Showing posts with label history. Show all posts
Showing posts with label history. Show all posts

Sunday, April 15, 2018

History about the Del Valle Opportunity Center (Lamar School) revisited.

The Del Valle Opportunity Center (Lamar School also known as La Mar School and Lamar Elementary School) has been a pinnacle in community activities in Del Valle, Texas for years. It has shaped at-risk students and has turned them around to be positive contributing members of society. For instance offering extracurricular activities, vocational training, and therapy along with other classes. These students focus on graduating rather than the traditional school experience. The Del Valle Opportunity Center has operated as a K-12 campus.


In 1937, Del Valle Missionary Baptist Church sold 1 acre of land to the Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle Independent School District) to open the Lamar School. Lamar School was established as an elementary school for black students who lived in the Colorado Common School District in Del Valle, Texas. Lamar School would educate black students in grades 1 through 7. 8th grade was added later. From 1937 to 1968, Lamar School would operate as Lamar School Elementary from 1937 to 1968.

From 1937 to 1957, Lamar School operated as a two-room schoolhouse before expanding into a modernized school campus eventually relocating into an actual building. For 20 years, Lamar School operated in a one story two-room schoolhouse. From 1937 to 1969 is when Mr. Norma Miller was principal and teacher at that school. Mrs. Norma Miller was vice principal and teacher at that school.

In 1940, the church sold an additional 5 acres of land to the Colorado Common School District to open the Lamar School which would eventually become Lamar Elementary School. Lamar School was a negro school.


In 1957, the Lamar School relocated into an International style L-plan building. The two-room schoolhouse was demolished and cleared out to make way for additional portables for the school district. Several buildings were built across the 6 acre campus. Portables were added as additional buildings to the Del Valle Opportunity Center. The architect of the building was Arnold E. Whittmann.

Until 1968, Lamar School operated as a school for African American students residing in Del Valle and the surrounding areas. The school was desegregated in 1968. 100 students attended the school in 1969.


Lamar School would eventually become the Del Valle Opportunity Center in 1970. A few extra additional portables were constructed as well. Del Valle Opportunity Center would become a school for at-risk students overtime. Del Valle ISD Opportunity Center has also went under the name Del Valle ISD Opportunity Center.

The school has had its share of violence and other mishaps occur as similar situations occur in such school settings. For example, a 15 year old stabbed another student in 1992. Police were called to the scene of the crime and arrested those who were involved during an investigation.

The Del Valle Independent School District school board passed a bond on February 22, 2007 to relocate the Del Valle Opportunity Center to another new building. Expansion was to be opened approximately in 2010. The Del Valle ISD School Board called a May 12, 2007 bond election for $105,800,000 dollars. The new Del Valle Opportunity Center was part of the $105,800,000 package.

In 2010, the Del Valle Opportunity Center was relocated to the new location of Del Valle High School. The building mysteriously caught on fire in November 20, 2010. The cause of the fire was determined to be unknown. Del Valle Opportunity Center was all but abandoned by 2011. The school had been vandalized with graffiti for a couple of years. The International style L-plan building quickly fell into rural decay.

The Del Valle Opportunity Center was sold to a commercial owner who now has a real estate business located there. In 2016, the Lamar School was demolished by commercial owner. The demolition process was a quick and speedy process due to the International style L-plan building being one story.



Del Valle Opportunity Center has had a series of mysterious fires occur to the inside of the school building. Fires would always start inside a classroom. The origins of these fire would come up with no leads. The leads would come up as empty leads.

On the morning of October 22, 2007, Del Valle Opportunity Center suffered from a classroom fire before any students were present on campus. No students or staff were harmed. Del Valle Opportunity Center shut down for the day. All Del Valle Opportunity Center students were redirected to Ojeda Junior High School. Del Valle Opportunity Center continued to serve students at Ojeda Junior High School until Monday, October 29th. (Ref: News Radio KLBJ, Del Valle Fire Affects Opportunity Center)

District officials and fire officials never discovered any leads in the final report from the Travis County Fire Marshall regarding the official cause of the fire. Visual reports indicate that the fire was contained to one classroom only and does not appear to be caused by vandalism.


On November 20, 2010, Austin firefighters received a call around 4:50 PM. On Monday, November 20th that the Lamar School building was up in flames. Firefighters were able to control the blaze in just under an hour. FM 973 was shut down for an hour causing traffic delays near the airport. Austin firefighters worked endlessly to stop the fire. Fire officials were unsure what might have ignited the fire or what caused the fire but will continue investigations.

Battalion chief Thayer Smith stated, “The fire was confined to one end of the school building”. “Smoke was everywhere.”

On December 2, 2010, Austin firefighters received a call around 4:50 PM that the Lamar School building was up in flames. The fire its was contained to one classroom but had somehow later spread through the entire building. Fire officials later determined the cause of the fire was from faulty electrical wiring.

Del Valle Opportunity Center (Lamar School) was located at 3311 South FM 973, Del Valle, Texas, US.

History of former Del Valle Middle School in Del Valle, Texas revealed.

On the date of January 16, 1964, Edward Thomas Flow and Ruby Kieke Flow deeded land on a warranty deed to the Colorado Common School District (Now Del Valle ISD) for schools to be built on. New schools were much needed for the school district. Another building program was passed during the 1964-1965 school year and resulted in the construction of a new junior high school and a new middle school. 1965 is when Del Valle Middle School constructed. Del Valle Middle School opened in August 1965. Grades 6 through 8 were taught at this school.

Prior to 1965, Del Valle Middle School students and Del Valle Junior High School students were educated at the 1948 Popham School (Popham Elementary School) campus. Del Valle Junior High School shared the same building as Popham School prior to 1965.

Del Valle Middle School was built next to the then Del Valle Junior-Senior High School and had shared the same campus just less than a block away. Both schools shared the Panther Fieldhouse. Both schools shared the Cardinal Baseball Field.

In 1993 when Bergstrom Airforce Base closed due to military budget cuts, Del Valle Middle School was selected as one of the 5 schools to be relocated and demolished by the Airport Noise Mitigation Program. Airport Noise Mitigation Program was initiated by Austin Bergstrom International Airport. The Airport Noise Mitigation Program verified that Del Valle Middle School was located in the flight path of the ABIA Airport. The Airport Noise Mitigation Program required Del Valle ISD to relocate 5 to 6 of their then present schools alongside the Colorado River. These schools could not be sound proofed due to high maintenance costs and lack of funding. 

1996 is when the land of the 5 Del Valle ISD schools were sold to the US Government and City of Austin on a memorandum contract for grand total of $45.6 million dollars. Schools were being slowly relocated at that time.

By 1999, Bergstrom Airforce Base was converted into the now present day Austin Bergstrom International Airport (ABIA). Del Valle Middle School was demolished and relocated to the location of 5500 Ross Road in 2000. The district offices, a couple of maintenance sheds,  and Del Valle Panther Fieldhouse are the only remaining structures left of Del Valle Middle School.

Del Valle Middle School was located at 2404 Shapard Lane, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.

Sunday, April 8, 2018

Former Anson Jones School of Abilene, Texas said to be haunted.

Many urban explorers who enjoy the activity of urban exploration claim the former Anson Jones School building is haunted. Many claimed to hear voices behind closed doors. The swings move by themselves. Doors open without warning.
Over 100’s people have trespassed onto the school property within the past 4 years. Anson Jones School was an elementary school that was a 1-7 school which taught grades 1 through 7. Anson Jones School was known as Anson Jones Elementary School.

Anson Jones School was built in 1947 with renovations made in 1950. This school is located just south of I 20. The school building was built as a 36,207 square foot building on a land tract of 10.33 acres. In 1950, 3 extra classrooms were added.

In 1954, school zoning changes effected Anson Jones School. 7th grade students began attending North Park School. By then Anson Jones School was a 1-6 school. A $110,000 9-classroom addition was added to Anson Jones School in 1957.

Abilene Reporter-News reported that Anson Jones School had vandalized multiple times in the of 1962 with hundreds to thousands dollars worth of damage done. At one point in time, Anson Jones School became the Taylor County Learning Center. Taylor County Learning Center was a public school that served grades 5 through 12.

Sam Daggubati purchased the property in 2002. Property owner Sam Daggubati had plans to build an Indian Cultural Center at the location in 2007, but nothing happened. (A Hindu Indian Cultural Center.)

Today loopnet.com has the school listed for sale at the price of $1,500,000. The building is currently up for sale to any tenants interested in purchasing the property. The property has been up for sale for the past 5 years.

Anson Jones School (Anson Jones Elementary School) is located at 2002 Jameson Street, Abilene, Texas, US 79603.

Former Summit School of Amarillo, Texas said to be haunted.

Many urban explorers who enjoy the activity of urban exploration claim the former Summit School building is haunted. On September 29th, 2014, News Channel 10 reported about the school building that is now a church in a news article under the headlines of “Intruders seeking paranormal thrills from local church” and a news video. Over 100 people have trespassed onto the church property within the past 4 years. 10 incidents of theft have been reported as well.

Stories about the janitor killing some of the children and throwing them in the broiler are known to be true local citizens. The janitor had supposedly hung himself. His dead soul supposedly haunts the school property. Souls of children haunt the school as well. People say the swings will move by themselves.

Larry Townsend, Pastor of Summit Baptist Church, knew the school’s alleged history before purchasing it. The school building had sat vacant for almost 45 years prior to Pastor Larry Townsend purchasing the building. Larry Townsend and his wife worked tirelessly to restore the former Summit School building.

Summit School was built in 1927 with renovations made in 1935. The architect for the school was Guy A. Carlander. In 1935 Summit School became Summit Elementary School. The West Wing of the addition was added in 1953. The school closed in 1972. A voluntary desegregation plan that started during the 1972-1973 school year closed several schools in the North Heights neighborhood.

Summit School (Summit Elementary School) and Summit Baptist Church are located at South 2800 NW 9th Avenue, Amarillo, Texas, US 79106.

Friday, April 6, 2018

Former Brownsville ISD building found to be sitting unoccupied.

A former Brownsville ISD building was found by Michael Mixerr during real estate research on propertyshark.com. According to propertyshark.com, this two story building was built in 1940 with extended alterations made in 1945.

Over several years many businesses have leased this building. From the 1970s to the 1990s, Model Industrial Corporation, Model Laundry Dry Cleaning Co., Laundry Dry Cleaning Co., and Model Industrial Services Inc occupied this building. Today this building sits unoccupied. Nothing much else can be found out about the building.

The address is 314 West Elizabeth Street, Brownsville, Texas, US 78520.

Looking at small tidbits of Loving County, Texas history.

This news article will take a look back at some small tidbits of the history of Loving County, Texas.

Prehistorically the area of Loving County had many springs that supported drinkable water to wildlife and nomadic hunters. Antonio de Espejo was said to have visited the area in 1583 and crossed the Pecos River into present day Loving County.

From 1837 to 1874, the area of modern day Loving County was part of Bexar County. John Pope surveyed the area in 1854 for a railroad company and returned in the year of 1855 to start a camp in northwestern Loving County and establish artesian wells in the area, but the venture was unsuccessful and was abandoned in 1861. In 1874 it was separated from Bexar County and became a part of Tom Green County. Oil was discovered  Loving County in 1921.

Loving County is named for Oliver Loving who a cattle rancher and pioneer of the cattle drive. Oliver Loving, along with Charles Goodnight, developed the Goodnight-Loving Trail in the vicinity of the county.

Loving County is served by the Wink Independent School District. Mentone’s school district (Mentone ISD aka Mentone Independent School District) was closed and consolidated into Wink ISD in 1972 as student enrollment had fallen to just two pupils. Mentone had an elementary school until 1972.

Today as of 2018, Loving County has no other incorporated communities as its county seat and only community is Mentone.

Looking at small tidbits of history about Mentone School in Mentone, Texas.

Mentone established its own school in 1910 as Mentone School as a wooden schoolhouse which had sat on the banks of the Pecos River. However this structure was destroyed after the Pecos River Flood of 1930. The building was moved to Mentone in 1930.

In 1935, a new 1 story brick building was erected. High school classes were held in the brick building while elementary school classes were held in the wooden building. The wooden building (Mentone Elementary School) remained active until 1960.


The advancement in scholastic standing of (towards) the Mentone School was granted in 1937. The status of a first class, fully accredited high school had been granted to Mentone School in September 10, 1938. During the 1937-1938 school is when Mentone High School was established. (Ref: Mentone School Fully Accredited, Abilene Reporter-News, Page 17, September 11, 1938)

During the 1940s, Mentone School had 12 grades which were 1st grad through 12th grade. In 1952, the teacher-student ratio for Mentone School was 3:1. In 1960, Mentone Elementary School were moved to the 1935 brick building and the brick building became Mentone Elementary School and was no longer Mentone High School.

Sheriff McKinley Hopper was said to have been the last person to have graduated Mentone High School and Mentone School. His graduating class had around 7-9 people in 1959. In 1960, Mentone High School closed and elementary students were moved out of the old wooden building that would later become a church and now in the 1935 brick building. The old wooden building became a church and community center.


Throughout Mentone’s history, Mentone School was never a “district school” meaning that the town of Mentone never had its own school district. Instead Mentone School was operated by Pecos County Common School District (now Pecos-Barstow-Toyah ISD).

The Department of Health Education and Welfare ordered the county to either racially integrate Mentone School or lose its federal money in 1972. Loving County had no black residents had never received a dime's worth of federal school aid. Starting in 1972, 6th graders and above were bused to Wink, Texas to attend school.
(Ref: The Lost Frontier, Life Magazine, March 10, 1972)

Loving County's crime wave in 1972 consisted of a profitless burglary of the schoolhouse (Mentone School) and the theft of several rolls of steel cable from an oil lease. At the time, Mentone School was an elementary school that taught grades 1 through 5. 6th graders and above took almost 80 mile round-trips to Wink by bus on a daily basis. (Ref: The Lost Frontier, Life Magazine, March 10, 1972)

Mentone School was closed and consolidated into Wink ISD in 1972 due to low enrollment. Student enrollment had fallen to just 2 pupils. The Mentone School had 4 pupils and 2 teachers when it closed in 1972. At the time Mentone School closed, Mentone School was an elementary school that taught grades 1 through 5. Mentone had an elementary school until 1972. Mentone is now served by the Wink Independent School District (Wink ISD) along with Loving County. (Ref: TSHAO)

In 1978, Mentone School (Mentone High School) became a town hall for a short while until 1980. 1980 is when Mentone School had been converted into community center and post office.


Today the brick building for Mentone School (formerly Mentone High School) is now been converted a community center and post office. Today the old wooden building for Mentone School (Mentone Elementary School) is now a church and community center.

Mentone School is located at the intersection of Wheat Street & Pecos Street, Mentone, Texas, US 79754.

Visiting the history of Clarkwood School in Corpus Christi, Texas.

Clarkwood School is one of the many forgotten schools of Corpus Christi, Texas along with Nueces County. Not many people know of this school or its whereabouts. Clarkwood School operated from 1800 to 1988 in the town of Clarkwood, Texas which was later annexed by Corpus Christi, Texas.


According to zillow.com, Clarkwood School was built in the year of 1800. Clarkwood School was built at the location of 211 South Clarkwood Road, Corpus Christi, Texas, US 78406. Clarkwood School was built as a 1,070 square foot, 2 story building on a 0.95 (1 acre) lot. The 1,070 square foot building is located on a 41,382 square foot lot.

In 1800, Clarkwood School was established along with its own school district called Clarkwood Common School District (Clarkwood Common School District No. 20). The town of Clarkwood had its own school district called Clarkwood Common School District which would later become Clarkwood Independent School District (Clarkwood ISD). Clarkwood Common School District bordered the small settlement of Violet, Texas and their common school district.

From the beginning until its slow closing, Clarkwood School was a 1-8 school that educated grades 1 through 8 and never educated high school grades. Clarkwood Common School District had an arrangement with Robstown ISD for high school students to attend high school in Robstown, Texas. Clarkwood School was an elementary school that was also known as Clarkwood Elementary School.


The building was remodeled from being a single story building and was converted into a two story building in 1940. That was the first remodel of the Clarkwood School building in the 1940s decade. Clarkwood School was built on top.

Prior to 1940, Clarkwood School was a wooden building. The outside was painted red and the inside was painted brown. Asphalt tiles were donated from a local Baptist church and used to create flooring on the inside.


Corpus Christi Caller-Times reported that on November 30, 1954 that a new six-classroom building was completed for $70,000. The inside was paved with glazed brick asphalt tile. 4 out of the 6 classrooms were in use. Clarkwood Lions Club took over the old wooden school building on that date. The architect was Brock Anderson of Corpus Christi. (Ref: Corpus Christi Caller-Times, November 30, 1954)

From 1954 onto 1988 is when Clarkwood Lions Club would use the old Clarkwood School building on a lease agreement with Tuloso-Midway Independent School District and Nueces County Common School District. In between that time period is when Clarkwood Lions Club would use the old Clarkwood School building as a dance hall.

On Thursday, January 6, 1955, Clarkwood Lions Club moved its 87 foot long, 26 foot wide frame building onto the property according to Corpus Christi Caller-Times. (Ref: Corpus Christi Caller-Times, January 6, 1955)

On the date of April 3, 1955, residents living within boundaries of the Clarkwood Common School District voted to become an independent school district thus becoming Clarkwood Independent School District (Clarkwood ISD) (Ref: Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Page 1, April 3, 1955)
(Ref: Robstown Record, Page 8, April 3, 1952)


Corpus Christi Caller-Times reported that on April 23, 1956, Clarkwood School measured 6.5 inches (6½ inches) of rain by noon that very day. Reportedly the whole town of Clarkwood had several businesses that were flooded. (Ref: Corpus Christi Caller-Times, April 23, 1956)

According to a clipping from a short news article written in Corpus Christi Caller-Times from September 13, 1959, the old Clarkwood School building received a coat of red paint that turned it into a square dance barn that would eventually become a dance hall. (Ref: The Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Page 27, September 13, 1959)

Last remodel for Clarkwood School was made in the year of 1965 as reported by zillow.com. Two single story buildings were already built in the back of the original 1800 school building by 1965.

In February 1969, Clarkwood Independent School District (Clarkwood ISD) was absorbed and consolidated into Tuloso-Midway Independent School District. The official vote for consolidation was 98-10. Clarkwood School was then operated by Tuloso-Midway Independent School District from 1969 to 1988.


From 1970 to 1988 is when Tuloso-Midway Independent School District would continue to operate Clarkwood School as Clarkwood Elementary School. Clarkwood School closed in 1988 due to lack of state funding and local funding.

In 1988, Clarkwood Lions Club sold the old Clarkwood School building and the Clarkwood Elementary School buildings along with the property to a man name Feliburto B Yzaguirre. By 1989, Feliburto B Yzaguirre and 6 of his family members occupied the buildings.

According to zillow.com, Clarkwood School is now a single family home that serves as an apartment complex with 6 to 11 units. So far the apartment complex is made up of 11 units. In these 11 units are 16 people. Today the property is owned by Feliburto B Yzaguirre.


The location for Clarkwood School was and is 211 South Clarkwood Road, Corpus Christi, Texas, US 78406.

History of Chapman Ranch School not forgotten.

Chapman Ranch School was a school established for the community of Chapman Ranch, Texas located south of Corpus Christi, Texas. The school operated from 1912 to 1951. The community of Chapman, Texas operated 2 schools, an elementary school and a high school. The elementary school taught grades 1 through 6 and the high school taught grades 7 through 12. Chapman Ranch Elementary School was the elementary school and Chapman Ranch High School was the high school. There was no middle school or junior high.

Chapman Ranch School is one of the many forgotten schools of Corpus Christi, Texas along with Nueces County. Not many people know of this school or its whereabouts. This history of this school has been much forgotten overtime.


Chapman Ranch School was built as a three-room school building in 1912 to educate students in grades 1 through 6. Chapman Ranch School only taught grades 1 through 6. Middle school students/junior high school students, senior high school students, and high school students attended school in Corpus Christi.

By 1913, the school has a student population of 100. Christi Independent School District (Corpus Christi ISD) began overseeing Chapman Ranch School as a “county school” for which the school operated as prior to 1925. From 1912 to 1925 is when Nueces County Common School District operated Chapman Ranch School as a “county school” for Corpus Christi and Nueces County.


By 1920, the school had 200 students. However the school never reached a student population never reached 300 given the population size of Chapman Ranch. Eventually the school outgrew its facilities. During the mid-1920s, plans to construct two new school buildings were implemented. 

According to The Laws of Texas, 1921 [Volume 21], Texas State Board of Education (now TEA) established Santa Cruz Independent School District (Santa Cruz ISD) in the year of 1921. Chapman Ranch School was a part of Santa Cruz Independent School District (Santa Cruz Independent School District No. 6) before being consolidated into Corpus Christi Corpus Christi Independent School District (Corpus Christi ISD). Chapman Ranch School also had went under the name of Santa Cruz School. The school was also known as Santa Cruz School to Corpus Christi natives.

A new school was built in 1925 which still stands today. The 1925 building had 3 rooms. Eleven teachers provided instruction for both elementary school students and high school students. In 1925, a second school building was built to educate high school students in grades 9 through 12. From 1925 to 1950 is when Chapman Ranch School operated as a 1-12 school.

In 1925, a second school building was built and it would become Chapman Ranch High School. High school students were educated here. The Chapman Ranch High School was rated as first class by the Texas Board of Education and had been granted full affiliation.

According to Lubbock Morning Avalanche, Texas Board of Education rated Chapman Ranch High School as a first class school. (Ref: Lubbock Morning Avalanche, Page 14, December 8, 1928)

In 1928, a total of 250 students attended schools in Santa Cruz ISD. 50 students registered in the high school, 125 in the elementary school, and 75 in the “Mexican School” (Santa Cruz Mexican School), thus a total of 250 students altogether. (Ref: Lubbock Morning Avalanche, Page 14, December 8, 1928)


School segregation was part of school life in Chapman Ranch. Only white students attended Chapman Ranch School. However Hispanic students began attending the school in the 1940s. 10% percent of the student population was Hispanic with Mexican ancestry. Many Hispanic students had families in Mexico.

In 1949, school officials for the Chapman Ranch School faced a health charge. Restrooms were deemed unsanitary by state officials from Texas State Board of Education (now TEA). Sanitation issues plagued the school during the 1940s as it did across many rural schools in the state of Texas, the West Coast, and across the Southern United States.


In 1950 during the 1950-1951 school year, Chapman School went from being a 1-12 to a 1-6 again for the first time in 25 years. Chapman Ranch School once again became a school where grades 1 through 6 were educated. Student population for Chapman Ranch School downsized due to Gilmer-Aiken Law which also allowed students in certain grades to transfer to neighboring school distorts if their own school district did not have a high school, senior high school, or a middle school/junior high school let alone a school that held secondary school classes.

Chapman Ranch School and the Santa Cruz Independent School District had been annexed by the city of Corpus Christi in 1951. The school continued to operate in 1951 despite being annexed by the city of Corpus Christi.

According to a news article from The Corpus Christi Caller-Times dating back to May 15, 1955, Chapman Ranch School operated three classrooms for grades 1 through 7. Each brick building contained 6 rooms. Both school buildings downsized from 6 rooms in each building to 3 rooms in each building. However The Corpus Christi Caller-Times perfectly starts Chapman Ranch School maintained only three classrooms. 135 students in grades 1 through 7 attended Chapman Ranch School in 1955.

The 1st grade was the only grade in which one teacher was assigned exclusively to educate. Grades 2, 3, and 4 were housed in a second room and grades 5, 6, and 7 were housed in a third room. Paul Cohn was the teacher for grades 5 through 7. (Ref: The Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Page 21, May 15, 1955)

So sometime during the 1950s is when Chapman Ranch School went from being a 1-6 school to a one 1-7 school. Later on during the 1950s is when Chapman Ranch School became a 1-7 school. High school students no longer attended Chapman Ranch School. High school students attended school in Corpus Christi. School stopped after 7th grade. 8th grade was added back in 1956. However that lasted until 1960.

Paul Cohn was superintendent of Chapman Ranch School (head man) and teacher as well during the 1950s. His job was to teach students who came from 100% percent Spanish speaking families. He believed in developing a sense of responsibility in children. Paul Cohn said, “Somewhere along the line they have to stop being led and learn to do things for themselves,”

On Friday afternoons, upper grades devoted time to square dancing and interpretive dancing. Girls began typing lessons in the 5th grade. Boys learned how to perform industrial work in the 4th grade. Milk was 2 cents a gallon. All grades worked on skits.


In 1975, H.A. George became superintendent of the Santa Cruz Independent School District in the community of Chapman Ranch. He was the only male member on a six-person teaching staff. Most teachers were primarily female. Chapman Ranch School had 100 students attending classes.

According to a news article from Abilene Reporter-News dating back to December 10, 1977, a threat to cut off federal funds to three tiny South Texas school districts was made by the US Department of Education. Santa Cruz ISD gets 90 percent of its annual $130,000 budget from local taxes. The other 10 percent comes from the state. (Ref: Abilene Reporter-News, Page 21, December 10, 1977)

Chapman Ranch School and Santa Cruz ISD were consolidated into Corpus Christi Independent School District (Corpus Christi ISD) in 1981 and ceased operating. Chapman Ranch School closed in 1981. Chapman Ranch School had been closed down due to Gilmer-Aikin Law that had consolidated smaller school districts into neighboring larger school districts. Other reasons why this school was closed is due to lack of enrollment and increasing maintenance costs. Those are the many reasons why rural public schools in Texas close down.

At one point in 1982, Chapman Ranch School became a church. Various church services were held in the school buildings before they became abandoned in 2010.

Chapman Ranch School is located at 1046 CR 8B, Chapman Ranch, Texas, US 78347.

Willow City School history explained by Mixerr Reviews.

Willow City School is located west of the heart of Willow City, a small town in northeastern Gillespie County, Texas, 12 miles northeast of the county seat of Fredericksburg. Willow City School is located in Willow City, Texas, US.


The first Willow City School was built as a log cabin in located on the Paulus Flat area near the Willow Creek in the year of 1876. The school was a log cabin with no floor and had split long benches. The building was used for school and church services. Willow City School was established as a community school for the small city/town of Willow City, Texas. Willow City School was a 1-10 from the beginning. Prior to 1905, Willow City School was a “county school” operated by Gillespie County School District (now Fredericksburg ISD).

The building was enlarged in 1881. Willow City had two teachers educating students at Willow City School as early as 1881. One who was Mr. John Warren Hunter. Mr. John Warren Hunter once had to wrestle a six-gun away from an angry student. An argument led to this incident.

In 1890, the original Willow City School building was heavily damaged by a flood. The original school building flooded away. The school building was damaged beyond repair and could no longer be used. A new school building was constructed on higher ground during the 1890-1891 school semester. Willow City School has been a center of social activity for Willow City since 1890.


Willow City School was rebuilt on even higher ground as a two-story sandstone schoolhouse building on a rectangular-plan in the year of 1905 now located on 5 acres of land designated as a school site. 4 buildings were built between 1905 and 1955. A barbecue pit shelter was built in 1905. The present building was the third school building for Willow City School. The present building stands today.

Willow City School had its own school district called Willow City Independent School District organized in 1905. Willow City School was no longer a “county school” operated by Gillespie County School District (now Fredericksburg ISD).

By the 1950s’, Willow City School became a 1-8 school. 9th grade students now started attending Fredericksburg High School in Fredericksburg, Texas. Willow City School was no longer the 1-10 school that taught grades 1 through 10.

Willow City School consolidated with Fredericksburg Independent School District (Fredericksburg ISD) in 1961. Students now travel to Fredericksburg for classes in schools operated by Fredericksburg ISD. Willow City Community Club was organized on May 12, 1961. The property was managed and organized by Willow City Community Club prior to 1999.


On April 19, 1999, the Friends of Gillespie County Country Schools was established and Willow City School became a member of the organization. Today Willow City School is a member of Friends of Gillespie County Country Schools (Friends of Gillespie County Schools). The Friends of Gillespie County Country Schools group works toward preservation of country school buildings, located in Gillespie County, that still are in existence. The Willow City School building and property is now owned by Gillespie County and Friends of Gillespie County Country Schools.

Today Willow City School operates as the Willow City Community Center. Willow City School represents a literal view of rural life from the late 19th century and early 20th century. Little alteration has happened to the building since the school was closed in 1961. This school building remains as a historic landmark.


Willow City School is located at 2501 RR 1323, Fredericksburg, Texas, US 78675. The other address for Willow City School is 2501 RR 1323, Willow City, Texas, US 78675.

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

St. Mary Missionary Baptist Church history nearly long forgotten.

St. Mary’s Missionary Baptist Church is one of the many forgotten religious institutions and churches of Pflugerville, Texas as well as the Austin/Travis County area. Only historians and long time residents of Pflugerville know about this religious institution.

St. Mary’s Missionary Baptist Church was organized in 1902 inside the small town of Pflugerville, Texas. St. Mary’s Church was located at Caldwell Lane west of Pflugerville. This church building was constructed out of native stone and red brick. The church congregation met weekly on Saturdays and Sundays. Several Baptist congregations of Travis County have met here over the years. In 1922, the church received improvements and renovations.

St. Mary’s Missionary Baptist Church shared a cemetery with St. Matthew’s Missionary Baptist Church. Some graves date back to the 1930s. Many graves appear to be unmarked. However 40 burials have been identified by the Austin Genealogical Society.

St. Mary’s Missionary Baptist Church closed in 1973 and the St. Mary’s Missionary Baptist Church structure no longer remains as the structure has been long demolished. Lack of membership led to the church closing.

St. Mary’s Missionary Baptist Church was located at Caldwell Lane, Pflugerville, Texas, US 78660.

Falls Creek School History of Marble Falls, Texas not forgotten.

Falls Creek School started out as a school in 1886 near the Blanco County line located in Southwest Travis County at the intersection of Hamilton Pool Road & FM 12. School was taught in a single one room log cabin. For the first 2 years is when Falls Creek School operated as a county school for Travis County Common School District. Falls Creek School also was known as Fall Creek School.

In 1888, Falls Creek School District No. 55 was established. Falls Cree School District bordered the county lines of Blanco County and Burnet County. Students from Bee Cave, Dripping Springs, Hamilton Pool, and Cedar Valley attended this school.

For the latter half of the late 19th century, only grades 1 through 8 were taught at this school. Grades 9 through 12 were added later. The school became a 1-9 school in the 1890s. Eventually Falls Creek School upgraded from a log cabin to a white frame box building that was one story.

1941 is when Falls Creek School consolidated into Marble Falls ISD and the school district was abolished. The other half of the school district consolidated into Johnson City ISD in 1942 during the 1941-1942 school year. Falls Creek School stopped appearing on maps by 1942. By 1942 the school was gone.

Falls Creek School was located at the intersection of Hamilton Pool Road (FM 3238) & FM 12, Dripping Springs, Texas, US 78620.

Ridgetop School history of Austin, Texas not forgotten.

Ridgetop School was established in 1908 as an elementary school that had served grades 1 through 6 and was established at the location of 5005 Caswell Avenue in Austin, Texas. Ridgetop School had its own school district called Ridgetop School District that was operated by Austin Public School (now Austin ISD) for Austin/Travis County from 1908 to 1950.

Ridgetop School was built as a hexagon shaped building in the year of 1908. This hexagon shaped building was two stories tall and had at least 3 chimneys. The school had 4 rooms at first and was later expanded to have 7 rooms to accommodate a growing student population. 1 outhouse served the entire school. During the 1908-1909 school year, students in grades 5 and 6 were all taught and educated in one room. Students in grades 5 and 6 were all taught and educated in one room with students in lower grades until 1910.

Grades 5 and 6 were no longer taught in a one room setting by 1910. Classes for grades 5 and 6 were held in seperate rooms. One room educated 5th grade and one room educated 6th grade. By 1910, Ridgetop School received maintenance remodels to the school building to accommodate a then growing student population.

1 outhouse served the entire school which later expanded to 2 outhouses by 1920. In 1920 the Ridgetop School had 3 outhouses. A fourth chimney was added to the school in 1929.

The school grew to have 50 students by 1930. Although Ridgetop School boasted an attendance roster of 50 students for the whole student population of Ridgetop School, the daily attendance on average was 30-40 students a day. Ridgetop School was a 1-6 school in 1930. The fourth chimney was renovated for the school in 1930. Ridgetop School received maintenance upgrades and building remodels to the school building to accommodate a then growing student population in the year of 1930.


This school would eventually serve grades 1 through 7 by the mid-20th century. Although Ridgetop School taught 7th grade, school stopped after 6th grade. 7th grade students transferred to Austin ISD and attended school at Allan Junior High School, University Junior High School, Baker Junior High School (Baker School), Burnet Middle School, Lanier Junior High School (Lanier Junior/Senior High School which is now Lanier High School), or Lamar Middle School. However most 7th grade students from Ridgetop School attended Allan Junior High School, University Junior High School, Burnet Middle School, or Lamar Middle School.


During the year of 1948 is when the old Ridgetop School building was demolished and a newer building was built in its place which still stands today. This modern school building was built as a 1 story building. The outhouses were filled with dirt from a local quarry. Ridgetop School District was consolidated into Austin ISD in 1950. In 1950 during the 1950-1951 school is when the school building had gotten more improvements made. The school now had a full functioning plumbing system.

In 1980, AISD officials announced plans to reorganize Ridgetop School into an alternative school that would serve students with multiple handicaps. However plans were shot down due to parental opposition. Ridgetop School became a 1-5 school in 1980.

Today Ridgetop School is a K-5 school. The school no longer educates 6th grade students. Ridgetop School is located at 5005 Caswell Avenue, Austin, Texas, US 78751.

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Saragosa School history of Saragosa, Texas not forgotten.

Saragosa School opened as an elementary school for students in grades 1 through 6 in the small community of Saragosa, Texas in the year of 1898 during the latter end of late 19th century. One teacher taught 20 students at Saragosa School in a two-room building. From 1898 to 1900, Saragosa School was a “county school” operated by the Pecos County Common School District (now Pecos-Barstow-Toyah ISD).

Beginning in the 20th century, the town of Saragosa created its own school district called Saragosa School District which served the town of Saragosa and Verhalen altogether. Saragosa School was part of the Saragosa School District beginning in 1900 during the 1900–1901 school semester. During the 1900–1901 school semester, Saragosa had operated three school districts, one for the town itself, one for Coyanosa, and one for Verhalen, all of which were one teacher schools.

In order to obtain water, Saragosa School had a well that connected to Saragosa Springs. A well for Saragosa School was dug in 1900 at an underground elevation of 100 feet. The well was later extended to 150 feet.


In 1938, Saragosa School District was consolidated into Pecos ISD (now Pecos-Barstow-Toyah ISD) due to low enrollment. Less than 100 students were attending Saragosa School during its consolidation into Pecos ISD. However Pecos ISD continued to operate the school under its jurisdiction despite school district consolidation. 60 students attended classes on a daily basis at average.

"We even added a seventh grade at one time to encourage kids to stay in school.” Former Pecos-Barstow-Toyah ISD assistant administrator David Dutchover recalls. (Ref: The Big Bend Sentinel Marfa, Texas,  VOL. 58.  NO. 17,  JULY 18, 1991)

Sometime during the 20th century is when Saragosa School went from being a 1-6 school to a 1-7 school which taught students in grades 1 through 7. Saragosa School never went past 7th grade, So junior high school students had to attend junior high school/middle school in Pecos, Texas. Junior high school students would attend the schools in Pecos ISD (now Pecos-Barstow-Toyah ISD). There was no high school for Saragosa. So students had to transfer into Pecos to continue high school in order to complete their high school education.

Pecos County Common School District started an adult education program for adults who needed to learn how to read and write. Former Pecos-Barstow-Toyah ISD assistant administrator David Dutchover supervised that program for several years. This adult education program started on a volunteer basis but was later funded by state funding and local funding.


By 1952 Saragosa School was predominantly Hispanic. It was now known as a “Mexican School”. Over 80% of the student population was Hispanic with Mexican heritage. By the 1953-1954 school year, over 90% of the student population was Hispanic.

Two rooms were added to Saragosa School in 1957 making the building a 5 room building. Saragosa School changed its name to Saragosa Elementary School in 1964.

According to an article from The Big Bend Sentinel dating back to July 18, 1991, Saragosa School was a “first through sixth grade facility”. This “first through sixth grade facility” had as many as 150 students. (Ref: The Big Bend Sentinel Marfa, Texas,  VOL. 58.  NO. 17,  JULY 18, 1991)

So Saragosa School had as many as 150 students but never reached closed to 200 students. So building capacity for Saragosa School would have been 160 students. The school was not built to accommodate 200 students. 

The days for Saragosa School were numbered as the school would eventually close down. Saragosa Elementary School closed in 1968 due to low enrollment and its students would attend classes at South Pecos Elementary School. Less than 50 students were enrolled during its closure.


Saragosa School was converted and renovated into a community center in 1987 after a devastating tornado damaged buildings and killed many people in the area. Renovations took a year to complete. By 1988, renovations to the community center were complete.

On July 10, 1987, Pecos-Barstow-Toyah ISD agreed to lease the Saragosa School land as a community center to the town of Saragosa, Texas. The building is currently on a 50-year lease as a community center. (Ref: School board agrees to loan Saragosa land, Karen Oglesby, PECOS, JULY 10, 1987)

1995 is when Saragosa School became a full functioning community center. Head Start began holding programs there during the 1995-1996 school year. Head Start was a previously unavailable program needed in Saragosa.

Today Saragosa School is home to Saragosa Head Start and is now a community center as well. Saragosa School is located at 204 West Main Street, Saragosa, Texas, US 79780.

Bryker Woods School history of Austin, Texas nearly forgotten.

Bryker Woods School was established and built as an elementary school at the location of 3309 Kerbey Lane in Austin, Texas in the year of 1939 as part of the Federal Emergency Relief Administration (WPA program). The Bryker Woods School building is a WPA building. Grades 1 through 6 were taught in this school with state mandated classes such as reading, English, arithmetics, science, and art.

Bryker Woods School had its own school district called Bryker Woods School District which had operated from 1939 to 1963. The Bryker Woods School was in the Bryker Woods School District.

After 6th grade, students were bused to Austin ISD schools to attend middle school/junior high school at Allan Junior High School, University Junior High School, Baker School (both Baker Elementary School and Baker Junior High School) or O. Henry Middle School. Some students went to finish school at Webb Elementary School and Webb Middle School.

Austin ISD charged Bryker Woods School District tuition fees to pay for its elementary school students, middle school students/junior high school students and high school students to attend their schools by a contract. Many Austin ISD elementary schools had their own school districts before consolidating into Austin ISD. Such as Govalle School for Govalle School District, Pecan Springs School for Pecan Springs School District, Fiskville School for Fiskville Common School District (Fiskville School District), and Ridgetop School for Ridgetop School District for instance.


On the date of Sunday, June 19, 1955 a Boy Scouts hut was built on the Bryker Woods School grounds. This Boy Scouts hut was built by a group of fathers and son residing in the Bryker Woods School District. The hut was built at an estimate of approximately $2,000. Arnold Wieland drew up blueprints and materials for the hut were obtained at reduced prices. Trade unions in the city had kindly donated their services. (Ref.: Austin Statesman Father's Day feature on Sunday, June 19, 1955)

1963 is when Bryker Woods School was consolidated into Austin ISD and Bryker Woods School District was abolished. It was after legislative reform and education reform mandated by the State of Texas that consolidated or dissolved several school districts across the state in August 1963. Through legislative reform and education reform, the State of Texas renamed many school districts from “common school districts” (CSD) to “independent school districts” (ISD).

The school was remodeled again in 1986. Bryker Woods School was enlarged by adding additional classrooms and adding office space. Restrooms were made handicap accessible as they were previously not before.


On the date of February 7, 2015, Bryker Woods Elementary School celebrated its 75th anniversary. The Open House event at Bryker Woods Elementary School celebrating its 75th anniversary lasted from 6 pm to 8 pm.

Today Bryker Woods Elementary School is a now a full functioning school operating as a PK-6 school (Pre-K-6 school). Bryker Woods Elementary School is a now 5A school in the state of Texas. A proud accomplishment for Austin ISD as well as the school. Bryker Woods Elementary School is one of the few AISD elementary schools that goes up to the 6th grade program as most other AISD elementary schools end at the 5th grade. 33% of students attend on a transfer basis.


Bryker Woods Elementary School is located at 3309 Kerbey Lane, Austin, Texas, US 78703.

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

History of Blue Bluff Church and Blue Bluff School of Austin, Texas forgotten.

Blue Bluff Church is one of the many forgotten churches of Austin and Travis County. Not many people know about the Blue Bluff Church of Austin, Texas. This news article will explain the in-depth history of Blue Bluff Church.


Blue Bluff Church started as a small two-room church building in 1876 located at 11019 FM 969. This small two-room church building was constructed using brick and wood. A third room was constructed using wood in 1877. The church called Blue Bluff Church was an African American church.

Overtime the small church became a renown church to the Decker community and City of Austin. Capacity for this church grew from 20 to 40 attendees by 1880. By late 1880, 2 wells were dug to retrieve water from the Colorado River.

In 1900, Blue Bluff Church became known as an established church for the Decker community. The name “Blue Bluff Church” started appearing on city and county maps by 1900 and as “Blue Bluff Ch.”. 1959 is the year when Blue Bluff Church was renamed to Rockquarry Missionary Baptist Church.

The church building was remodeled in 2009. A new one story brick built was built on the same site at the exact same position. Walls to the front and back were constructed out of red brick. New windows were brought in.

Today the Blue Bluff Chapel is now operating under the name Rockquarry Missionary Baptist Church for which the church has been since 1959.

Blue Bluff Church is located at 11019 FM 969, Austin, Texas, US 78725.


Blue Bluff Church was located at the same location of Rockquarry Missionary Baptist Church on FM 969 as shown on the 1971 USGS topographical map of that area. Blue Bluff Church on city and county maps is labeled instead as “Blue Bluff Ch.” such as cited on the 1956 USGS topographical map of East Austin Quadrangle and the 1971 USGS topographical map of East Austin Quadrangle.

This may, however, be a labeling error on part of the USGS surveyors who surveyed and laid out the map. Rockquarry Missionary Baptist Church has been extant at that location since at least 1919. Blue Bluff Church is located where Rockquarry Missionary Baptist Church is today on the 1971 USGS topographical map of that area.

Despite being known as Rockquarry Missionary Baptist Church, USGS surveyors refereed to the church building as “Blue Bluff Ch.” on the 1971 USGS topographical map of East Austin Quadrangle, the 1987 USGS topographical map of East Austin Quadrangle, and the 1994 USGS topographical map of East Austin Quadrangle



As for Blue Bluff School…

In 1885, a wooden school building called Blue Bluff School was built for Blue Bluff Church to become a private school located in a separate building at the corner of FM 969 & Blue Bluff Road which was operated by Blue Bluff Church. The Blue Bluff School educated students in grades 1 through 7. Middle school grades 6 and 7 were included by 1886.

Blue Bluff School was a private school considered by the Decker community to be a religious school. The Blue Bluff School was a church school indeed. Blue Bluff Church owned the Blue Bluff School.

By 1898, this school would become a public school during weekdays (Monday through Friday) for the Decker School District (of what is now Manor ISD) and a private school on weekends. Church services and religious ceremonies were held in the school building on weekends.

In 1900, Manor ISD oversaw allocating funds for the school. The school was a public school by 1900 officially on city and county maps. Blue Bluff School operated as a public school at one point for the Decker School District from 1898 to 1941. Blue Bluff School had educated students in grades 1 through 6.

During the year of 1901 is when Blue Bluff School stopped educating 7th grade students. 7th grade was dropped for the Blue Bluff School and students in 7th grade now had to transfer to Manor ISD or Austin ISD to attend school. However most 7th grade students transferred to Manor ISD to attend schools in Manor, Texas. Most if not all 7th grade students were bussed to Manor Junior High School (now Manor Middle School) in Manor, Texas.

Blue Bluff School was consolidated into Manor ISD in 1941 along with the Decker School in the Decker School District. By 1943, Blue Bluff School closed and the property reverted back to Blue Bluff Church. The school was demolished shortly thereafter. 

History of Blue Bluff Church of Austin, Texas forgotten.

Blue Bluff Church is one of the many forgotten churches of Austin and Travis County. Not many people know about the Blue Bluff Church of Austin, Texas. This news article will explain the in-depth history of Blue Bluff Church.


Blue Bluff Church started as a small two-room church building in 1876 located at 11019 FM 969. This small two-room church building was constructed using brick and wood. A third room was constructed using wood in 1877. The church called Blue Bluff Church was an African American church.

Overtime the small church became a renown church to the Decker community and City of Austin. Capacity for this church grew from 20 to 40 attendees by 1880. By late 1880, 2 wells were dug to retrieve water from the Colorado River.

In 1900, Blue Bluff Church became known as an established church for the Decker community. The name “Blue Bluff Church” started appearing on city and county maps by 1900 and as “Blue Bluff Ch.”. 1959 is the year when Blue Bluff Church was renamed to Rockquarry Missionary Baptist Church.

The church building was remodeled in 2009. A new one story brick built was built on the same site at the exact same position. Walls to the front and back were constructed out of red brick. New windows were brought in.

Today the Blue Bluff Chapel is now operating under the name Rockquarry Missionary Baptist Church for which the church has been since 1959.

Blue Bluff Church is located at 11019 FM 969, Austin, Texas, US 78725.


Blue Bluff Church was located at the same location of Rockquarry Missionary Baptist Church on FM 969 as shown on the 1971 USGS topographical map of that area. Blue Bluff Church on city and county maps is labeled instead as “Blue Bluff Ch.” such as cited on the 1956 USGS topographical map of East Austin Quadrangle and the 1971 USGS topographical map of East Austin Quadrangle.

This may, however, be a labeling error on part of the USGS surveyors who surveyed and laid out the map. Rockquarry Missionary Baptist Church has been extant at that location since at least 1919. Blue Bluff Church is located where Rockquarry Missionary Baptist Church is today on the 1971 USGS topographical map of that area.

Despite being known as Rockquarry Missionary Baptist Church, USGS surveyors refereed to the church building as “Blue Bluff Ch.” on the 1971 USGS topographical map of East Austin Quadrangle, the 1987 USGS topographical map of East Austin Quadrangle, and the 1994 USGS topographical map of East Austin Quadrangle

Govalle School history of Austin, Texas nearly forgotten.

Govalle School is a 143 year old elementary school operating out of in Austin, Texas. Grades K through 6 are taught at this school. This news article will explain the history of Govalle School and its school district.


Govalle School was established in 1870 at the location of Webberville Road  in Austin, Texas. The Govalle School was located between Boggy Creek and the railroad. At first, Govalle School operated out of a log cabin that was a one-room schoolhouse. The log cabin was constructed using cedar logs and oak. At first grades 1 through 6 were taught in this one-room log cabin. Eventually Govalle School expanded to add high school grades later on.

From 1870 to 1911 is when Govalle School operated out of a log cabin that was a one-room schoolhouse. Grades 1 through 6 were taught in this one-room log cabin with 2 teachers holding state mandated classes such as reading, English, arithmetics, science, and art. Grades 5 and 6 were held in separate rooms.

Govalle School had its own school district called Govalle School District from 1870 to 1963. Govalle School District was also known as Govalle Common School District No. 18 or Govalle ISD.

1891 is the year when Govalle School became a “county school”. Travis County Public Schools (aka Travis County Common School District) began overseeing Govalle School by monitoring funds and hiring teachers. Travis County Public Schools saw to it that Govalle School received both state funding and local funding. By 1895, Govalle School became an accredited school by the State of Texas.

In 1911, the one-room log cabin was demolished and a newer three-room schoolhouse was built to replace the one-room schoolhouse. By 1915 a fourth room was added. In 1916 a fifth room was added to the additional wing. Sometime in the 20th century is when Govalle School was rebuilt into an L-shape plan building.

Historically Govalle School had a high Hispanic student population. The Govalle School had a 75% percent Hispanic student population although white students attended there. The Govalle School became a “Mexican School” before World War I.


High school grades were added to the Govalle School in 1922. Govalle School District had a high school called Govalle High School that operated from 1922 to sometime in the 1940s. Govalle High School operated on the same campus as Govalle Elementary School. Initially high school stopped at grade 10.

By 1925, Govalle School District had 10 grades enrolled for the Govalle School. Grade 11 was added later. By the 1925-1926 school year Govalle High School became an accredited high school.

By 1935, Govalle School District encompassed deep East Austin to the MK Pacific Railroad next to FM 969 (Webberville Road). The school district boundaries reached north to FM 969. This school district encompassed 5 to 6 miles.

In the mid 1940s, Austin ISD began overseeing Govalle School. Sometime in the mid 1940s is when Govalle High School was discontinued leaving its middle school students and high school students to continue education at Austin ISD schools. Govalle School was primarily an elementary school by then.  Sometime in the mid 1940s is when Govalle School District dropped its high school grades from Govalle School. So Govalle School went from being a 1-10 school to a 1-7 school.

Govalle School had undergone a series of landscape renovations in December 1946. The playground and soccer field were repaved. New grass was brought in. New dirt was brought in from Armadillo Clay.

In 1947, Govalle School was renovated to its current building plan seen today. From 1947 to 1949, Govalle School had received a series of building renovations. Several classrooms and additional wings were added to the school building.

Austin ISD charged Govalle School District tuition fees to pay for its elementary school students, middle school students/junior high school students and high school students to attend their schools by a contract. Many Austin ISD elementary schools had their own school districts before consolidating into Austin ISD. Such as Bryker Woods School for Bryker Woods School District, Pecan Springs School for Pecan Springs School District, Fiskville School for Fiskville Common School District (Fiskville School District), and Ridgetop School for Ridgetop School District for instance.


In 1949, school buses served only those students in the 7th grade from the Govalle School in the Govalle School District to University Junior High School and only those in the 5th and 6th grades from St. Elmo School (now St. Elmo Elementary School) to Fulmore Junior High School (now Fulmore Middle School). Despite 6th grade students from St. Elmo School being bussed to Fulmore Junior High School, 6th grade students still attended University Junior High School.

School bus service to Austin High School, Austin Senior High School, Allan High School, and Allan Junior High School was eliminated along with service for junior high school students and senior high school students for the following school districts: Govalle School District, St. Elmo School District, Rosedale School District, and Esperanza Common School District. School bus service for Negro students continued in operation on the same schedule used that year.

1949 is when Austin ISD began bussing 6th grade students and 7th grade students from Govalle School in the Govalle School District and St. Elmo School to University Junior High School. University Junior High School began accepting students from both Govalle School and St. Elmo School.


1963 is when Govalle School and Govalle School District were consolidated into Austin ISD. It was after legislative reform and education reform mandated by the State of Texas that consolidated or dissolved several school districts across the state in August 1963. This was the year through legislative reform and education reform, the State of Texas renamed many school districts from “common school districts” (CSD) to “independent school districts” (ISD).

Govalle School consolidated into Austin ISD in 1963. Govalle School taught 7 grades when Austin ISD consolidated their school district. Grades 6 and 7 were kept as originally planned by Austin ISD. This left Govalle School permanently as an elementary school.

Student population for Govalle School in 1966 was 60% Hispanic and 20% White. No black students attended this school. After 1966, the Hispanic student population for Govalle School grew even further.

Govalle School became Govalle Elementary School in 1970. 7th grade was kept and Govalle School was a 1-7 school by then. Students enrolled in grades 6 and 7 had classes held in different classrooms away from the K-6 students. Plans to integrate Govalle Elementary School were announced by the school board in 1970. Integration went smoothly despite parental opposition and pressure.

In 1971, Govalle Elementary School became racially integrated. Black students were now allowed to attend Govalle Elementary School as previously they were not allowed before. African American students compromised 2% of the population.

On the date of 5/6/1980, six elementary school students were injured when a car was driven by 17 year old Mariano Garcia had crashed into the school library. The brakes had failed before hitting Govalle Elementary School.


Today Govalle School operates as Govalle Elementary School which is now a K-5 school. Govalle Elementary School is a 4A school with its student population being over 85% percent Hispanic. Many students come from low income families however.

Govalle School is located at 3601 Govalle Avenue, Austin, Texas, US 78702.

Sandy Creek School history of Leander, Texas forgotten.

Sandy Creek School is one of the many forgotten schools and educational institutions of Austin, Travis County, and Leander. Many Austinites never knew this school even ever existed at one point in time. This news article will try its best to reflect accurately about the history of Sandy Creek School.

Sandy Creek School was built in 1870 as a log cabin that would serve as a one-room school house for the Round Mountain School District (School District No. 3). It was started in a log cabin on land donated by Jesse Smith and J. R. Faubion in the 1870s. Sandy Creek School was built 8 miles south of Leander near the Travis County line - Williamson County line as the building was said to be located on Sandy Creek and Liberty Hill Road (now FM 2243).

The Sandy Creek School served students in grades 1 through 8 as Round Mountain School did. After 8th grade is when students transferred to Leander High School in Leander, Texas. The school never held Kindergarden classes.

Students in grades 1st through 5th had geography, language, reading, writing, and arithmetic. 5th grade students learned history. History was the most important subject for 5th graders of the Sandy Creek School and Round Mountain School. Eighth grade students learned algebra, English and Spanish.

The two schools in the Round Mountian School District writing were taught by Ms. Thelma Jones Faubion. Terms of the one-teacher school was six months a year at a salary of $65 a month. Drinking water was retrieved by teachers and students at nearby creeks called Sandy Creek and Long Hollow. All students and teachers walked several miles to school. There was no transportation.


According to The Austin Weekly Statesman (Now Austin American-Statesman), the Sandy Creek School goes back to at least 1875 and is called or referred to as “Sandy Creek Schoolhouse”. [Ref.: The Austin Weekly Statesman, December 16, 1875.]

In 1939 during the 1938-1939 school year is when a water well and added a new hand pump were installed by WPA workers. By 1939 the water well and new hand pump were fully functioning. Two teachers at each of the schools located in the Round Mountain School District. However by 1940 the water well was reported to fail during droughts.

In 1942, Sandy Creek School consolidated into Round Mountain School. After consolidating into Round Mountain School and after being consolidated into Leander ISD, most of the Sandy Creek School building was demolished. The other portion turned into an additional building for the school district. By 1942, Sandy Creek School stopped appearing on Travis County maps.

During the 1940's, Leander ISD school boundaries were extended to include the Round Mountain community. In conclusion, the students whom had attended Round Mountain School and Sandy Creek School were transferred to Leander ISD.


In 1973, Appellees (trustees) brought this suit against the members of Round Mountain community and sought to have determined the validity of a charitable trust at the Court of Civil Appeals of Texas, Austin. Appellees were E. M. Fulkes, Jr., Rosco Faubion, R. Morris Faubion and Ed M. Faubion.

As cited from the ROUND MOUNTAIN COMMUNITY et al., Appellants, v. E. M. FULKES, Jr., et al., Appellees lawsuit No. 12087 from Court of Civil Appeals of Texas, Austin on November 7, 1973 501 S.W.2d 474 (1973).

“By warranty deed dated January 19, 1900, J. A. Faubion and his wife conveyed certain real property in the Round Mountain Community to T. T. Hamilton, J. A. Smith, and D. Landy, "Trustees of the Round Mountain Community and their successors in officer for the sole use and benefit of said community." Members of the Round Mountain Community used this property as a schoolhouse for their children. During the 1940's, Leander School District was extended to include the Round Mountain Community Area. Thereafter, the children who had attended the Round Mountain School were transferred to the Leander School District. Since that time, and to the date of hearing in this case, Round Mountain Community has used the trust property for community functions, socials, and meetings for the various clubs in the area.”

So that means both Round Mountain School and Sandy Creek School both served as community centers that held community functions, social gatherings, and meetings for various clubs in that area.


Today a portion of the Sandy Creek School is now located at 14340 Round Mountain Road, Leander, Texas, US 78641 where Round Mountain School is. The Sandy Creek School building has now merged into Round Mountain School which is now Round Mountain Community Center.

Sandy Creek School was located at the intersection of Round Mountain Road & FM 2243, Leander, Texas, US 78641.

Williamson Creek School history of Austin, Texas forgotten.

Williamson Creek School is one of the many forgotten educational institutions of Austin/Travis County that have faded away with time. Williamson Creek School is one of the many rural schools of Texas that have been forgotten.

In 1901 during the 1900-1901 school term, a log cabin was constructed to be the building for Williamson Creek School on modern day South Congress Avenue less than south of St. Elmo Road. Williamson Creek School was a “negro school” serving African American students in grades 1 through 11. These students lived in South Austin and the St. Elmo neighborhood. Another extra room with an equipped blackboard was added in 1908 during the 1908-1909 school term.

H. Bell was the superintendent for Williamson Creek School. The Travis County Schools Superintendent was responsible for seeing that rural schools got financial funds from the state. H. Bell was a county school superintendent. The Williamson Creek School had been a part of the St. Elmo School District from the beginning until 1937 when the St. Elmo School District was consolidated into Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD).

Sometime in 1931 during the 1930-1931 school term is when Williamson Creek School became a 1-8 school only teaching grades 1 through 8. Students went LC Anderson High School to complete their high school education. In 1937 the school was consolidated into Austin ISD and students started Pleasant Hill School (Pleasant Hill Negro School) after plans to close Williamson Creek School by 1941 were announced. 1941 is when Williamson Creek School closed.

The whereabouts of the Williamson Creek School as to if the building was demolished or converted into a private residence is unknown. It is presently unknown if the school building for Williamson Creek School was demolished. What is known is that the school does not show up on the 1942 highway map for Travis County. That means the school had closed down by then.

Williamson Creek School could have been located on the 4600 block or 4700 block of South 1st Street hence the given name for this school. Based off a 1898 Travis County map, the Williamson Creek School was located at 4621 South 1st Street. However no wooden foundation or concrete foundation indicate the school existing at this location despite the school being shown to have been located on the right side of South 1st Street on the 1898 Travis County map.

Williamson Creek School was located at 4621 South 1st Street, Austin, Texas, US 78745.