Showing posts with label education. Show all posts
Showing posts with label education. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Pleasant Hill School deemed to be the oldest school in Austin, Texas.

Many historians, news reporters, journalists, writers, and Austin ISD staff can agree that Pleasant Hill School (Pleasant Elementary Hill School) is the oldest school in Austin, Texas. In fact, Pleasant Hill School is one of the oldest public schools in Austin, Texas next to Pease School (Pease Elementary School), Eanes School (Eanes Elementary School), and Austin High School. The Pleasant Hill School is/was both a negro school and a white school.


History of Pleasant Hill School began in 1858 at Onion Creek Lodge #220 (Onion Creek Masonic Lodge #220) as Red Cedar School and later Union School. The Masons discussed the issue of opening their own lodge. The Masons petitioned for their own lodge in 1858. Pleasant Hill School first began inside a small one-room log cabin built from red cedar which was conceived from Bastrop County.

In those days, Pleasant Hill School was a K-12 school teaching 1st grade through 10th grade operating as a 1-10 school. 11th grade was added sometime during the 20th century. From 1858-1935 is when Pleasant Hill School operated in the Onion Creek Lodge.

The log cabin later destroyed by Indians in the fall of 1859. Everything was salvaged by Indians with the building being beyond repair. The building burned. The result of this fire was believed to have been antics by local school children. Exact details as to how the Pleasant Hill School burnt down is still a mystery to this day.

A new building was required to be built. Native white limestone was quarried in from Oak Hill. The stone lodge building was completed in 1860. First floor of the Onion Creek Lodge was used by the Pleasant Hill School and the second floor was used to hold religious services by the Masons, Presbyterians, Baptists, and Methodists by alternating on Sundays. The Masons leased their lodge building to various religious groups and religious organizations over the years.

The Union School House changed name to Pleasant Hill School in 1869. The Mason’s assumed full ownership of the entire building the same year. 1869 was a year that brought forth a lot of changes for the Onion Creek Masonic Lodge and Pleasant Hill School.

Extra additional space was added at a cost of $440 dollars in 1870. 1870 is when more changes were brought forth.


Extra additional space was added at a cost of $770 dollars in 1908. The 1908-1909 school semester saw an increase in enrollment. Austin Public Schools (Austin ISD) began overseeing administrative duties for Pleasant Hill School during this time. 1st grade through 9th grade were taught here. Pleasant Hill School was a 1-9 school. School never went past 10th grade.

In the 1934-1935 school semester, Pleasant Hill School had 28 students. The average daily attendance was 15 students daily. There was one teacher for 28 students. The cost per year was $435. One teacher taught 1st grade through 9th grade for 120 days.

First floor of the Onion Creek Lodge was used by the Pleasant Hill School to educate students until 1935 when the present school building was built and opened. 1935 is when Pleasant Hill moved into a new and improved school building a mile north on Circle S Road. For the school semesters of 1935-1936 and 1936-1937 is when Pleasant Hill School became a 1-9 school teaching 1st grade through 9th grade. After finishing 9th grade, students attended Austin High School in town.

1956 is when Austin ISD took full control over Pleasant Hill School and the Pleasant Hill School District by incorporating and annexing the property around the school. The Pleasant Hill School District lasted from 1953 to 1956. It was never really powerful and did not last long due to the city of Austin annexing that area in 1956. Lifespan and duration of Pleasant Hill School District was short. Pleasant Hill School integrated in 1956.


By 1960 Pleasant Hill School was a known negro school. Despite integration, a majority of the student population was African American. Much of Southeast Austin had a large black population by 1960. Pleasant Hill School was no exception. 1960 is the same year Austin ISD added Kindergarden to the Pleasant Hill School and that is when Pleasant Hill School became a K-9 school.

By 1975, Pleasant Hill School became Pleasant Hill Elementary School and was no longer a 1-9 school that taught grades 1st through 9th as the school had in the past. Pleasant Hill School reformed and was restructured into an elementary school which would become Pleasant Hill Elementary School that grades Kindergarden through 6th.


By 1985 during the 1985-1986 school year, Pleasant Hill School is no longer a negro school or an all-white school. Hispanic students and families had been moving into the area compromising more than 50% of the student population.

By 1989, Hispanic students compromised 50%-65% of the student population for Pleasant Hill Elementary School. A majority of students at this school were Hispanic as of that year.

In May 1992, the Pleasant Hill Elementary School playground was renovated in honor of former kindergarten teacher Jo Ann Hinte through a fund-raising campaign. The school's playground roof was a mere inconvenience.


As of 2017, Pleasant Hill School is the oldest free public school in Texas and is the oldest school in Austin overall. Today the early Pleasant Hill School and school building still stands which is now Onion Creek Masonic Lodge #220.

Hispanic students compromise 85% of the student population for Pleasant Hill Elementary School. A majority of students at this school that are Hispanic come from a Mexican background/ancestry. Hispanic students compromise a majority student population for Pleasant Hill Elementary School as of this time currently.

Coker School history found to be dating back to pre-Civil War era.

The North East ISD (NEISD) 50th Anniversary Newsletter cites “Coker School was in operation prior to the Civil War”. Past records indicate that Coker School clearly existed before 1861.

Early settlers in San Antonio, Texas founded and organized Coker School in 1841. Coker School was never located in a permanent location prior to 1861. According to the NEISD 50th Anniversary Newsletter, “In the early days, school was taught in different parts of the community in order to equalize the distance children had to travel to get to school. “ In 1861 is when Coker School received one-room log cabin that would serve as a school building.

Coker School started out as a co-ed public school that fees were paid by tuition. Parents paid a two dollar tuition to cover the teacher's salary. Students bought their own books. In 1861 is when Coker School became the Coker Common School. Gradually more families moved into the Coker community.

Clarksville School in Austin, Texas long forgotten revisited.

The history of Clarksville School and Clarksville School itself have been long forgotten. Clarksville School has faded away with time away from people’s minds. Clarksville School is one of Austin’s many forgotten institutions from decades ago. Most never really heard or seen the former Clarksville School. Clarksville School was one of the many schools historians never wrote a book about or news stations have either covered.

Clarksville School was an elementary school for African-American students from 1881 to 1964. The Clarksville School was at the location of 1811 West 11th Street, Austin, Texas, US 78703. Clarksville School was zoned to Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD) during its time of operation.

Basic instruction such as home economics, spelling, history, and literature (reading course) were taught and provided. Spelling was one of the most highly important subjects taught at this school next to their reading courses.



Clarksville School was built as a one-room schoolhouse as a log cabin in 1881 at the location of 1811 West 11th Street in Austin, Texas. The log cabin was built from cedar trees grown in the area. The Clarksville School was a negro school established by Austin Public Schools school board. African American children were taught here.

Clarksville School taught Grades 1st through 7th. From 1881 to 1886 is when Clarksville School conducted classes inside a log cabin. The log cabin school was demolished in 1886. In 1886 the Clarksville School had an enrollment of 27 students.

From 1886 to 1889, Clarksville School conducted classes at the AME Church on 11th Street. Classes were held temporarily in the AME Church for a short period of time. AME Church leased classroom space to Austin Public Schools at the time for Clarksville School and Wheatville School (Wheatville Elementary School).

In 1889, a new log cabin building built from cedar trees grown in the area was constructed. Clarksville School students then moved into the new building in the same year. By 1889, Clarksville School taught Grades 1st through 7th. In 1896 the Clarksville School had an enrollment of 47 students.


In 1900 during the 1900-1901 school year, only grades 1st through 6th were taught at Clarksville School. Students who wanted to continue their junior high school education and high school education were transferred to Kealing Junior High School (now Kealing Middle School) and Anderson High School in East Austin. Some pupils were transferred to Campbell School (now Campbell Elementary School).

The 1900-1901 school year saw an increase of student enrollment at Clarksville School. School improvements to the building and other structures were made during the 1900-1901 school year. Clarksville School operated as a one-room elementary school then.


Clarksville School was the site of the Clarksville Colored School controversy in 1916. One of the earliest public expressions of this sentiment was the Clarksville Colored School controversy in 1916.

A group of white homeowners from the Enfield neighborhood banded together in opposition of the planned construction for a "Colored" elementary school in Clarksville which would become Clarksville Colored School. Clarksville began to shift and the Values of land in the Clarksville neighborhood began to rise in the year of 1916. A number of West Austin's Anglo (white) residents began to voice their opinions that the presence of the African American Clarksville community would devalue their land.

A year prior, the Austin Public Schools school board voted to set aside some money to finance construction for the Clarksville Colored School and the “colored” West Austin Elementary School (West Austin School) that educated African-American students and Hispanic students. West Austin Elementary School served the rapidly expanding Mexican-American population in the area.

Clarksville Colored School was built because of the largest concentration blacks in West Austin in the Clarksville neighborhood. Austin Public Schools reasoned that the new elementary school for African-Americans that lived in West Austin be built in the Clarksville neighborhood.

White West Austin residents opposed the construction of the new elementary school in the Clarksville neighborhood because they reasoned that it would encourage blacks to remain in Clarksville. White West Austin residents thought it best that the school be built in East Austin where the majority of black Austinites lived and where the black high school was located.

In May 1916, the school board voted to allow for the school's construction. The old Clarksville School log cabin was demolished. A wood-frame dwelling that had previously occupied the site was remodeled and enlarged to include 6 classrooms at a cost of about $1,500 as stated in a 1916 news article from the Austin American-Statesman newspaper. The new Clarksville School was built as a red brick building. 1916 is when Clarksville School became Clarksville Colored School. Expansion was never really needed because enrollment was at a flat rate.


In 1917 is when the new Clarksville School was built as a red brick building. The school conducted education was not in one room as before. School was conducted in 7 classrooms this time around. Expansion was never really needed because enrollment was at a flat rate.

According to the history article TSHA wrote about the Clarksville neighborhood titled CLARKSVILLE, TX (TRAVIS COUNTY), “In 1918 the Austin school board closed the Clarksville school”

Apparently Austin Public Schools closed down Clarksville School in 1918. Whether or not the school would be temporarily or permanently closed is unknown. How long the school was closed is undetermined. Clarksville children still attended elementary school at West Austin School (West Austin Elementary School). Junior high school students and senior high school students from the neighborhood attended school at Kealing Junior High School and Anderson High School.


From the 1920s to the 1940s, student population never went past 70 pupils. Usually enrollment stayed above 60 or 62. Enrollment was usually at a flat rate most of the time. The student population was 70 in 1940.


Because of the 1954 court ruling of Brown vs the Board of Education that determined that racial segregation in public schools was unconstitutional, Clarksville School closed in 1964 and the children were bussed to the formerly all white Matthews School (Matthews Elementary School). The school building was reported to be in dilapidated condition in 1964. For the 1964-1965 school year, the former Clarksville School building sat in a dilapidated condition almost beyond repair it seems while still extant of course.

The Clarksville School building was moved to O. Henry Junior High School (now O. Henry Middle School) in 1965. The Clarksville School building now serves as an added on addition to O. Henry Middle School now serving as a cafeteria.

The former Clarksville School campus was converted into a park called Clarksville Park in 1966. A pool and basketball court were installed. Playground equipment was brought in by Austin Parks & Recreation. A volleyball court was built next to the basketball courts. Clarksville Park was established for $50,000 dollars.


Today the cement pavilions where Clarksville School campus one stood is now basketball courts. A volleyball court has been since built next to the basketball courts. More improvements have been made to Clarksville Park as of 2016.

All that remains of the Clarksville School are the cement pavilions. Today the Clarksville School legacy lives on as Clarksville Park.Clarksville School was located at the location of 1811 West 11th Street, Austin, Texas, US 78703.

Monday, October 9, 2017

DJ Snake bass test tones can help equalize balance in your speakers.

Did you know that DJ Snake bass test tones can help equalize balance in your speakers? Well if you purchased his newly remastered state-of-the-art digital download album of his Turnt Up Bass Classics album that was released on iTunes back in 2016, then you will know what I am talking about. For instance songs such as How Low, Moments in Bass, and Frequency use a 26 Hz bass test tone that will surely clear and equalize your speakers.

Bandit Cave in Rollingwood rediscovered by Mixerr Reviews!

Rollingwood boasts many caves and Bandit’s Cave is one of them. One of Rollingwood’s most unique features is Bandit’s Cave. Bandit Cave is 440 feet long with a depth of 10 feet. The cave has 2 entrances with one of the entrances being a walk-in entrance. The cave has standing room in it. A crawlway exited at Lake Austin in the cliffs above Redbud Isle. Bandit Cave was wired for lighting.

Bandit Cave in Rollingwood, Texas has been around since at least 1840 and the cave has most definitely existed before the Texas Revolution. The cave does not show up on the 1839 City of Austin topographic map prepared and laid out by city planner/architect Ed Waller.


History of Bandit Cave in Rollingwood, Texas has been long forgotten and has faded away from time and people’s minds. Only longtime citizens of West Lake Hills, Austin, Rollingwood, Travis County, and the Eanes area know about the history of Bandit Cave. Bandit Cave is one of the many forgotten caves of Austin and Travis County. Bandit Cave is located in a vacant lot at the intersection of Riley Road & Pickwick Lane in Rollingwood, Texas.

Over the years, Bandit Cave has through different hands of ownership from various homeowners who purchased the property. Col. Charles M. Crawford and his wife owned Bandit Cave from 1840 through the Civil War. Cecil Johnson and Cecil Johnson Jr. owned much of the land through much of the early 20th century. Lillian Crider owned the land from the 1950s onto 1971.

Bandit Cave has gone under many sets of different names and alternate aliases over the years such as.: Bandit’s Cave, Rollingwood Cave, and Amend’s Cave. Bandit Cave is most commonly known as “Bandit Cave” or simply as “Bandit’s Cave”. To Rollingwood residents this is known as “Rollingwood Cave”.



The cave called Bandit Cave was first owned by ranch owner Col. Charles M. Crawford who moved to Austin in 1840. Col. Charles M. Crawford and his wife owned the Texas Chinchilla Ranch from 1840 to the time of their deaths. On the Texas Chinchilla Ranch property was Bandit Cave.

Bandit's Cave was reputed to have been the hideout of a gang who robbed the Texas Treasury of $17,000 in 1860. The treasury was $17,000 worth of gold and silver coins located in the cave. The bandits were never caught and the loot was not recovered.

During the Civil War is when Bandit Cave became a hideout for bandits and outlaws on the run. The cave served as a hideout for bandits during the Civil War. After the Civil War is the hideout became more or less abandoned. Original entrances were filled with cement.


In 1900, the property was sold via a gift claim deed and a warranty deed to former well-known West Lake Hills resident Cecil Johnson. 1900 is when Cecil Johnson built his Johnson Ranch on the property where Bandit Cave was. After Cecil Johnson passed, a gift deed was deeded to Cecil Johnson Jr. and ownership was transferred to him. From 1900 to 1940 is when Cecil Johnson Jr. owned the land where Bandit Cave was. The Johnson Ranch continued to operated there until the land was sold.

Cecil Johnson Jr. sold the land and cave to a Dr. L. L. Amend in 1940. Dr. L. L. Amend was a chiropractor whom had owned the land property and Bandit Cave from 1940 to 1950. Dr. L. L. Amend discovered the cave in 1942.


Rollingwood resident Lilian Crider bought the property of where Bandit Cave was located in 1950 from a Dr. L. L. Amend. Many relics from her antiquities store on Barton Springs Road were preserved inside Bandit Cave. She gave tours of Bandit Cave to many local residents and citizens for many years. Lillian Crider also shared the cave with the Rollingwood community as well.

Lilian Crider and her husband used wind from Bandit Cave to provide air condition from their home. (As cited from an October 1952 news article from the Austin American-Statesman titled “Pair to Use Cave Wind to Air Condition Home.”.)

In the 1960s, neighborhood mothers decorated the cave for Halloween trick-or-treating for the neighborhood children. Rollingwood Women’s Club made it a tradition to hold Halloween parties inside Bandit Cave annually. Each Halloween is when Bandit Cave was opened to the Rollingwood Women’s Club. Pumpkin decorating contests were held in Bandits Cave. The cave was used for neighborhood parties also. 

Lillian Crider sold the property to Velma Shurtleff in 1971 where they continued the tradition of the Rollingwood Women’s Club to hold Halloween parties for the neighborhood children until 1988. Prior to 1988 the Rollingwood community held Halloween parties in Bandit Cave. That all came to an abrupt halt in the year 1988 for fear out of vandalism attacks.


In 1988, the property was sold to a man named Dan McNamara who sealed Bandit Cave sealed shut with an iron door for fear out of vandalism attacks that could possibly occur. The iron door to the entrance of Bandit Cave is sealed shut on both sides. Dan McNamara was under pressure to continue this tradition after acquiring the land from prior owner Velma Shurtleff. He resisted of course. 

Dan McNamara is very protective of Bandit Cave. He has not even let biologists into his cave to study the biology inside of this cave. There are digging leads in the cave, but the diggers gave up after several attempts hitting limestone.

Freddie Poer from texascavers.com claimed that Bandit Cave was turned into neighborhood yard waste dump back in 2009. However that claim was false. Bandit Cave WAS NEVER a neighborhood yard waste. As of 2009 a new fence has been covered around the property. There are no trespassing signs!


Today Bandit Cave belongs to a man named Dan McNamara who wishes to preserve the cave itself. Bandit’s Cave is privately-owned today and off limits to the public. Dan McNamara is very protective of Bandit Cave. The land and Bandit Cave are still owned by Dan McNamara.

Bandit Cave is located in a vacant lot at the intersection of Riley Road & Pickwick Lane, Rollingwood, Texas, US 78746.

History of Thomaston School in Thomaston, Texas long forgotten.

History of Thomaston School began with Thomaston Public School in 1874 with James H. Moore as the teacher. The Thomaston School building was built as a white one-room school house in the town of Thomaston, Texas.

James H. Moore was the first teacher to have educated students and held classes at Thomaston School. James H. Moore taught school there from the latter end of the 19th century to the fledgling 20th century. Mr. James H. Moore taught here until he retired. Mrs. Elmer Luddeke was one of the early teachers of the Thomaston School.

Professor J. W. Carroll was the first principal for the Thomaston School. His daughter, Miss Edna Carroll, taught classes at Thomaston School. Professor J. W. Carroll ran the school on a 9 month school schedule as students had to help their families grow crops during harvest season.

A news article dating back to Saturday, September 18, 1880 in The Cuero Star verifies and claims the caption under the headlines of “Thomaston School Commences Oct. 1, 1880.”. So at some unverifiable point between the years of 1874 and 1880, Thomaston School stopped operating.

The Thomaston School building was also used for church services where Sunday school was held until a church building was built in the year of 1886. Reverend Z. B. Graves held church services inside the Thomaston School building.

1894 is when a new two-room school was built. Thomaston School employed 2 teachers after the year of 1894. From thereon, Thomaston School operated on a 9 month school schedule. Enrollment was as high as 72 students at times. A well was installed on the property in the year of 1903. Thomaston Public School eventually became Thomaston School and later Thomaston Elementary School.

Thomaston Elementary School taught students from 1st grade to 8th grade. After 8th grade, students were transferred into town in Cuero for high school education where students attended Cuero High School in Cuero Independent School District (Cuero ISD). Finances were tight for the small school.


Thomaston School was not a district school until 1906. Thomaston School (Thomaston Elementary School) was not a district school until the 1906-1907 school year in October of 1906. It was very odd for school to start in October as most schools started on the month of September.

A news article dating back to Monday, June 4, 1906 written for San Antonio Daily Express verified that Professor J. W. Carroll was re-elected princpal of the Thomaston School with his daughter, Miss Edna Carroll as the assistant principal. She also served as both assistant principal and teacher.

However, a news article dating back to Wednesday, September 12, 1906 in the San Antonio Daily Express verifies that the Thomaston School and Thomas School District were created in the small town of Thomaston, Texas located inside Dewitt County on the date of September 10, 1906. Thomaston School was a primary school that primary grades which was 1st grade to 8th grade. A news article dating back to Wednesday, September 12, 1906 in the San Antonio Daily Express verified the school opened with the headlines being “Thomaston School opens.”

So that means another “Thomaston School” was opened. This particular “Thomaston School” was opened as the “Thomaston Primary School” and that the town of Thomaston first organized its own school district called Thomas School District on the most likely date of September 8, 1906 prior to Thomas Primary School opening on September 10, 1906. Thomaston School was a primary school that primary grades which was 1st grade to 8th grade. After 8th grade, students were transferred into town in Cuero for high school education where students attended Cuero High School in Cuero ISD.

Thomaston Primary School opened at 10 AM in the morning of Monday, September 10, 1906 with Professor J. W. Carroll as the principal and Miss Jessie Tartar and Miss Edna Carroll both as the teachers teaching grades 1 through 8. Miss Jessie Tartar and Miss Edna Carroll were the first teachers to have taught at Thomaston Primary School.

Professor J. W. Carroll was the first principal for the Thomaston Primary School as well as Thomaston School District. Professor J. W. Carroll and his daughter, Miss Edna Carroll, had both worked for Thomas School District when the school district was first organized.

Thomaston School (Thomaston Primary School) was built on a 5-room plan instead of being built as a one room schoolhouse as most schools located on the rural countryside were at that time in the United States. The Thomaston Primary School building was built as a one story schoolhouse which was painted white.

Thomaston Primary School had a music room with a piano installed on the date the school opened. The school had a library with a nice collection of books added and donated from nearby communities. Grades 1st through 4th were taught in one room and grades 5th through 8th in another room.


The Thomas School District opened 4 schools (as time went alongside) which were the following.: Thomaston Primary School, Thomaston Public School, Thomaston Elementary School, Thomaston White School, and Thomaston Negro School. All of which were most likely K-8 schools that taught 1st grade through 8th grade. After 8th grade, students from these schools were transferred into town in Cuero for high school education. Students attended Cuero ISD schools for high school.

Of course this school and several other Thomaston Schools were opened during the height of segregation when segregation was law of the land in Texas, the West, and the South. So white students attended white school and African American students attended negro schools at that time. No Mexican Schools were found on any maps of Thomaston, Texas. So it is possible that Hispanic students attended the white schools and negro schools.


At some point after 1920 is when Thomaston Primary School downsized from a K-8 school to a K-7 school teaching 1st grade through 7th grade. After 7th grade students would attend school in Cuero. After 1920, Thomaston School only taught 1st grade through 7th grade. School stopped after 8th grade.

Thomaston, Texas failed to maintain its prosperity as a railroad town as US Highway 87 along with a series of other county highways improved and cars made transportation easier. Passenger service for the towns railroad was discontinued in November 1950.

A news article from The Cuero Record on the date of Friday, September 16, 1955 verifies that Miss Murphree and Mr. Bill Milligan were in charge of Thomaston School. So Miss Murphree and Mr. Bill Milligan were the last faculty members of Thomaston School Board members to have been in charge of Thomaston School. Miss Murphree taught school at Thomaston School for 14 years and retired after 29 years of teachers.


Sometime during the 1956-1957 school year is when Thomaston School and Thomaston School District consolidated into Cuero Independent School District. Thomaston School and Thomas School District closed down after a lack of enrollment and lack of funding. Thomaston School District could no longer operate on property taxes, income taxes, or wealth taxes. So Thomaston School District consolidated into Cuero Independent School District (Cuero ISD) where students living Thomaston were sent to complete their education whether it be elementary school education and/or high school education.

Staff member Mrs. Jerry Mauer wrote a news article about the history of Thomaston School and Cuero ISD schools along a series of rural schools in Dewitt County in The Cuero Record newspaper dating to Sunday, March 24, 1957.

Mrs. Jerry Mauer explains “Pupils taught in the Thomaston School received an excellent basic education and were able to enter accredited high schools.” Mrs. Jerry Mauer verified that students from Thomaston now attend Cuero Independent School District schools.


Today no remains or traces of Thomaston School or any of the 4 Thomaston Schools that the Thomaston School District had operated from 1874 to 1956 can be found. The school buildings have been demolished, purchased by private land owners, or vacant on someones farm land in the countryside.

Not much is known about the Thomaston School and not much else can found or researched about this school either. All school records, property records, land deeds, energy bills, building easements, and school board meeting minutes have either been misplaced, lost, shredded, burned, or relocated. Not much is known about the Thomaston School or Thomaston School District either.

History of Mixerr Reviews explained by Michael Mixerr.

Mixerr Reviews is an independent news blog from Austin, Texas, US that often strays away from mainstream news and mainstream media. Mixerr Reviews talks about news that the underground scene cares about. In other words, Mixerr Reviews is basically a news blog.

Michael Mixerr started doing his overviews in October 2011. As many media news outlets, sources, and newspapers influenced him to do so. In him doing so, Michael Mixerr matured his writing style for Mixerr Reviews into a more organized well laid out newspaper format.

At first Mixerr Reviews was sort of a mail order only newspaper though as some thought it would be. It was through email only at one point. Mixerr Reviews was only available to those who knew Michael Mixerr on a personal level and the only way you could get it was through him. Meaning that Mixerr Reviews was available in Austin, Texas, US only. But in September 2012 is when Michael Mixerr made Mixerr Reviews available to the whole world through the Internet and not just locally in Austin only.

Mixerr Reviews was originally intended to be a music news blog. But Michael Mixerr wanted Mixerr Reviews to be a indie news blog. As times changed, so did Mixerr Reviews and all the other reviews changed in formatting to along with time. He has matured overtime. The reviews are useful sources of information to many people around the world. There is no propaganda allowed on Mixerr Reviews.

Mixerr Reviews/Mixerr Reviews Blogspot ATXN mission is being a local business while being a well known independent news organization that covers many news topics that corporate news media organizations won't debate on and is too afraid to discuss while they are on the air during live broadcast. Being descriptive and accurate is one of Mixerr Reviews priorities. Mixerr Reviews talks about topics no news organization would ever cover, discuss, or debate on.

History of University Junior High School in Austin, Texas not forgotten.

Many Austinites of today never knew a University Junior High School ever existed. Most question the existence of this school. It has been almost long forgotten despite being located on the internationally acclaimed University of Texas at Austin campus. University Junior High School opened in September 1933 and operated until June 3rd, 1967 when the school closed. Students at this school were taught and had received secondary education training.


Building a new junior high school was first brought to discussion in the year of 1932. University Junior High School was the proposed school to be built as the new junior high school for Austin Public Schools. Much space was needed for Austin Public Schools in terms of enrollment for students receiving secondary education. So University Junior High School would provide much needed space for Austin Public Schools growing secondary education students.

Funding was scarce. Especially during the Great Depression! So Austin Public Schools turned to UT for financial aid because there was not enough funding for the school district to operate this particular junior high school at the time. So an agreement and a joint contract between University of Texas and Austin Public Schools was made.

University of Texas and Austin Public Schools came up with a written contract that was a joint contract. The agreement that was reached stipulated that the University of Texas would provide the site and building at a cost between $300,000 to $400,000 dollars while the Austin Public Schools selected and paid the regular teaching staff and half the salary for the principal. The University of Texas at Austin funded the construction This proposed school was used as a tool for the University of Texas Education Department staff to observe and explore educational theories.

Austin’s only junior high (Allan Junior High School) was already becoming increasingly overcrowded. Allan Junior High School was extremely overcrowded by 142% way over capacity. University Junior High School was the answer and solution to the problems Austin Public Schools was facing. University Junior High School was built to serve as a secondary school operating on from a joint contract between the University of Texas (UT Austin) and Austin Public Schools (now Austin Independent School District bka Austin ISD).

University Junior High School was built as a Spanish Renaissance style structure that was 2 stories tall and had a basement. The cafeteria was located in the basement. (That is what made this school so unique from the other junior high schools in Austin.) Labs were built using the amphitheater plan. Eagles was the school mascot.

September 1933 is when University Junior High School opened with an enrollment of 831 within its first year. The 1933-1934 school year was the first school year University Junior High School operated on. 6th grade through 8th grade were taught at University Junior High School. That is what made this school so unique from the other junior high schools in Austin. Junior high schools did not use the “6-8 middle school” model as most middle schools and junior high schools of today use in some school district across the state of Texas. (9th grade was added later on.)


During the 1930s, University Junior High School was dubbed as a “model junior high school” by the The WPA Guide to Texas: The Lone Star State. University Junior High School was dubbed as a “model junior high school” for not only Texas but Austin as well.

Of course this junior high school was opened during the height of segregation when segregation was law of the land in Texas. So only white students were admitted. African American students were not permitted to attended University Junior High School at that time.

Later on in 1938, University Junior High School shifted from a “6-8 middle school model” to a “7-9 junior high school model” which taught 7th grade through 9th grade. From thereon out, 7th grade through 9th grade was taught at University Junior High School. 1938 is the last year 6th grade students would ever attend this junior high school. After 1938, 6th grade students would either attend elementary school (as that was the norm of the time) or be transferred to another junior high school.


Sometimes 10th grade students from Austin High School would be transferred to University Junior High School to relieve overcrowding during the 1940s. This school zoning practice was done due to overcrowding. What exact grades would be assigned at this school always shifted around to relieve and accommodate overcrowding in other Austin ISD schools of the time.

University Junior High School became overcrowded by 1942. It was almost overpopulated at the time. Austin Public Schools held board meetings and discussions to build another junior high school. However plans to build another junior high school were halted by World War II. Lack of funding is what also halted plans to build another junior high school for Austin Public Schools. This junior high school was almost overpopulated at the time.

In 1949, school buses served only those students in the 7th grade from the Govalle School School district to University Junior High School and only those in the 5th and 6th grades from St. Elmo School District to Fulmore Junior High School.

School bus service to Austin High School, Austin Senior High School, Allan High School, and Allan Junior High School was eliminated along with service for junior high school students and senior high school students for the following school districts: Govalle School District, St. Elmo School District, Rosedale School District, and Esperanza Common School District. School bus service for Negro students continued in operation on the same schedule used that year.


Sometime in the 1950s is when University Junior High School became a 6-9 school teaching 6th grade through 9th grade. Which was unusual because most junior high schools at the time did not operate on a “6-9 model” or a  “6-9 middle school model”. That is what made this school unique from the other junior high schools in Austin. From thereon out, 6th grade through 9th grade was taught at University Junior High School.

Sometime in the 1950s is when a portion of the University Junior High School building became University Junior High School with 10th grade through 12th grade being taught there. This practice would last until 1967 when the school closed.

Enrollment decreased in 1953 due to the opening of Baker Junior High School and O. Henry Junior High School relieving student load. The opening of the 2 junior high schools relieved overcrowding by nearly 200%! University Junior High School becomes UJH.


The 1960s is when University Junior High School became integrated. University Junior High School became fully integrated during the 1965-1966 school year. African American students are finally permitted to attend University Junior High School and so are Hispanic students.

Prior to 1965, University Junior High School was an all-white school. University Junior High School led desegregation for Austin ISD schools. It was a struggle for Austin to desegregate its schools. But University Junior High School desegregated successfully. Other Austin ISD schools desegregated slowly.


On some evening in 1967, the UJH school band performed the songs from the South Pacific film which helped promote racial sensitivity. The theatrical production South Pacific had the theme of racial sensitivity. "Bali Ha’i” was the band's favorite. A mystical tune.

June 3rd, 1967 is when University Junior High School closed. University Junior High School closed down because UT needed the space to accommodate campus expansion for the growing population of the time. The property belonged to UT from the beginning anyway. Students already attending this school were transferred over to the new Martin Junior High School better known now as Martin Middle School. The University Junior High School building became an annex for the UT school.

In 1967, Martin Junior High School (now Martin Middle School) was opened to replace University Junior High School. Martin Junior High School was Austin ISD’s first fully integrated school serving a diverse array of all races including African American students and Hispanic students. Not only was Martin Junior High School Austin ISD’s first fully integrated school, it was Austin ISD’s first fully integrated middle school/junior high school.


University Junior High School is now owned by the University of Texas operating as the School of Social Work. The school building remains intact at its original location. Location for University Junior High School was 1925 San Jacinto Boulevard, Austin, Texas, US 78712. The school is now a historical landmark.

History about the Elroy School in Del Valle, Texas nearly long forgotten revisited.

Elroy School was built in the community settlement of Elroy located in Del Valle, Texas in summer of 1894. Lumber to construct the Elroy School was donated by citizens in the community. Many citizens in the community helped build this school. Elroy School operated under Elroy School District and Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle ISD).

Mainly Elroy School operated as a 1-9 school under the school districts of Elroy School District and Colorado Common School District where 1st grade through 9th grade were taught. Older students often went into town to continue their education. 10th grade through 12th grade was later added.

Sometimes students who wanted to continue their high school education had to transfer into school districts such as Creedmoor Common School District, Garfield School District, Del Valle Independent School District, or go the largest school district in town called Austin Independent School District. Sometimes students had to transfer to other school districts to continue their high school education depending on the availability of such said school districts stated above.

Mr. Daniel Ross was the first trustee for the Elroy School then. Mr. Daniel Ross then hired Mrs. A Pettis to teach at the Elroy School in 1894. Mrs. A Pettis was the first teacher to teach at Elroy School. Mr. Daniel Ross was in charge of Elroy School at the time.

Semesters were run in a six month time period. It was an agreement with Travis County Common School District superintendents that the rural school districts semesters were to run on a minimum of six months yearly per school term. Elroy School was one of the many Travis County rural schools than operated in such fashion.


Two teachers were employed to the Elroy School in 1901. These two teachers had to teach in the same room. After 1903, the school term was extended to 7 months instead of the average 6 months most school districts in Texas had at that time.

Elroy School was described as “one of the prettiest schoolhouses in the county” in the 1905 Travis County School Annual as well as the 1906 Travis County School Annual. A second room was added the summer of 1906. The third room was added in 1909. A third teacher was added that same year. The 1905-1906 school year brought forth big changes. Enrollment had increased by 30 students.

The 1911-1912 school term was lengthened to 8 months. Although beginning in the year of 1911 the school began to be lengthened to 8 months slowly.

In 1916, the wooden Elroy School was demolished and replaced as red brick schoolhouse which still stands today. That was when Elroy School was a three-room school building. New swing sets were installed sets out in the front of the school building. Sometime during the 20th century is when Elroy School became a combined elementary school-high school.

By 1926, Elroy School was a K-12 school which primarily operated as a 1-9 school although older students attended. Later Elroy School operated as a K-9 school.


The Elroy School District had its own segregated schools which were separated by race. Such as the Elroy Negro School, Elroy White School, and Elroy Mexican School for instance. Segregation law of the land in Texas State. Small community settlement Elroy, Texas was no exception to this case.

The Elroy White School was the Elroy School located on 9019 Elroy Road which still stands today. The Elroy White School was the “main school” known as “Elroy School”. Elroy White School had a ratio of 2 teachers to 107 white students with the ratio being 2:107 in the year of 1907.

The Elroy School on 9019 Elroy Road was the “main school”. For a while, the Elroy School on 9019 Elroy Road served primarily as an elementary school. Swing sets out in the front indicated that Elroy School was an elementary school. When Elroy School was an elementary school, grades 1 through 9 were taught and older students had to go into town to continue their education. That Elroy School served primarily as an elementary school called Elroy Elementary School where grades 1 through 9 were taught. 10th grade through 12th grade was later added.

Elroy Negro School served as a school for black/African-American students who lived in the Elroy community located on 14107 FM 812. Elroy Negro School had a ratio of 2 teachers to 61 black students with the ratio being 2:61 in the year of 1907. Elroy Negro School taught elementary grades primarily. Elroy Negro School was converted into Elroy Elementary School in 1950. From 1950 to 1961, Elroy Elementary School was taught here. In 1961 after consolidating with Del Valle ISD, the Elroy Negro School was demolished. No traces of Elroy Negro School exist today.


In 1950, the school building received a series of renovations from Del Valle Independent School District bond elections. A new library was installed and renovated after a previous flood destroyed the old library. It was due to a school bond election that Elroy School received a new library. 1950 is when Elroy School operated as a K-9 school.

1952 is when Elroy School District transferred high school students to attend high schools in Austin ISD (which was then known as Austin Public Schools prior to 1955). Most high school students from Elroy School and Elroy School District were transferred to Austin High School, McCallum High School, Travis High School, and Allan High School. Most Elroy students attended Austin High School and Travis High School though to continue their high school education.

In 1952, Elroy School no longer operated as a combined elementary school-high school. This time Elroy School operated as an elementary school. By then Elroy School only taught 1st grade through 8th grade. School stopped at 9th grade. Only elementary school classes were held.

Elementary school classes were held until 1959. From 1950 to 1960 is when school building received a series of renovations from Del Valle Independent School District bond elections. A new library was installed after a previous flood destroyed the old library months earlier. The Elroy School would reopen in the 1960-1961 school semester only to close down again a year later.


By 1960 however, Superintendents from Travis County School District were considered plans to consolidate the Elroy School District into Colorado Common School District in 1961 during the 1961-1962 school semester.

“Schools and school districts close because they cannot operate on county tax values.” Which is what former Superintendent of Travis County School District Irvin W. Popham stated and explained in a news article written in the Austin American-Statesman newspaper dating back to 8/24/1960 titled “Schools’ Headache”.

In 1961 Elroy School and Elroy School District were consolidated into Colorado Common School District in 1961 and consolidated & restructured into Del Valle Independent School District (Del Valle ISD) in 1963. 1961 is when Elroy School was closed which was during the 1961-1962 school semester.

Schools in Elroy School District, including those which were separated by race, eventually consolidated into Colorado Common School District in 1961 which eventually was restructured into Del Valle Independent School District (Del Valle ISD) in 1963. Other schools were demolished, shut down by Del Valle ISD, auctioned off, or sold to private homeowners. (Such as the Cloud School, Cottonmouth School, Pilot Knob School, and the J. B. Norwood School for example.)

1963 is when the Elroy School became the Elroy Community Center. From 1963 to 1988 the Elroy School operated as a community center. Not only did the Elroy School building operate as community center, but also as a church which held services too.


In 1980, the school building received a series of renovations from Del Valle Independent School District bond elections. For a short time in the 1980s, Y Knot Ranch owned and leased the building to various businesses and organizations. Both Y Knot Ranch and Del Valle ISD own the property together through a joint venture.

In late 1988, Travis County Fire Rescue purchased the Elroy School from Del Valle Independent School District and Y Knot Ranch. In 1989, the former Elroy School building became a fire station for Travis County. Fire station Travis County Fire Rescue ESD #11 currently serves a majority of southeastern Travis County. In recent years buildings were added onto Elroy School. 2 buildings were added next to the former Elroy School building.

In an August 24, 1989 edition of the Austin American-Statesman newspaper explains the red brick schoolhouse has been converted to a fire station. (The red brick schoolhouse is Elroy School.) Travis County Fire Department used the former Elroy School as a fire house.


On the date of September 21, 2016, an upgrade to existing electric services was made and added on.Only the existing fire house received an eud. A couple of more renovations were added on approval from Travis County commissioners. On this date, the building was declared up to code by Travis County commissioners.

Today Travis County Fire Rescue owns the former Elroy School building and property operating under the name of Travis County Fire Rescue ESD #11, which is located at 9019 Elroy Road, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.


Alternate addresses for this school are 9019 Farm to Market Road 812, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617 and 9019 FM 812, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.

Monday, October 2, 2017

Montopolis School saved from demolition by investor Austin Stowell.

It’s official! Investor and land owner Austin Stowell of KEEP Investment Group has decided to keep the Montopolis School (Montopolis Negro School) building intact safe away from demolition. Austen Stowell is willing to work with the City of Austin who wants to purchase the property for historic preservation. His goal is to seek a historic zoning category other than single family after the Historic Landmark Commission failed to reach the threshold for zoning the property building as historic last year in December 2016. Austin Stowell of KEEP Investment Group is planning to negotiate a sale to the city for a win-win resolution giving some of the members of the community what they want in an attempt of historic preservation.

The former Montopolis School could see rebirth or a breath of a fresh new life as museum and a park. His main goal is to seek adaptive reuse to preserve the structure. “The substantial community group called Neighborhood Planning Contact Team opposes any use of the site other than as a museum or a park.” said Austin Stowell. However it is unclear and unofficial as to whether or not the former Montopolis School will become a museum, community center, or a park.

Austin Stowell acquired the property in March 2015 and then in December 2016, he acquired a demolition permit for the property which was denied. Everything around the structure has been sheathed in aluminum to help preserve the school building from further deterioration. Austin Stowell refers the property as “mummified” .

However single family units will be built around the Montopolis School building. Real estate plans along with housing development will not stop. Housing development plans to build 15 single family units and other real estate plans will continue. 14 to 15 single family units will be built around the Montopolis School building instead.

On the date of September 28, 2017, the Austin City Council voted unanimously to approve the purchase of the former Montopolis Negro School site and agreed to consider changes to how the city designates historical landmarks. City staffers will now prepare a plan to restore the school “as a historic asset and museum that would attract tourists and convention delegates."

On September 29, 2017, plans for demolition are cancelled as owner Austin Stowell recognizes the significance and importance of the Montopolis School. Everything around the school building has been sheathed in aluminum to help preserve the school building from further deterioration. Austin Stowell refers the property as “mummified” .

*Austen Stowell is the same Austin Stowell of KEEP Investment Group.

History of the Montopolis School in hindsight.

Montopolis School was built in 1891 as Montopolis Negro School to serve black students living the Austin/Del Valle area as well as Travis County, Del Valle, and the Montopolis neighborhood. Students who lived in Del Valle attended this school as well. Montopolis School was operated by Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle Independent School District) from 1891 to 1952. Years of operation for this school were from 1891 to 1962. The Montopolis School was a segregated school for black students.

1st grade through 8th grade were taught at the Montopolis School during its time of operation. Kindergarten was added later as required by education law. School stopped after 8th grade. Students who wanted to continue their high school education attended LC Anderson High School in the Rosewood neighborhood in East Austin.

The Montopolis School was always strapped for money and operated on a short schedule annals by todays education standards as many of Travis County’s rural schools were back in those days. School was often held on a short schedule.


The original Montopolis School originated at the location of 100 Bastrop Highway, Austin, Texas, US 78742 near the Colorado River east of US 183. The original Montopolis School was located at 100 Bastrop Highway from 1891 until 1934. From the 1890s on, Montopolis School was a K-8 serving grades 1 through 8. Montopolis School was operated by Colorado Common School District for a number of years. Montopolis School was first called Colorado School No. 4.

The school was first named as Colorado School in the 1890s. Colorado School namesake came from the Colorado River just 1 block away from the school site. Montopolis School was a part of Colorado Common School District from the beginning.


Colorado School No. 4 was renamed to Burditt’s Prairie School sometime during the 1920s. Enrollment dropped a slow rate in 1927. The 1927-1928 school year saw a decline in enrollment.

A flood during a storm destroyed the original school in 1934. The old school building was 94%-95% completely destroyed by the flood during the storm. From 1934 to 1935, the Montopolis School was rebuilt. The new school building was built with wood from the old school building and new wood from a nearby lumber yard. A two-roof frame from former US Army barracks from Camp Swift in Bastrop County was relocated to the site and was renovated for school use. 

In 1935, the Montopolis School reopened and classes continued. The site for the new location of the Montopolis School was 500 Montopolis Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741. St. Edward’s Baptist Church under the leadership of Rev. J. H. Harrel donated 1.82 acres of land to Colorado Common School District #36 in 1935. More land was donated to the school overtime as the years passed.

Sometime during the 1930s, the name for Burditt’s Prairie School reverted back to “Colorado School”. The “Colorado School” stuck until the 1940s when it renamed again to Montopolis School.


In 1951, Montopolis School had 43 students in grades 1 through 8. The 1951-1952 school year was the last school year the Montopolis School would operate as a K-8 school covering and serving grades 1 through 8.

1952 is when ownership of the Montopolis School was transferred from Travis County Public Schools and Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle ISD) to Austin Public Schools (now Austin Independent School District aka Austin ISD). The City of Austin annexed the Montopolis neighborhood in the same year. 1952 is when Montopolis School became Montopolis Elementary School.

The building was renovated at a cost of $4,903 in 1952. New equipment was supplied for the school. Toilets and 2 new classrooms were installed. Showers came that maintenance installation. A couple of churches had donated money and equipment to the school.

In 1953 is when the Montopolis School became a K-4 school serving 1st grade through 4th grade. Montopolis Elementary School restructured from being a K-8 school to a K-4 school. For the 1953-1954 school semester, Montopolis Elementary School had 43 pupils in grades 1 through 4.


In 1961, Austin ISD school officials and superintendents declared the Montopolis School building along with the Montopolis School to be “outmoded and outdated”. Supervising teacher John Bell recommended that Montopolis School be shut down and closed with the remaining students to transfer to Sims Elementary School.

On the date of March 30, 1962 is when Montopolis School was closed by Austin ISD. So Austin ISD shut down the school sending its remaining students to continue their education attending nearby schools such as Allison Elementary School, Sims Elementary School, Lamar Elementary School (Lamar School), Del Valle Junior High School, Del Valle Senior High School, Del Valle High School, LC Anderson High School, and Johnston High School.

On May 11, 1964, Austin ISD put up the school property for a bid auction. The highest was at a value of $5,102 and the bidder was O.A. Wilhoitte of Austin. O.A. Wilhoitte purchased the school property from Austin ISD in 1967 for an adjusted value of $5,200 and the school was converted into a church called Montopolis Church of Christ which operated as a community church from 1967 to 1988. In 1968, David Willhoite served as a trustee for Montopolis Church of Christ.


In 1987, the City of Austin allowed eminent domain action to happen for some road construction in an attempted road extension of Grove Boulevard. But however, the city never built the road. Not much is known about if renovations were made or how many improvements were made to the school building itself during that time.

Montopolis Church of Christ was never really a financial success. Money was always tight for this church. Church attendance was rather low as the church was never popular with the community. So Montopolis Church of Christ closed in 1988.  The church was abandoned in 1988.


Austin Stowell acquired the property in March 2015 in part of a real estate sale. Austin Stowell purchased the property from David Wilhoitte who owned this property from 1967 to 2015. David Wilhoitte was the sole trustee for the property.

Back in August 2016, city had recommended to initiate historic zoning to keep the Montopolis School from being demolished after they determined the building to be historic. This building qualified for a historical landmark designation, but that alone will not be enough to save the school from further demolition.

In December 2016,  groups pressed city hall to preserve the Montopolis School by issuing the property with a historical landmark. The Montopolis Neighborhood Association called upon City of Austin to buy the Montopolis School from Austin Stonewall (Austin Stowell) of KEEP Investment Group.

On the date of 1/3/2017, Austin Stonewall filed an application for demolition however the demolition was denied by the City of Austin. This was to build 15 single family units and apartments as part of his original real estate plan with KEEP Investment Group/Real Estate. However nothing happened.

On the date of September 28, 2017, the Austin City Council voted unanimously to approve the purchase of the former Montopolis Negro School site and agreed to consider changes to how the city designates historical landmarks.

On September 29, 2017, plans for demolition are cancelled as owner Austin Stowell recognizes the significance and importance of the Montopolis School. Everything around the school building has been sheathed in aluminum to help preserve the school building from further deterioration. Austin Stowell refers the property as “mummified” .


Today, Montopolis Church of Christ is currently located in its same position as an original steel framework structure sitting vacant for a number of years. (For which Montopolis Church of Christ has been.) Montopolis Negro School is one of the last of the 42 schools that educated African-American children of Austin/Travis County.

Austin Statesman reports historic properties like the Montopolis School are extremely vulnerable to demolition even thought the city has recommended initiate historic zoning to keep the Montopolis School from being demolished after they determined the building to be historic. This building qualifies for historical landmark designation. The City of Austin and real estate developers are currently debating the outcome for the Montopolis School.

The location is 500 Montopolis Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741.

Sunday, October 1, 2017

History of the Gregg School in Manor, Texas long forgotten.

Gregg School in Manor, Texas is of the many long forgotten educational institutions and schools of Austin/Travis County that have faded away with time and from people's memories. Gregg School was one of the many Travis County rural schools. To many Travis County natives, the Gregg School was also known as the Old Rock Church (Rock Church) and Gilleland Creek Academy.


In 1870, William Stiles donated one acre of land for the Gregg School to be built on at the present location of 5300 Gregg Lane, Manor, Texas, US 78653. The school building was located northwest of Manor. The school building was constructed of rock and was called Gilleland Creek Academy. Walls of the old rock building were never plastered or renovated. William Stiles was both the architect and builder of the Gregg School. The Gregg School opened in 1871.

Mr. Dew was the first teacher to have taught at the Gregg School beginning in 1872. In 1872 Mr. Dew had gotten married. A 4 room cottage was built by the school board in front of the school for Mr. Dew and his wife in the same year. Mr. Dew boarded with Mrs. Kayte Boyce. Mr. Dew taught at Gregg School from 1872 to 1882.

The Gregg School was not operated as a district school in any of the local school districts in the area, but the students were charged tuition when the school first started operating.William Stiles, William Boyce, Mrs. Kayte Boyce, Lee Giles, Aaron Boyce, and Camell Hill were one of the early trustees for Gregg School.

Students from Manor, Decker, Dessau, and Pflugerville attended this school. Even students from Williamson County attended the Gregg School. Even students from as far as Coupland attended the Gregg School.

The second teacher was Ms. Hattie Hardy who taught there from 1882 to 1896. Ms Hattie Hardy married a man named Mr. Cain. In 1896, Ms. Hattie Hardy moved to a home her hometown of Manor.

William Stiles died on December 24, 1883 at the age of 73 and his wife, Piety Ellis Stiles, died a few years later on May 23, 1885. They are both buried in the Gregg School Cemetery. Their graves are marked by headstones enclosed within an iron fence. In 1884, the school property transferred ownership to Travis County Public Schools and Travis County. After Mr. William Gregg opened a store and post office in 1888, Gilleland Creek Academy became known as the Gregg School.


By the early 1900’s, Sunday Church Services were being held in the school house. Gregg School became known as the Rock Church in 1900. A small cemetery called the Gregg School Cemetery was located close nearby. The Gregg school had 1 teacher and 32 students in 1907 with a 1:32 ratio. The 1908-1909 school year had 1 teacher and 33 students. The 1909-1910 school year had 1 teacher and 37 students with a 1:37 ratio.

In 1910 the rock building was torn down and a newly built wooden frame building was erected on the site of the former rock building. Only the chimney erected out of rock and brick remained from the rock building. The 1910 wooden frame building was built by Westley Gustafson.

By the 1930s, Gregg School was a K-7 school that taught 1st grade through 7th grade. School stopped after 7th grade. For the 1935-1936 school year, Gregg School had 62 students. There was 1 teacher for 62 students with a 1:62 ratio. One teacher taught all 7 grades for 118 days to 120 days. Of course the teacher got paid for 6 months of teaching during said school semester.


In 1947, citizens of Manor voted to consolidate the school districts of Gregg, Decker, Blue Bluff, Lockwood, New Sweden, Carlson, and Lund into Manor ISD. Series of school district consolidations into bigger school districts were common in Texas from the 1940s to the 1960s. The Gregg School District was no exception to this case.

1948 is when the Gregg School was consolidated into Manor Independent School District (Manor ISD) and Pflugerville ISD. Gregg School was divided between Manor ISD and Pflugerville ISD. Other students who attended Gregg School were bussed to Pflugerville to attend Pflugerville ISD schools while the remaining students attended school in Manor.

The school sat abandoned for a certain amount of unspecified years before being demolished. The land and cemetery reverted ownership to Travis County. In 1963, the Gregg School was all but abandoned.


In 1965, the Gregg School was demolished. From looking at a 1965 aerial map provided by NASA and Historic Aerials (historicaerials.com), one can determine that all that remained of the Gregg School was a pile of rocks ashes from the demolished school building resembling a pile of dirt often found at construction sites. The 4 room cottage built by the school board in 1872 still remained at the front.

1965 is when land for the former Gregg School property and the Gregg School Cemetery were deeded and sold to a man named Christian Buck who lived on the land until his death. In 1965, Christian Buck conerveted the land into a ranch after paperwork was finalized. Christian Buck bought the land from Manor ISD, Pflugerville ISD, and Travis County.


The Christian Buck Estate deeded Jack W Gullahorn and Patricia H Gullahorn the former Gregg School land property and Gregg School Cemetery on the date of 11/24/1982. A house was built on the former Gregg School land property in 1983 for Jack W Gullahorn and Patricia H Gullahorn. The 1983 house was built as a 3 story house. A trailer was hauled onto the property during the same year which was located west of the house. The 4 room cottage built by the school board in 1872 located at the front was demolished.


In 2005 and 2006, Schoenstatt Movement of Austin deeded and granted Alexander House the Gregg School land property and the Gregg School Cemetery to Alexander House of Austin from a quit claim deed.

In 2010, Alexander House of Austin deeded and granted Gregg School land property and the Gregg School Cemetery back to Jack W Gullahorn and Patricia H Gullahorn from a quit claim deed. No changes to the cemetery were made.


As of September 2017, Jack W Gullahorn and Patricia H Gullahorn still own the former Gregg School land property and the Gregg School Cemetery. Jack W Gullahorn has since converted the land into a ranch. No known changes have been made to the cemetery were made.

All that remains of the Gregg School is the Gregg School Cemetery located private land on the right side of Gregg Lane. The cemetery is completely overgrown with tall grass and almost all tombstones found are toppled over. The cemetery is in poor condition. Patricia H Gullahorn and Jack W Gullahorn are the caretakers for the Gregg School Cemetery. Gregg School Cemetery is also known as the Old Rock Church Cemetery.

The Gregg School was located at 5300 Gregg Lane, Manor, Texas, US 78653.

Monday, September 25, 2017

Short history about the communication system language of Morse code.

Samuel Morse is the wonderful man responsible for inventing the communication system language of Morse code. With the invention of the telegram came the invention of Morse code in 1835. Morse code is a code of dots and dashes for letters of the alphabet converted into electric signals. In the 1900s, Morse code was used as military language by the US Navy and Canadian Army to send long distance messages overseas during wartime through warfare. By 2000 Morse code is not a common language. Nobody used Morse code by 2014. It's not used in everyday conversation.

Even today, Morse code is not a common language that is not used in everyday communication. I never really understood the concept of Morse code for daily communication usage. Morse code must be a secret language. Somehow Morse code is important to this day.

About the England-France war in the 1200s during the King John reign.

During the reign of King John of England in the 1200s, England was at war with France. The England-France relationship did not get along during that time period so the politics were not well played out and out of control. The King of England did not get along with France very well at all.

The England-France war turned out to be disastrous, violent, and thus deadly. There were many bloody slayings and killings caused by the casualties of war. People were killed in this war.  Homes were set ablaze on fire, villages were damaged by destruction of canons, and soldiers were corrupt.

The war had ended in 1224 before the end of the King John reign. England and France did not get along politically despite being allies for each other as they are right now currently.

Philosophy surrounding Ancient Greece.

640 BC is when Ancient Greece was at war with themselves and Persia. Athens and Sparta were the most notable cities in these civil wars in the Ancient Greece era. Ancient Greece was divided into city-states.These series of wars with Persia were called the Greco-Persian Wars. People from all over the world had cometo learn from Greece before the wars as some professional historians believe.

Greek philosophy originated within the timespan of 640 BC to 322 BC. Philosophers would generally be in opposition of war. Philosophers in opposition of the government would be killed. ANYBODY in opposition of the government would be killed by the government. Usually by those in charge in power.

Saturday, September 23, 2017

Friendship of Manda School works to historically preserve Manda Community Center.

From 2016 to 2017, the Friends of Manda School have begun maintenance and upkeep of the former Manda School building as an attempt of historic perseveration. The Manda community along with several volunteers have been restoring the Manda School building to its original condition as found decades earlier.

Every single year the Friends of Manda School clean the school building and land property by mowing the grass and terminating insects from hidden corners. Ceiling tiles from top roof have been restored.

Several window panels have been replaced and window screens have been added to all windows of this school. All wooden floors have been flattened and resurfaced to be up to code for building standards and code standards by volunteers from Friends of Manda School. Central AC heating is now connected to this building.

Every single year the Friends of Manda School hold meetings at the Manda Community Center. Mainly these meetings are about future regards of Manda Community Center and funding for historic preservation toward this building which are held by the Board of Directors for Friends of Manda School. Friends of Manda School is responsible for the upkeep and maintenance of this school building.

As a community center, community functions, social gatherings, programs, and various meetings are still held inside this building.

Manda School is now operated and preserved by the Friends of Manda School (Friendship of Manda School) as Manda Community Center. Friends of Manda School plans to keep the Manda School open as the Manda Community Center in Manda, Texas which is near the town of Manor, Texas.

A look at the history of Pleasant Grove School in Spicewood, Texas.

Pleasant Grove School began its life as Cat Hollow School in the Cat Hollow community of Lake Travis in 1890. The Cat Hollow School lasted from 1890 to 1901 within a time range of 11 years. The school was rebuilt in 1891. Cat Hollow School was built as a wooden frame house serving as a one-room schoolhouse. Cat Hollow School taught 1st grade through 6th grade. The school did not educate students past 7th grade. Cat Hollow School was a K-6 school.

In 1901 is when the school was renamed to Pleasant Grove School and when the Cat Hollow School building was sold to a private homeowner. Travis County Public Schools operated the school before Pleasant Grove school prior to 1916 from 1890 to 1915.

Transportation to school was by wagon, horse, or just simply by foot. Many elementary school aged children traveled to school often by foot going to and from school. The school did not provide or offer transportation to students living out in the countryside.


By 1910 student enrollment stood at 30. 7th grade was added in the year of 1910 thus becoming a K-7 school. The Pleasant Grove School taught 1st grade through 7th grade. Students who wanted to continue education beyond the 7th grade would have to attend school in Bee Cave, Hamilton Pool, or Dripping Springs. Students who continued their education beyond the 7th grade attended Bee Cave School, Eanes School, Hamilton Pool School, or Dripping Springs School, or Dripping Springs High School.

The school building was deemed inadequate by Travis County Public Schools officials sometime during the early dawn of the 20th century. A new one needed to be built. Community leaders begged for a new schoolhouse to be built. However despite opposition from Travis County Public Schools officials, the Pleasant Grove School continued to operate until 1916.

1916 is the year when people from the Mud community built another schoolhouse. The Cat Hollow School was for $10 dollars in 1916. Lumber was hauled from wagons that came from Lake Travis community. Lumber was hauled out from Austin. The school building was completed in 3 weeks.

1916 is the same year Pleasant Grove School was granted its own school district by the State of Texas. The name of the school district would be Pleasant Grove School District #10. (Travis County Public Schools operated the school before Pleasant Grove was granted its own school district.)

$300 dollars were donated to Pleasant Grove School in 1917. Ms. Bessie Bohman was the first teacher to teach at Pleasant Grove School for the 1917-1918 school year. Enrollment later increased to 40 students. The average daily attendance was 35 students a day.


More students attended this school in 1921 in part due to state aid funding. Pleasant Grove School received state aid from 1921 to 1936. The school was rebuilt and improved in order to meet state requirements in 1929. Several improvements were made before the Great Depression.

School enrollment declined slowly during the 1930s mostly in part due to the Great Depression. 15 students were enrolled during the 1935-1936 school year. That was a 140% drop in enrollment rate from the begging of the century. A $1,000 dollar bond was voted on by residents of the community in 1935. The school was repainted in 1936. Several repairs were made to the school building.
More improvement was made by painting the school with several coat and layers of paint.

In 1941, Pleasant Grove School was renamed to Mud School. That is when the small schoolhouse became the Mud Schoolhouse (Mud School). Mud School when it was named after the former small community of Mud, Texas. Later that year Pleasant Grove School was moved to the small community of Mud, Texas. The school was renamed to Pleasant Grove - Mud Schoolhouse in 1946. The school was rebuilt and improved again in 1947.

In 1948, Pleasant Grove School and Pleasant Grove School District #10 were consolidated into the Teck Common School District and eventually later into Dripping Springs ISD in 1950. Later after 1950, the school building served as a church which held religious services for a brief period in time.


In 1995, Andy Kirkpatrick bought the school building and land property from Dripping Springs ISD and opened the Moon River Bar & Grill inside the former Pleasant Grove School building where it operated from 1995 to 2014. Several additional add-ons have been incorporated onto the school building. Moon River Bar & Grill was a small restaurant that was owned and operated by UMJO LLC and Garden Foulois Inc.

Moon River Bar & Grill was a small successful restaurant known to many Lake Travis residents and Austin citizens along with the rest of Travis County. The rest of Travis County knew about Moon River Bar & Grill very well.

However the owners decided to shut down the Moon River Bar & Grill business in 2014. Party due to wage labor violations cited by the Department of Labor and a set of other problems. Moon River Bar & Grill failed to pay their workers federal minimum wage.


In January 2014, Dead Explorer conducted a paranormal investigation at the Moon River Bar & Grill after an employee of the Moon River Bar restaurant claimed she heard the voice of a female ghost in the kitchen. Staff have come to find out pots have been moved from shelves. Ironically there is a cemetery located less than a block north of the restaurant which serves as the final resting place for Confederate soldiers who fought in the Civil War.

The paranormal investigation video of Moon River Bar & Grill went viral on YouTube later that year receiving thousands of views online. A DVD of the Moon River Bar & Grill paranormal investigation has been released on Dead Explorer’s website which you can purchase there.


Andy Kirkpatrick sold the property to Gary L Barrett in 2015. The building was converted to Hippo’s Hill Country Hideaway which had operated from 2015 to 2016. In 2016, Hippo’s Hill Country Hideaway closed down due to wage labor violations cited by the Department of Labor, low quality service, and a set of other problems.

Future of the former Pleasant Grove School building remains unknown presently speaking. However parts from the school building have been moved and relocated offsite to an unknown location. The green square single story unit structure at the front entrance is no longer present from street view.

Apparently the Pleasant Grove School itself sits just inside the entrance of Pace Bend Park off of Highway 71 & FM 2344 at the location of 2002 Pace Bend Road North, Spicewood, Texas, US 78669. The building is still in its location.

Hudson Bend School history long forgotten revisited.

The Hudson Bend School in Bee Cave, Texas and its history have been long forgotten. Many people do not know of the history of this school or are aware of existence. Hudson Bend School is one of the many early schools of the Lake Travis community, Travis County, Austin, and Bee Cave of course.

Wiley Hudson and his family settled in Hudson Bend near the Colorado River (now Lake Travis) in 1830. In 1860, men from the community built a one-room schoolhouse. Lumber was donated from nearby. A man named Mr. Watson was hired to be the teacher by the school. By 1890, Hudson Bend community boasted 2 schools called Hudson Bend School and Hirsh Creek School (Hurst Creek School). Hudson Bend had its own school district called School District No. 57.


In 1901, both Hudson Bend School and Hirsh Creek School were consolidated into Teck School via Teck Common School District in 1901. Hudson Bend School stopped operating in 1911. The building was sold off to a private homeowner in the same year. Hirsh Creek School was demolished. Both schools no longer exist.

In 1985, a new middle school was opened by Lake Travis ISD. Lake Travis ISD officials decided to name the new middle school Hudson Bend Middle School after the former Hudson Bend School in an effort to remember their 19th century historic roots. After all, the name “Hudson Bend Middle School” originated from “Hudson Bend School”. The first school term Hudson Bend Middle School operated on was the 1985-1986 school year.

Today the legacy and name of Hudson Bend School live on at Hudson Bend Middle School at the location of 15600 Lariat Trail, Austin, Texas, US 78734. This middle school proudly boasts a high school graduation rate of 96.5% (96 ½ percent).

History of the Washington School in Washington, Texas.

In 1880, a church and school building was erected in a central location at Brown's Prairie, with the Reverend David Buchmueller serving as both pastor and schoolteacher.  Washington School started its fledgling beginning as Brown's Prairie School as a small rural wooden one-room schoolhouse built in 1880. Washington School operated under School District No. 42 from 1880 to 1951.

A newer six-room schoolhouse was built in 1911. Washington School then was an explementary state certified elementary school which taught 1st grade through 6th. There was one teacher for those six grades. 7th grade students transferred to schools in Brenham ISD.  Washington School (then Brown's Prairie School) was a K-6 school.

In 1927, Brown’s Prairie School became an intermediate school. The school then taught 10 grades. Three teachers taught there. In 1932, another teacher was added. The Washington School scored 827 1/2 points as a Class A school in the 1934-1935 school semester. 11 grades were taught at this school at one point in time.


A contract with the town of Washington, Texas and WPA was laid out to build a new school building to replace the wooden building. This newer school building would serve and educate students of the town in the year of 1938. Construction of the school building began in 1939. Construction period for this school took a year from 1939 to 1940. WPA helped funded the school’s construction as part of their responsibilities.

The Washington School building was built as a single story structure with limestone and granite from a quarry. Walls were constructed out of limestone. Travis Broesche and Carl Whitmarsh were the architects responsible for construction of Washington School. Travis Broesche was the architect and the stone mason was Carl Whitmarsh. An auditorium was added.


In 1940, the Washington School was finally completed and ready to educate students of the area. The 1939 school building replaced the 1911 one-room school building. The 1940-1941 school year was the first school semester Washington School operated on. More than 100 students were served during that school semester. Brown's Prairie School changed its name to Washington School in the 1940s.

In 1950 the school was transformed into a K-8 school. In 1951 is when the Washington School was closed down and consolidated into Brenham ISD. The 1950-1951 school year was the last school term Washington School operated on. All of its students were transferred to Brenham ISD after being annexed into the school district.

Today the school building has been repurposed into Washington Volunteer Fire Department and also serves as a modern day community center. A Texas Historic Landmark was issued to the school in 2016.

History of J. B. Norwood Schools in Del Valle, Texas forgotten revisited.

The J. B. Norwood Schools in both Del Valle, Texas and Austin, Texas were named after James B. Norwood (James Bascum Norwood aka James Bascom Norwood). James B. Norwood was a white landowner that relocated to Texas after being in Tennessee for many years. The J. B. Norwood School(s) were named after James B. Norwood. J.B. Norwood donated land for the school.

During time of operation, J. B. Norwood School had its own school district called J. B. Norwood School District better known as School District No. 66 from 1892 to 1935.


J. B. Norwood Schools began life in 1892 with the opening of schools J. B. Norwood White School and J. B. Norwood Negro School. Both of which were built in 1892. Both schools were built as wooden frame schools Nearly 100% of these schools were built out of wood. These schools were a one-room buildings that was long and narrow with many windows. These schools would teach 1st grade through 8th grade from 1892 to 1931. Both schools were located at the intersection of FM 973 & Burleson Road.

The J. B. Norwood School started life out first as the Cloud School. Later in 1894 the Cloud School would eventually become J. B. Norwood School for which the school would eventually form into. The Cloud School was an early incarnation of the The J. B. Norwood School.

Of course racism and segregation were law of the land in Texas prior to integration. J. B. Norwood School District had its own separate “J. B. Norwood School’s” for each race and ethnicity. A J. B. Norwood School for white students, a J. B. Norwood School for negro students, and a “Mexican School” for hispanic students. Each school in School District #66 was designated as a “J. B. Norwood School”.


By 1931, J. B. Norwood School(s) reverted from K-8 schools that taught grades 1st through 8th to K-7 schools which taught grades 1st through 7th. Most J. B. Norwood School(s) taught grades 1st through 8th. Students were bussed to Austin ISD to attend high school.

With the influx of Mexican immigrants from the 1930s, a new “Mexican School” was in demand to be established. In 1932 the J. B. Norwood Mexican School was built at Emma Browning Avenue next to J. B. Norwood White School and J. B. Norwood Negro School. J. B. Norwood Mexican School served the educational needs of Mexican children.

When the Bergstrom Air Force Base was being built in 1933, School District No. 66 was forced to relocate its schools elsewhere. Finally after much delay, School District No. 66 relocated its schools in 1935. The school relocation displaced students so they attended schools in the Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle ISD).

J. B. Norwood School (J. B. Norwood Negro School) was relocated to Norwood Lane & Burleson Road (FM 812) in 1935. J. B. Norwood School (J. B. Norwood White School) relocated across the street from J. B. Norwood Negro School later on in 1935. 31 students were enrolled at the J. B. Norwood Negro School during the 1934-1935 school semester. The average daily attendance during the 1934-1935 school semester was at 18 students a day.

In 1934-35, J. B. Norwood Negro School had 31 students with an average daily attendance of.  Teacher-student ratio was 1:31 (1 being the teacher and 31 being students). Cost per year for each student was $440 which amounted to $24.44 per student per year. The school schedule was 114 days and sometimes 120 days.

In 1935 after many students were displaced, the “J. B. Norwood Schools” and the school district itself were consolidated into Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle ISD). All students from School District #66 attended Del Valle schools. All J. B. Norwood Schools were relocated to Norwood Lane & Burleson Road (FM 812) in Austin, Texas in the same year.


Sometime in the 20th century, the J. B. Norwood Schools were demolished. There are no traces of these school remaining today. None are extant. J. B. Norwood Schools were located inside the property of today’s Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (ABIA).