Showing posts with label history. Show all posts
Showing posts with label history. Show all posts

Sunday, February 10, 2019

Interesting history of East End Grain Silos in Houston, Texas explored.

The East End Grain Silos were constructed out of concrete in 1930. A total of 4 grain silos were constructed using concrete foundations. East End Grain Co. owned the property which these 4 grain silos were located on. The grain silos occupied 2 acres worth of land. These 4 grain silos were located on the banks of Buffalo Bayou. The grain silos used to be connected to a freight rail line next to the railroad tracks which separate the East End neighborhood from Downtown.

The first known renovations to the grain silos occurred during the 1930s. In 1940, all 4 grain silos were renovated again. The silos not only operated as grain silos but as gravel silos as well. Cement concrete was mixed and manufactured inside these silos.

In 2011, the storage building for East End Grain Silos were demolished. All of what remained in 2013 was a gravel pit. The only remainders left were the 4 grain silos which can be viewed as a landmark of Houston's industrial past. Recently homeless people have been camping near the grain silos. However citizens seem to not be bothered by this. Nature has growing on and around the grain silos.

The East End Grain Silos are a great place to view Houston's industrial history from the past. However not much is there for the time being. Trees are growing/have grown inside 2 of the 4 silos.

The East End Grain Silos are located at 507 North Nagle Street, Houston, Texas, US 77003.

History behind Beckwith School in Flint, Michigan.

Beckwith School is one of many schools in Flint, Michigan that have been forgotten and faded away with time. The Beckwith School itself served as one of the many early educational institutions of Flint, Michigan along with many others. Not much is known about the Beckwith School itself.


Beckwith School began its life in Flint, Michigan in 1896 as a single story house. This single story house was a one-room school where 1st grade through 6th grade were taught. At that time, Beckwith School was a 1-6 school. (7th grade was added later.) After students completed 6th grade, students were bussed into Flint to attend Flint Community Schools. Westwood Heights School District (Westwood Heights Schools) operated the school from 1896 to 2001.

Beckwith School had its own school district called Beckwith School District which it operated on. The school district was never well off financially. So they relied on Westwood Heights School District and Flint Community Schools for help.

1920 is Beckwith School moved to location on Clio Avenue between Carpenter Road and Pierson Road. 7th grade was added in 1920. School was taught in a two story house this time as opposed to a one story house. After students completed 6th grade and 7th grade, students transferred over to Flint Community Schools to attend Flint Central High School.

During the 1931 is when Westwood Heights School District, Beckwith School District, and Flint Community Schools had an agreement to pay the tuition of the students attending high school at Flint Central High School. Not many school districts could not pay the tuition of their high school students. Especially the rural school districts. That had meant many students didn’t get a chance to go to high school,


In 1947, Beckwith School moved to a different location on Ridgeway Avenue near the intersection of Doran Street & Ridgeway Avenue. This building was a single story red and brown brick building with a black and brown roof. For the most part, the color of the roof was black. 1950 is when Beckwith School became a K-8 school. Beckwith School became Beckwith Elementary School.

Students began attending Beecher High School operated by the Beecher Community School District in Beecher, Michigan in 1952. After 8th grade is when students transferred over to Beecher Schools to attend Beecher High School.

Beckwith School and its school district merged into Westwood Heights School District in 1957. This left Westwood Heights School District to operate Beckwith School as an elementary school for students in grades 1 through 6.

For whatever reason, 1974 is the year when Beckwith School closed. This left the school to be abandoned. Westwood Heights School District began searching for tenants they could lease from. Luck came their way in 1976. Genesee Christian School became the first tenant to lease from Beckwith School. Genesee Christian School leased quarters in the former Beckwith School in 1976. At that time, the 2-year-old school had about 100 students.


In 1987, Genesee Christian School had relocated to a bigger space thus leaving the school vacant again for the second time. Westwood Heights School District made no improvements to the building during that time.

In 1989 during the 1988-1989 fiscal year, Beckwith School burned down in a fire. The cause of the fire left just a part of the building standing and the basement was left open. That fire left the basement exposed. However the exact cause of the fire remains unknown.

1991 is when Beckwith School was demolished. The parking lot was repaved over with cement. The asphalt has since been covered up.

Beckwith School was located at Ridgeway Avenue, Flint, Michigan, US 48504.

Friday, February 8, 2019

Donald Trump signs hemp bill into law.

The Marijuana Times, High Times, and KiwiFarms.net report that the US Congress passed a bill to legalize hemp and President Donald Trump says he will sign the bill into law. The bill President Donald Trump will sign into law is called the 2018 Farm Bill. (Ref: https://kiwifarms.net/threads/u-s-congress-passes-bill-to-legalize-hemp-trump-says-he-will-sign-it-into-law.50895/)

The 2018 Farm Bill includes a provision to legalize hemp throughout the entire country. This bill will allow farmers to grow it as any other agricultural commodities available once the bill takes effect. It will be the first time in decades that hemp will be finally legal after the bill is finalized. Hemp soon will become legalized. (Ref: https://themarijuanaherald.com/news/u-s-congress-passes-bill-to-legalize-hemp-trump-says-he-will-sign-it-into-law/)

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 34 states have passed some type of policy allowing hemp to be cultivated at the state level. States such as Arizona, Texas, Colorado, and North Dakota are considering legalizing hemp to help the industry.

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Round Rock Stagecoach Inn successfully relocated.

On the date of January 2, 2019, the Round Rock Stagecoach Inn of Round Rock was successfully relocated to 750 Chisholm Trail in an effort of historic preservation by Round Rock Preservation as part of their Round Rock Preservation Project. The Inn has been relocated with no issues. Round Rock Preservation preserved this historic inn as part of the Restore Stagecoach Inn Community Project.

However only $25,000 dollars have been funded to this restoration effort. Round Rock Preservation asks for more donations to meet their $100,000 dollar goal. 100% of the funds donated will go to restore the Round Rock Stagecoach Inn. Round Rock Preservation depends on donations from individuals and businesses to raise funds to preserve significant important historic structures and sites within the City of Round Rock. The City now asks the public to fund the exterior and interior restoration of the RR Stagecoach Inn. The cost of the restoration is approximately $250,000.

Round Rock Stagecoach Inn was built in 1848. Round Rock Stagecoach Inn is better known as the Old Stagecoach Inn. More information can be found at www.rrpreservation.org and www.roundrocktexas.gov/stagecoach-inn.

The Round Rock Stagecoach Inn is now located at 750 Chisholm Trail, Round Rock, Texas, US 78681.

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Short history of Gordon McGregor School in Windsor, Ontario Canada explored.

Gordon McGregor School was named after Gordon M. McGregor, who was the organizer for the Ford Motor Company of Canada. The school served students living in the Ford City section of Windsor, Canada.

This building has historical roots. Gordon McGregor School was constructed in 1924 using masonry brick similar to Tudor Revival. The school originally had 12 classrooms. 11 rooms were filled in just 2 months. 12 more classrooms were added in 1927 due to high demand of expansion. Mr. K.C. Hortop served as the Gordon McGregor School’s first principal from 1924 to 1955.

On January 9, 1950, Gordon McGregor School celebrated its 25th anniversary. The announcement was made by Mr. K.C. Hortop. Gordon McGregor School was a JK-13 school. (Ref: Windsor Star, Page 10, January 9, 1950)

The school closed in 2016. The reason why Ministry of Education closed Gordon McGregor School was to create a JK-12 school (JK-12 facility) at Percy P. McCallum School. The school was declared surplus.

Many students and parents were upset about the closure of this school. They spoke at city hall meetings protesting the school’s closure. Some parents created petitions to prevent the school from closing. Its students were sent to McCallum School.

Gordon McGregor School is located at 1646 Alexis Road, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Its postal address is 1646 Alexis Rd, Windsor, ON N8Y 4P4, Canada.

Saturday, January 12, 2019

History of Gershom School in Detroit, Michigan explored.




Not much history is known about the Gershom School in Detroit, Michigan. It is one of Detroit’s many forgotten schools next to Morley School, Cass Union School, Andrew Jackson Intermediate School, and Hunter High School. This news article will explore and explain the history behind Gershom School.


Gershom School was established and built in the Delray neighborhood of Detroit in 1912. The building itself was a 1,088 square foot building constructed out of masonry brick. The school was located on a 8,276 square foot lot. The building had 4 restrooms and a basement. The roof was made out of asphalt. Originally the school was 3 stories in height on an L-shaped building plan.

The student population was largely German Jewish and Czechoslovakian. However overtime, the student population largely became German Jewish. No African American students attended there during that time.

Sometime during the mid-20th century is when the 3rd floor of Gershom School was leveled making the building then become 2 stories. More high school aged students began attending the high school. This led to crowded classrooms. Sometime during the early 1970s is when the 2nd floor of Gershom School was leveled making the building then become 1 story.

The front of Gershom School.
The front of Gershom School.

Detroit Public Schools sold the building to a private homeowner in 1975. No other known modifications were made during that time. Several alterations and modifications were made to the building specifically for its interiors. The other portion of the building located in the very back was demolished.

On the date of 9/5/2005, the property was to a couple of homeowners. These 2 homeowners heavily altered the interiors of this building. (Ref: https://www.redfin.com/MI/Detroit/124-S-Dupont-St-48209/home/98400484)
Gershom School as it appeared in 2015.
Gershom School as it appeared in 2015.

On the date of Friday, August 21, 2015, Wayne County had filed for foreclose on the former school lot due to unpaid bills and unpaid taxes. $805 dollars of taxes were due at the time. Wayne County put the property up for auction on the date of Wednesday, September 16, 2015. It was during the auction date that Wayne County sold the lot to the Treasurer of Wayne County.
(Ref: Wayne County CAD, Document Number: 0524640638)
Gershom School in 2018 after the arson. Notice how the roofs and windows are missing.
Gershom School in 2018 after the arson. Notice how the roofs and windows are missing.

Sometime in 2017 is when the building burned down due to arson. The roof completely perished during the fire.

Ruins of Gershom School.
Ruins of Gershom School.
Today the property and school are now owned by the Treasurer of Wayne County. According to trulia.com, this property is no longer available to rent or to buy. (Ref: https://www.trulia.com/p/mi/detroit/124-s-dupont-st-detroit-mi-48209--2099307101)


Gershom School is located at 124 South Dupont Street, Detroit, Michigan, US 48209.



Sunday, January 6, 2019

Round Rock Stagecoach Inn now relocated.

On the date of January 2, 2019, the Round Rock Stagecoach Inn of Round Rock was successfully relocated to 750 Chisholm Trail in an effort of historic preservation by Round Rock Preservation as part of their Round Rock Preservation Project. The Inn has been relocated with no issues. Round Rock Preservation preserved this historic inn as part of the Restore Stagecoach Inn Community Project.

However only $25,000 dollars have been funded to this restoration effort. Round Rock Preservation asks for more donations to meet their $100,000 dollar goal. 100% of the funds donated will go to restore the Round Rock Stagecoach Inn. Round Rock Preservation depends on donations from individuals and businesses to raise funds to preserve significant important historic structures and sites within the City of Round Rock. The City now asks the public to fund the exterior and interior restoration of the RR Stagecoach Inn. The cost of the restoration is approximately $250,000.

Round Rock Stagecoach Inn was built in 1848. Round Rock Stagecoach Inn is better known as the Old Stagecoach Inn.

More information can be found at www.rrpreservation.org and www.roundrocktexas.gov/stagecoach-inn.

Monday, December 31, 2018

Ferris Elementary School in Highland Park, Michigan slated to be razed.

In 2013, mlive reported that Ferris Elementary School in Highland Park, Michigan is slated to be razed. Demolition is still pending as Ferris Elementary School still sits abandoned and vacant as of 2018. Vandals and scrappers have broken into the place stealing copper among other things. Everything of value has been stripped out all around the property. The atrium is now completely overgrown with vegetation.

The school has become another eyesore for the community. Ferris Elementary School is one of the many abandoned schools of Highland Park that has yet to be repurposed, renewed, revitalized, upgraded, or demolished.

Ferris Elementary School operated as George W. Ferris Elementary School (aka Ferris School) in Highland Park, Michigan from 1911 to 2001 and was operated by Highland Park Schools.

Ferris Elementary School is located at 59 Cortland Street, Highland Park, Michigan, US 48203.

History behind King Academy of Inkster, Michigan explored.

Not much history is known about King Academy. However King Academy was one of the many abandoned schools in Inkster, Michigan. This new article will explore some history and will shed some light on this school.

King Academy served as a private school from 1997 to 2005. King Academy operated a charter school for students in Kindergarten through 6th grade. It was located next to the former Blanchette Junior High School aka Blanchette Middle School which Inkster Public Schools operated.


12 acres of land were acquired on Henry Ruff Road in 1990 by Pentecostal Temple Church of God in Christ. Inkster Christian Academy and Pentecostal Temple Day Care were its firsts tenant to own the property. This building was built as a $2.5 million educational facility. Construction was completed in 1991. (Ref: http://ptchurch.net/history/)

In 1996, Sister Karen Corner came up with a written proposal for a charter school. Her proposal was brought to Inkster Public Schools. Pentecostal Temple Church of God in Christ sold the building to King Academy for a charter school in 1997.

In 1997, Pastor King facilitated the award of a charter school from the Inkster Public Schools to operate King Academy. King Academy opened its doors in September 1997. 105 students attended during the 1997-1998 school year and 221 students during the 1998-1999 school year. The church has benefited greatly from this venture. (Ref: https://www.mackinac.org/2984)

King Academy provided multiple educational opportunities such as computer classes and summer programs. Its parental involvement was very high thanks to the parent-teacher cooperatives. King Academy attracted students from Inkster Public Schools. (Ref: http://ptchurch.net/history/)

King Academy served 154 students in grades Kindergarden through 6 in 2005. 2005 was the last year King Academy would operate under. 98% of the student body were black during that time, which was higher than the Michigan state average of 32%. King Academy closed in 2005. Declining enrollment is what led this particular charter school to close. Pentecostal Temple Church of God in Christ purchased King Academy in 2005. The sale was finalized in the year of 2006. (Ref: https://www.publicschoolreview.com/king-academy-profile)

Wayne-Westland Community Schools acquired the building from Pentecostal Temple Church of God in Christ in July 2013 after finding out the church was neglecting their maintenance duties. Most of the building was not up to code or city standards. When Wayne-Westland Community Schools received the building, it was already in very rough shape. The building deteriorated further due to the harsh winter climate every year.

Today King Academy is abandoned. Illegal dumping has taken place at this site promoting the City of Inkster to fine and penalize its current owners. Many of its windows are boarded up with plywood. However that has not kept away vandalism and theft. Pentecostal Temple Church of God in Christ no longer owns the building or its property. Today Wayne-Westland Community Schools owns the building and its property.

Neighbors complain the building is an eyesore and want it removed. Many neighbors complain that City of Inkster lets abandoned buildings stay around for too long such as this one and want it gone.


King Academy is located at 1615 Henry Ruff Road, Inkster, Michigan, US 48141.

Urban Renewal Coordinator's Office of Inkster, Michigan found abandoned.

Urban Renewal Coordinator's Office was established as an office building next to LeMoyne Park in 1960. The building was built under provisions of Urban Renewal Project No. Michigan R-21, Inkster, Michigan in May 17, 1960 as part of the Southwest Redevelopment Project. The office building opened in 1961. Land disposition documents and other related documents were held at the Urban Renewal Coordinator's Office.

The Urban Renewal Coordinator's Office was actually the Urban Renewal Department under another name. Allen Park Commission was housed at this location at one point.

At some point in 2010 is when the Urban Renewal Coordinator's Office was repurposed into an Inkster Police Department division. The police department relocated elsewhere leaving this building to become abandoned in 2011.

Today the site has overgrown vegetation covers the grounds. However most of its windows are still in tact and have not been broken from harsh weather ironically. Several doors remain locked. Neighbors complain the building is an eyesore and want it removed. Many neighbors complain that City of Inkster lets abandoned buildings stay around for too long such as this one. Neighbors want it gone.

Urban Renewal Coordinator's Office is located on 4310 Middlebelt Road, Inkster, Michigan, US 48141.

Sunday, December 23, 2018

What happened to Building 27 at Willowbrook State School?

Building 27 at Willowbrook State School was built in 1941 and completed in 1943. The building was designed to be a male infirmary and is a one-story structure constructed out of brick. This building along with Building 25 and Building 29 were designed to be for non-ambulatory patients. (https://s-media.nyc.gov/agencies/lpc/arch_reports/689.pdf)

Many of its patients were nonverbal and required continuous care. Many could not walk or speak. Building 27 housed 140 profoundly retarded (IQs under 20) adolescents of both sexes. Only a few were toilet trained which is why the building reeked of urine and feces.
(https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/GPO-CRECB-1972-pt5/pdf/GPO-CRECB-1972-pt5-1-1.pdf)
(Ref: https://www.thecrimson.com/article/1973/10/5/for-a-friend-in-the-snakepit/)

Building 27 was featured in the 1972 documentary Willowbrook : The Last Great Disgrace recorded by Geraldo Riviera for his news exposé. These patients did have clothes on. But the one thing that couldn’t be hidden is that there were no training programs. That all these patients did was sit during the day.
(Ref: http://index.geraldo.com/folio/willowbrook)

Today Building 27 is now a part of CUNY College of Staten Island. The perimeter is fenced off with a chain link fence. Building 27 is now being used for storage along with Building 25. The abandoned former Willowbrook State School buildings are owned by the College of Staten Island.

Students who attend CUNY College of Staten Island claim they hear voices coming from these building as they believe the campus is haunted. Some students and local residents have claimed to hear voices coming from Building 27 and Building 25.

History of Beckwith School in Flint, Michigan revisited.

Beckwith School is one of many schools in Flint, Michigan that have been forgotten and faded away with time. The Beckwith School itself served as one of the many early educational institutions of Flint, Michigan along with many others. Not much is known about the Beckwith School itself.


Beckwith School began its life in Flint, Michigan in 1896 as a single story house. This single story house was a one-room school where 1st grade through 6th grade were taught. At that time, Beckwith School was a 1-6 school. 7th grade was added later. After students completed 6th grade, students were bussed into Flint to attend Flint Community Schools. Westwood Heights School District (Westwood Heights Schools) operated the school from 1896 to 2001.

Beckwith School had its own school district called Beckwith School District which it operated on. The school district was never well off financially. So they relied on Westwood Heights School District and Flint Community Schools for help.

1920 is Beckwith School moved to location on Clio Avenue between Carpenter Road and Pierson Road. 7th grade was added in 1920. School was taught in a two story house this time as opposed to a one story house. After students completed 6th grade and 7th grade, students transferred over to Flint Community Schools to attend Flint Central High School.

During the 1931 is when Westwood Heights School District, Beckwith School District, and Flint Community Schools had an agreement to pay the tuition of the students attending high school at Flint Central High School. Not many school districts could not pay the tuition of their high school students. Especially the rural school districts. That had meant many students didn’t get a chance to go to high school,

In 1950, Beckwith School moved to a different location on Ridgeway Avenue near the intersection of Doran Street & Ridgeway Avenue. This building was a single story red and brown brick building with a black and brown roof. For the most part, the color of the roof was black though. 1950 is when Beckwith School became a K-8 school. Beckwith School became Beckwith Elementary School.

Students began attending Beecher High School operated by the Beecher Community School District in Beecher, Michigan in 1952. After 8th grade is when students transferred over to Beecher Schools to attend Beecher High School.

Beckwith School and its school district merged into Westwood Heights School District in 1957. This left Westwood Heights School District to operate Beckwith School as an elementary school for students in grades 1 through 6.

Genesee Christian School once leased quarters in the former Beckwith School in 1976. At that time, the 2-year-old school had about 100 students. In 1997, Genesee Christian School had relocated thus leaving the school vacant.

2001 is when Beckwith School was demolished. The parking lot was repaved over with cement. The asphalt has been covered up.

Beckwith School was located at Ridgeway Avenue, Flint, Michigan, US 48504.

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

History of Vickery School in Fort Worth explored.

Today Vickery School is one of Fort Worth’s most endangered schools that have been neglected and nearly forgotten. Many residents of Fort Worth, Texas seems to remember the school. Many of those urban explorers interested in the activity of urban exploration have seemed a huge interest in this particular school. 

Vickery School has undergone many name changes over the years with names such as R. Vickery School, R. Vickery Elementary School, Richard Vickery School, and Richard Vickery School.


In 1909, Fort Worth Star-Telegram published a report on the educational facilities of Fort Worth of new schools that were going to be built including the new Vickery School and new ward schools of the time. The school was named for Mr. Richard Vickery. (Ref: Fort Worth Star-Telegram, June 29, 1909)

The land for the school was purchased from J.A. Lewis and his wife for $800 dollars on July 8, 1909. Construction for Vickery School began in September 1909. Mrs. W. J. Caruth Sr. and the Caruth family donated land to the Vickery School along 300 acres of land to the City of Fort Worth. (Ref: Plano Daily Star-Courier, Page 3, January 1, 1959)

R. Vickery School opened as a school for white students. 100% of the student population was all white as Fort Worth ISD designated Vickery School as a “white school”. The Glenwood neighborhood was nearly 98% white or caucasian.

R. Vickery School was built at a cost of $42,000 in 1910 and was designed by Waller, Shaw, & Field. R. Vickery School was built as a new twelve-room school on 1905 East Vickery Boulevard in Fort Worth, Texas. R. Vickery School served the Glenwood neighborhood. It was built after Fort Worth annexed Glenwood. The school opened in September 1910. (Ref: https://hometownbyhandlebar.com/?p=2288)

The building is two stories (three stories total) on a raised basement and constructed out of buff brick. The front of the building features three classrooms separated by two stairwells. Entrances are located at the stairwell bays. Both front entrances feature small flat-roofed porches. The school was influenced by the Classical Revival architecture. The basement has 4 half-basement rooms. (Ref: http://www.fortwortharchitecture.com/east/vickery.htm)


The campus was further enlarged in 1933 with the construction of 2 rooms, a cafeteria, and an auditorium. Wyatt Hedrick designed on a one story auditorium and a classroom wing to the school building in 1936 as a complimentary addition and completed in 1937. This wing housed additional classrooms. Vickery School then became Vickery Elementary School in 1937. Grades 1 through 8 were educated here.

As reported by El Paso Herald, On September 24, 1947, former principal Elmo R. Reeves of R. Vickery Schoo was set free from being charged on two counts of theft, after the Tarrant County grand jury yesterday failed to return an indictment against him. Complaints had charged him with taking $910.75 and $42.50 from funds donated by Mrs. R. Vickery as a memorial to her late husband, for whom the school was named. (Ref: El Paso Herald, Page 18, September 24, 1947)

Sometime during the mid-1960's is when a one-story metal building addition was constructed to the rear of the building.

R. Vickery Elementary School closed as a white school in May 1962. R. Vickery Elementary School would reopen as a black school in September 1963. By 1963, the student population was (Ref: https://www.geocaching.com/geocache/GC1EMHV_old-school-cache)


By 1983 during the 1983-1984 school year, the school building was underutilized and in need of physical renovation. The school also saw a decline in student population. The school closed in 1985. After Vickery School closed, students were rezoned to Van Zandt-Guinn Elementary School. (Ref: City of Fort Worth’s School Survey of 2002 to 2003)

Fort Worth Independent School District sold the property to Doyle Lee Fuller in 1985 after the school closed. Part of the Vickery School building was used as a night club called Club Frennadna’s. The brick on the basement and first floor were painted blue and white colors.

Club Frennadna’s shut down after TABC canceled their permit and license for alleged violations of the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Code in 2004. It was discovered that $1,700 dollars from a 1995 assessment went unpaid. The Administrative Law Judge (AWJ) recommended the permit and license be canceled.
(Ref: https://www.tabc.state.tx.us/laws/pfd_1999_2006/603890.pdf)

2007 is when Fuller Photo ID & Laminating Service took over a portion of the school building. ID’s were produced and processed inside of the building. Fuller Photo ID & Laminating Service shared the same space as Club Frennadna’s.

Vickery School has been sitting vacant and abandoned since then. Windows have been broken out due to vandalism. The interior has been exposed to elements of weather over the years. It has been reported that homeless people have been living behind the school.

By 2015, the site became a homeless camp. Police found skeletal remains behind Vickery Elementary School evicting more than 80 people using as a homeless camp. Homeless people had been living without permission. Reports of city workers cleaning up a wooded area where the when they found “full skeletal remains.” (Ref: https://dfw.cbslocal.com/2015/03/29/skeletal-remains-found-at-cleared-fort-worth-homeless-camp/)


Today Vickery School is no longer owned by Fort Worth ISD. Photo ID & Laminating Service now owns Vickery School.

The City of Fort Worth has put the school building on the Endangered List as reported by HISTORIC FORT WORTH, INC. and the City of Fort Worth. R. Vickery School is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. This historical building needs to be saved!


Vickery School is located at 1905 East Vickery Boulevard, Fort Worth, Texas, US 76104.

History of Round Rock Mexican School explored.

Only so much history about the Round Rock Mexican School has been saved and archived on documentation. Round Rock Mexican School is one the many forgotten schools of Williamson County next to Cedar Park School, Caldwell Heights School, Stony Point School, Monodale School, and Chandler Branch School among other schools in that area. This news article will explain the history behind Round Rock Mexican School.

Some may remember that Round Rock Independent School District (Round Rock ISD) operated the Round Rock Mexican School from 1933 to 1948. The school operated for 15 years before being shut down in 1948.


Prior to 1933, Hispanic students (students of Mexican descent) attended school with white students in the Round Rock ISD schools. Mexican students attended the white schools.

The need for a “Mexican School” arose during a Round Rock ISD School Board meeting of November 3, 1931. According to board meeting minutes from November 3, 1931, a petition was presented to the school board regarding the establishment of a “Mexican School” by then president Rev. Theodore Krienke.

The question of establishing a Mexican school was deferred to another year. Meaning that the Round Rock ISD School Board pushed the idea of opening a Mexican school back to 1932. A. H. Kaufman was appointed as a member of the committee. (Ref: Round Rock ISD School Board Meeting Nov. 3, 1931)

Board President Rev. Theodore Krienke and A. H. Kaufman petitioned the idea of opening a Mexican school in 1932. The need for a Mexican School was in demand. Round Rock ISD looked for property to lease from for a Mexican School. (Ref: https://history.roundrockisd.org/1932-05-03-theo-krienke-begins-22-year-stint-as-board-president/)

On February 7, 1933, Board President, Rev. Theodore Krienke asked that a committee be appointed to “look into the situation of teaching the Mexican children”. (Ref: https://history.roundrockisd.org/1933-02-07-situation-of-teaching-mexican-children/)

It was on the date of August 1, 1933 that the “Mexican School” opened for Mexican-American students in a space leased from the St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church. Round Rock ISD rented from this church for a year during the 1933-1934 school year. (Ref: Round Rock ISD School Board Meeting Aug. 1, 1933)

Norma Pfluger was elected to be the teacher of the Mexican School at $75 per month for 7 months on August 1, 1933. The school year was 7 months long. The effects of the Great Depression were being felt in Round Rock and teachers had been recently ordered to work without pay. Round Rock ISD agreed to pay rent in order to establish a separate school for students of Mexican descent.

The Round Rock Mexican School building that was used from 1934 to 1948 by Round Rock ISD.
The Round Rock Mexican School building that was used from 1934 to 1948 by Round Rock ISD.


On April 22, 1934, 1.5 acres were purchased from Mr. Tennie Q. Aten for $200 for the Round Rock Mexican School. 0.3 acres was added to the purchase for an additional $25 dollars in May 1934. Round Rock Mexican School was established were Round Rock Institute existed from 1883-1913 on land owned by Tennie Q. Aten.

Construction for Round Rock Mexican School began in summer 1934. A cornerstone was placed on the exterior wall of the school building showing the names of Round Rock School District Board of Trustees such as Rev. Theodore Krienke, O. L. Brady, and A. H. Kaufman. The school building was constructed using limestone from Round Rock White Limestone Company and Austin White Lime Company.

October 8, 1934 is when Round Rock Mexican School opened. Round Rock Mexican School educated Hispanic students (primarily Mexican students) enrolled in grades 1st through 9th. Students looking to attend school past 10th grade often migrated out of town as the public schools of Round Rock were segregated by race. The Mexicans students did go to high school, but very few of them finished.
(Ref: http://www.williamson-county-historical-commission.org/Old_School_Days_in_Williamson_County.html)

Round Rock Mexican School was located at the hilltop located on Chisholm Trail affectionally known as “College Hill”, northwest of the intersection of IH-35 & RM 620 (Round Rock Avenue). The Round Rock Mexican School was located at the address of 609 Chisholm Trail. (Ref: https://history.roundrockisd.org/history-of-schools/)

According to board meeting minutes from January 2, 1939,

“Motion was made and carried that the Negro and Mexican school terms for this year be made to run for eight months instead of seven months, it being understood that this action be for the current school term only.”

(Ref: https://history.roundrockisd.org/1939-01-03-extra-month-added/)



The Round Rock Mexican School building in 1939.
The Round Rock Mexican School building in 1939.

Round Rock ISD School Board voted to connect the “Mexican School” to the sewer system during a school board meeting on April 2, 1940. (Ref: https://history.roundrockisd.org/1940-04-02-mexican-school-connected-to-sewer-system/)

It was following the 1948 court ruling of Delgado vs. Bastrop ISD against segregation of Hispanic students in public schools of Texas that many of its “Mexican Schools” were shut down. Delgado v. Bastrop ISD ruled the segregated “Mexican Schools” and practice of segregating Mexican-American students to be unconstitutional. Round Rock ISD shut down Round Rock Mexican School in 1948 during the 1947-1948 school year to comply with the lawsuit and court order. Students from this school were transferred to Central Elementary School (now Berkman Elementary School) during that same year.
(Ref: https://history.roundrockisd.org/1948-mexican-school-ruled-unconstitutional/)

The McNeil Mexican School aka McNeil School was absorbed by Round Rock ISD in 1948 during the 1947-1949 school year to join the Round Rock Mexican School.

According to board meeting minutes from September 6, 1949, the question of selling the Round Rock Mexican School building was discussed. (Ref: Round Rock ISD School Board Meeting Sept. 6, 1949)

The building for Round Rock Mexican School was sold to Col. W.N. Todd, Jr., in February 1953 for a price of $4,500 and converted into a private residence. It was moved southeast to Creedmoor, Texas where he lived. Today the building no longer stands. (http://wbna.us/community/history-of-wells-branch/bill-todd-1920-2011-2/)

For many years the land sat vacant without any purpose. This was because the school was located within a 100 year floodplain and its close proximity to Brushy Creek.


Today the property of Round Rock Mexican School is now home to Chisholm Trail Crossing Park and the building for Round Rock Mexican School no longer stands. The former site of the school is now occupied by a fast-food restaurant and a Comfort Suites. (Ref: Austin American-Statesman, A1, October 2, 2014)

Round Rock Mexican School was located at 609 Chisholm Trail, Round Rock, Texas, US 78681.

Monday, December 10, 2018

History of Running Brushy School in Cedar Park, Texas explored.

Running Brushy School (aka Running Brushy Creek School) was established as a log cabin schoolhouse in the 1860s. It was replaced in 1877 by a one-story, one-room wood frame building with double front doors along with a row of windows on the north and south sides. Summer services were conducted under a brush arbor. County elections were also held there. (Ref: Hattie Standefer Cluck, pg. 43, Lorena Hillyer Fox)

Running Brushy School District (aka Running Brushy Creek School District) and Cedar Park School District operated the Running Brushy School from the 1860s until 1923. (Ref: Williamson County Deed Book 11, pg. 434)

Running Brushy School was located on the Cluck property close to the RR Foreman’s house. George Cluck and Harriet Cluck sold 1 1/2 acres for $1.00 to the “trustees of the Running Brushy School community”. The trustees were George Cluck and J. N. Stewart. Running Brushy received its name from a heavy flowing spring on the Cluck home place. (Ref: Williamson County Deed Book 11, pg. 434 & 435)

The deed stated this was to be used for both school and church purposes; however, "no meeting of any kind or public nature be allowed to interfere with the regular exercises of a school".
(Ref: Williamson County Deed Book 12, pg. 446)

Running Brushy School consolidated with White Stone School in 1923. The school operated until 1937. Running Brushy School was later demolished in 1970 due to its dilapidated condition.

Today Running Brushy School lives on under the name of Running Brushy Middle School which is operated by Leander ISD. That is where the namesake of that school came from.


Running Brushy School was located near the intersection of Buttercup Creek Boulevard & US 183, Cedar Park, Texas, 78613. Running Brushy School was located next to Cedar Park School.

*Running Brushy School was also known as Running Brushy Creek School.
*Running Brushy School District was also known as Running Brushy Creek School District.

History of Cedar Park School in Cedar Park, Texas revisited.

Not much is known about the Cedar Park School in Cedar Park, Texas. Only so much history about Cedar Park School has been saved and archived on documentation. Round Rock Mexican School is one the many forgotten schools of Williamson County next to Round Rock Mexican School, Caldwell Heights School, Stony Point School, Monodale School, and Chandler Branch School among other schools in that area. This news article will explain the history behind Cedar Park School.


A community school called Cedar Park School was constructed sometime during the 19th century possibly by 1878. Exact date is unknown. The community school and church building were said to have been constructed at the same time according to the Williamson County Historical Commission. (Ref: http://www.williamson-county-historical-commission.org/CEDAR_PARK/Cedar_Park_Texas_Historical_Marker_williamson_county.html)

The school was a one-room frame building built on a box frame plan with double front doors at the entrance which were painted white. The school building was painted white as well. The building was said to have 6 windows with 3 of each on both sides. The school classroom was divided with boys sitting on one side of the room and girls on the other. (Ref: www.williamson-county-historical-commission.org/CEDAR_PARK/HISTORY_OF_CEDAR_PARK_TEXAS_narrative.pdf)

The Cedar Park School served as a church also called “Cedar Park School/Church”. J. M. McNeeley served as superinten­dent and reverend on Sunday afternoons. This building served as both a church and school.

The town of Cedar Park even had its own school district called Cedar Park School District. Running Brushy School, New Hope School, New Hope High School, Block House School, and Bagdad School were a part of the “Cedar Park School District”. Cedar Park School District was a “common school district” which sent its students in secondary grades to attend school in the Leander Common School District (now Leander ISD).
(Ref: Williamson County Deed Book 12, pg. 446)

Cedar Park School was a 1-7 school where grades 1 through 7 were taught which was not uncommon during that time period. Usually those students wanting an education past the 7th grade rode the train to Leander for a secondary education at a cost of 5¢ cents per day.

According to Williamson County Historical Commission, Cedar Park School was located at Buttercup Creek Boulevard & US 183 and southeast of White Stone School located at the intersection of FM 1431 & US 183. (Ref: http://www.williamson-county-historical-commission.org/CEDAR_PARK/Cedar_Park_Narrative_footnotes.pdf)


Mr. George Allen became superintendent of Cedar Park School in 1908 during the 1908-1909 school year. Cedar Park School had 20 students attending school daily. Many students were 8 or 9 years old. Mr. Walker Barton began grouping the students by grade rather than gender. (Ref: Land of Good Water, pg. 319, Clara Scarbrough)

Thomas L. Allen was appointed trustee of the Cedar Park School District in 1920. At that time the school, Cedar Park School was more than 40 years old and in need of repair. The school was considered obsolete by Williamson County Common School District officials. (Ref: http://www.williamson-county-historical-commission.org/CEDAR_PARK/Cedar_Park_Texas_Historical_Marker_williamson_county.html)

During the same year is when Thomas Allen began plans for consolidating Cedar Park School with Block House School located 2 miles north. A petition led to each of the two schools closing. Block House and Cedar Park consolidated to form the new White Stone School District in 1923. Cedar Park School District was consolidated into Leander Independent School District Leander ISD 1923. It was a petition that led the Cedar Park School to close down. (Ref: www.williamson-county-historical-commission.org/CEDAR_PARK/HISTORY_OF_CEDAR_PARK_TEXAS_narrative.pdf)

The Cedar Park School more or less sat abandoned sat abandoned for more than 3 decades. This was from the 1920s to the 1950s. White Stone School District was consolidated into Leander Independent School District (Leander ISD) in 1952. At one point in time the former Cedar Park School was used as a hay barn to store hay. Somehow Cedar Park School eventually fell to the ground and was later demolished due to suburban development. (Ref: http://www.cedarparktexas.gov/home/showdocument?id=1337)


Today the Cedar Park School has faded away with time from peoples memories. The school only exists in historical reports from Williamson County Historical Commission.

Cedar Park School was located at Buttercup Creek Boulevard & US 183, Cedar Park, Texas, US 78613. Century Food Store and Cash America Pawn stand where the Cedar Park School once stood.
(Ref: https://communityimpact.com/wp-content/uploads/archives/LCP/issues/LCP-2009-01.pdf)

Friday, November 30, 2018

History of Lower Balcones School in Boerne, Texas explored and examined.

Lower Balcones School was a county school operated by Kendall County Common School District in Boerne, Texas from 1890 to the 1940s. Lower Balcones School was one of the many country schools built in the United States during the late end of the 19th century. Not much is known about the Lower Balcones School or its history. This news article will explain and examine the history behind Lower Balcones School.


Lower Balcones School was built as a one-room schoolhouse built as a wooden frame building in 1890 during the 1890-1891 school year for Kendall County Common School District. Lower Balcones School was located on the Boerne Stage Road serving as the main road from Boerne to San Antonio at the time. The school building for Lower Balcones School is located next to Balcones Creek which serves as the boundary line between Kendall County and Bexar County.

The school term started in October and ended in March. The last day was usually around Memorial Day. Its school bell did not start ringing until the day after Labor Day. (Ref:https://conradsstories.com/2011/09/09/lower-balcones-school)

Kendall County Common School District was responsible for funding the school through county finances as it was for all of its schools. Grades 1 through 8 were taught at the school the first 10 years starting in the 1890-1891 school year. Grades 9 and 10 were added in 1901.

40 students attended Lower Balcones School in 1890 during the 1890-1891 school year. This school used 20 double desks which seated 2 students. All of its 40 students were in elementary grades. 41 students in grades 1 through 8 attended Lower Balcones School in 1891.


Beginning in 1901 during the 1900-1901 school year is when grades 9 and 10 were included into the school. Grades 9 and 10 were in the same room.

In 1909, the school building burned down in a fire. The school building perished afterwards. Nothing could be salvaged. This would require Kendall County Common School District to allocate funding for a new school building to be constructed. Students attended school elsewhere where they could continue classes. The fire had occurred in 1909 during the 1909-1910 school year.

A new two-room school building was established in 1910. Classes were continued in 1910 during the 1910-1911 school year. Beginning in 1911, classes for grades 9 and 10 were held in a separate room away from students in grades 1 through 8. The average daily attendance for the 1930s decade was 36 students.

It was sometime during the 1940s when Lower Balcones School was consolidated into Boerne ISD. This was due to the availability of automobiles becoming more affordable and road improvement. The advent of transportation led students to attend school in town with no further need for country schools or county schools.


Today Lower Balcones School serves as a multi-use facility by serving as Unity Church of Boerne and as a meeting hall. The meeting hall is in the other room of the school building. Unity Church of Boerne now owns the school building of Lower Balcones School.

Address for Lower Balcones School is 121 Scenic Loop Road, Boerne, Texas, US 78006.

History of the Cove School in Orange, Texas discovered.

Not much history is known about the Cove School. Information regarding Cove School is quite vague. This news article will attempt to find out the history of Cove School in Orange, Texas.


Mr. David Bland and Mrs. Bland moved to Orange, Texas in 1881. Both them and their children lived in a 1 story house. The couple saw an urgent need for a school in the community. So both of them built a school that would become the Cove School located south of Orange, Texas. Mrs. Bland began teaching again in 1881. She used a room in their house as a classroom while Cove School was being built. The school being conducted in their house was a private school. Grades 1 through 8 were educated here.

Cove School was established and opened in 1882 on land that was owned by Mr. David Bland and Mrs. Bland. This was in order to have educational facilities for children living in Orange, Texas. Mrs. Bland was its first teacher already having several years of teaching experience.  (Ref: Gateway to Texas - Orange County, page 200)

Mr. David Bland donated more land for the school in 1884. It was then that Mr.s Bland would continue to teach at Cove School for 7 years until 1891. She was succeeded by her daughter Allie Bland. D. B. McKinley was the school trustee.
(Ref: Gateway to Texas - Orange County, page 200)
(Ref: Orange County Official Public Records, Volume 1344, Page 200)

David Bland conveyed the land to Adams Bayou Community School District No. 6 of Orange County on the date of January 12, 1893. It was then that the Cove School would become part of Adams Bayou Community School District No. 6. (Ref: Orange County Official Public Records, Volume P, Page 298)

Sometime in the 1900s is when Adams Bayou Community School District No. 6 was renamed to Cove Independent School District. (Ref: Orange County Official Public Records, Volume 3, Page 593)

Paul A. Nash and his wife Sarah Thornhill Nash donated a tract of land to Cove Independent School District in 1946. Over time, more land owners would donate acres from their tracts of land to Trustees of Cove Independent School District. Grades K through 8 were served in one building.

The first Cove School building was torn down in 1947. The gym and 2 story building serving as Cove School were built and constructed in 1947. Cove School would be rebuilt again in 1954. This time the 80% of the school building was a one story building. Grades K through 8 were educated here. (Ref: http://www.wosaf.org/history.html)


In 1965 when Cove Independent School District was merged into Orange ISD to form West Orange-Cove ISD, the Cove School was closed for whatever reason.  The property was transferred from Cove Independent School District to West Orange-Cove ISD. West Orange-Cove ISD would own the property from 1965 to 1972.

West Orange-Cove ISD formed from West Orange Independent School District, Cove Independent School District, and Orange Independent School District shortly after West Orange ISD and Cove Independent School District consolidated in 1965 during the 1965–1966 school year.  The new West Orange-Cove ISD was forced to by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) absorb Orange Public Schools fka Orange ISD and operated through the City of Orange. The school district’s name upon consolidation was West Orange-Cove Independent School District. (Ref: http://www.wosaf.org/history.html)

Bosie Southern Company and Lutcher and Moore Lumber Company removed the rails of the railroad siding next along a shed southwest on the property on August 25, 1971. Moore Lumber Company removed wooden beams from said railroad. (Ref: Orange County Official Public Records, Volume 411, Page 63)

On July 12, 1972, West Orange-Cove ISD sold the property and buildings to William M. Boiter. (Ref: Orange County Official Public Records, Volume 420, Page 532)


On the date of 2/16/2007, William M. Boiter sold the land to Ruben Dorantes on a special warranty deed. The school sat vacant. (Ref: Orange County Official Public Records, Number 309865)

One the date of 1/19/2012, Ruben Dorantes sold the property to a man named Terry T. White, Sr. on a general warranty deed. Since then the school has been sitting abandoned. No further use of this school has been recorded. Ref: Orange County Official Public Records, Number 381937)


The Cove school saw at least three buildings in its duration. One built in 1882, another one built in 1947, and the other 2 built in 1954.

Cove School is located at 1220 Dupont, Orange, Texas, US 77660.

Monday, November 19, 2018

Adams School of Beaumont, Texas to be demolished.

A Pre-Bid Conference was held on Wednesday, November 14, 2018 at 9:00 A.M at the Adams School in Beaumont, Texas. All bids were opened and publicly read by City Council Chambers. The Conference was in regards to the commercial asbestos abatement, demolition, and debris removal of the 3 structures of the Adams School. City Clerk Tina Broussard says closing date for this bid is Thursday, December 6, 2018.

The Adams School is going to be demolished soon. So it may be lights out for good on the old Adams School. The gymnasium will be demolished along with the school itself.

Commercial asbestos abatement will be performed before any of the demolition process occurs as the school building was built in 1930. Any debris left will be removed and salvaged from the property. It is unknown if Beaumont ISD or City Council Chambers will keep any salvage from the debris removal.

Adams School is located at 1250 Cedar Street, Beaumont, Texas, US 77701.

History of the Federal Building in Port Arthur, Texas.

For those who didn’t know, the locally well known “Federal Building” in Port Arthur, Texas is better known as US Post Office and Federal Building. What happened to the “Federal Building” in Port Arthur, Texas? Nobody exactly knows why or how this US Post Office building became abandoned and let it decay overtime. This news article will explain the history of the “Federal Building” in Port Arthur, Texas.


US Post Office and Federal Building was built in 1900 by Tom & Sons to serve as a post office for the public and government. James K. Taylor served as the architect. Its property is a 5,271 square foot lot. The basement was finished a year later in 1901. The construction period was from 1900 to 1903. Construction for this building was completed in 1903. This building housed government offices at point.

Historical significance of “Federal Building” is its Classical Revival architectural style. The design and construction stand out in notability the most. Its Classical Revival architecture was highly praised by NRHP officials.

US Post Office and Federal Building was admitted to the National Register of Historic Places on May 12, 1986 as #86001099. (Ref: https://nationalregisterofhistoricplaces.com/tx/jefferson/state.html)

The “Federal Building” was abandoned in 1994. Reasons why are unknown. The post office moved to a new location across town into a newer “state of the art” building.

According to a news article from Port Arthur News dating back to 2002, property of the US Post Office and Federal Building was in violation of Chapter 10 of Code of Ordinance of the CITY OF PORT ARTHUR. Excess grass, weeds, and/or brush was found growing on said property. (Ref: Port Arthur News, Page 30, Sunday, November 10, 2002)


On the date of 6/21/2008, the building was listed for sale by its owner on Zillow.com for an amount of $659,000 dollars, but later removed the building from real estate listings on the date of 3/23/2011. To set the record straight, the owner removed the building from real estate listings and not the realtor. The property has listed for sale many times over the years.

(Ref: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/500-Austin-Ave-Port-Arthur-TX-77640/2143939217_zpid/)
(Ref: https://www.loopnet.com/Property-Record/500-Austin-Avenue-Port-Arthur-TX-77640/JZH0xKi4w/Owner-Mortgage/)

On April 4, 2011 the property was put up for a minimum bid of $46,611.07 dollars in a NOTICE OF SALE listed inside The Examiner. On April 3, 2012, the property was listed yet again for bid inside The Examiner under “SHERIFF SALE April 3, 2002”. The minimum starting bid of $500 dollars and a current year value of $59,580. The property was sold to Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office later in 2012.

(Ref: The Examiner, Vol. 16, No. 6, April 21, 2011)
(Ref: The Examiner, Vol. 16, No. 52, March 15, 2012)

The property was resold to Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office again in 2013. In 2015, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office transferred and sold the property with all rights to a private owner. A private owner assumed full ownership and all rights of the property that year.

Today the building is now privately owned and still sits vacant & abandoned. No further use has been attempted or made.


The “Federal Building” aka US Post Office and Federal Building is located at 500 Austin Avenue, Port Arthur, Texas, US 77640. Its alternate address is 500 6th Street, Port Arthur, Texas, US 77640.