the restaurant was open every day accept Monday. The 1982-1983 fiscal year was their first full fiscal year ever. Gretchen McDade Ross owned the land where Lek’s Little Thailand restaurant was located.

What was unique about Lek's Little Thailand was their unusually spiced southeast Asian specialties included in their Thai food. Their pot Thai stood and pot nua out the most from everything else on the menu. Leland was known for his spicy, authentic Thai food. Especially his own concoction of Thai Bloody Marys. (Ref: Leland R. “Dick” Simcoe Obituary on legacy.com)

Notable items on the menu were pot nua (peppery beef on rice), pot Thai (which consists of stir-fried noodles, bean sprouts, cab­bage, and sliced scrambled egg, served with fresh lime to cut the oil), and lemon grass soup. Pot Thai was stir-fried noodles. Side dishes for Pot Thai were bean sprouts, cab­bage, and sliced scrambled egg. It was served with fresh lime to cut the oil taste. Their lemon grass soup was sweet and sour altogether at the same time. 

Lek's trailer had an Arkansas Razorbacks license plate and portraits of the royal couple of Thailand on the wall. Country & Western played on the sound system. “Thai it-you'll like it.” was their business slogan.


Noopin Simcoe and Leland R. Simcoe would not fully own the property until 1990. Gretchen McDade Ross and Gretchen McDade Ross Management sold the land to the couple on a warranty deed as part of correction deed on the date of 11/12/1990.

At the very end of 1994, City of Austin grabbed their land via eminent domain as part of the Airport Noise Mitigation Program. It was on a warranty deed at an appraisal value of $10,625 dollars. The City of Austin bought out nearly all residencies located less than 2 miles within the flightpath as what the Airport Noise Mitigation Program required.

Noopin Simcoe and Leland Simcoe relocated in 1995 to Garfield, Texas. A small town east of Del Valle. They would reopen at the address of 4316 Caldwell Lane, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617. Little Thailand still operates under a new employment team to this day.

At the end of 1996, the trailer was auctioned off and moved elsewhere. Lek’s Little Thailand was located in the flight path of Austin Bergstrom International Airport. By 1997 is when everything was paved over with gravel. Grass soon grew where the trailer once was located at.
(Ref: Austin American-Statesman, November 4, 1996)

Today all that remains was the metal gate that closed Pearce Lane & Fincher Lane (FM 973) during flooding and chain link surrounding the property. Nothing else remains.


Lek's Little Thailand was located at 10800 Pearce Lance, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617. Their telephone number was 512-247-3855.

Former Advance Auto Parts shop in Little Rock, Arkansas converted into a watermelon shop.

A former Advance Auto Parts shop had been converted into a watermelon shop in 2017. What was once Advance Auto Parts is now a watermelon shop. A Hanna-Chevrolet pickup truck is now parked at the front entrance of the former Advance Auto Parts shop building. The building had been leased to several other companies for over 10 years to companies such as King of Wings Shop and Advance Auto Parts.

According to U.S. Bank of Minneapolis and street view imagery from Google Maps using Google street view, the Advance Auto Parts shop building was abandoned in August 2016. On July 2017 is when the Advance Auto Parts shop building became a watermelon shop. A watermelon has been posted by the driveway entrance of Asher Avenue. This indicates the shop is now open for business. It is unknown as to what the future plans for this watermelon shop are.

The watermelon shop is located at 4102 Asher Avenue, Little Rock, Arkansas, US 72204.

Wednesday, October 31, 2018

An in-depth history of Lajitas School explored.

Lajitas School is one of the many forgotten schools in the State of Texas. Only so much history is known about this school. This news article will dive into the in-depth history of Lajitas School.


Lajitas School first opened northwest-bound of the Mariposa mine by FM 170. The school was first located in a room built to the side of the Lajitas Catholic Church (Lajitas Mission) that McGuirk built in 1900. That is where the school gets its Christian theme and background. English and Spanish was taught here from the beginning to end. (Ref: Ghosts of the Big Bend)

In 1921, Lajitas School relocated further down FM 170 into a single story, wooden frame building built in a similar form of a snuff box. The wooden frame snuff box building was the second Lajitas School.

County school funds were depleted by 1930 due to the Terlingua Common School District favoring Perry School. Chisos Mining Company controlled the political structure of the school district. (Ref: Quicksliver: Terlingua and the Chisos Mining Company, p. 140)

The teacher hired for the fall of 1932 suddenly quit. This resulted in Lajitas School being closed down for 3 years until 1935. Both the Perry School and the Lajitas School shared a teacher from 1935 to 1938. Howard Perry operated the Lajitas School during the fall semesters only.

Hazel Matthews was the teacher until being transferred to Perry School in 1937. Ann Ellis served as secretary and school teacher. Chisos Mining Company delayed opening the Lajitas School until the spring semester of 1937. Classes continued that spring.

According to Big Bend Historian Clifford Casey, Lajitas School continued to operate until 1952. It was due to the success of Perry School that Lajitas School ultimately shut down. Lajitas School had shut down due declining enrollment and opening of the Perry School. County funds stopped by then.

In 2002, the Lajitas School building was transformed into a lodge called Lajitas Equestrian Center & Hunting Lodge which is currently in operation. It is known as a hunting lodge by the Lajitas community for the most part. 

The first Lajitas School is located at FM 170, Lajitas, Texas, US 79852.
The second Lajitas School is located at FM 118 & FM 170, Lajitas, Texas, US 79852.

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

El Paso Congressman Beto O’Rourke to run against Ted Cruz for Texas Senate.

In early 2018, Congressman Beto O’Rourke from El Paso, Texas publicly announced he would be running against Senator Ted Cruz for Texas Senate. Beto O’Rourke is also running for US Senate against Ted Cruz. However Beto O’Rourke is mainly shifted his focus on primarily running for Texas Senate.

In this past year alone, Beto has managed to gain Hispanic vote across the State of Texas. He plans to gain the Hispanic vote across the United States. In early 2018, Beto O’Rourke ran a 10k race from US to Mexico as a symbol of unity. All this was to gain the Hispanic vote across the United States.

David Ewalt Community Center in limbo after residential bid.

Pontiac resident Demetra Leonard made a $120,000 winning bid on buying out the David Ewalt Community Center in 2013. She bought the property from the City of Pontiac. It is now under private ownership. It is now October 2018 and nothing has happened. The building is sealed and now vacant.

(Ref: https://www.theoaklandpress.com/news/pontiac-receives-in-high-bids-in-auction-of-city-owned/article_3f20007d-d978-5712-be28-f44ce2b5ef63.html)

David Ewalt Community Center is located at 1460 North Perry Street, Pontiac, Michigan US 48340.

Saturday, October 13, 2018

History of Tablito School rediscovered and revealed.

Tablito School was named after a place called La Tablita. Governor Manuel Salcedo and Governor Herrera along with his 12 other officers were escorted from San Antonio de Béxar under an armed guard. They were executed near the site of the battlefield at a place called “La Tablita” in 1813. The killing of Governor Manuel Salcedo and his officers in 1813 was by some of the revolutionaries. A declaration of independence was adopted on April 6, 1813, establishing the First Independent State of Texas of the Mexican Republic, with José Bernardo Gutiérrez de Lara as president. (Ref: Castaneda, 1950, p. 99)

Tablito School was built in the area of La Tablita on January 1st, 1917 for Common School District No. 23 aka Elemndorf School District. Bexar County Common School District was responsible for financing and maintaining this school. J. C. Schulz was appointed by a county judge and commissioners to hold an election for increased special school tax and issuance of school bonds.

Tablito School was once located at the intersection of Streich Road & Old Corpus Christi Road just 3½ miles west of Elmendorf. Tablito School was also known as Tablito Elementary School. (Ref: East Central Independent School District Museum map of 1949)

Talbito School had a high percentage of Hispanic students many of whom were Mexican. Over 70% of its student population was Hispanic. It was a “Mexican school” for Hispanic students enrolled in the Elemndorf School District which is why it was called the “Mexican school”. Children spoke Spanish freely while attending Tablito School.

In 1949, the East Central Independent School District was formed and 15 rural schools were united into that one school district. Tablito School was consolidated into East Central Independent School District in 1949. Tablito School was closed in 1951. The Tablito School building was moved about a mile east on Goliad Road.


Today Tablito School is now the David Crocket Grange located at 14309 Old Corpus Christi Road, Elemendorf, Texas, US 78112. David Crocket Grange is a grange hall.

Sunday, October 7, 2018

History of San Juan School in San Antonio, Texas explored.

San Juan School was one of the many forgotten schools of San Antonio and Bexar County next to Berg’s Mill School. Not much is known about the San Juan School in San Antonio, Texas. What is known is that San Juan School was a rural school located way out in the county in San Antonio, Texas. Many historians have not covered this school written in books. Many citizens of San Antonio seemed to have forgotten about this school’s existence or its presence.

San Antonio Independent School District established San Juan School sometime during the mid-to-late 19th century. Its exact year of establishment is unknown. What is known is that San Juan School was an elementary school that was known as San Juan Elementary School and was a co-ed school. Students in grades 1 through 6 were educated here. 7th grade was added later. 

School attendance boasted a small bumbling population. Attendance rate was very high. Student enrollment never went past 300. Most of the pupils were children of Mexican descent. 70% percent of the student population was Mexican.


As early as 1884, San Juan School had faced structural problems and health concerns. A San Antonio Light newspaper article had highlighted the issue in their newspaper that year. Citizens of San Antonio were protesting against San Antonio Independent School District dumping sewage into the San Antonio River. Many of whom were upset.

“The citizens below San Antonio assembled and met at San Juan School House for the purpose of protesting against throwing the sewerage into the San Antonio River. Such interference with the health and use of the water for their household purposes.

The meeting was called to order by Captain D. M. Poor. Ed Braden was appointed Chairman, and Frank Ashley Secretary. The following named gentlemen were appointed to draft a resolution and report the same next Saturday in the San Juan School House at 3 o'clock p.m. for a protest against throwing the filth of the city into the river and that a committee meet on Thursday in the County court room at 10 o'clock a.m.”

(Ref: San Antonio Light, Page 1, Tuesday, January 29, 1884)


School attendance in the 1930s boasted a bumbling population. On average, 30 students attended this school daily. In the 1930s, San Juan School educated students in grades 1 through 6. 7th grade students attended school elsewhere.

Over 60% of the student population was Mexican by 1932. The PTA was very involved with the quality of education upon its students. Manual training and sewing were taught at this school. Boys were taught manual training while girls were taught sewing. Girls learned sewing at a young age. Girls held an intense interest in sewing. Classes in dancing were held. (Ref: San Antonio Express, February 13, 1932)

The 1940s is when 7th grade was added to the school. By the end of the 1960s, over 70% of the student population was Hispanic. Over 200 students had attended this school during that time. 7th grade classes were discontinued.

In 1952, parents complained to the school district and city council that students were being deprived and denied of outdoor activities due to air traffic and noise pollution from Brooks City Air Force Base. Students were deprived of outdoor activities by playing indoors due to air traffic. However nothing happened. The school continued classes and remained open.


San Juan School closed in 1970 after the school building was found to be too closely located within the flight path of Brooks City Air Force Base. This led students to relocated to different schools across the school district.

It was at the suggestion of Frank Tejeda of the Southside Neighborhood Association who requested the school board consider leasing San Juan Elementary School at $1 per year. San Juan Society offered to become a tenant and use the property on a lease from the school district.

San Juan Society began using this building on a lease in 1970. San Juan Society used the San Juan School building as a community center for a year with a lease of $1 a year. The San Juan Society received legal permission from the board to lease the old San Juan School building for community meetings, recreational and educational activities. San Juan School was is the third retired school in the district (SA ISD) to be leased out in 1970 for such purposes. (Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 55, August 28, 1970)

In 1971, San Juan Society requested its lease be cancelled for some apparent reason. The school district delayed the lease. However San Juan Society pulled away slowly from the lease and took business elsewhere. This left the building to sit vacant for a few years until 1975. (Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 3, February 12, 1971)

By 1975, San Antonio Express referred to the school property as improved land for sale by San Antonio Independent School District offers. The school building and property was up for sale. The building was still extant then.
(Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 3, February 18, 1975)
(Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 19, February 18, 1975)

San Antonio Independent School District sold the property to Barthold Gilbert in 1976. The school bundling was demolished in 1977. Barthold Gilbert would own this property until his death in 1981. The lot was sold to a woman named Fay A Kiln in 1982. (Ref: http://bexardata.com/property/id/eBkP3iQ4j)


Restrictions were put on the property as part of the special warranty deed issued on December 14, 1992. The pretty was not to be used for educational purposes meaning that a school could not be operated on such property. $3,000 dollars was paid to Fay A Kiln. A quorum was present. (Ref: Bear County Public Records Doc No. 2372965)

Many people have lived address over the years especially during the beginning of the 2000s. However Fay A Kiln remained on record as property owner. Many people have had their mailing address located at this location.

The school building is no longer extant. No remains of the school are left. Today Fay A Kiln owns the property. She leases the property to various people in San Antonio and of Bexar County.
(Ref: http://bexardata.com/property/id/eBkP3iQ4j)


San Juan School was located at 8630 Old Corpus Christi Road, San Antonio, Texas, US 78223. Its other known address was 8632 Old Corpus Christi Highway San Antonio, Texas, US 78223.
Today its current address is located at 8638 Old Corpus Christi Road, San Antonio, Texas, US 78223.


History of Webster School in Pontiac, Michigan explored.

Elmer Webster Elementary School (Webster School) was built in 1920. It was designed by Perkins, Fellows, & Hamilton. This school would open in 1921 and served students from Kindergarten up to 6th grade.

It was an unusual building as it had an innovative combination cafeteria located in the center of the school. An auditorium and gymnasium located in the center of the school as well. The basketball court had a stage. The building was just one story in height.

The school closed in 2006 due to low enrollment. Pontiac School District had lost students due to other school closures. The building has been vacant for more than 10 years.

Pontiac School District sold the property to developer Micah 6 Community in 2015. A neighborhood group worked out an agreement after the sale. This neighborhood group was looking at buying the building and property at the time. The reason why is because this neighborhood group was looking into preserving the history of this school.

Renovations had started in the summer of 2016. There have been plans to turn this school into a small business, garden, and playscape.

Webster School is located at 640 West Huron Street, Pontiac, Michigan, US 48341.

Friday, October 5, 2018

What was Lucy’s Thrift Shop in Lockhart, Texas? A blast from the past!

Ever wonder what Lucy’s Thrift Shop was? You know. The building located on Borchert Loop off of Texas Highway 142 in Lockhart, Texas? Well this news article will explain a brief summary on history of what this building once was.

Lucy’s Thrift Shop was in 1966 as a grey single story square building by Harvey Schultz for his electrical business. Harvey Schultz sold the building to a female named Lucy Serrato in 1977. This building sat vacant for a couple of years before any plans were by Lucy. Lucy Serrato would eventually turn this building into a thrift shop which she would later run by herself.

Lucy Serrato converted the building into a thrift shop called Lucy's Thrift Shop in 1983. Lucy Serrato ran Lucy's Thrift Shop as she served as both CEO and founder. The building was painted a bright white color. (Ref: Lockhart Post, Page 7, Thursday, September 29, 1983)

The thrift shop closed sometime in 2006. It was abandoned in 2008. Today the building is now vacant. Its current use is unknown. Plans regarding the future of this building are unknown as well.

Lucy’s Thrift Shop is located on 1802 Borchert Loop, Lockhart, Texas, US 78644.

Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Reviving history of Davis Airport. A forgotten airport of San Antonio, Texas.

Davis Airport is one of the many forgotten airports of San Antonio, Texas that has been long forgotten. Not much is known about this airport or its history. Not much else can be found out about this airport whether online or offline. Much of its history remains forgotten and unknown.

Davis Airport was built in 1936 where the modern day Crown Hill Park neighborhood is located today. The City of San Antonio owned the airport as it was a public airport nearly 2 miles adjacent to San Antonio International Airport.

Its runways were a small sod field built on rolling hills. The rolling hills accommodated the lower altitude. Davis Airport was considered to be out in the country by Bexar County residents. It was located north of San Antonio on I 410. Davis Airport served as an auxiliary airport for San Antonio International Airport. Sometimes airport traffic from San Antonio International Airport was diverted to Davis Airport. However that was only during rare instances.

1960 is when the City of San Antonio closed Davis Airport down and operations were merged with San Antonio International Airport. The airport was closed down to meet demands for accommodation of population growth. Construction for the Crown Hill Park neighborhood began in 1961. Construction for the Crown Hill Park neighborhood was near completion by 1963. Only one airplane hangar remained in 1963. This airplane hangar was located south where McCulloch Avenue is today.

The airplane hangar located south of the runway near I 410 was converted into a supermarket and later a store in 1964. In 1966, the building moved further north of the Loop 410 (I 410). The building was demolished sometime in the 1980s. Today no trace of Davis Airport remains.


*Loop 410 is I 410.
*The south airplane hangar was located 20 feet near I 410.

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Exploring news about the Elroy Oil Field.

Elroy Oil Field is an oil field that is located in the small community of Elroy, Texas. Elroy Oil Field is one of the few operating oil fields in Travis County and Austin next to the Santa Rita Oil Field and Oil Well on Trinity Street & 19th Street. Only a handful of oil fields in Travis County exist. Not that many oil fields in Austin or Travis County exist. 


Elroy Oil Field was built and established after oil was discovered in 1950 by Electragas, Inc. on land property owned by Martha Golden Cooper and Douglas Kay Cooper. This oil field started out as a minuscule mining and fracking operation with 2 oil wells and 2 oil tanks. Mining and fracking involves pumping huge amounts of wastewater deep underground in order to drill for oil. The oil is placed inside of oil tanks.

(Ref: Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2004)
(Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 47, Sunday, November 16, 1952)

Elroy Oil boasted a total of 6 oil tanks and 8 oil wells in 1956. Petroleum was found on the property while digging for oil in 1959. 4 wells were reportedly found to have been drilling for petroleum during oil production. (Ref: Report of Investigations, Issues 78-87)

Sometime in the 20th century is when the more oil rigs were installed. The number of oil wells and oil tanks remained the same throughout the 1960s. 8 oil wells were reportedly found on the property of Douglas Kay Cooper.

Elroy Oil Field was reduced to just down to 4 oil tanks and 7 wells by 1987. 1988 is when Elroy Oil Field was reduced even further down to just 2 oil tanks and 5 wells. Elroy Oil Field is the only oil field which still reports brine production inside of Travis County.

(Ref: Report 276  OCCURRENCE, AVAILABILITY, AND QUALITY OF GROUND WATER IN TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS)
(Ref: Report - Texas Department of Water Resources, Issue 276)


In 2011, Martha Golden Cooper sold 247 acres of land to Butler Interests LTD and to the Martin Butler Trust. Butler Interests LTD and the Martin Butler Trust have been managing the 247 acres worth of land property since then.

shalexp has reported 305 BBLs of natural oil had been produced in March 2018. The total gas production for Elroy Oil field was 40 MCF. There had been no gas production from this oil field for the year of 2018.

(Ref: https://www.shalexp.com/texas/travis-county/east-elroy-unit/815322)
(Ref: http://www.texas-drilling.com/travis-county/leases/east-elroy-unit/004137)

In April 25, 2018, Motor Sports Magazine cited that the moveable bumps at F1 Austin racetrack had something to do with seismic activity in the local area, some of which is caused by mining and fracking. Mining and fracking involves pumping huge amounts of wastewater deep underground in order to drill for oil. The oil is placed inside of oil tanks. The Elroy Oil Field is situated less than 2 miles from the track.

(Ref: https://www.motorsportmagazine.com/opinion/motogp/motogp-mutterings-grand-prix-americas)


Today Elroy Oil Field is now currently operating 15 oil wells and 5 oil tanks on 493 acres worth of land.
owned by Martha Golden Cooper and Electragas Inc. from Houston, Texas. All 15 oil rigs continue to dig for oil in the Elroy community and Travis County. Mining and fracking still continues at Elroy Oil Field.

Electragas, Inc still owns the property today along with Martha Golden Cooper, Douglas Kay Cooper, and Eileen Moore Cooper. A portion of the land tract for Elroy Oil Field is now part of the Martin Butler Trust.


Elroy Oil Field is located on Williford Lane, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.

Old Browning Hangar in Austin, Texas now revitalized and open.

An airplane hangar called the Browning Hangar in Austin, Texas has now been revitalized. For much of 2018 the old Browning Hangar was under construction. Work on revitalizing the Browning Hangar was completed in early August 2018.

Today the Browning Hangar has now been revitalized while maintaining its historic design and is now serving as a mixed use structure. As of September 2018, the hangar is now open to the public.

Browning Hangar still stands strong as 1 of the 3 remaining structures from the former Robert Mueller Municipal Airport including the control tower. Only a few airport hangars from the Robert Mueller Municipal Airport are in existence today.

Browning Hangar was once in service for the Robert Mueller Municipal Airport from 1945 to 1999. In 2000 the airplane was abandoned. Architectural Engineers Collaborative revitalized the airplane hangar in 2007. The sides and doors were removed in the same year. A protective roof cover was added. Restoration was started in 2007 and had ended in 2008. By 2017, the airplane hangar was completely open to both the public and private.

Saturday, September 8, 2018

Old Browning Hangar in Austin, Texas now revitalized.

An airplane hangar called the Browning Hangar in Austin, Texas has now been revitalized. For much of 2018 the old Browning Hangar was under construction. Work on revitalizing the Browning Hangar was completed in early August 2018. Today the Browning Hangar has now been revitalized while maintaining its historic design and is now serving as a mixed use structure.

Browning Hangar was once in service for the Robert Mueller Municipal Airport from 1945 to 1999. In 2000 the airplane was abandoned. Architectural Engineers Collaborative revitalized the airplane hangar in 2007. The sides and doors were removed in the same year. A protective roof cover was added. Restoration was started in 2007 and had ended in 2008. By 2017, the airplane hangar was completely open to both the public and private.

Browning Hangar still stands strong as 1 of the 3 remaining structures from the former Robert Mueller Municipal Airport including the control tower.

Thursday, August 30, 2018

El Paso Congressman Beto O’Rourke ran 10k from US to Mexico.

In early 2018, Congressman Beto O’Rourke from El Paso, Texas ran 10k from US to Mexico as a symbol of unity. All this is to gain the Hispanic vote across the United States. He does want to work in our economy. Beto O’Rourke is also running for US Senate against Ted Cruz.

Friday, August 17, 2018

Remembering the Colorado Mexican School.

Colorado Mexican School is one of the many forgotten schools and institutions of Austin and Del Valle that have faded away with time and from people's memories. This news article explains the history behind Colorado Mexican School


The Colorado Mexican School was constructed in 1934 as a one-room  school facing south of the Colorado White School (Colorado School). The Colorado Mexican School was built on Old Del Valle Road near US 183 & Highway 71. Blacks student had sometimes attended the Colorado Mexican School. The school educated students in grades 1 through 7.

Average daily attendance was 26 to 30 students on daily basis. The attendance rate still remained low as it historically was and has been. Almost 100 students attended this school.

Prior to the opening of Colorado Mexican School, Hispanic students attended the Colorado White School before a separate school for Hispanics became available. Hispanic students were not required to attend school. Hispanic students had either attended the negro schools or white schools.

Of course racial segregation was implemented by law in Texas and southern United States, so schools were separated by race. Separate schools were built for white, black, and Hispanic students. Black students attended separate schools from white students. White students attended separate schools from black students. That is the reason why the "Colorado White School", "Colorado Mexican School", and "Colorado Negro School" existed.

Although the Colorado School had an Austin address, it served students from the communities of Del Valle, Austin, Montopolis, Bergstrom Village, Glenbrook, and Colton.


By the 1940s, the Colorado White School and Colorado Mexican School received indoor plumbing with 2 separate toilets inside the brick building. Water pipes were upgraded and fixed.

The Colorado Mexican School eventually became combined into one school by 1942. Roof replacement was installed in the same year. The Colorado Mexican School had a daily attendance rate of 100 students in 1944. 100 students was the average on a daily basis. A huge increase from the 1930s attendance rate. The rate remained the same even in 1945.

By the late 1940s, the segregated Colorado Mexican School experienced extreme overcrowding. Colorado Common School District was 1 of 4 school districts listed as a defendant in the 1948 court case of Delgado v. Bastrop ISD. Colorado School was listed as a prime example of racial segregation in the lawsuit against the state of Texas. LULAC brought suit against several school districts for denying Hispanic students the use of school facilities and educational services. The suit claimed Hispanic students were separated and segregated from white students even though under state law they were considered "White" or "Caucasian".

Although US Court found both the Colorado Mexican School and Colorado Common School District to be operating within the terms of the decree, overcrowding of the school witnessed would contradict the provision for “equal school instruction.”

By the late end of 1948, the school was closed due to overcrowding conditions. Travis County Schools Superintendent Irving W. Popham described conditions at Colorado Mexican School as “the worst Travis County has ever known.” Travis County Schools, Austin Independent School District (then Austin Public Schools which is now known as Austin ISD) and Colorado Common School District deemed the Colorado School unfit and inadequate for a learning environment due to overcrowding from a lack of space and growth in enrollment. Overcrowding was extreme. Travis County government officials determined the Colorado School deemed to be unfit and antiquated.

The Nuestra Senora La Luz Catholic Mission Church in Montopolis offered the use of its chapel for 53 first-grade students. The remaining 40 students stayed at the Colorado Mexican School until the school district finally closed down the school. Its students were shipped to other schools.

From 1948 to 1950, the Colorado Mexican School was used as a community center and church. As part of the land agreement with Travis County and City of Austin, the school was to be zoned as a church and community if in the event the school were to close down due to overcrowding, structural error, or declining enrollment. Colorado School held religious services during operation as a church.

(Ref: Austin American Statesman, Crowded Rural Schools Lack Pioneer Facilities, January 26, 1947)
(Ref: Austin American Statesman, Latin-American school segregation outlawed, June 15, 1948)
(Ref: Handbook of Texas Online, V. Carl Allsup, "Delgado v. Bastrop Isd”)


In 1950, the old Colorado Mexican School was all but abandoned by the school district. Grass was kept untrimmed. Windows and window panels were boarded with thin plywood. Vegetation had sprawled all over.

The Colorado Common School District along with Travis County Schools & TEA were consolidating school districts & schools in Southeastern Travis County in the 1950s in an effort to collect more on property taxes, declining enrollment, and lack of funding. Schools and school districts that were consolidated into Colorado Common School District were Elroy, Creedmoor, Pilot Knob, Dry Creek, Hornsby-Dunlap, Maha, and Garfield.

1950 is also when the Del Valle schools became slowly integrated. Some schools were no longer separated by race or ethnicity.

1952 is the year when the city of Austin began annexing portions of the Colorado Common School District in both Austin and Del Valle. The Colorado Mexican School was within the city limits causing confusion with Austin ISD and Del Valle ISD school district boundaries. Because the Colorado Mexican School was within he Austin city limits, the school district had to find a new location for its own schools.

In 1958, grass vegetation took over the driveways as Colorado Mexican School was totally abandoned. The buildings were still standing by then. 1958 is also the year when the Del Valle schools became integrated. Schools were no longer separated by race or ethnicity. Integration was slow to come to liberal Austin and Del Valle, but it came easy as the racial integration process went smooth with no trouble.

In 1958, Austin Public Schools (Austin Independent School District bka Austin ISD) sold the land to United States Government as the school was located dangerously close in a flight path being near Bergstrom Air Force Base. Davidson tract was located outside the former Bergstrom Air Force Base.

In 1964, the Colorado Mexican School was demolished after years of being abandoned. All that remained in 1965 was a gravel pit located on site of the former Colorado Mexican School. That gravel pits sat out there for years before becoming overgrown by vegetation. All outbuildings have been demolished. No traces of the school or cistern remain today.


Schools such as this one should be preserved as a museum, converted to a dance studio, bank, or revitalized into government offices. This can be listed as an example of priorities placed in the wrong place. Historic preservation should be a secondary priority for a school district.

Something needs to be done to commemorate the Colorado Mexican School as a part the 1948 Federal Court ruling on Delgado v. Bastrop ISD. People don't recognize how LULAC fought for equal school instruction, services, and facilities. Efforts of LULAC also need to be brought to attention.

Colorado Mexican School was located at 1601 Old Del Valle Road, Austin, Texas, US 78742.



*Colorado Common School District was known to Travis County Schools officials and civilians as Colorado Common School District No. 36 or as School District No. 36.
*The Colorado School was simply just called "Colorado School" at one point in history.
*Colorado School had an Austin address despite being zoned to Del Valle ISD.
*Colorado School was adjacent to 2 other schools before the schools became molded into one school called "Colorado School" due mainly to racial integration following 1948. Thus Colorado Mexican School and Colorado Negro School were eventually combined into the Colorado White School.
*Old Del Valle Road was also known as Old Austin-Del Valle Road, Austin-Del Valle Road, and Del Valle Road.

Saturday, August 11, 2018

Short history behind the 1933 building addition of the old Oak Hill School.

Oak Hill School got its second school building as enrollment expanded in 1933. The 1933 eastern addition was constructed during the Great Depression through work relief efforts. It was constructed out of stone masonry.  This small building addition served as an art room. It was also used for the cafeteria. There were restrooms installed for this building. The land for the former school was donated by James Andrew Patton. In December of 1993, the old Oak Hill School received city designation as an Austin Landmark and the property was zoned GR-CO.  

Short history of Hanna School in Hanna, Louisiana explained.

Hanna School was built in 1912 inside the small community of Hanna, Louisiana which is right outside of Shreveport. Red River Parish School District opened the school in 1912 for black students. Class sizes were often small. (Ref: Shreveport Times, Page 3, March 17, 1978)

Renovations to the school were made during the 1930s. Hanna School was segregated by race during the 1970s. Hanna School integrated in 1980 with black and white students in attendance. The school was considered by Red River Parish Board to be state of the art at the time.

Hanna School closed in 2001 due to asbestos. Asbestos was found in the walls and roof. By 2002, the school was abandoned. The school would soon fall into a state of decay. Reportedly several windows are missing and the second floor has collapsed into the first floor leaving a mess in a hallway. There is very little furniture remaining.

Red River Parish School District and Red River Parish Board have offered Hanna School for redevelopment in past years. However nothing has happened. Restoration is not an option due to high cost of asbestos removal and aging structural issues.