Showing posts with label education. Show all posts
Showing posts with label education. Show all posts

Saturday, February 3, 2018

ACC Rio Grande Campus shut down until 2019.

The 102 year old Main Building of ACC Rio Grande Campus is currently undergoing renovation. A chain link fence now surrounds the property of what was once Austin High School, Allan Junior High School, and John T. Allan High School (Allan High School). Construction began during December 2017 during holidays. The campus remained closed during construction. Extensive renovation and much needed repair needs to be done.

Other programs offered at Rio Grande Campus will move to other ACC campuses across Austin.The Arts and Humanities programs will move to the ACC Highland Campus. The drama and dance programs offered at Rio Grande Campus moved to the ACC Highland Campus.

The Main Building (Building 1000) for ACC Rio Grande will reopen in 2019. ACC plans for the ACC Rio Grande Campus to reopen in 2019 at 1212 Rio Grande Street, Austin, Texas, US 78701.

History of University High School in Austin, Texas not forgotten.

Many Austinites of today never knew a University High School ever existed. Most question the existence of this school. It has been almost long forgotten despite being located on the internationally acclaimed University of Texas at Austin campus. University High School opened in 1942 and operated until June 3rd, 1967 when the school closed. Students who attended this school were taught and had received secondary education training at this school.


Building a new junior high school and another high school was first brought to discussion in the year of 1932. University Junior High School was the proposed school to be built as the new junior high school for Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD). University High School was the proposed high school. Much space was needed for Austin Public Schools in terms of enrollment for students receiving secondary education. So University Junior High School and University High School would provide much needed space for Austin Public Schools growing secondary education students.

Funding was scarce. Especially during the Great Depression! So Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD) turned to UT (University of Texas at Austin aka UT Austin) for financial aid because there was not enough funding for the school district to operate this particular junior high school at the time. So an agreement was made between University of Texas and Austin Public Schools. Their agreement eventually evolved into a joint contract.

University of Texas and Austin Public Schools came up with a written contract that was written into a joint contract. The agreement that was reached stipulated that the University of Texas would provide the site and building at a cost between $300,000 to $400,000 dollars while the Austin Public Schools selected and paid the regular teaching staff and half the salary for the principal. The University of Texas at Austin funded the construction This proposed school was used as a tool for the University of Texas Education Department staff to observe and explore educational theories.

Austin’s only junior high (Allan Junior High School) was already becoming increasingly overcrowded. Allan Junior High School was extremely overcrowded by 142% way over capacity. University Junior High School was the answer and solution to the problems Austin Public Schools was facing at that time. University Junior High School (along with University High School in the same building) was built to serve as a secondary school operating on from a joint contract between the University of Texas (UT Austin) and Austin Public Schools (now Austin Independent School District bka Austin ISD).

University High School was built in 1932 as a Spanish Renaissance style structure that was 2 stories tall and had a basement. The cafeteria was located in the basement. (That is what made this school so unique from the other schools in Austin.) Labs were built using the amphitheater plan.

The Spanish Renaissance style structure would become University Junior High School in 1933. The 1933-1934 school year was the first school year University Junior High School operated on. At first University Junior High School operated on a “7-9 junior high school model” serving grades 7 through 9. (University Junior High School would serve grades 7 through 9 until 1938.) 6th grade students would either attend elementary school (as that was the norm of the time) or be transferred to another junior high school.


1942 is when one half of the University Junior High School building was split into two schools thus University High School was born. One side of the building would be University Junior High School and the other side of the building would be University High School with students in grades 10 and 11.
Splitting the building into two separate schools was the solution for overcrowding in Austin ISD schools at the time. This measure saved the school district money from building another junior high school or a high school. The practice of University High School teaching students in grades 10 and 11 lasted from 1942 to 1946.

What was unique about this high school is that this high school operated on a “10-11 model” meaning that University High School taught grades 10 and 11 which was unusual because most high schools in the United States operated on a “10-12 high school model” also seen and viewed as a “10-12 senior  high school model” instead of a “10-11 high school model”.

Of course University High School was a segregated high school at that time. African American students were not permitted to attended University Junior High School at that time.


However University High School became overcrowded by 1944. It was almost overpopulated at the time. Austin Public Schools held board meetings and discussions to build another high school. However plans to build another high school were halted by World War II. Lack of funding is what also halted plans to build another high school for Austin Public Schools. This high school was almost overpopulated at the time during the 1944-1945 school year.

So in an effort to relieve overcrowding, some students attending Austin ISD junior high schools and students attending both Austin High School & Allan High School attended both University Junior High School and University High School. During the 1943-1944 school year. 6th grade students would begin attending University Junior High School and 10th grade students would begin attending University High School.

By 1944 University High School was its own accredited high school with state approval. University High School was its own accredited high school along with Allan High School, Anderson High School, and Austin High School.

1946 is when students in grades 10 through 12 were being taught at University High School. University High School began accepting 12th grade students in 1946 during the 1945-1946 school year. This practice would last until 1967 when the school closed.

Enrollment decreased in 1947 due to the opening of Baker Junior High School. The opening of Baker Junior High School relieved overcrowding by 150%. Baker Junior High School taught grades 6 through 10. (This included grades 9 and 10.) Some Baker Junior High School students in 10th grade were bussed to attend University High School and also University Junior High School in an effort to relieve overcrowding.

Sometimes 10th grade students from Austin High School, Allan High School, and Baker Junior High School (Baker School) would be transferred to University Junior High School to relieve overcrowding during the 1940s.


1965 is when University High School and University Junior High School became integrated. University High School became fully integrated during the 1965-1966 school year. African American students were finally permitted to attend University Junior High School and so are Hispanic students.

Prior to 1965, University High School was an all-white school. Both University High School and University Junior High School led desegregation for Austin ISD schools. It was a struggle for Austin to desegregate its schools. But University High School and University Junior High School desegregated successfully. Other Austin ISD schools desegregated slowly.

June 3rd, 1967 is when both University High School and University Junior High School closed. University Junior High School closed down because UT needed the space to accommodate campus expansion for the growing population of the time. The property belonged to UT from the beginning anyway. Students already attending this school were transferred over to the new Martin Junior High School better known now as Martin Middle School. The University Junior High School building became an annex for the UT school.

In 1967, Martin Junior High School (now Martin Middle School) was opened to replace University Junior High School. Martin Junior High School was Austin ISD’s first fully integrated school serving a diverse array of all races including African American students and Hispanic students. Not only was Martin Junior High School Austin ISD’s first fully integrated school, it was Austin ISD’s first fully integrated middle school/junior high school.


University High School and University Junior High School are now owned by the University of Texas operating as the School of Social Work. The school building remains intact at its original location. Location for University High School was 1925 San Jacinto Boulevard, Austin, Texas, US 78712. The school is now a historical landmark.

History of University Junior High School in Austin, Texas not yet forgotten but remembered.

Many Austinites of today never knew a University Junior High School ever existed. Most question the existence of this school. It has been almost long forgotten despite being located on the internationally acclaimed University of Texas at Austin campus. University Junior High School opened in September 1933 and operated until June 3rd, 1967 when the school closed. Students who attended this school were taught and had received secondary education training at this school.


Building a new junior high school was first brought to discussion in the year of 1932. University Junior High School was the proposed school to be built as the new junior high school for Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD). Much space was needed for Austin Public Schools in terms of enrollment for students receiving secondary education. So University Junior High School would provide much needed space for Austin Public Schools growing secondary education students.

Funding was scarce. Especially during the Great Depression! So Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD) turned to UT (University of Texas at Austin aka UT Austin) for financial aid because there was not enough funding for the school district to operate this particular junior high school at the time. So an agreement was made between University of Texas and Austin Public Schools. Their agreement eventually evolved into a joint contract.

University of Texas and Austin Public Schools came up with a written contract that was written into a joint contract. The agreement that was reached stipulated that the University of Texas would provide the site and building at a cost between $300,000 to $400,000 dollars while the Austin Public Schools selected and paid the regular teaching staff and half the salary for the principal. The University of Texas at Austin funded the construction This proposed school was used as a tool for the University of Texas Education Department staff to observe and explore educational theories.

Austin’s only junior high (Allan Junior High School) was already becoming increasingly overcrowded. Allan Junior High School was extremely overcrowded by 142% way over capacity. University Junior High School was the answer and solution to the problems Austin Public Schools was facing at that time. University Junior High School was built to serve as a secondary school operating on from a joint contract between the University of Texas (UT Austin) and Austin Public Schools (now Austin Independent School District bka Austin ISD).

University Junior High School was built as a Spanish Renaissance style structure that was 2 stories tall and had a basement. The cafeteria was located in the basement. (That is what made this school so unique from the other junior high schools in Austin.) Labs were built using the amphitheater plan. Eagles was the school mascot.


September 1933 is when University Junior High School opened with an enrollment of 831 within its first year. The 1933-1934 school year was the first school year University Junior High School operated on. At first University Junior High School operated on a “7-9 junior high school model” serving grades 7 through 9. (University Junior High School would serve grades 7 through 9 until 1938.) 6th grade students would either attend elementary school (as that was the norm of the time) or be transferred to another junior high school. In many countries, 6th grade is the last year of elementary school.

During the 1930s, University Junior High School was dubbed as a “model junior high school” by the The WPA Guide to Texas: The Lone Star State. University Junior High School was dubbed as a “model junior high school” for not only Texas but Austin as well. Of course this junior high school was opened during the height of segregation when segregation was law of the land in Texas. So only white students were admitted. African American students were not permitted to attended University Junior High School at that time.

Later on in 1938 during the 1938-1939 school year, University Junior High School shifted from a “7-9 junior high school model” to “6-8 middle school model” to a which taught 6th grade through 8th grade. From thereon out, 6th grade through 8th grade was taught at University Junior High School. 1938 is the last year 9th grade students would ever attend this junior high school for a short while.

6th grade through 8th grade were taught at University Junior High School. That is what made this junior high school (and school) so unique from the other junior high schools in Austin. Junior high schools did not use the “6-8 middle school” model as most middle schools and junior high schools of today use in some school district across the state of Texas. (9th grade was added later on.)


University Junior High School became overcrowded by 1942. It was almost overpopulated at the time. Austin Public Schools held board meetings and discussions to build another junior high school. However plans to build another junior high school were halted by World War II. Lack of funding is what also halted plans to build another junior high school for Austin Public Schools.

This junior high school was almost overpopulated at the time during the 1942-1943 school year. So in an effort to relieve overcrowding, some students attending Austin ISD junior high schools and students attending both Austin High School & Allan High School attended both University Junior High School and University High School. So grades 6 through 10 began attending both University Junior High School and University High School in 1942 during the 1942-1943 school year.

It was in 1942 that 6th grade students would begin attending University Junior High School. Sometimes 10th grade students from Austin High School would be transferred to University Junior High School to relieve overcrowding during the 1940s. This school zoning practice was done due to overcrowding. What exact grades would be assigned at this school always shifted around to relieve and accommodate overcrowding in other Austin ISD schools of the time. It was from the 1940s to the 1960s that University Junior High School would operate on a “6-10 model”.

What was unique about this junior high school is that this junior high school operated on a “6-10 model” meaning that University Junior High School taught grades 6 through 10 which was unusual because most junior high schools in the United States operated on a “7-9 junior high school model” instead of a “6-8 middle school model”.

1942 is when one half of the University Junior High School building was split into two schools thus University High School was born. One side of the building would be University Junior High School and the other side of the building would be University High School with students in grades 10 and 11. The practice of University High School teaching students in grades 10 and 11 lasted from 1942 to 1946.

By 1944 University High School was its own accredited high school with state approval. University High School was its own accredited high school along with Allan High School, Anderson High School, and Austin High School.

1946 is when students in grades 10 through 12 were being taught at University High School. University High School began accepting 12th grade students in 1946 during the 1945-1946 school year. This practice would last until 1967 when the school closed.

Enrollment decreased in 1947 due to the opening of Baker Junior High School. The opening of Baker Junior High School relieved overcrowding by 150%. Baker Junior High School taught grades 6 through 10. (This included grades 9 and 10.) Some Baker Junior High School students in 10th grade were bussed to attend University High School and  also University Junior High School in an effort to relieve overcrowding.


In 1949, school buses served only those students in the 7th grade from the Govalle School in the Govalle School District to University Junior High School and only those in the 5th and 6th grades from St. Elmo School (now St. Elmo Elementary School) to Fulmore Junior High School (now Fulmore Middle School). Despite 6th grade students from St. Elmo School being bussed to Fulmore Junior High School, 6th grade students still attended University Junior High School.

School bus service to Austin High School, Austin Senior High School, Allan High School, and Allan Junior High School was eliminated along with service for junior high school students and senior high school students for the following school districts: Govalle School District, St. Elmo School District, Rosedale School District, and Esperanza Common School District. School bus service for Negro students continued in operation on the same schedule used that year.

1949 is when Austin ISD began bussing 6th grade students from Govalle School in the Govalle School District and St. Elmo School to University Junior High School. University Junior High School began accepting students from both Govalle School and St. Elmo School.


Sometime in the 1950s is when University Junior High School became a 6-9 school teaching 6th grade through 9th grade which was unusual because most junior high schools at the time did not operate on a “6-9 model” or a “6-9 middle school model”. That is what made this school unique from the other junior high schools in Austin, the state of Texas, and the United States. From thereon out, 6th grade through 9th grade was taught at University Junior High School. However students in grade 10 would still attend the school despite that.

Enrollment decreased in 1953 due to the opening of O. Henry Junior High School and Porter Junior High School relieving student load. The opening of the 2 junior high schools relieved overcrowding by nearly 200%! University Junior High School became UJH in 1953.

1965 is when University Junior High School became integrated. University Junior High School became fully integrated during the 1965-1966 school year. African American students were finally permitted to attend University Junior High School and so are Hispanic students.

Prior to 1965, University Junior High School was an all-white school. University Junior High School led desegregation for Austin ISD schools. It was a struggle for Austin to desegregate its schools. But University Junior High School desegregated successfully. Other Austin ISD schools desegregated slowly.


On some evening in 1967, the UJH school band performed the songs from the South Pacific film which helped promote racial sensitivity. The theatrical production South Pacific had the theme of racial sensitivity. "Bali Ha’i” was the band's favorite. A mystical tune.

June 3rd, 1967 is when University Junior High School closed. University Junior High School closed down because UT needed the space to accommodate campus expansion for the growing population of the time. The property belonged to UT from the beginning anyway. Students already attending this school were transferred over to the new Martin Junior High School better known now as Martin Middle School. The University Junior High School building became an annex for the UT school.

In 1967, Martin Junior High School (now Martin Middle School) was opened to replace University Junior High School. Martin Junior High School was Austin ISD’s first fully integrated school serving a diverse array of all races including African American students and Hispanic students. Not only was Martin Junior High School Austin ISD’s first fully integrated school, it was Austin ISD’s first fully integrated middle school/junior high school.


University Junior High School is now owned by the University of Texas operating as the School of Social Work. The school building remains intact at its original location. Location for University Junior High School was 1925 San Jacinto Boulevard, Austin, Texas, US 78712. The school is now a historical landmark.

History of Brewton Springs School in Austin, Texas not forgotten.

Brewton Springs School was one of the many forgotten educational institutions of Austin/Travis County that have been long forgotten. In fact, Brewton Springs School was one of the many Travis County rural schools. As a school, Brewton Springs School operated from 1879 to 1950. Brewton Springs School was devoted to education.

Brewton Springs School was also called Bruton Springs School which that school was sometimes referred to as. Brewton Springs School went under several names over the years as its time operating as a school such as Snuff Box School, Snuff Box, and Bruton Springs School.


Brewton Springs School was established in 1879 as a 1-12 school which taught grades 1 through 12. School was taught in an old picket house located on the Allen Farm taught by Miss Annie Gambee. Miss Annie Gambee was the first teacher. Students sat on benches made of elm logs. Each bench furnished seats for 5 to 6 students. Its earliest school trustees were Herbert H. Allen, Joe Hutson, and Pate Patterson.

The school was granted its own school district in 1879. Although Brewton Springs School was within bounds of present day Eanes ISD boundaries, Brewton Springs School had its own school district called School District #50 that was not connected with Eanes School or to the Eanes School District (School District #48 now known as Eanes ISD) at that time. Brewton Springs School was a completely autonomous school operated as cited in the book Eanes: Portrait of a Community. Brewton Springs School instead operated as a “county school” under Travis County Common School District aka Travis County Public Schools.


In 1881, the first school was built as a 15’ x 10’ foot box square building designed as a one-room schoolhouse located on the Jim Brewton farm. Hence the name Brewton Springs. The school only had one door. By 1881 Brewton Springs School had county funding allocated towards the school.

The architectural design of the school building was built as a snuff box. Because the school was shaped similarly to a snuff box, some students called the school Snuff Box. However the name Snuff Box did not derive from the architecture of the school building itself. The name Snuff Box came about because so many of its students chewed tobacco and dipped snuff.

As cited in the book Lone Star Travel Guide to Texas Hill County, Brewton Springs School was also known as Snuff Box. The Brewton Springs School was located east of Bee Cave. Brewton Springs School was located east of Bee Cave and west of Cuernavaca Drive near Patterson Road.

During its earliest years when tax funds ran low and there was not enough money to pay a teacher, students from Brewton Springs School attended school at Bee Caves School, Teck School, Cox Springs School, and Eanes School. It was only on occasion that Brewton Springs School students were sent to Bee Cave to attend the Bee Cave.

A split caused by a change and shift in scholastics resulting in a small house to be built at Walnut Springs. 2 houses in the school district proved to be too many. School terms were split. One term was taught half at one house and half at the other. So the school moved back to the Allen farm. Brewton Springs School moved a series of several times during its history throughout the 19th century and 20th century.

1892 is when the Walnut Springs house had burned. Around 1896 is when Brewton Springs School was moved to the Thomas Riley Place. At this point the school moved several times. The school district hired 3 more teachers to teach at the school.


Brewton Springs School was moved again in 1904. During the same year, the school was remodeled with more lumber from leftover donations. Benches were donated. 14 teachers were hired throughout the 1904-1905 school term. 34 students attended this school during the 1904-1905 school term.

Even in the 1920s when most schools were 1-8 schools, Brewton Springs School was a 1-12 school unlike Eanes School were school stopped at 7th grade. From the 1920s on, Eanes School did not go beyond the 7th grade. The 1920s is when Eanes School began changing its scholastics by primarily teaching elementary school grades.

(From the 1920s on, Eanes School did not go beyond the 7th grade. The 1920s is when Eanes School began changing its scholastics by primarily teaching elementary school grades. 8th grade students were bussed to O Henry Middle School. Although Eanes School did not go beyond the 7th grade, Eanes School still taught middle school students and high school students until 1943. After 1943, high school students attended Austin High School and Allan High School. Middle school students attended Allan Junior High School and O. Henry Middle School. Or had remained at Eanes School as their school had taught middle school grades until 1950.)

1936 is when the school district began making plans to tear down and rebuild the then current Brewton Springs School building. Meetings were held with the Superintendent of Travis County Public Schools.

In 1937 the school was torn down and rebuilt on John Teague’s property located on FM 2244 (Bee Cave Road) near Cuernavaca Drive by Patterson Road near Patterson Ranch. Homer Teague moved into the old schoolhouse afterwards. The other old schoolhouse remained as a private residence. While the school was being moved, classes were held in Watson Springs Baptist Church. Watson Springs Baptist Church was a single-room frame church. The church was also nicknamed “Snuff Box Church” because members of the congregation used to spit tobacco juice out of the window during services.


In 1948, Brewton Springs School began attempting to merge and consolidate into the Eanes School District #48. Some Brewton Springs School began attending the Eanes School.

In 1949, both Brewton Springs School and its school district were consolidated into Eanes ISD under Gilmer-Aiken Law. Gilmer-Aiken Law consolidated many rural school districts including Brewton Springs & Bee Cave and had reformed many Texas public schools. Eanes School students who wanted to continue their education past 7th grade either went to Brewton Springs School or to Allan Junior High School and Austin High School in Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD). However Brewton Springs School continued to operate under Eanes ISD.

1950 was the year the Travis County Schools Superintendent and State of Texas closed down Brewton Springs School and its school district during the 1950-1951 school year. The school district itself was consolidated and abolished during the same year. Brewton Springs School students were merged with Eanes School and to Bee Cave School. Brewton Springs School students were merged to both Cox Springs School, Dripping Springs School, and Lago Vista School as well.

In 1950, Brewton Springs School was shut down by the State of Texas due to Gilmer-Aiken Law after Bill No. 116 of the 50th legislature was passed. After Brewton Springs School shut down, its students were transferred to Eanes School. Eanes School then had 80 students. A third room to the two-room rock building of Eanes School was constructed in the same year to relieve overcrowding.


It is unknown and unclear whether or not the final Brewton Springs School building was demolished after consolidation with Eanes ISD or sold in public auction/private auction held by Travis County to a homeowner whereas the school building became a private residence.

Although the school building of Brewton Springs School may no longer be extant or the memories of the Brewton Springs School have been forgotten, Brewton Springs lives on as a historic name under the street name of Bruton Springs Road located in the Cuernavaca neighborhood.

Brewton Springs School was located on FM 2244, Austin, Texas, US 78733.

History behind the small Cox Springs School in Lago Vista, Texas revisited.

Cox Springs School was built in 1908 as a white squared one-room building located at the intersection of Lohman Ford Road & Sylvester Ford Road in Lago Vista, Texas. Cox Springs School was built for both the Cox Springs School District and Lago Vista Common School District (now Lago Vista ISD). Cox Springs School was known as Cox Springs School House when the school district first opened this school.

Grades 1 through 10 were taught at Cox Springs School. Grades 11 and 12 were transferred to Leander High School in Leander, Texas operated by Leander ISD. Grades 1 through 11 attended this school starting in 1909. More 11th grade students were admitted to the school in the 1909-1910 school year by Cox Springs School District.

Cox Springs School established its own school district called Cox Springs School District in 1908. Lago Vista Common School District aka Lago Vista Common School District No. 2 was better known as Lago Vista Common School District.

Beginning in 1910 is when Lago Vista Common School District began overseeing school operations for Cox Springs School District. After 10th grade, Cox Springs School students either completed their high school education at Leander High School in Leander, Texas or Lago Vista School on Lohman Ford Road. Most Cox Springs School students transferred to Leander High School rather than Lago Vista School. Lago Vista School did not always have state funding to educate grades 11 and 12.


As a school building, Cox Springs School would remain at the intersection of Lohman Ford Road & Sylvester Ford Road in Lago Vista, Texas from 1908 to 1940 before the school building was relocated to Old Burnet Road in Jonestown, Texas.

Cox Springs School had its own school district called Cox Springs School District from 1908 to 1950 before being consolidated into Lago Vista Common School District. Lago Vista Common School District aka Lago Vista Common School District No. 2 was better known as Lago Vista Common School District.


In 1940, the Cox Springs School building was moved from the intersection of Lohman Ford Road & Sylvester Ford Road in Lago Vista, Texas and relocated to Old Burnet Road in Jonestown, Texas at a road called Natures Way. Natures Way near Old Burnet Road in Jonestown is now a modern day neighborhood called The Bluffs.

The reason why Cox Springs School was moved to Jonestown in 1940 was because water elevation in Lake Travis was rising. So rather than risk the school being located in a floodplain, the Cox Springs School District decided to relocated the school building. Mr. J. J. Carlton generously donated land to Lago Vista Common School District.


1950 is when Cox Springs School District was renamed to Lago Vista Independent School District (Lago Vista ISD). The Cox Springs School District name was abolished. Cox Springs School was a 1-12 school by then. Grade 12 was added in 1950 due to Gilmer-Aiken Law mandated by the State of Texas. More funds went towards the school district that following year.

In 1955, the little red building known as Lago Vista School was rebuilt in 1955 at the location of 7610 Lohman Ford Road. From 1955 to 1960, Lago Vista School was a 1-12 school teaching grades 1 through 12. To Lago Vista citizens and locals, Lago Vista school was known as the “the little red schoolhouse” or the “little red building"on 7610 Lohman Ford Road. During 1955 is when Cox Springs School became a 1-10 school again.

Lago Vista Common School District was renamed to Lago Vista Independent School District in 1955. The state legislature brought forth changes in public education during the 1955-1956 school by consolidating rural schools districts and common school districts into bigger neighboring school districts in an attempt of education reform and saving costs. Several common school districts were consolidated, abolished, renamed to “independent school districts”, or merged to bigger neighboring school districts.


The last group of students from grades 1st through 10th attending Cox Springs School were moved to Lago Vista School in 1960. Lago Vista School only taught grades 1 through 10 in 1960 and afterwords. Students in grades 11 and 12 completed their high school education at Leander High School. Cox Springs School was shut down in 1960.

From 1960 to 1978 is when Lago Vista ISD used the Cox Springs School building for storage. The building was used for storage until 1978. In 1978 the building was abandoned.

In 2010, North Shore Heritage & Cultural Society along with Travis County Historical Commission began making efforts to save the school. The walls were repainted the original white color it always had. Plaques and signs were designed for the school giving the building a description. In this description is the history of Cox Springs School.


Currently as of January 2018, the North Shore Heritage & Cultural Society and former students are working with the City of Lago Vista, City of Jonestown, and Travis County Historical Commission to move the school building onto a permanent location. North Shore Heritage & Cultural Society and former students are working to restore the former school building. North Shore Heritage & Cultural Society wants to save this building in an attempt of historic preservation so students of today can see how students who lived in Lago Vista and Jonestown during the early 20th century received their education. Both commissions plan to keep the old school in tact.

Both the City of Lago Vista and City of Jonestown consider Cox Springs School to be a historical building despite no Texas Historic Landmark marker. Although there is no Texas Historic Landmark marker, a brown metal sign about the school’s history is located behind the school building facing Old Burnet Road. Cox Springs School is one of the oldest buildings in Lago Vista next to the Lago Vista School which is commonly known as “the little red schoolhouse” to local citizens and historians.


Although the Cox Springs School is considered to be in Lago Vista, Texas, the actual location the school building is currently located at is 18842 Old Burnet Road, Jonestown, Texas, US 78645. The alternate address is 18842 Old Burnet Road, Leander, Texas, US 78645.

Central Catholic High School found to be oldest private school in Texas.

The Central Catholic High School is found to be the oldest operating private school in Texas. Central Catholic High School first opened in 1842 in San Antonio, Texas as a Catholic school. Not only is Central Catholic High School oldest private school in Texas, it is also the oldest operating school in Texas and the oldest boys school for the state as well. Today Central Catholic High School 1403 North St. Marys, San Antonio, Texas, US 78215.

German Heritage School found to be oldest operating private school in Austin, Texas.

The German Heritage School located at 507 West 10th Street in Austin, Texas has been determined to be the oldest continuous operating private school in the state of Texas and Austin. The school building itself was built in 1857 and opened in 1858 as a private school that eventually became a charter school.
Housed in the historic German Free School, the German-Texan Heritage Society promotes awareness and preservation of the German cultural heritage of Texas by using and preserving this pre-Civil War era building. The German Free School was the first school in Austin chartered by the Texas State Legislature.

History of John T. Allan High School in Austin, Texas not forgotten.

In Edwin Waller’s 1839 plan for the City of Austin, two blocks were set aside for schools at Rio Grande and 12th Street. Elementary schools, junior high schools, and high schools were specifically zoned to this area.

John T. Allan High School was built in 1916 at the location of 1218 West Avenue as planned by the Austin Public Schools school board (now Austin ISD). This three-story building was separated from the main building by West Avenue and connected with a walkway. At first John T. Allan High School shared the same campus where John T. Allan Junior High School (Allan Junior High School) and Austin High School located at 1212 Rio Grande Street from 1916 until 1925. (John T. Allan Junior High School was located at 1212 Rio Grande Street from 1916 to 1925.)

Additions to the West Avenue complex were completed later to accommodate growing enrollment. A new 2 story basement was dug in 1924. The basement was completed the same year. Special programs such as “manual training” and “domestic arts” were offered here in the early years. 1924, the decision was made to swap the Austin High School with Allan Junior High School.


By 1925, both John T. Allan High School, Allan Junior High School, and Austin High School all faced overcrowding due to growing enrollment. These buildings could no longer accommodate the growth by 1925. So Austin ISD came up with a plan to swap the 2 campuses.

1925 is when Allan Junior High School and Austin High School swapped campuses. Austin High School was moved to this location from on the corner of Trinity and 9th Street from their campus in 1925. The switch was made during the Thanksgiving holiday of that year. Allan Junior High School relocated to the corner of Trinity and 9th Street during that same year and had remained there until 1956 when a fire destroyed the school building.

Both Austin High School and Allan High School expanded its campuses north all the way to 13th Street in the late 1930s. Special programs such as “manual training” and “domestic arts” were offered here. A “tunnel” was built under West Avenue connecting to both schools in 1939. Enrollment was 300 students.

Until 1940, the high school only went through 11th grade. In 1940, Texas legislation passed added the 12th grade level to the high school and that has remained through present day. Student involvement increased during the 1940s.


In 1953 is when the name of John T. Allan High School was changed to Stephen F. Austin High School (aka SF Austin High School). John T. Allan High School was no more. The additional West Avenue building complex was transferred to the Austin High School campus.

The John T. Allan High School building at 1218 West Avenue was used for high school classes until 1975. In 1976 AISD shut down the building. For years the building was used for AISD offices. 2004 is the year when Austin ISD sold the John T. Allan High School building to Austin Community College.

For a number of years, Allan High School had maintained a record of academic excellence and concern for quality of education. Allan High School was and is one of Austin’s oldest high schools next to LC Anderson High School and University High School.

Today, the Austin ISD school campus of the former John T. Allan High School (Allan High School) and its other historical buildings is now used by Austin Community College (ACC). Although Austin ISD may own a portion of the campus, ACC assumes full control and property rights. Today John T. Allan High School building has a Texas Historic Landmark under the title of “Austin High School, Rio Grande Campus” near 1218 West Avenue, Austin, Texas, US 78701.

*Prior to 1926, Austin High School was known as Austin Senior High School.
*1926 is when Austin Senior High School changed its name to just Austin High School.

Creedmoor School history long forgotten revisited.

This new article explains the history of Creedmoor School in Creedmoor, Texas from its establishment in 1880 to its current standing as of 2018.


Creedmoor School was built and established as Willow Springs School in 1880 as a log cabin.  Later an additional room was added on to the one room school. The school was built on the same site of Creedmoor Co-op Gin also know as Creedmoor Gin.

Creedmoor School was first known as Willow Springs School. This name was chosen from the many willow trees in the area. These willow trees surrounded the springs nearby. Willow trees grow near springs. Willow trees were common in the Creedmoor area as most of the land was farmland. The school was later named Creedmoor School.

Ms. Bell Miller and Ms. Ida Rice were the first teachers at Creedmoor School. The faculty was increased to 3 teachers and a second principal. Ms. Ida Rice was the first teacher to teach at Creedmoor School. Ms. Bell Miller was the second teacher to teach at Creedmoor School. Their first school board members consisted of Dr. R. Ailton, Jake Steussey, and J.D. Campbell. Grades 1-12 were taught at here at first.

In 1909, a 4 room building was erected within a 2 to 4 bock radius near the intersection of FM 1327 & FM 1625. The four room building served as both the elementary school and high school. The building was erected to accommodate increased enrollment. Playground equipment was donated by local citizens. By 1915 the school district had boasted an enrollment of 200 students.


In 1921, a disastrous tornado destroyed the school building. Another school building was swept away by a cyclone. School was conducted in a local Creedmoor church (Creedmoor Union Church) on FM 1625 while the school buildings were being planned and constructed. Construction period had ranged 2 years from 1921 to 1923. Creedmoor School was completed in 1923. This time the Creedmoor School was built as a building with 6 rooms becoming a 6 room school building. The 6 room Creedmoor School building was a K-12 school from 1923 until 1925.

In 1925, the 6 room building served as Creedmoor High School and Creedmoor Elementary School was served in a log cabin and later the old Creedmoor Negro School building was moved to the site of the new Creedmoor School. Creedmoor High School operated in the 6 room school building from 1925 until 1950.

In 1950, the elementary school was incorporated into the 6 room building known as the Creedmoor School. This made the 1923 school building for Creedmoor School a K-12 school again. The Creedmoor Common School District was known as Common School District No. 41 or simply School No. 41 on Travis County school district maps.


1955 is when the 1923 school building was demolished. In its place was a 1 story building separated into 3 units. One being elementary school, the other being middle school, and the last one being high school.The log cabin that once served as a 1-12 school then serving as Creedmoor Elementary School was demolished. The year of 1955 faced increased enrollment.

The 1955 school building was built at a cost of $22,000. The 1955 school building was built out of recycled building material and bricks from the 1923 school building which made this school unique. The bottom floor was the only portion that remained from the 1923 school building.

Creedmoor School was operated by Creedmoor Common School District as a K-12 school from 1880 to 1955. Creedmoor High School was demolished in 1955. The 1956-1957 school year is when the school faced more enrollment. 500 students were enrolled within the school district.


Creedmoor School was home to a bilingual program. Del Valle ISD hosted an educational program at Creedmoor Elementary School (Creedmoor School) called Del Valle School Bilingual Culture Program at one time in 1966 to 1973 so on. Spanish language was taught in grades 1-5 and 6th grade as well within this educational program. The concept of “machismo” in Latin American life was taught in the program. Half the of the students enrolled in the program were Hispanic despite the program being diversely compromised into mixed races. The program started with 127 students within its first year.

The bilingual program got phenomenal reception worldwide in part from its dedicated teachers. A few news storylines appeared on newspapers, articles, thesis documents, newsletters, and dissertations in the United States and across the globe. As a result, this program was eventually extended into other Del Valle schools such as Popham School, Lamar School, Del Valle Elementary School, and Del Valle Middle School. Del Valle Middle School was one of the last Del Valle schools to implement this program into a Del Valle ISD school.

A grant from the state was given to the school for its bilingual education program under the Title II Act. Funding had depended on congressional action. It was under the Title II Act where funding for this bilingual education had depended on congressional action.

In 1966 the school added more educational to the Creedmoor School programs and as an addition to this bilingual education program. 1966 is the same year when Creedmoor School became a K-8 school entirely. Soon more educational programs followed. Grade 9 was taught there until reconstruction of  Del Valle High School was completed.


In 1967, both Creedmoor Common School District and Creedmoor School were consolidated into Del Valle Independent School District. In the same year, Creedmoor School had been redistricted into an elementary school thus becoming Creedmoor Elementary School. Creedmoor Elementary School and Creedmoor High School were operated by Creedmoor Common School District from 1880 until 1967.

1967 is when Creedmoor High School students were transferred to Del Valle High School. Junior high school students and middle school students were transferred to Del Valle Junior High School, Ojeda Middle School, and Del Valle Middle School. Some elementary students were transferred to Smith Elementary School in Austin, Texas, Lamar School, or to Popham Elementary School (Popham School) in Del Valle, Texas. Creedmoor School would eventually become Creedmoor Elementary School.

Creedmoor School was a K-8 School by 1968. Creedmoor School boasted an attendance rate of 200 students by 1968. Despite consolidation in 1968, Creedmoor did not shut down and still had continued to operate. Creedmoor School had boasted an attendance rate of 300 students by 1969.

When Smith Elementary School opened in 1975, students from Creedmoor Elementary School were transferred to that school the day it opened. That was done in an effort to relieve overcrowding. Smith Elementary School (Smith School) was opened in an effort to relieve overcrowding at Creedmoor School.

In 1976, Creedmoor School closed down due to lack of space to accommodate growth in enrollment. Creedmoor School shared and rented space with Creedmoor Union Church for a short period of time. Students were tranfserred to nearby schools. Creedmoor Common School District closed for good in 1978.

Creedmoor Common School District and Del Valle ISD sold the 1 story school building to a woman named Dorothy Brock (Dorothy Loveless Brock) and her husband who lived in a trailer next to the school building from 1978 to 1991.


In 1986, Developers, architects, and engineers attempted to save the Creedmoor School and have the school be given a Texas Historic Landmark. However due to lack of cooperation from Dorothy Brock, this never happened the building fell into disrepair. By 1986, the school building fell into a state of disrepair and needed much extensive renovation. Many fixes needed to be made. The roof was leaking and needed repairs to be done. Wall structures were determined to be sound.

In 1991 Dorthy Brock sold the Creedmoor School building and property to Dennis Wilhoite and Schmidt Cattle LP. Dennis Wilhoite sold the land to a trust bank in 1992. Again in 1992, the Schmidt Cattle bought out the surrounding property.


In 2003, Del Valle ISD purchased land from longtime resident Annie M. Caldwell for a new school to be built in order to accommodate increased enrollment in Del Valle schools. This school would become an elementary school instead of a K-12 school called Creedmoor Elementary School. Construction started in 2003. Construction period for Creedmoor Elementary School was from 2003-2004. The house and other buildings owned by Annie Caldwell were demolished. The 1955 Creedmoor School was demolished in 2004 when the new school was opened east of town.

Construction of this school was finally finished in 2004. An opening ceremony for opening grounds was held east of town on the site of the current Creedmoor School in 2004. 600 to 760 citizens attended the opening ceremony.

The 1955 Creedmoor School was demolished in 2004 when the new school was opened east of town. By 2005 the  Creedmoor School was demolished for good. No remaining traces were found. In 2007 J S Electric Inc built a warehouse on the former Creedmoor School property where the school building once was. Both Schmidt Cattle LP and J S Electric own the property.

Today the Creedmoor School is known as Creedmoor Elementary School which now located at 6504 FM 1327, Creedmoor, Texas, US 78610. Today Creedmoor Elementary School has the highest enrollment rates of any Del Valle ISD schools as 2018.

The legacy of Creedmoor School still lives on even with no designated Texas Historic Landmark markers in sight or the vicinity of this small rural community. Creedmoor, Texas has evolved from a small rural community to a small town with enormous farm land. Creedmoor School is one of the many Austin/Travis County educational institutions that have been long forgotten.

ACC Rio Grande Campus shuts down during renovation.

The 102 year old Main Building of ACC Rio Grande Campus is currently undergoing renovation. A chain link fence now surrounds the property of what was once Austin High School, Allan Junior High School, and John T. Allan High School (Allan High School). Construction began during December 2017 during holidays. The campus remains closed during construction. Extensive renovation and much needed repair needs to be done.

Other programs offered at Rio Grande Campus will move to other ACC campuses across Austin.The Arts and Humanities programs will move to the ACC Highland Campus. The drama and dance programs offered at Rio Grande Campus will move to the ACC Highland Campus.

The Main Building (Building 1000) for ACC Rio Grande will reopen in 2019. ACC plans for the ACC Rio Grande Campus to reopen in 2019 at 1212 Rio Grande Street, Austin, Texas, US 78701.

Oprah Winfrey denies any plans running for US president.

It’s official! Oprah Winfrey has come out stating she has denied any plans for running in a presidential bid. “There will be no running for office of any kind for me," Oprah Winfrey told Larry King of CNBC a few days ago. She had given a speech which somehow prompted rumors that she may consider running for US president in 2020.

Thursday, January 11, 2018

History of Gurley School in Waco, Texas not forgotten.

Gurley School (Gurley Elementary School) is one of the many forgotten schools of Waco, Texas. Gurley School was located at 3903 South 3rd Street, Waco, Texas, US 76706. The school taught grades Kindergarten through 7. Gurley School operated from 1913 to 2013.


Gurley School was originally a county school built in 1913. The school was built with a gymnasium and 8 classrooms. In the beginning, Gurley School was a 1-7 school which taught grades 1 through 7. After 7th grade is students when students attended junior high school and middle school at North Waco Junior High School and Brazos Middle School.

Students in grades 6 and 7 has classes that were held in different classrooms from all the other elementary grades. Grades 6 and 7 were/are the middle school grades by todays educational standards.


According to a news article from The Waco News-Tribune dating back to May 8, 1947, residents protested an extension ordinance because it would slice off about half the school district’s revenue, thus wreck one of the best of the county schools.

The City granted the petitioners’ request by adopting a motion to kill the ordinance, but City Secretary Otis Dellay was advised to keep the copy of the ordinance because it will be needed again in several years. City officials said the city limits will have to be extended southeast. However the extension ordinance had been delayed. Gurley School was a part of Waco Public Schools (now Waco ISD) by 1947. (The Waco News-Tribune, Page 11, May 8, 1947)


The gymnasium was converted into an auditorium in 1955. Major remodeling to cafeteria was done during the same year. The cafeteria and auditorium were converted into a dual purpose room with the auditorium now being in the cafeteria. The school then taught grades Kindergarten through 7 as Kindergarten was added to the school sometime in the 1950s.

From July 19, 1956 to July 21, 1956 in when Gurley School had received $148,000 dollars worth of alterations to the school building. The front entrance now had a modern design. The front entrance now had a masonry pillar to mark the front entrance as a decorative feature instead old three steel poles as a more modern design.

It was reported in The Waco News-Tribune on the date of June 21, 1956 that Gurley School received major remodeling, extensive repairs, and several renovations. Emergency repairs on Gurley Elementary School were made in the summer of 1956. Restrooms were repaired. Major remodeling and a proposed addition was done in 1957.

Emergency repairs were scheduled in 1953, but were postponed until 1956 and 1957 because of the inability to determine the future enrollment. Major remodeling and a proposed addition was done in 1957. The plans were presented to the administrative staff. Plans were made for beautifying the school grounds.

A committee member from the Gurley School PTA wrote to the school board on May 29 about what they considered "disgraceful" conditions at Gurley School. Mrs. Warren Tynes, president of the PTA, said “The restrooms are not sealed and the commodes are so old they get out of order easily.The commodes are not partitioned off.”
(Gurley Gets Emergency Repair Work Emergency The Waco News-Tribune, Page 1, June 21, 1956)
(Board Adopts Gurley School Building Plan The Gurley School, The Waco News-Tribune, Page 1, July 19, 1956)


South Waco Elementary School was built to replace Gurley School and the then South Waco School located at the intersection of Oakwood Avenue & 7th Street in 1993. 1995 was the year the new South Waco Elementary School opened at the location of 2104 Gurley Lane for Waco ISD.

Gurley School closed to regular education students in 1997 to become a school for special education students. Gurley School was an alternative school special education students from 1997 to 2013. The school was known as a “special needs school” to Waco residents.

Waco ISD made administrative decisions to close down Gurley School due to low enrollment and high maintenance costs in 2012 during the 2012-2013 school year. Enrollment had dropped every year at this school. So the decision to close the school saving money from high maintenance costs was made. 2013 was the year Gurley School closed. The remaining students were sent to South Waco Elementary School

In 2013 the school was all but abandoned. Gurley School sat abandoned for a short period of time from 2013 to 2016. As a security measure, a chain link fence protected the school from vandalism and graffiti. By 2016, Gurley School was demolished. All that remains is the parking lot that is now used for Gurley Park. 

The location for this school was 3903 South 3rd Street, Waco, Texas, US 76706.

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

TV show billionaire Oprah Winfrey considers running for US president.

As of January 2018, former TV show host billionaire Oprah Winfrey has considered running for president against Donald Trump for the next presidential election in 2020. On the night Oprah Winfrey accepted the Cecil B. DeMille Award for a lifetime achievement, she had given a speech which somehow prompted rumors that she may consider running for US president in 2020.

According to a poll from NY Post, Winfrey has the support of 76 percent (76%) of Democrats and a very low percentage of Republicans at a whopping 22 percent (22%). NY Post claims there is a “sizable crowd of undecideds”. 48% of voters would favor Winfrey which could lead her approval ratings to go up. The Democratic Party seems to favor Winfrey and may secretly back her up on political campaign contributions.

However Winfrey has come out stating she has denied any plans for running in a presidential bid. "There will be no running for office of any kind for me," Oprah Winfrey told Larry King of CNBC a few days ago.

And She shows no signs of slowing down anytime soon in the near future. Today Oprah Winfrey has an estimated net worth of $3 billion.

History of the Gregg School in Manor, Texas long forgotten revisited.

Gregg School in Manor, Texas is of the many long forgotten educational institutions and schools of Austin/Travis County that have faded away with time and from people's memories. Gregg School was one of the many Travis County rural schools. To many Travis County natives, the Gregg School was also known as the Old Rock Church (Rock Church) and Gilleland Creek Academy.


In 1870, William Stiles donated one acre of land for the Gregg School to be built on at the present location of 5300 Gregg Lane, Manor, Texas, US 78653. The school building was located northwest of Manor. The school building was constructed of rock and was called Gilleland Creek Academy. Walls of the old rock building were never plastered or renovated. William Stiles was both the architect and builder of the Gregg School. The Gregg School opened in 1872.

Mr. Dew was the first teacher to have taught at the Gregg School beginning in 1872. In 1872 Mr. Dew had gotten married. A 4 room cottage was built by the school board in front of the school for Mr. Dew and his wife in the same year. Mr. Dew boarded with Mrs. Kayte Boyce. Mr. Dew taught at Gregg School from 1872 to 1882.

The Gregg School was not operated as a district school in any of the local school districts in the area, but the students were charged tuition when the school first started operating. William Stiles, William Boyce, Mrs. Kayte Boyce, Lee Giles, Aaron Boyce, and Camell Hill were one of the early trustees for Gregg School. Students from Manor, Decker, Dessau, and Pflugerville attended this school. Even students from Williamson County, from as far as Coupland, attended the Gregg School.

The second teacher was Ms. Hattie Hardy who taught there from 1882 to 1896. Ms Hattie Hardy married a man named Mr. Cain. In 1896, Ms. Hattie Hardy moved to a home her hometown of Manor.

In 1884, the school property transferred ownership to Travis County Public Schools and Travis County. After Mr. William Gregg opened a store and post office in 1888, Gilleland Creek Academy became known as the Gregg School.


By the early 1900’s, Sunday Church Services were being held in the school house. Gregg School became known as the Rock Church in 1900. A small cemetery called the Gregg School Cemetery was located close nearby. The Gregg School had 1 teacher and 32 students in 1907 with a 1:32 ratio. The 1908-1909 school year had 1 teacher and 33 students. The 1909-1910 school year had 1 teacher and 37 students with a 1:37 ratio.

In 1910 the rock building was torn down and a newly built wooden frame building was erected on the site of the former rock building. Only the chimney erected out of rock and brick remained from the rock building. The 1910 wooden frame building was built by Westley Gustafson. In 1920, Gregg School established their own school district called Gregg School District #22.

By the 1930s, Gregg School was a K-7 school that taught 1st grade through 7th grade. School stopped after 7th grade. For the 1935-1936 school year, Gregg School had 62 students. There was 1 teacher for 62 students with a 1:62 ratio. One teacher taught all 7 grades for 118 days to 120 days. Of course the teacher got paid for 6 months of teaching during said school semester.


Citizens of Manor voted to consolidate the school districts of Gregg, Decker, Blue Bluff, Lockwood, New Sweden, Carlson, and Lund into Manor ISD in 1947. Series of school district consolidations into bigger school districts were common in Texas from the 1940s to the 1960s. The Gregg School and Gregg School District was no exception to this case.

1948 is when the Gregg School was consolidated into Manor Independent School District (Manor ISD) and Pflugerville ISD. Gregg School was divided between Manor ISD and Pflugerville ISD. Other students who attended Gregg School were bussed to Pflugerville to attend Pflugerville ISD schools while the remaining students attended school in Manor. Gregg School District #22 consolidated into Manor ISD.

By 1950, the Gregg School had closed for good. The school sat abandoned for a certain amount of unspecified years before being demolished. The land and cemetery reverted ownership to Travis County.

In 1965, the Gregg School was demolished. From looking at a 1965 aerial map provided by NASA and Historic Aerials (historicaerials.com), one can determine that all that remained of the Gregg School was a pile of rocks ashes from the demolished school building resembling a pile of dirt often found at construction sites.

1965 is when land for the former Gregg School property and the Gregg School Cemetery were deeded and sold to a man named Christian Buck who lived on the land until his death. In 1965, Christian Buck conerveted the land into a ranch after paperwork was finalized. Christian Buck bought the land from Manor ISD, Pflugerville ISD, and Travis County.

The 4 room cottage built by the school board in 1872 still remained at the front for a while until being demolished a year later in 1966. That is when Travis County approved funds to demolish the Gregg School building. Other buildings were simply sold off overtime.


The Christian Buck Estate deeded Jack W Gullahorn and Patricia H Gullahorn the former Gregg School land property and Gregg School Cemetery on the date of 11/24/1982. Nothing was left of any structures at Gregg Cemetery or Gregg School when it was purchased by the Gullahorns in 1982. The church had been long gone by the decade of the 1980s.

A house was built on the former Gregg School land property in 1983 for Jack W Gullahorn and Patricia H Gullahorn. The 1983 house was built as a 3 story house. A trailer was hauled onto the property during the same year which was located west of the house.


In 2005 and 2006, Schoenstatt Movement of Austin deeded and granted Alexander House the Gregg School land property and the Gregg School Cemetery to Alexander House of Austin from a quit claim deed. In 2010, Alexander House of Austin deeded and granted Gregg School land property and the Gregg School Cemetery back to Jack W Gullahorn and Patricia H Gullahorn from a quit claim deed. No changes to the cemetery were made.

Gregg Cemetery was finally granted status as a Historic Texas Cemetery in 2015 largely through the efforts of Richard Lamson of Dallas. The wife of Richard Lamson had relatives buried in the cemetery along with a host of other family members. Some of the Gullahorns are said to be buried there as well.

In September 2017, Jack W Gullahorn and Patricia H Gullahorn still owned the former Gregg School land property and the Gregg School Cemetery. Jack W Gullahorn has since converted the land into a ranch. No known changes have been made to the cemetery were made.


All that remains of the Gregg School is the Gregg School Cemetery located private land on the right side of Gregg Lane. The cemetery is completely overgrown with tall grass and almost all tombstones found are toppled over. The cemetery is in poor condition. Patricia H Gullahorn and Jack W Gullahorn are the caretakers for the Gregg School Cemetery. Through the years they worked to protect the cemetery and find descendants of those buried there who might be willing to help maintain it.


The Gregg School was located at 5300 Gregg Lane, Manor, Texas, US 78653.

*Gregg School Cemetery is also known as the Old Rock Church Cemetery.
*Gregg School was also known as Gillieland Creek Academy.
*William Stiles died on December 24, 1883 at the age of 73 and his wife, Piety Ellis Stiles, died a few years later on May 23, 1885. They are both buried in the Gregg School Cemetery. Their graves are marked by headstones enclosed within an iron fence.

St. Johns School history of Austin, Texas examined and explained by Michael Mixerr.

This news article written by Michael Mixerr will revisit the news article entitled “Michael Mixerr examines the history of a former Austin ISD elementary school site.” which had examined the history about the former St. John's Elementary School site.

The location of 906 East St. Johns Avenue, Austin, Texas, US 78752 was once the address for the former St. Johns Elementary School from 1958 to 1995.St. John's Elementary School aka St. Johns School, once operated and owned by Austin ISD, was a "negro school" with a large African American student population located in the historic St. John's neighborhood of Austin, Texas from 1938 to 1995. St. John's Elementary School (St. John's School) was named after the historic long gone St. John's Orphanage and St. Johns Institute.


In 1938, St. John's School was built for a capacity of 106 students located at 700 Delmar Avenue which was the first site for St. John's School for Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD) and Fiskville School District (School District #11). St. Johns School was built on the property of St. Johns Orphanage for students who attended St. Johns Institute, St. Johns Orphanage, Austin Public Schools, and Fiskville School District.St. Johns Elementary School was once known as St. Johns School.

St. Johns School operated in an L-plan shaped building that was one story tall. The entire building was constructed out of wood. Foundation was laid out on a beam and tier styled building plan. The foundation was made out of lumber. Classes were taught in a one room setting. St. John's School first operated as St. John's Negro School from 1938 to 1948 where grades 1 through 7 were taught.


In 1940, Fiskville White School (Fiskville School) and Fiskville Negro School burned down in a fire. The fire damaged the buildings badly beyond repair. Both schools needed to be rebuilt. Fiskville White School (Fiskville School) was rebuilt at its original location at 305 Deen Avenue and replaced the 1924 building that had been burned. Fiskville on Dungan Street near Georgian Drive burned down too.

Fiskville Negro School relocated to 700 Delmar Avenue and was rebuilt next to St. Johns School in 1941. One building had taught grades 1 through 4 and the other building taught grades 5 through 7. Both school structures were rebuilt into brick buildings. The foundation was laid in cement style.

In 1942, St. John's School was rebuilt for a capacity of 110 students located at 700 Delmar Avenue which was the first site for St. John's School. St. Johns School operated in an L-plan shaped building that was one story tall. The entire building was constructed out of brick. Foundation was laid out on a beam and tier styled building plan. The foundation was made out of cement and brick. From 1942 until 1958, St. John's School would be located at 700 Delmar Avenue prior to relocating at the 906 East St. Johns Avenue location in 1958.

St. John's School taught grades 1 through 7 in 1942 all the way near to the very end of the 1940s decade. Each grade from 1st grade to 7th grade had 10 students. 2 to 4 teachers taught 110 students. Student population stayed at 100 most of the time. Grades 1 through 8 were taught at St. John's School. Grade 9 was added later. High school students attended L.C. Anderson High School after 9th grade.

The name for St. John's School changed from St. John's Negro School in 1948. 1948 is when St. John's School went from being a one-room school to a two-room school. Grade 9 was added, but only for a short period of time. Grades 7 and 9 were held in a separate room.


In 1951, Fiskville School District consolidated into Austin ISD. Fiskville Negro School would be operated by Austin ISD until 1951. Students attending Fiskville Negro School would now be attending St. Johns School. In 1951, the parking lot was repaved with gravel. Parking for teachers and administrators would soon be provided.

In 1952, the parking lot was repaved with gravel and limestone. St. Johns School was reorganized and downsized thus became a 1-7 school teaching grades 1 through 7. Grades 8 and 9 would no longer be taught at St. John's School. Students in those grades went to attend L.C. Anderson High School or Manor Colored High School. Most students past grade 9 attended L.C. Anderson High School however.

Buildings from Fiskville School (Fiskville White School) and Fiskville Negro School were relocated here in 1952 to accommodate the growing student population as a result of school district consolidation in 1951. 3 additional buildings were added on as add-ons to the St. Johns School in 1952 and again in 1954.


By 1956, the school was over capacity and the site needed to be expanded. This led Austin ISD to allocate funding for plans to relocate St. John's School to another location from the 700 Delmar Avenue location. The student population was over 200 by then which was 90% over capacity. The 1957-1958 school would be the last time classes would be held at Fiskville Negro School and St. Johns Negro School. Fiskville Negro School and St. Johns School closed the following year. The old St. John's School buildings at the 700 Delmar Avenue location was demolished that year.

In 1958, Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD) opened St. John's School in 1958 at the 906 East St. John's Avenue location. The new St. John's School was built for a capacity of 224 students in a one story building constructed out of brick. St. John's Elementary School was built to replace the 2 existing all black schools (Fiskville Negro School and St. Johns Negro) in the area in the year of 1958. At that point, St. John's School would be the only all-black school outside of East Austin next to Sprinkle School, Manor Colored High School, Manor Negro School, Montopolis School, Clayton Vocational Institute, and Littig High School.

Prior to 1958, the 906 East St. John's Avenue location site was a plot of flat vacant land. This plot of vacant land belonged to St. Johns Orphanage and St. Johns Institute prior to Austin ISD buying the land out from them.

In 1964, T. A. Brown Elementary School (Brown School) would be built and opened to replace Fiskville School and St. Johns School. T. A. Brown Elementary School had students from Fiskville School and St. Johns School attend school there after attendance zones were set and finalized.


In 1969, US Fifth Circuit Court found Austin ISD in noncompliance of not racially integrating their schools. 94% of the student population was African American. St. John's Elementary School and L.C. Anderson High School had a minority population higher than any other Austin ISD school. Its minority population was higher than any AISD school at that time. The neighborhood was rough and the St. Johns School had low performing test scores. This led St. John's School to be closed down a year later. The 1969-1970 school year had 163 students that were all black.

On the date of August 27, 1970, the following Austin ISD schools were shut down by a Federal District Court judge for the US Fifth Circuit Court.: L.C. Anderson High School, Kealing Junior High School, Rice Elementary School, Rosewood Elementary School, Winn Elementary School, and St. John's Elementary School were ordered shut down by a Federal District Court judge.

Finally the court ordered the closing of all-black St. Johns Elementary School and transfer of the St. Johns students to surrounding schools. Those students were dispersed to the other schools on an arbitrary geographical boundary-line basis as a result of that noncompliance. When St. John's Elementary School was closed, students were sent to Brown Elementary School, Pearce Junior High School (now Pearce Middle School), Winn Elementary School (Winn School), and Andrews Elementary School.

By 1972 St. John's School was abandoned. The school sat abandoned for more than 5 years. For a certain number of odd years, St. John's Elementary School became abandoned. The school served mainly as offices for a short period of time.


St. Johns Elementary School reopened in 1980. St. John's Elementary School was downsized from a K-5 school to a K-3 school in 1980. From 1980 to 1988 is when St. John's Elementary School operated as a K-3 school where kindergarten through 3rd grade was taught.

In 1988, St. John's Elementary became an alternative school for pregnant teenagers. St. John's School was an alternative school from 1988 to 1995. The name for the school was changed back to St. John's School. Interestingly the school never had a library throughout its history. Mostly young women from ages 16 to 18 attended this alternative school. Age range for this alternative school was from 16 to 19.

On the date of November 8, 1990, a book drive was held by the school to create something the school has never had. A library. For the first time the school would have a library. [Ref.: School for pregnant teens launches library fund, Austin American Statesman, November 8, 1990]

Home Depot bought out land where St. Johns Elementary School was occupying from Austin ISD to build a Home Depot building in 1994. The decision for Home Depot to build a store here was made since the location was close to I 35 as the location was perfect in commerce for their business and clients. The land was purchased for a price of $480,170.

On an agreement in terms of their lease agreement, Home Depot allowed Austin ISD to let St. Johns Elementary School continue to operate until the 1994-1995 school year was complete. This allowed the Austin ISD school district time to gather all their belongings and possessions.Community meetings for parents and PTA about the future of St. John's School were held during the 1994-1995 school year.

In 1995, St. John's Elementary School was demolished to make way for construction of a new Home Depot. Summer of 1995 is when this Home Depot location was open for business. Traces of the St. John's School were no longer visible or extant.


The land that once housed a Home Depot and a car dealership was purchased for $6.9 million dollars with a 2006 public safety bond to eventually become a new police substation and municipal court. City of Austin was going to use this Home Depot location as space for government offices, Austin PD headquarters, and a new animal shelter. Austin PD (APD) headquarters were supposed to relocate there but preferred to stay located downtown. Due to an October 2008 dispute on where to build a new animal shelter, the city never moved forward with those plans. Nothing ever happened.

This Home Depot was closed in 2008. The reason why this Home Depot closed was also due to building code issues and also due to a lack of business. Parts of the building were not handicap accessible which is odd because this Home Depot was built in 1995. This Home Depot location has been abandoned since 2008 ever since getting bought out by the City of Austin.


Currently as of December 2017 and January 2018, the City of Austin and Austin Resource Recovery are using the building for storage. Compost bins occupy the inside of this former Home Depot building. For now the site sits abandoned collecting dust and vandalism which is truly an eyesore to the St. Johns neighborhood. Over the years, this former Home Depot building has been plastered over with graffiti mostly by the front entrance. Some areas of the building are covered with mold.

Future plans are being plotted by City of Austin for this building location to relocate municipal government offices into this building. However the building needs a new roof and not considered inhabitable by code enforcement officials. So the building might need to be demolished. So far… Nothing has been implemented yet.


St. John's Elementary School was located at 906 East St. Johns Avenue, Austin, Texas, US 78752. The address for this Home Depot location was 7211 North Interstate 35 Frontage Road, Austin, Texas, US 78752.

*St. Johns Elementary School also went under the names of St. John's School, St. Johns Negro School, St. Johns Negro School, St. Johns School, and St. John's Elementary School.
*St. Johns Elementary School had the highest minority population of all AISD schools at one point.
*This location was going to be a rehabilitation clinic at one point. However that plan never occurred or happened. Instead the building was transformed into a storage unit for the City of Austin.

Monday, January 1, 2018

Michael Mixerr examines the history of a former Austin ISD elementary school site.

This news article written by Michael Mixerr will be examining the history of a former Austin ISD elementary school site of what was once St. John's Elementary School.

The location of 906 East St. Johns Avenue, Austin, Texas, US 78752 was once the address for the former St. Johns Elementary School from 1958 to 1995. St. Johns Elementary School was once known as St. Johns School. St. John's Elementary School (St. Johns School) was once operated and owned by Austin ISD.


St. John's Elementary School aka St. Johns School was a "negro school" with a large African American student population in the historic St. John's neighborhood of Austin, Texas from 1942 to 1995. St. John's School first operated as St. John's Negro School from 1942 to 1948. Grades 1 through 8 were taught at St. John's School. Grade 9 was added later. High school students attended L.C. Anderson High School after 9th grade. St. John's Elementary School (St. John's School) was named after the historic long gone St. John's Orphanage.


In 1942, St. John's School was built for a capacity of 110 students located at 700 Delmar Avenue which was the first site for St. John's School. St. Johns School operated in an L-plan shaped building that was one story tall. The entire building was constructed out of brick. Foundation was laid out on a beam and tier styled building plan. The foundation was made out of cement and brick. From 1942 until 1958, St. John's School would be located at 700 Delmar Avenue prior to relocating at the 906 East St. Johns Avenue location in 1958.

St. John's School taught grades 1 through 7 in 1942 all the way near to the very end of the 1940s decade. Each grade from 1st grade to 7th grade had 10 students. 2 to 4 teachers taught 110 students. Student population stayed at 100 most of the time.

The name for St. John's School changed from St. John's Negro School in 1948. 1948 is when St. John's School went from being a one-room school to a two-room school. Grade 9 was added, but only for a short period of time. Grades 7 and 9 were held in a separate room.


In 1952, the parking lot was repaved with gravel and limestone. St. Johns School was reorganized and downsized, thus became a 1-7 school teaching grades 1 through 7. Grades 8 and 9 would no longer be taught at St. John's School. Students in those grades went to attend L.C. Anderson High School.

3 additional building were added on as add-ons to the St. Johns School in 1954. By 1956, the school was over capacity and the site needed to be expanded. This led Austin ISD to allocate funding for plans to relocate St. John's School to another location from the 700 Delmar Avenue location. The student population was over 200.

In 1958, Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD) opened St. John's School in 1958 at the 906 East St. John's Avenue location. The new St. John's School was built for a capacity of 224 students in a one story building. The old St. John's School building was demolished at the 700 Delmar Avenue location was demolished that year. Prior to 1958, the 906 East St. John's Avenue location site was a plot of flat vacant land.

St. John's School was built to replace the existing all black school in the area in the year of 1958. At that point, St. John's School would be the only all-black school outside of East Austin next to Sprinkle School, Manor Colored High School, Manor Negro School, Clayton Vocational Institute, and Littig High School.


In 1969, US Fifth Circuit Court found Austin ISD in noncompliance of not racially integrating their schools. 94% of the student population was African American. St. John's Elementary School and L.C. Anderson High School had a minority population higher than any other Austin ISD school. Its minority population was higher than any AISD school at that time. The neighborhood was rough and the St. Johns School had low performing test scores. This led St. John's School to be closed down a year later. The 1969-1970 school year had 163 students that were all black.

On the date of August 27, 1970, the following Austin ISD schools were shut down by a Federal District Court judge for the US Fifth Circuit Court.: L.C. Anderson High School, Kealing Junior High School, Rice Elementary School, Rosewood Elementary School, and St. John's Elementary School were ordered shut down by a Federal District Court judge.

Finally the court ordered the closing of all-black St. Johns Elementary School and transfer of the St. Johns students to surrounding schools. Those students were dispersed to the other schools on an arbitrary geographical boundary-line basis as a result of that noncompliance.

When St. John's Elementary School was closed, students were sent to Brown Elementary School, Pearce Junior High School (now Pearce Middle School), Winn Elementary School (Winn School), and Andrews Elementary School. For a certain number of odd years, St. John's Elementary School became abandoned. The school sat abandoned for more than 5 years. By 1972 St. John's School was abandoned.


St. Johns Elementary School reopened in 1980. St. John's Elementary School was downsized from a K-5 school to a K-3 school in 1980. From 1980 to 1988 is when St. John's Elementary School operated as a K-3 school where kindergarten through 3rd grade was taught.

In 1988, St. John's Elementary became an alternative school for pregnant teenagers. St. John's School was an alternative school from 1988 to 1995. The name for the school was changed back to St. John's School. Interestingly the school never had a library throughout its history. Mostly young women from ages 16 to 18 attended this alternative school. Age range for this alternative school was from 16 to 19.

On the date of November 8, 1990, a book drive was held by the school to create something the school has never had - a library. For the first time the school would have a library. [Ref.: School for pregnant teens launches library fund, Austin American Statesman, November 8, 1990]

Home Depot bought out land where St. Johns Elementary School was occupying from Austin ISD to build a Home Depot building in 1994. The decision for Home Depot to build a store here was made since the location was close to I 35 as the location was perfect in commerce for their business and clients. The land was purchased for a price of $480,170.

On an agreement in terms of their lease agreement, Home Depot allowed Austin ISD to let St. Johns Elementary School continue to operate until the 1994-1995 school year was complete. This allowed the Austin ISD school district time to gather all their belongings and possessions.Community meetings for parents and PTA about the future of St. John's School were held during the 1994-1995 school year.

In 1995, St. John's Elementary School was demolished to make way for construction of a new Home Depot. Summer of 1995 is when this Home Depot location was open for business. Traces of the St. John's School were no longer visible or extant.


The land that once housed a Home Depot and a car dealership was purchased for $6.9 million dollars with a 2006 public safety bond to eventually become a new police substation and municipal court. City of Austin was going to use this Home Depot location as space for government offices, Austin PD headquarters, and a new animal shelter. Austin PD (APD) headquarters were supposed to relocate there but preferred to stay located downtown. Due to an October 2008 dispute on where to build a new animal shelter, the city never moved forward with those plans. Nothing ever happened.

This Home Depot was closed in 2008. The reason why this Home Depot closed was also due to building code issues and also due to a lack of business. Parts of the building were not handicap accessible which is odd because this Home Depot was built in 1995. This Home Depot location has been abandoned since 2008 ever since getting bought out by the City of Austin.


Currently as of December 2017 and January 2018, the City of Austin and Austin Resource Recovery are using the building for storage. Compost bins occupy the inside of this former Home Depot building. For now the site sits abandoned collecting dust and vandalism which is truly an eyesore to the St. Johns neighborhood. Over the years, this former Home Depot building has been plastered over with graffiti mostly by the front entrance. Some areas of the building are covered with mold.

Future plans are being plotted by City of Austin for this building location to relocate municipal government offices into this building. However the building needs a new roof and not considered inhabitable by code enforcement officials. So the building might need to be demolished. So far… Nothing has been implemented yet.


St. John's Elementary School was located at 906 East St. Johns Avenue, Austin, Texas, US 78752. The address for this Home Depot location was 7211 North Interstate 35 Frontage Road, Austin, Texas, US 78752.

*St. Johns Elementary School also went under the names of St. John's School, St. Johns Negro School, St. Johns Negro School, St. Johns School, and St. John's Elementary School.
*St. Johns Elementary School had the highest minority population of all AISD schools at one point.
*This location was going to be a rehabilitation clinic at one point. However that plan never occurred or happened. Instead the building was transformed into a storage unit for the City of Austin.

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Hurricane Harvey destroys 100 year old building in Elgin, Texas.

Hurricane Harvey destroyed the roof a 100 year old building located at 217 Central Avenue in Elgin, Texas and has destroyed the interior structure of the building. As of now, the roof is completely missing. The roof has collapsed from destruction of wind currents during Hurricane Harvey. The building is a former shell of what it once was before Hurricane Harvey weather hit the small town of Elgin, Texas.

The building that was destroyed what was once a Thai food restaurant. From 2010 to 2017 is when  Katie's Catering Thai Cuisine operated at the corner of Avenue B & Central Avenue in Elgin, Texas.

POLLEN ARCHITECTURE is planning to turn this 100 year old building into a new vision. As of two months ago, the first day of restoration and cleanup began. The removal and stabilization alone is estimated to be a total cost of $6,000. Possibly $8,000 including fees. However more work needs to be done to get completed. Margo Sawyer wanted to thank everyone who has already so generously donated! Any help would be greatly appreciated!

This building is zoned in C-2 Commercial District with Zone 2 Overlay which allows more than 50% residential on the ground floor. This building is also located in the Elgin Local Historic District and Elgin National Register Historic Commercial District. The parcel number is R12232.
The building is located at 217 Central Avenue, Elgin, Texas, US 78621.

A GoFundMe page has been set up to revitalize the building that was once a Thai food restaurant. You can help by sending donations here to this link.:https://www.gofundme.com/Transform-Harveys-destruction-into-Sawyer-Art-Garden

Updated history of Pleasant Valley School in Austin, Texas.

Pleasant Valley School was a school in Austin, Texas that operated from 1864 to 1968. The school building was located where modern day intersection FM 2222 & Loop 360 is now located. Pleasant Valley School first served as an elementary school serving grades 1 through 5. Later Pleasant Valley School became a 1-11 school serving grades 1 through 11.

Pleasant Valley School served as school for students living in the neighborhoods of Northwest Hills, Allandale, West Austin, Courtyard, Spicewood, Pleasant Valley, Spicewood Mesa, and Twin Mesa neighborhoods. Even students from the Eanes School District attended Pleasant Valley School despite living in Westlake at one point in the latter half of the 19th century.


Thomas Hughell Walden donated land to Travis County Appraisal District for a school in 1864 located on land which owned called Old Walden Place where the modern day intersection FM 2222 & Loop 360 is now located. Pleasant Valley School opened up as a schoolhouse where school was held inside a log cabin built in 1864. Classes would be held for this school inside of the log cabin from 1864 to 1867.

Hughell Walden, Ewan Williams, and Fendrick Smith were the first school trustees. Miss Jennie Parrish, Mrs. Munn, and Mr. Stringer were the teachers. Ewan Williams gave 1½ acres of land to the school. Pleasant Valley School was also known as Bull Creek School on several topographical maps from the 1880’s to the 1910’s as the school was located near Bull Creek.

The old school building was outmoded and outdated by 1866. So a new log cabin was built in 1867. School was held in this log cabin from 1867 until 1919. The first school year for this school building was the 1867-1868 school year. Funding was tight as money was scarce during the Reconstruction era after the American Civil War. Grades 1 through 5 only were taught at this school. Students wanting to continue towards 6th grades and onwards went to Oak Grove School on Spicewood Springs Road.

The 1867 Pleasant Valley School log cabin building burned down to the ground in 1885. This led to a dispute in land titles over who owned the land where Pleasant Valley School was located. The school itself was located on a flat. Although Pleasant Valley School was on land owned by Thomas Hughell Walden, the school building moved several times. Eventually the school itself was rebuilt in 1885.

Classes continued in the school year of 1885-1886. Grades 6 through 11 were added in 1886. One side of Pleasant Valley School served grades 1 through 5 and the other side served grades 6 through 11. The side that served grades 1 through 5 switched to serve grades 1 through 6.


In 1918, the Travis County Schools superintendent deemed the school building to be outdated and overcrowded. This led to a demand for aa new school building to be built. However that area of town suffered from extreme poverty at that time and receiving a new school building would be a difficult task.

The land was considered to be very poor by county and city officials as the Northwest Hills neighborhood and Allandale was sparsely settled due to the mountainous hills alongside the rocky limestone formations. Lands were used for farming and ranch. Most of the citizens living in the Northwest Hills neighborhood and in Allandale were very poor back then. The flat yet somewhat mountainous hills alongside the rocky limestone formations alongside Northwest Hills was a perfect ideal location for a school to be built on.


1919 was the year Pleasant Valley School District was formed. Although Pleasant Valley had its own school district by 1919, Travis County Public Schools (Travis County Common School District) operated and oversaw the school. The Travis County Schools superintendent was responsible for helping allocate funding to several rural schools and school district in Travis County.

 The Pleasant Valley School District had a 50¢ cent school tax which produced only $91.83 per year, which in turn was only $4.84 per student of free-school age. The Travis County Schools superintendent was responsible for helping allocate funding to Pleasant Valley School.

During the summer of 1919, people from the Allandale and Northwest Hills neighborhoods voted bonds within an amount of $2,000 dollars build a new modern two-room schoolhouse. The vote was unanimous due to their desires for a better school. It was a cry for help. A cry for better educational facilities. Thomas Hughell Walden was the man instrumental in getting Austin Public Schools (Austin ISD) to establish the new Pleasant Valley School building. He and several other petitioned city officials and county officials to build a new schoolhouse in the Pleasant Valley/Northwest Hills community.

When the bonds reached the Attorney General's office for inspection, they could not be approved.  The bonds to build a new school were rejected. Only $500 dollars in bonds could be legally issued for construction of Pleasant Valley School. The tax base of the district was simply too small. The new schoolhouse was not built. Instead an old was provided with a new roof and a new floor along with 2 extra windows.

Pleasant Valley School later opened up as a schoolhouse for Austin ISD (then known as Austin Public Schools) and Travis County Public Schools (Travis County Common School District) in 1919 as a one story two-room wooden-framed schoolhouse that would be later on converted into a three-room wooden-framed schoolhouse in what was considered then as rural Travis County. Years of operation for this school were from 1919 to 1968.


Unfortunately the one story school would face another tragedy. The school burned down again in the year of 1931. The school burned down to the ground. Everything was destroyed by the fire. Books, desks, educational material, sports equipment, and several other items were never recovered. It was a total loss for Pleasant Valley School District. Students were sent to Oak Gove School in the Oak Grove School District (School District No. 5) temporarily until a new school building could be built.

Fortunately however, the school was able to be rebuilt in 1932 after being burned down to a flat surface. 1932 was also the same time where the school became accredited receiving accreditation from the State of Texas. Later Pleasant Valley School became a 1-11 school. The State of Texas accredited Pleasant Valley School with high acclaim for their educational standards.

On the 1932 Topographic and Road Map of Travis Count, the school appears as Pleasant Valley School. Pleasant Valley School was no longer referred to as Bull Creek School any maps from the 1930s onwards.


The school would not live on forever. It too would be moved as the city of Austin grew around it.
Pleasant Valley School District was closed in 1968 when the school property reverted by sale to Mrs. C.C. Champion as provided in the original deed, Pleasant Valley School District was closed and consolidated into Summitt School District and later Austin ISD. Austin ISD sending the remaining students to continue their education in nearby schools in the Austin school district.

The other reasons why the Pleasant Valley School and Pleasant Valley School District closed was due to declining enrollment and imminent domain. Shortly after sale to Mrs. C.C. Champion as provided in the original deed, Pleasant Valley School sat abandoned for 2 years until 1970.


In 1970, Pleasant Valley School was relocated and made into a private residence on the Champion family land. This was done in order to prevent demolition. The Champion family donated land to TXDot for Loop 360 and have donated huge portions of their land to real estate development during the latter half of the 20th century.

Imminent domain would make right of way for a new Loop 360 and the Pleasant Valley School building was in its route (right of way). That Loop 360 route that would eventually become a highway to serve West Austin neighborhoods such as Courtyard, Allandale, Spicewood, Pleasant Valley, and Northwest Hills. City of Austin used imminent domain to construct Loop 360 where Pleasant Valley School was at.


As of December 2017, the Pleasant Valley School building is now a private residence on land owned by the Champion family. The school building has been repainted a white color which was the original color for this school building.

However the land is being rezoned by the Champion family for a hotel and is slated for demolition. The Champion family isn't keen on getting historical status or a Texas Historic Landmark marker for the school building as they want to proceed with building the hotel. No, the Champion family has not gotten the City of Austin to initiate historic zoning to keep the building in tact. So far nothing has been done yet. Only time will tell certainly.


Pleasant Valley School was located at the intersection of Loop 360 & FM 2222, Austin, Texas, US.