Showing posts with label education. Show all posts
Showing posts with label education. Show all posts

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Manda Community Center : A fine example of historic preservation done right.

From 2016 to 2017, the Friends of Manda School have begun maintenance and upkeep of the former Manda School building as an attempt of historic perseveration. Several window panels have been replaced and window screens have been added to all windows of this school. All wooden floors have been flattened and resurfaced to be up to code for building standards and code standards. Central AC heating is now connected to this building.

Every single year the Friends of Manda School clean the school building and land property by mowing the grass and terminating insects from hidden corners. Flooring has been resurfaced by volunteers from Friends of Manda School.

Every single year the Friends of Manda School hold meetings here at the Manda Community Center. Mainly meetings are about future regards of Manda Community Center and funding for historic preservation toward this building which are held by the Board of Directors for Friends of Manda School. Community functions, social gatherings, programs, and various meetings are still held inside this building. Friends of Manda School plans to keep the Manda School open as the Manda Community Center in Manda, Texas which is near the town of Manor, Texas.


Citizens from the Manda community urged commissioners from the Travis County Public Schools (Travis County Common School District) to build a schoolhouse in the Manda community in 1914. Commissioners from the Travis County Public Schools agreed to allocate funding construction of a schoolhouse in Manda, Texas.

By 1915, the Manda community voted on a one issue to construct a new school building that was during the spring of that year. Construction for the Manda School building lasted from the summer to the fall of 1915. Although the construction for the Manda School building mostly operated during the summer, it continued in the fall season. School was held in the New Sweden Lutheran Church on New Sweden Church Road during construction.


The Manda School was opened in 1916 as a two-room schoolhouse which was a single story building structure for the Manda Common School District in the settlement of Manda, Texas. Manda School was spread out into a 2 room plan incorporated in the school building structure sitting on piers. 1st grade through 12th grade were taught in this two-room schoolhouse. Manda School is the only remaining two room school house in Travis County in Austin, Texas from the 1900s era and 1910s decade.

Manda School was named after Amanda Bengtson Gustafson who was sister of the settlement’s postmaster the same year. Manda is a short diminutive for Amanda. The name Manda was shortened from the name Amanda. Many students who had attended this school had Swedish ancestry in their family background and came from Swedish families.

The Manda School eventually became known as the Manda Schoolhouse in 1916. 1916 was the same year the community of Manda, Texas was granted its own school district by the State of Texas and Travis County Public Schools which was called Manda Common School District. Manda Common School District included students from neighboring communities such as Manor, New Sweden, Littig, and Elgin.

Historians have agreed that the Manda School was the original New Sweden School building. Prior to 1916, the Manda School building was used as the New Sweden School building in the New Sweden School District. There were 32 rural school houses with similarity to the one in Manda, but the Manda Schoolhouse is the only one that remains in all of Travis County/Austin. The name New Sweden/Manda Schoolhouse has given to the school by local historians.


New Sweden School, Gregg School, Carlson School, Kimbro School, Willow Ranch School, and several other schools along with school districts were consolidated to form into the Manda Common School District in 1947. More schools and school districts were consolidated to form into the Manda Common School District.

In 1951, the Manda School contributed $20,000 towards the Travis County polio campaign and program. Half of the monetary amount of $20,000 was sent to the national foundation (Polio Foundation) which performed the research for a cure to polio. A news article from the February 01, 1951 edition of the Austin American-Statesman newspaper argued that the monetary amount the amount contributed in the drive won’t even pay their salaries.


The Manda School District was dissolved in 1960 and was divided among Manor ISD, Pflugerville ISD, and Elgin ISD. Most students who attended the Manda School were bussed to Manor ISD though due to proximity towards Manor. When Manda School District was dissolved in 1960, this permanently closed down Manda School.

1960 is the same year Manda Community Club was formed. Despite the Manda Community Club being formed the Manda School building more or less sat abandoned. Manda Community Club tried their hardest to preserve the historic Manda Schoolhouse but ultimately the organization dissolved in 1968. From 1968 on, the Manda School more or less sat abandoned with no meaningful use. The school building still stood in 1969.


Manda School slowly but surely fell into a state of disrepair. That was until the Friends of Manda School (Friendship of Manda School) decided to make the former Manda School building into a community center which would become the Manda Community Center in 2006.

Manda School is now operated and preserved by the Friends of Manda School (Friendship of Manda School). Friends of Manda School is responsible for the upkeep and maintenance of this school building. Every single year the Friends of Manda School clean the school building and land property by mowing the grass and terminating insects from hidden corners. The Manda community along with several volunteers have been restoring the Manda School building to its original condition as found decades earlier.

The Manda Community Center is a fine example of historic preservation done right. We need to urge commissioners of the Travis County Historic Commission to preserve historic buildings such as the Manda School. With help from both local citizens and volunteers, we can keep and preserve buildings such as this one. To this day, the Manda School operates as the Manda Community Center. The school building now serves as the reminder of the early settlement of Manda, Texas.


Manda School/Manda Community Center is located at 16717 Manda Carlson Road, Manor, Texas, US 78653.

History of the Barton Springs Baptist Church in Austin, Texas nearly forgotten.

Barton Springs Baptist Church started birth out as a church in 1882 which was a wooden frame building constructed out of wood. African American citizens attended this church. Barton Springs Baptist Church served as both a church and school. The church was incorporated into the Austin City Limits in 1937. In 1945, the Barton Springs Baptist Church burned down in a fire. 1946 is the year when the church was replaced with a wooden building that sits on cinder blocks today.

Both City of Austin and Barton Springs Baptist Church began preserving the cemetery and church building in 1993. During the same year the city of Austin zoned the church as historic. Barton Springs Baptist Church became an Austin Historical Landmark in 1993.


The school that operated in this church was the St. Elmo Negro School in the St. Elmo School District.

Students who were enrolled in the St. Elmo School District attended St. Elmo School No. 2 located at 2109 Goodrich Avenue in the Barton Hills neighborhood. Grades 1st through 8th were taught at this school. Both 9th grade and 10th grade were later added during the late 19th century. But St. Elmo School No. 2 was a K-8 school overall.

St. Elmo Negro School along with the St. Elmo School District incorporated into Austin Independent School District in 1937. In 1938, the former St. Elmo Negro School became Barton Springs Baptist Church. St. Elmo Negro School is one of the last few reminders of the former St. Elmo city and community. Today St. Elmo Negro School is under the entity of Barton Springs Baptist Church.

The location of Barton Springs Baptist Church is 2109 Goodrich Avenue, Austin, Texas, US 78704.

Pleasant Grove School history almost nearly forgotten.

Pleasant Grove School began its life as Cat Hollow School in the Cat Hollow community of Lake Travis in 1890. The Cat Hollow School lasted from 1890 to 1901. In 1901 is when the school was renamed to Pleasant Grove School. The Pleasant Grove school taught 1st grade through 7th grade. Students who wanted to continue beyond 7th grade would have to attend school in Bee Cave, Hamilton Pool, or Dripping Springs. Travis County Public Schools operated the school before Pleasant Grove was granted its own school district. By 1910 student enrollment stood at 30.

However the school building was deemed inadequate by Travis County Public Schools officials sometime during the early dawn of the 20th century. A new one needed to be built. Community leaders begged for a new schoolhouse to be built.


1916 is the year when people from the Mud community built another schoolhouse. The Cat Hollow School was for $10 dollars in 1916. Lumber was hauled from wagons that came from Lake Travis community. Lumber was hauled out from Austin. The school building was completed in 3 weeks. 1916 is the same year Pleasant Grove School was granted its own school district by the State of Texas. The name of the school district would be Pleasant Grove School District #10.

$300 dollars were donated to Pleasant Grove School in 1917. Ms. Bessie Bohman was the first teacher to teach at Pleasant Grove School for the 1917-1918 school year.  Enrollment later increased to 40 students. The average daily attendance was 35 students a day.


More students attended this school in 1921 in part to state aid funding. Pleasant Grove School received state aid from 1921 to 1936. The school was rebuilt and improved in order to meet state requirements in 1929. Several improvements were made before the Great Depression.

School enrollment declined slowly during the 1930s mostly in part due to the Great Depression. 15 students were enrolled during the 1935-1936 school year. That was a 140% drop in enrollment rate from the begging of the century. A $1,000 dollar bond was voted on by residents of the community in 1935. The school was repainted in 1936. Several repairs were made to the school building.
More improvement was made by painting the school with several coat and layers of paint.

In 1941, Pleasant Grove School was renamed to Mud School. That is when the small schoolhouse became the Mud Schoolhouse (Mud School). Mud School when it was named after the former small community of Mud, Texas. Later that year Pleasant Grove School was moved to the small community of Mud, Texas. The school was renamed to Pleasant Grove - Mud Schoolhouse in 1946. The school was rebuilt and improved in 1947.

In 1948, Pleasant Grove School and Pleasant Grove School District #10 were consolidated into the Teck Common School District and eventually later into Dripping Springs ISD in 1950.


Apparently the Pleasant Grove School building sits just inside the entrance of Pace Bend Park off of Highway 71 & FM 2344. However the school operated as a small restaurant called Moon River Bar & Grill (UMJO LLC) on 2002 Pace Bend Road North, Spicewood, Texas, US 78669 from 2002 to 2016. In January 2016, the former Pleasant Grove School building was moved relocated offsite to an unknown location. Future of the former Pleasant Grove School building remains unknown presently speaking.

History of Willow Ranch Negro School of Elgin, Texas forgotten.

Willow Ranch Negro School began life after the Willow Ranch School was established in 1890 where grades 1st through 6th were taught. The school was a one-room building that was long and narrow with many windows and the front of this building had a small front-gable. Willow Ranch Negro School also went under the name Wells School. Willow Ranch Negro School operated from 1890 to 1938.

Subjects such as Texas history, geography, writing, mathematics, and art were taught here. Students learned basic skills and elementary instruction. Much Texas history was taught inside of this school. Mainly writing, mathematics, and art were taught at Willow Ranch Negro School.

13 students were enrolled at Willow Ranch Negro School in the 1934–1935 school semester. 1 teacher taught 13 students in one room. The school remained open until 1938. In 1938, Willow Ranch Negro School and Willow Ranch School consolidated into Elgin ISD. Students were then transferred to Elgin ISD.

In 1980, St. Paul Christian Ministries bought the former Willow Ranch Negro School building from Elgin ISD. The former Willow Ranch Negro School become St. Paul Kimbro Baptist Church in 1980. 1985 is when more improvements to this church were made. The building received central AC heating. Several air condition units were placed at windows.

Today the school exists under the entity of St. Paul Kimbro Baptist Church operated by St. Paul Christian Ministries. The building is currently vacant. However the building seems to have AC units still intact at several windows.

Willow Ranch Negro School is located at 15618 Wells School Road, Elgin, Texas, US 78621.

History of the St. Elmo Negro School in Austin, Texas forgotten.

St. Elmo Negro School started life out as St. Elmo School No. 2 in the St. Elmo School District in 1882. (St. Elmo School No. 2 was St. Elmo Negro School.) The school building was located in a church that was a wooden frame building constructed out of wood. African American students who were enrolled in the St. Elmo School District attended St. Elmo School No. 2 located at 2109 Goodrich Avenue in the Barton Hills neighborhood. Grades 1st through 8th were taught at this school. Both 9th grade and 10th grade were later added during the late 19th century. St. Elmo School No. 2 was a K-8 school overall.

St. Elmo Negro School along with the St. Elmo School District incorporated into Austin Independent School District in 1937. In 1938, the former St. Elmo Negro School became Barton Springs Baptist Church. In 1945, the Barton Springs Baptist Church burned down in a fire. 1946 is the year when the church was replaced with a wooden building that sits on cinder blocks today.

Both City of Austin and Barton Springs Baptist Church began preserving the cemetery and church building in 1993. During the same year the city of Austin zoned the church as historic. Barton Springs Baptist Church became an Austin Historical Landmark in 1993.

St. Elmo Negro School is one of the last few reminders of the former St. Elmo city and community. Today St. Elmo Negro School is under the entity of Barton Springs Baptist Church.

The location of St. Elmo Negro School is 2109 Goodrich Avenue, Austin, Texas, US 78704.

Hudson Bend School history long forgotten.

The Hudson Bend School in Bee Cave, Texas and its history have been long forgotten. Many people do not know of the history of this school or are aware of existence. Hudson Bend School is one of the many early schools of the Lake Travis community, Travis County, Austin, and Bee Cave of course.

Wiley Hudson and his family settled in Hudson Bend near the Colorado River (now Lake Travis) in 1830. In 1860, men from the community built a one-room schoolhouse. Lumber was donated from nearby. A man named Mr. Watson was hired to be the teacher by the school. By 1890, Hudson Bend community boasted 2 schools called Hudson Bend School and Hirsh Creek School.

In 1901, both Hudson Bend School and Hirsh Creek School were consolidated into Teck School via Teck Common School District in 1901. Hudson Bend School stopped operating in 1911. The building was sold off to a private homeowner in the same year. Hirsh Creek School was demolished. Both schools no longer exist.

In 1985, a new middle school was opened by Lake Travis ISD. Lake Travis ISD officials decided to name the new middle school Hudson Bend Middle School after the former Hudson Bend School in an effort to remember their 19th century historic roots. After all, the name “Hudson Bend Middle School” originated from “Hudson Bend School”. The first school term Hudson Bend Middle School operated on was the 1985-1986 school year.

Today the legacy and name of Hudson Bend School live on at Hudson Bend Middle School at the location of 15600 Lariat Trail, Austin, Texas, US 78734. This middle school proudly boasts a high school graduation rate of 96.5% (96 ½ percent).

History of Moore’s Crossing School long forgotten.

Moore’s Crossing School is one the many forgotten schools of Austin, Del Valle, and Travis County. It is one of those schools that has faded away with time and away from peoples memories. Moore’s Crossing School now only exists in county deeds and state records in a office operated the bureaucracy of Texas Government.

It is stated from Travis County deed records, Vol. 48: 573-574 that the Moore's sold a half-acre as a parcel of land on Onion Creek at the low water crossing to Travis County for $1 to erect a school building. That school building would become Moore’s Crossing School which was a simple wood frame building was erected by Travis County Schools after the land transfer in 1881. Members of the Moore family had donated land for a school to encourage commercial business at the crossing.

There were no schools within walking distance of the Moore property at that time as stated from the Travis County Public School : The Defender Yearbook of 1936. From the years 1881 to 1909 Moore’s Crossing School was operated by Travis County Common School District.

Moore’s Crossing School was also used as a church during its time of operation. Of course this was after school hours. Moore’s Crossing School was used as a church from 1900 until 1904. 16 people were baptized at the church in 1900. The church broke no traditions of doing so. G.W. Stewart was pastor of Onion Creek Baptist Church in the year 1900 was a a pastor here as well. Brother R.C. McCullough was a visiting preacher. Pastor G.W. Stewart and Brother R.C. McCullough baptized many people. Moore's Crossing also supported a Methodist congregation that used the school as its meeting place.


Moore’s Crossing School served the Moore's Crossing community for nearly 30 years from 1881 to 1909. However, After 20 years of use, the at Moore's Crossing School did not meet county standards. In 1905, the Travis County Superintendent condemned the school at Moore's Crossing in the Travis County School Annual repertoire. The Moore School was looked upon with distaste as a relic of the area's past. Meetings were held at the school about future plans for use of this school.

“The Moore School is on the very edge of the district, on the very edge, indeed, of the bank of Onion Creek, which marks the boundary line. Meetings were held last year to agitate the building of a new  schoolhouse near the center of the district and a special tax carried for that purpose, which, however, was defeated by a few opponents, on account of defective election retums. So, school will continue to be kept in a hulk of a house by the side of the creek The children will continue to shiver in the cold when the board shutters are opened to let in the light or to ruin their eyes in the semi-darkness when the shutters are closed to keep out the cold.” (Travis County Superintendent, School Annual, 1905: 63).

The property returned to the Moore’s as per the original deed stipulation as stated in the Travis County Deed records, Volume 238: 405-406 from 1905. School taxes in 1905 ranged from 10 cents to 20 cents depending on the support of the community. The Travis County School Annual of 1905 claims the Moore’s Crossing School was “perhaps the worst physical plant for white students in the county”.


By 1909, the Moore’s Crossing School was all but abandoned. Later the Moore’s Crossing School was torn down in 1909 by Moore’s Crossing community residents in 1909. Only an outbuilding or 2 survived from the vicious demolition by local residents.

In 1910, Robert J. Moore replaced the school with a cotton gin on land he donated to W.T. Caswell. No traces of the school remained as after demolition everything was gone. Travis County Schools officials declared the school in inadequate by 1910. After Moore's Crossing School white students went to attend school at Pilot Knob (Pilot Knob Elementary School), Dry Creek School, or Elroy School off FM 812.


Today only a dilapidated outbuilding that was an outhouse for the Moore’s Crossing School survives, but exists in ruin on the Michalk property less than 1 block away from Michalk Grocery. Today the Michalk family owns the building.

Moore’s Crossing School was located at 12237 Moore’s Crossing Road, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.

History of the J. B. Norwood Negro School forgotten.

J. B. Norwood Negro School was a school that taught 1st grade through 8th grade from 1892 to 1935 in Del Valle, Texas. J. B. Norwood Negro School was named after a white landowner named after James B. Norwood (James Bascum Norwood aka James Bascom Norwood).

J. B. Norwood Negro School began life in 1892 after being built as a wooden frame school. Nearly 100% of this school was built out of wood.  The school was a one-room building that was long and narrow with many windows. This school taught 1st grade through 8th grade. The school was always 100% African-American. J. B. Norwood Negro School was located at the intersection of FM 973 & Burleson Road in Del Valle, Texas before moving to Emma Browning Avenue.

Of course racism and segregation were law of the land in Texas prior to integration. J. B. Norwood School District had its own separate “J. B. Norwood School’s” for each race and ethnicity. A J. B. Norwood School for white students, a J. B. Norwood School for negro students, and a “Mexican School” for hispanic students. Each school in School District #66 was designated as a “J. B. Norwood School”. 

There were J. B. Norwood Schools in both Del Valle, Texas and Austin, Texas. The J. B. Norwood Negro School location was Del Valle on Emma Browning Avenue (then an unidentified road) located north of Onion Creek identified based off a topographic Travis County map from the year 1932. The school was identified as “J. B. Norwood Negro School” .
During time of operation, J. B. Norwood School had its own school district called J. B. Norwood School District better known as School District No. 66 from 1892 to 1935.

By 1932, the J. B. Norwood Negro School reverted from a K-8 school that taught grades 1st through 8th to a K-7 school which taught grades 1st through 7th. Most J. B. Norwood School(s) taught grades 1st through 8th. Students were bussed to Austin ISD to attend high school.

When Bergstrom Air Force Base was being built in 1933, School District No. 66 was forced to relocate its schools elsewhere. Finally after much delay, School District No. 66 relocated its schools in 1935. The school relocation displaced students so they attended schools in the Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle ISD). 

J. B. Norwood Negro School was relocated to Norwood Lane & Burleson Road (FM 812) in 1935. J. B. Norwood White School relocated across the street from J. B. Norwood Negro School later on in 1935. 31 students were enrolled at the J. B. Norwood Negro School during the 1934-1935 school semester. The average daily attendance during the 1934-1935 school semester was at 18 students a day.

Sometime in the 20th century, the J. B. Norwood Negro School was demolished. There are no traces of this school remaining today. J. B. Norwood Schools were located inside the property of today’s Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (ABIA).

History of J. B. Norwood Schools in Del Valle, Texas forgotten.

The J. B. Norwood Schools in both Del Valle, Texas and Austin, Texas were named after James B. Norwood (James Bascum Norwood aka James Bascom Norwood). James B. Norwood was a white landowner that relocated to Texas after being in Tennessee for many years. The J. B. Norwood School(s) were named after James B. Norwood. J.B. Norwood donated land for the school.

During time of operation, J. B. Norwood School had its own school district called J. B. Norwood School District better known as School District No. 66 from 1892 to 1935.


J. B. Norwood Schools began life in 1892 with the opening of schools J. B. Norwood White School and J. B. Norwood Negro School. Both of which were built in 1892. Both schools were built as wooden frame schools Nearly 100% of these schools were built out of wood.  These schools were a one-room buildings that was long and narrow with many windows. These schools would teach 1st grade through 8th grade from 1892 to 1931. Both schools were located at the intersection of FM 973 & Burleson Road.

Of course racism and segregation were law of the land in Texas prior to integration. J. B. Norwood School District had its own separate “J. B. Norwood School’s” for each race and ethnicity. A J. B. Norwood School for white students, a J. B. Norwood School for negro students, and a “Mexican School” for hispanic students. Each school in School District #66 was designated as a “J. B. Norwood School”.


By 1931, J. B. Norwood School(s) reverted from K-8 schools that taught grades 1st through 8th to K-7 schools which taught grades 1st through 7th. Most J. B. Norwood School(s) taught grades 1st through 8th. Students were bussed to Austin ISD to attend high school.

With the influx of Mexican immigrants from the 1930s, a new “Mexican School” was in demand to be established. In 1932 the J. B. Norwood Mexican School was built at Emma Browning Avenue next to J. B. Norwood White School and J. B. Norwood Negro School. J. B. Norwood Mexican School served the educational needs of Mexican children.

When the Bergstrom Air Force Base was being built in 1933, School District No. 66 was forced to relocate its schools elsewhere. Finally after much delay, School District No. 66 relocated its schools in 1935. The school relocation displaced students so they attended schools in the Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle ISD).

J. B. Norwood School (J. B. Norwood Negro School) was relocated to Norwood Lane & Burleson Road (FM 812) in 1935. J. B. Norwood School (J. B. Norwood White School) relocated across the street from J. B. Norwood Negro School later on in 1935. 31 students were enrolled at the J. B. Norwood Negro School during the 1934-1935 school semester. The average daily attendance during the 1934-1935 school semester was at 18 students a day.

In 1934-35, J. B. Norwood Negro School had 31 students with an average daily attendance of.  Teacher-student ratio was 1:31 (1 being the teacher and 31 being students). Cost per year for each student was $440 which amounted to $24.44 per student per year. The school schedule was 114 days and sometimes 120 days.

In 1935 after many students were displaced, the “J. B. Norwood Schools” and the school district itself were consolidated into Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle ISD). All students from School District #66 attended Del Valle schools. All J. B. Norwood Schools were relocated to Norwood Lane & Burleson Road (FM 812) in Austin, Texas in the same year.


Sometime in the 20th century, the J. B. Norwood Schools were demolished. There are no traces of these school remaining today. None are extant. J. B. Norwood Schools were located inside the property of today’s Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (ABIA).

History of Waters Park School long forgotten.

Waters Park School started its beginnings on 3807 Adelphi Lane in Northwest Austin, Texas in 1891. Waters Park School was built as a log cabin that was a one-room schoolhouse as many schools were at that time. The school taught 1st grade through 8th grade. After 8th grade, students would drop out of school in order to help their families grow crops as agricultural lifestyle was prevalent in that area at the time.

The Waters Park School log cabin building burned down from a fire that had mysteriously started. After the school burned down, Waters Park School became Summitt Negro School and relocated to 3605 Adelphi Lane at St. Stephen’s Church. It is unclear exactly what year and when the Waters Park School burned down.From then on out, school was conducted within St. Stephen’s Church on Duval Road in 1934. (St. Stephen’s Church is known as St. Stephen’s Missionary Baptist Church.)

Waters Park School became Summitt Negro School and relocated to 3605 Adelphi Lane at St. Stephen’s Church in 1934 after the original school burned down. Summitt Negro School continued This permanent African-American school continued to exist at the church operating there until 1960 when the school was integrated into the old Summitt School on Burnet Road & Kramer Lane.

Waters Park School was originally located at 3807 Adelphi Lane, Austin, Texas, US 78727.

Summitt School history of Austin, Texas forgotten revisited.

The history of Summitt School itself has been long forgotten having faded away with time away from people’s minds. Summitt School was one of the many schools historians never wrote a book about. Most never really heard or seen the old Summitt School.


The first Summitt School was probably built in 1875 on the Northeast corner of what is now the Balcones Research Center operated by the University of Texas at Austin. Summitt School was first built as a log cabin which served as a one room schoolhouse in the beginning of 1875. What was a one room schoolhouse eventually became a two room schoolhouse.

The Summitt School was remodeled in 1880 with a second additional room added. A second room was needed to accommodate growth. The 1880-1881 school year saw an increase in growth. The assistant teacher taught 1st grade through 4th grade. The principal taught 5th grade through 8th grade and 9th grade.

Several families donated land for this school to be built on upon. The Summers family donated the original acre of land for Summitt School. The Bell family donated of land for the Summitt School as well. (It was the custom at that time for families to donate land for schools where they were needed with the understanding that the land would be returned to them if the school was closed.)


School semesters only last 4 ½ months due to the agricultural lifestyle surrounding the area. Students had to work in the fields to plow crops during harvest season. Food had to be sold. School hours in those days went from 9 AM to 4 PM. School semesters operated on a tight schedule due to budgetary concerns.

There was not always enough money to operate on a 4 month semester schedule. Both schools had students attending 2 ½ months at Waters Park School and then 2 ½ months at Summitt School. The school year was increased 3 months at both schools later on.


Summitt School had its own school district called Summitt Common School District (Summitt School District). Schools that were zoned to the Summitt School District were Waters Park School, Summitt School, Fiskville School, and Esperanza School.
[The school districts Fiskville School District (Fiskville Common School District), Esperanza School District, and Waters Park School District were later consolidated to Summitt School District following a series of school consolidations from the 40s to the late 50s.]

The Summitt School District was a very large school district. Almost as large as Colorado Common School District, Austin ISD, Pflugerville ISD, and Round Rock ISD. The boundaries for the Summitt School District were Anderson Lane (south), Lamar Boulevard (east), Howard Lane (north), and Mountain Pacific Railroad (west).


Summitt School history itself has a less than an excellent account of history. Racism and segregation were law of the land in Texas. So the Summitt School had separate schools for white students and black students. For instance there was Summitt White School and Summitt Negro School.

•White students would attend Summitt White School located at the intersection of Burnet Road and Kramer Lane. White students would attend Austin High School after finishing 8th grade.

•Black students would attend Summitt Negro School at 3807 Adelphi Lane (near Duval Road and Burnet Road). Black students would attend Anderson High School after finishing 8th grade. (Of course both Summitt Schools taught 9th grade as well. This was depending on availability of space.) Summitt Negro School started its beginnings as Waters Park School on 3807 Adelphi Lane. After the school burned down, Waters Park School became Summitt Negro School and relocated to 3605 Adelphi Lane at St. Stephen’s Church.

When it came to school funding, racial segregation came into place. Texas State Legislature often gave more money to white schools than to black schools. Nonetheless both schools ran on a tight fiscal budget. The Summitt White School was more well funded than the Summitt Negro School. Negro schools got less funding than their white counterparts. Thus negro schools operated on a tighter schedule than white schools.


In 1914 the Summitt School log cabin was demolished. The Bird family donated 2 acres of land of what is now IBM property that same year. (Additional land was bought from the Bird family for a new school.) This time the school building was located at what is now the intersection of Burnet Road and Kramer Lane.

In 1915, Summitt School went from being a K-9 school to a K-8 school. If students wanted to go on to high school, they went in carpools to attend Austin ISD high schools. The Summitt School District paid their tuition. Round Rock ISD and Pflugerville ISD let high school students attend their schools for free in hopes the Summitt School District would eventually join them. 1915 is when Waters Park School was closed and consolidated with Summitt School District. The Waters Park School District consolidated with Summitt School District as well.


World War II was a period the Summitt School District was in its prime during its peak as World War II brought a lot of tax revenue to the school district and area. Summitt School Districts was one of the richest school districts in northern Travis County next to Pflugerville ISD. It was due to the high taxes paid by the Magnesium Plant during World War II.

After the Magnesium Plant property was sold to The University of Texas in 1948, tax revenue decreased and the district found it harder and harder to pay the tuition for all the students enrolled in Austin high schools.


The 1950s brought forth some new changes. Fiskville School consolidated with Summitt School District in the 1950s. Summitt School went from being a K-8 school to a K-6 school. In 1954, a new building that was a two-wing structure was opened. A 3rd wing was added that same.

A petition was finally circulated and a vote was taken on joining Austin ISD. The first vote went against joining Austin ISD. Many residents residing in the Summitt School District were afraid of much higher property taxes if they joined with Austin. The petition was recirculated and when the second vote was taken, residents voted in 1960 to become part of Austin ISD. People along the Lamar Boulevard chose to consolidate with Pflugerville ISD.

In 1960, Summitt School and Fiskville School became a part of Austin ISD. Both schools consolidated into the school district. The community pursued intense efforts to keep the school open.


In 1980, the Summitt School located at Burnet Road and Kramer Lane became a K-3 school as part of Austin ISD's desegregation plan mandated the same year as ordered by US Court. Students in grades 4th, 5th, and 6th were bussed to Webb Elementary School on East St. John's Avenue. (Webb Elementary School shares the same campus as Webb Middle School.)


1986 was a year brought forth much needed new change for both Summitt School and Austin ISD. Summitt School opened in its current facilities on September 2, 1986, as a 66,263 square-foot building complex constructed on a 14.4 acre site on 12207 Brigadoon Lane. Enrollment was 580 students. Summitt School became Summitt Elementary School in September 2, 1986. The original school name plate was brought over from the old Summitt School and placed it in the new entrance hall of Summitt Elementary School.


An additional eight classroom wing was constructed during 1990. In the 1990-1991 school year, grades 4th, 5th, and 6th were brought back. 4th grade and 5th grade were brought back first. By 1990, the Summitt School was deemed outmoded and outdated by Austin ISD officials. The school had no central heating system. Though it continued use as an alternative school.

In 2003, the Summitt School at Burnet Road and Kramer Lane was demolished. In 2004, all of what was left of the former school building was gravel in a vacant green field. In the year of 2008, land property of the Summitt School at Burnet Road and Kramer Lane was built as a shopping center, Firehouse Subs, and a Freebirds restaurant.

Today the history of Summitt School lives on at 12207 Brigadoon Lane, Austin, Texas, US 78727 for where it is located at.

Friday, September 8, 2017

Former New Sweden School in Manor, Texas long forgotten revisited.

New Sweden School was named after the 1870s Swedish settlement of New Sweden which was located north of Manor, Texas. Many of the students who once attended this school had Swedish ancestry in their family background. Many of these students came from Swedish families. New Sweden School was located on the New Sweden Church Road that is east of FM 973.

New Sweden School was a K-8 school. Students who wanted to continue their high school education had to attend Manor High School in Manor. 9th Grade was added later sometime during the early 20th century. New Sweden School had its own school district called New Sweden School District (School District No. 22/ School District #22) before being consolidated into Manda Common School District.


New Sweden School was built as a one room schoolhouse in the summer of 1916. Classes started in the fall later that same year. Construction for the New Sweden School lasted from summer to fall. Claus Bergstrom was the first teacher to teach at the school.

New Sweden School reverted back to a K-8 school in the 1930s. The boasted a small PTA population in the 1930s. 9th Grade students were bussed to attend Manor High School in Manor. Other students continued school in Manor ISD.

K. Kunziker built a new well constructed out of concrete and brick in the year of 1931. This well would provide water for students and faculty as there was no indoor plumbing system for the New Sweden School during that time.

In 1947 is when the New Sweden School closed. New Sweden School and several other schools along with New Sweden School District were consolidated to form the Manda Common School District in 1947. Most students were from New Sweden and Manda communities were bussed to Manor ISD though due to proximity towards Manor. The school operated as community center from 1947 to 1960 before finally becoming a church for good. New Sweden School had served as a church and also a community center. Although New Sweden School served mainly as a church however after being consolidated into Manor ISD.

In 1960 is when the New Sweden School building became a church for good. Church attendance was 25 to 35 churchgoers every Sunday. Church attendance was never very high. Religious services were held at this church. Not much else is known about New Sweden School during its activity as a church.

In 1985, the school building was all but abandoned. The property reverted to Raymond Hees and Herman Hees sometime between 1985 to 2002. By then the building fell into a well beyond fixable state of damage. Over the years, the former school building fell into a horrendous state of rural decay. Overtime the building burned down from natural wildfire. Top roof perished from the flames. Top roof for this former school is no longer extant as it has collapsed into the school building.

In 2012, owners Raymond Hees and Herman Hees deeded the land where the school is to Graham Mortgage Companies. Today Graham Mortgage Companies owns the school building and land. Today the school is surrounded by shrubs, bushes, wild brush, and a slew of trees in the country breeze.

The former New Sweden School was located 7 miles north of Manor, Texas. The address for the New Sweden School was 12178 New Sweden Church Road, Manor, Texas, US 78653.


*New Sweden School District was School District No. 22 better known as District #22.
*New Sweden School and New Sweden School District eventually consolidated into Manor ISD.
*New Sweden School and New Sweden School District were abolished in 1947 even thought the building was still in operation at the time.
*Manda School District also went under the title of Manda Common School District.

History of the former Cottonwood School in Manor, Texas long forgotten.

Cottonwood School began its history as Bitting School in 1895 near the small town of Littig, Texas. Captain J. W. Bitting donated one acre of land to Travis County Public Schools for the Bitting School in 1895. Bitting School was built as a schoolhouse in 1895 to serve students that lived in the small towns of Littig, Texas and Elgin, Texas as well as rural Travis County.

The Bitting School was named after Confederate veteran J. W. Bitting (Captain J. W. Ramie) who served as captain in the American Civil War from 1861 to 1865. John W. Bitting served as captain in North Carolina. T. F. Nairn and Dan Williams donated lumber material to built the school.

At first the school term was 3 months. The school term was later extended to 4 months. Professor J. W. Ramie was one of the first teachers who taught 50 students in one room. There were 3 students sitting at one desk. Many had to sit by the windows. Attendance was very high.


A new school building was built for Bitting School in 1908.  This time the Bitting School became the  Cottonwood School (Cottonwood Elementary School) and was relocated miles far away from Littig at Cottonwood Creek on Old Kimbro Road in Manor, Texas. Cottonwood School was named after Cottonwood Creek. Enrollment was 35 students a day for average daily attendance and the school term was extended to 6 months in 1908. Bitting School relocated next to Cottonwood School.

In 1908, the Bitting School became the Littig School and a portion of the Bitting School building was relocated to Littig to become part of the 1887 Littig White School building. [Although the Bitting School was the former Littig School (Littig White School).]  Existence of Bitting School lasted from 1895 to 1908.

County trustees bought the property of the school in 1913. Professor J. W. Ramie continued to teach students at this school until 1920. Another teacher was added the same year. Cottonwood School was already separated from Bitting School by then. Cottonwood School only taught white students while Cottonwood Negro School only taught black students.

There  was  one  teacher who taught 32 students to 33 students a day. The cost per year for a student was an average of $30.00 resulting in an average cost per year to be $500. One teacher taught all 7 grades for 155 days to 160 days. The teacher’s salary was $50.00 a month and the teacher got paid for 8 months.


Cottonwood School became Cottonwood Elementary School in 1920. Cottonwood Elementary School became a K-7 school rather than the standard K-8 grade school model in 1920 where grades 1st through 7th were taught. Cottonwood Elementary School, at this time, was a one-room school.

After finishing 7th Grade, students were bussed to attend Manor High School in Manor ISD. Many students did not attend junior high school, senior high school, or high school in general in those days. They had to help out their families grow crops in time for harvesting season or work at the Elgin Cotton Gin.

Alice Ballerstedt Brady taught at Cottonwood School for the school term of 1925-1926. Alice Ballerstedt Brady herself was a former students of Cottonwood School who graduated the school during 7th grade. After 7th grade she attended Manor High School, At age 15 she graduated Manor High School as Valedictorian in 1920.


Transportation was often by horse and buggy. Student sometimes rode in carpools by parents who drove them to and from school. Busses were not provided until 1930. By 1932, the school had 3 busses. Bus drivers were paid by the school district and Travis County Public Schools.

In 1947, Cottonwood School and Cottonwood Negro School consolidated into Littig Common School District and later in 1954 into Elgin ISD. Most students already attended school in Manor and Elgin though despite all that.

Today the Cottonwood School lies in a wooden pile of dilapidation as a result rural decay on Old Kimbro Road. Not much remains of the Cottonwood School except for a wooden pile and a collapsed roof which you can visibly see when looking at the Manor, Texas area via satellite view on any maps online or a library.

Cottonwood School was located on Old Kimbro Road & US 290, Manor, Texas, US 78653.


As for the Cottonwood Negro School, Cottonwood Negro School was named after the Cottonwood Creek as well. The Cottonwood Negro School served as a one-room school that was an elementary school. After finishing 7th Grade, students were bussed to Manor to attend Manor ISD schools. Many students did not attend junior high school, senior high school, or high school in general in those days. They had to help out their families grow crops in time for harvesting season or work at the Elgin Cotton Gin.

There  was  one  teacher who taught 32 students a day. Sometimes 33 students a day. The cost per year  for a student was an average of $28.73 resulting in an average cost per year to be $431. One teacher taught all 7 grades for 155 days to 160 days. The teacher’s salary was $50.00 a month and the teacher got paid for 8 months.

Transportation was often by horse and buggy. Student sometimes rode in carpools by parents who drove them to and from school. Busses were not provided until 1930. By 1932, the school had 3 busses.

Both Cottonwood School (Cottonwood Elementary School) and Cottonwood Negro School had an average daily attendance of 32 students for the 1934-1935 school semester. The 1936-1937 school semester had an average daily attendance of 34 students.

In 1947, Cottonwood School and Cottonwood Negro School consolidated into Littig Common School District and later in 1954 into Elgin ISD. Most students already attended school in Manor and Elgin though despite all that.

The Cottonwood Negro School was located on modern day Ballerstedt Road, Elgin, Texas, US 78621 which is just south of Old Kimbro Road.

Former Bitting School in Elgin, Texas long forgotten.

Captain J. W. Bitting donated one acre of land to Travis County Public Schools for the Bitting School in 1895. Bitting School was built as a schoolhouse in 1895 to serve students that lived in the small towns of Littig, Texas and Elgin, Texas as well as rural Travis County. The Bitting School was named after Confederate veteran J. W. Bitting (Captain J. W. Ramie) who served as captain in the American Civil War from 1861 to 1865. John W. Bitting served as captain in North Carolina. T. F. Nairn and Dan Williams donated lumber material to built the school.

At first the school term was 3 months. The school term was later extended to 4 months. Professor J. W. Ramie was one of the first teachers who taught 50 students in one room. There were 3 students sitting at one desk. Many had to sit by the windows. Attendance was very high.

A new school building was built for Bitting School in 1908.  The same time Cottonwood School (Cottonwood Elementary School) was built. This time the school was located between Cottonwood Creek far away from Littig. Bitting School relocated next to Cottonwood School. Enrollment was 35 students a day for average daily attendance and the school term was extended to 6 months in 1908.

In 1908, the Bitting School became the Littig School and a portion of the Bitting School building was relocated to Littig to become part of the 1887 Littig White School building. [Although the Bitting School was the former Littig School (Littig White School).] Existence of Bitting School lasted from 1895 to 1908.

County trustees bought the property of the school in 1913. Another teacher was added the same year. Professor J. W. Ramie continued to teach students at this school until 1920.

Bitting School Road in Elgin, Texas was named after the Bitting School itself.  That is why you see the road bear the name “Bitting School Road” today. The road of today carries a historical connection to the former Bitting School that once existed in time.

The former Bitting School was located 2 miles north of Bitting School Road & Hogeye Road, Elgin, Texas, US 78621.


*Bitting School was located nearly 2 miles north of the intersection of Bitting School Road & Hogeye Road near the small town of Littig, Texas.
*Captain J. W. Bitting also went under the name Captain J. W. Ramie.
*Captain J. W. Bitting was John W. Bitting.
*The Bitting School was the former Littig School (Littig White School).

History of the Elm Grove School in Elgin, Texas much forgotten.

Not much is known about the Elm Grove School in Elgin, Texas. The origins of this school or what led to its closure by consolidation by Elgin ISD is very much unknown. Elm Grove School is one of the many forgotten educational institutions of Austin/Travis County that has faded away with time and from people's memories. Elm Grove School was one of the many Travis County rural schools.

The Elm Grove was built at the intersection of Albert Voelker Road and Morrow Lane in 1897 by Littig Common School District. The Elm Grove School was built as a single 2 story wooden structure. Ben E. Clayton was first superintendent for this school in 1897. Elm Grove School was first opened in 1897. The first school year was 1897-1898.

30 students attended the school by 1900. The average daily attendance was 30 to 32 students per day. Daily attendance never reached past 40 students.

In 1954, the Elm Grove School along with Schiller School consolidated into Elgin ISD. From 1954 to 1964 is when Elm Grove School served as a church and community center. In 1964 the school was abandoned. 1968 is when the school was demolished. Land remained vacant from 1968 to 1970 when a house was built over the once extant contemporaneous school site.

No signs or traces of this school remain extant. A house has been built over the place where the school once resided. Elm Grove School was located at Albert Voelker Road & Morrow Lane, Elgin, Texas, US 78621.

History about the prestigious Austwell School in Austwell, Texas long forgotten.

The history of the Austwell School in Austwell, Texas has been long forgotten and faded away with time. Many schools such this one have been left out of the local news media.

Austwell School was a former school located inside the small town of Austwell, Texas. Austwell School was a former school in the Austwell ISD school district which is now the Austwell-Tivoli Independent School District (Austwell-Tivoli ISD).

Beginnings of the prestigious Austwell School began in the year of 1915. A. Austin provided the town with a church, school, store, and cotton gin in the year of 1915. The school A. Austin provided the small town of Austwell, Texas with would eventually become the Austwell School. The Austwell School was built as a 4 story red brick building in 1915.

In 1916 the Austwell School became an accredited school with the state of Texas and with the Austwell-Tivoli community. The school was very good when it came to educating the students. Many Refugio County residents sent their children to the Austwell School due to its reputation in the community. After graduation, entrance into college was assured. The success rate and graduation rate were 99% to 100%. The dropout rate stayed practically below 1%.

Austwell, Texas faced a series of storms and hurricanes from 1954 to 1956. The final blow for the Austwell School came in 1954 when the school was hit by a series of storms and hurricanes. In 1954, the Austwell School was badly damaged by storm (which resulted later into a hurricane) that damaged the school building badly beyond repair to the point where Refugio County School Board officials declared the school uninhabitable. The 4 story red brick building which was once the Austwell School was torn down in 1954.

In 1956, a single story structure was built in its place to replace the old 1915 school building. 1956 is when Austwell School became Austwell Elementary School. Austwell Elementary School included grades K-8 thus becoming a K-8 school. In 1958 8 additional classrooms were added to the 3 wing building.

Sometime during the 20th century is when Austwell ISD consolidated with Tivoli ISD to form the consolidated school district of Austwell-Tivoli Independent School District. Sometime during the late 20th century is when the new Austwell School became abandoned. By 2008 the school was all but abandoned tucked in the Southwest corner of town.


The prestigious legacy of Austwell School has been long forgotten thanks to the Austwell-Tivoli Independent School District consolidation of both Tivoli ISD and Austwell ISD. Lack of historical preservation and oversight is another factor to the downfall of Austwell School. Today the prestigious legacy of Austwell School lies within the modern day Austwell-Tivoli Elementary School in Tivoli, Texas.

Who Francisca Urquidez Martinez was.

Francisca Urquidez Martinez was a Yaqui Indian girl in Presidio, Texas who was the granddaughter to a Yaqui Chief.  She had extensive knowledge of traditional herbal healing, common knowledge among Mountain Yaqui Indians who came to Texas in 1870. (Also known as the Texas Band of Yaqui Indians.) Her common knowledge of herbal healing led her to be an accredited source of medical information. She lived in Presidio, Texas most of her life. Francisca Urquidez Martinez was the daughter of Dario Urquidez.

Monday, September 4, 2017

History of Bonnie View School forgotten.

The history of the Bonnie View School in Bonnie View, Texas has been long forgotten. Not very much is known about this school.

In November 2, 1922, Refugio County School Board erected a school building a cost of $30,000. The school was built on a concrete foundation. Wooden floors were added inside. W. C. Stephens was the architect responsible for designing this school building. The school building itself was 3 stories tall in height and had a basement. Bonnie View School was first established at Five Points. Bonnie View School was the beginning of the present Calallen Independent School District (Calallen ISD) in Corpus Christi, Texas.

Church services were held in this building for a number of years. Later Bonnie View School became a community center. In 1954, Bonnie View School consolidated into Calallen Independent School District (Calallen ISD) located in the Calallen district of Corpus Christi, Texas. The Bonnie View School was demolished in 1960.

Land where the former Bonnie School building once stood became a county park in 1972 for Refugio County. Today only a metal square framed building remains of the Bonnie View School. This metal square framed building has since been remodeled.

Locations for this school were 359 FM 629 Bonnie View, Texas, US 78393 and 359 FM 629 Woodsboro, Texas, US 78393.

Berg's Mill School history long forgotten.

Berg’s Mill School is one of the many forgotten educational institutions of San Antonio and Bexar County. The Berg’s Mill School was a rural school located way out in the county in San Antonio, Texas. Not much is known about the Berg’s Mill School or its history. Many historians have not covered this school written in books. Many citizens of San Antonio seemed to have forgotten about this school’s existence or its presence.

Berg’s Mill School was constructed believably as a one room schoolhouse in the year of 1896. The one room schoolhouse was probably built as a single story structure. 1896-1897 is the first school year the Berg’s Mill School operated from. By then Berg’s Mill School was considered both as a rural school and a “county school”.  This school was a co-ed school. Most of the pupils were children of Mexican descent.

Student enrollment never went past 100. School attendance boasted a bumbling small population. Despite a small bumbling population of students, attendance seemed not to be very high. School attendance in the 1930s boasted a bumbling population.

Manual training and sewing were taught at this school. Boys were taught manual training while girls were taught sewing. Girls learned sewing at a young age. Girls held an intense interest in sewing.

In 1940, Berg’s Mill School closed. In 1940 when Berg’s Mill School closed, students who attended Berg’s Mill School were transferred and redistricted to Harlandale ISD and Southside ISD. Berg’s Mill School pupils were then transferred to San Juan School (now San Juan Elementary School). Berg’s Mill School closed due to the curbed growth of San Antonio growing southbound. Post World War II growth absorbed the population.

Summitt School history of Austin, Texas forgotten.

The history of Summitt School itself has been long forgotten having faded away with time away from people’s minds. Summitt School was one of the many schools historians never wrote a book about. Most never really heard or seen the old Summitt School.


The first Summitt School was probably built in 1875 on the Northeast corner of what is now the Balcones Research Center operated by the University of Texas at Austin. Summitt School was first built as a log cabin which served as a one room schoolhouse in the beginning of 1875. What was a one room schoolhouse eventually became a two room schoolhouse.

The Summitt School was remodeled in 1880 with a second additional room added. A second room was needed to accommodate growth. The 1880-1881 school year saw an increase in growth. The assistant teacher taught 1st grade through 4th grade. The principal taught 5th grade through 8th grade and 9th grade.

Several families donated land for this school to be built on upon. The Summers family donated the original acre of land for Summitt School. The Bell family donated of land for the Summitt School as well. (It was the custom at that time for families to donate land for schools where they were needed with the understanding that the land would be returned to them if the school was closed.)


School semesters only last 4 ½ months due to the agricultural lifestyle surrounding the area. Students had to work in the fields to plow crops during harvest season. Food had to be sold. School hours in those days went from 9 AM to 4 PM. School semesters operated on a tight schedule due to budgetary concerns.

There was not always enough money to operate on a 4 month semester schedule. Both schools had students attending 2 ½ months at Waters Park School and then 2 ½ months at Summitt School. The school year was increased 3 months at both schools later on.


Summitt School had its own school district called Summitt Common School District (Summitt School District). Schools that were zoned to the Summitt School District were Waters Park School, Summitt School, Fiskville School, and Esperanza School.
[The school districts Fiskville School District (Fiskville Common School District), Esperanza School District, and Waters Park School District were later consolidated to Summitt School District following a series of school consolidations from the 40s to the late 50s.]

The Summitt School District was a very large school district. Almost as large as Colorado Common School District, Austin ISD, Pflugerville ISD, and Round Rock ISD. The boundaries for the Summitt School District were Anderson Lane (south), Lamar Boulevard (east), Howard Lane (north), and Mountain Pacific Railroad (west).


Summitt School history itself has a less than an excellent account of history. Racism and segregation were law of the land in Texas. So the Summitt School had separate schools for white students and black students. For instance there was Summitt White School and Summitt Negro School.

•White students would attend Summitt White School located at the intersection of Burnet Road and Kramer Lane. White students would attend Austin High School after finishing 8th grade.

•Black students would attend Summitt Negro School at 3807 Adelphi Lane (near Duval Road and Burnet Road). Black students would attend Anderson High School after finishing 8th grade. (Of course both Summitt Schools taught 9th grade as well. This was depending on availability of space.)

When it came to school funding, racial segregation came into place. Texas State Legislature often gave more money to white schools than to black schools. Nonetheless both schools ran on a tight fiscal budget. The Summitt White School was more well funded than the Summitt Negro School. Negro schools got less funding than their white counterparts. Thus negro schools operated on a tighter schedule than white schools.


In 1914 the Summitt School log cabin was demolished. The Bird family donated 2 acres of land of what is now IBM property that same year. (Additional land was bought from the Bird family for a new school.) This time the school building was located at what is now the intersection of Burnet Road and Kramer Lane.

In 1915, Summitt School went from being a K-9 school to a K-8 school. If students wanted to go on to high school, they went in carpools to attend Austin ISD high schools. The Summitt School District paid their tuition.Round Rock ISD and Pflugerville ISD let high school students attend their schools for free in hopes the Summitt School District would eventually join them. 1915 is when Waters Park School was closed and consolidated with Summitt School District. The Waters Park School District consolidated with Summitt School District as well.


World War II was a period the Summitt School District was in its prime during its peak as World War II brought a lot of tax revenue to the school district and area. Summitt School Districts was one of the richest school districts in northern Travis County next to Pflugerville ISD. It was due to the high taxes paid by the Magnesium Plant during World War II.

After the Magnesium Plant property was sold to The University of Texas in 1948, tax revenue decreased and the district found it harder and harder to pay the tuition for all the students enrolled in Austin high schools.


The 1950s brought forth some new changes. Fiskville School consolidated with Summitt School District in the 1950s. Summitt School went from being a K-8 school to a K-6 school. In 1954, a new building that was a two-wing structure was opened. A 3rd wing was added that same.

A petition was finally circulated and a vote was taken on joining Austin ISD. The first vote went against joining Austin ISD. Many residents residing in the Summitt School District were afraid of much higher property taxes if they joined with Austin. The petition was recirculated and when the second vote was taken, residents voted in 1960 to become part of Austin ISD. People along the Lamar Boulevard chose to consolidate with Pflugerville ISD.

In 1960, Summitt School and Fiskville School became a part of Austin ISD. Both schools consolidated into the school district. The community pursued intense efforts to keep the school open.


In 1980, the Summitt School located at Burnet Road and Kramer Lane became a K-3 school as part of Austin ISD's desegregation plan mandated the same year as ordered by US Court. Students in grades 4th, 5th, and 6th were bussed to Webb Elementary School on East St. John's Avenue. (Webb Elementary School shares the same campus as Webb Middle School.)


1986 was a year brought forth much needed new change for both Summitt School and Austin ISD. Summitt School opened in its current facilities on September 2, 1986, as a 66,263 square-foot building complex constructed on a 14.4 acre site on 12207 Brigadoon Lane. Enrollment was 580 students. Summitt School became Summitt Elementary School in September 2, 1986. The original school name plate was brought over from the old Summitt School and placed it in the new entrance hall of Summitt Elementary School.


An additional eight classroom wing was constructed during 1990. In the 1990-1991 school year, grades 4th, 5th, and 6th were brought back. 4th grade and 5th grade were brought back first. By 1990, the Summitt School was deemed outmoded and outdated by Austin ISD officials. The school had no central heating system. Though it continued use as an alternative school.

In 2003, the Summitt School at Burnet Road and Kramer Lane was demolished. In 2004, all of what was left of the former school building was gravel in a vacant green field. In the year of 2008, land property of the Summitt School at Burnet Road and Kramer Lane was built as a shopping center, Firehouse Subs, and a Freebirds restaurant.

Today the history of Summitt School lives on at 12207 Brigadoon Lane, Austin, Texas, US 78727 for where it is located at.