Showing posts with label history. Show all posts
Showing posts with label history. Show all posts

Saturday, August 12, 2017

US President Donald Trump to declare war on Korea.

It’s official! As of August 10, 2017, Donald Trump has declared war on Korea. Donald Trump has declared the US is running out of patience with Korea over its nuclear drive. Trump claims its ballistic missile programs have gotten out of hand. United States calls on other regional powers in other countries from across the globe to implement sanctions against Korea. Sanctions will be employed in a phased and comprehensive approach. He wants all “responsible nations” to join in. So does the US.

“Today we are facing the threat of the reckless and brutal regime of Korea. The Korean dictatorship has no regard for the safety and security of its people, for its neighbors, no respect for humanity, and has no respect for human life.” said Trump.

Things have gone out of hand. Donald Trump has made declaring war on Korea a top priority over nearly everything else in politics. He warns that the Korean dictatorship regime “better choose a better path do it quickly”. Russia is ready to do whatever they can to help United States against Korea. Russia is ready to render aid to the United States.

History about Oak Grove Church in Austin, Texas nearly long forgotten. (Revisited)

Origins for Oak Grove Church date back to 1861 when the building was know as Oak Grove School. Oak Grove Church was the former Oak Grove School that was located on the end of Spicewood Springs Road in Austin, Texas which served as aa rural schoolhouse that had served Travis County and rural Austin from 1861 to 1970. Oak Grove School taught grades 1 through 8 as Oak Grove School was a K-8 school.

In 1970, the former Oak Grove School was converted from a 110 year old schoolhouse into a neo-classical modern church which would become the Oak Grove Church we know today. No known modifications were made to the church.

Over the years, the Oak Grove Church was set on fire several times by vandals. The Oak Grove Church finally burned to the ground on the date of August 31, 1992 after being set on fire several times. Report of arson to the Oak Grove Church had appeared in an August 31, 1992 edition of the Austin American-Statesman newspaper in an article titled “Congregation mourns loss of old church”. Today only a shed, cement foundations, and a basketball court remain. The shed is currently being used for storage.

Now Oak Grove Cemetery was first plotted in 1885. Earliest burial found at this cemetery dates back to the year 1887. Today the cemetery is maintained by the donations of friends and family. Oak Grove Cemetery is private property and off limits to the public.

Oak Grove Church was/is located at 7901 Spicewood Springs Road, Austin, Texas, US 78759. Both the Oak Grove Church and Oak Grove Cemetery are located at this address. Oak Grove Cemetery is now property of Oak Grove Church. Today both Oak Grove Church and Oak Grove Cemetery are private property and are currently off limits to the public.

History of the small McNeil School in Austin, Texas, forgotten.

The McNeil School is one of Austin’s many forgotten institutions from almost 2 centuries ago. Most never really heard or seen the former McNeil School. McNeil School was one of the many schools historians never wrote a book about or news stations have either covered. More so or less, McNeil School has faded away with ongoing time.


The McNeil School first opened and operated in 1887. 1887-1888 was the first school year McNeil School operated on from. The McNeil School was built as a single story one-room log cabin building in 1887. From thereon out, the McNeil School operated from 1887 to 1951. McNeil School operated on a full year schedule in 1887 under the name “McNeil Schoolhouse”. The McNeil Schoolhouse was located southeast of the intersection of the A&NW  Railroad  and north of McNeil-Jollyville Road.

The McNeil School taught grades 1st through 6th in 1887 from thereon out. Students who desired to continue their education had to transfer to Round Rock Independent School District or to Merrilltown School in the Merrilltown School District. McNeil School had its own school district called McNeil School District before being consolidated into Round Rock Independent School District (Round Rock ISD) in 1950.

1888 is when more improvements were added to the log cabin. McNeil School did not have indoor plumbing, electricity, central heating, lead painting, or even phone service until the mid 20th century. McNeil School received indoor plumbing and electricity in the 1940s. 1888 saw growth in enrollment for the McNeil School.

Children who attended this school were primarily of Mexican descent. Although the majority of the student population was of Mexican descent, white students attended McNeil School. Children of workers/employees from Austin White Limestone Company attended McNeil School. In fact at one time, 100% of the students were children of Austin White Limestone Company employees. Company housing was provided and termed “the flats” by local McNeil residents.
of $1,200 and

In 1906, McNeil School was rebuilt into a new one-room schoolhouse built of native stone. The native stone schoolhouse replaced the earlier school building. The 1906 McNeil School building was built out of limestone.


As for the McNeil Mexican School, McNeil Mexican School was built in 1932. In 1932 the school opened. Children who attended this school were primarily of Mexican descent. All of the student population was of Mexican descent. White students had attended this school as well. The school never went past the 7th grade. Grades 1st through 6th were taught at McNeil Mexican School. Students who desired to continue their education had to transfer to Round Rock Independent School District.

In 1939, a new school (McNeil Mexican School) was built again due to structural errors the first Mexican School had. A 1939 news article from the Austin American-Statesman newspaper describes the construction of a new school for Mexican Americans in McNeil. The new one-room schoolhouse was built of native stone for a cost of $1,200 and replaced the earlier school building.


In 1940, both McNeil School and McNeil Mexican School received indoor plumbing and electricity. Although there was no central heating system installed in the school. Property taxes were raised significantly to in order to receive funds to install indoor plumbing and electricity.

1950 is when McNeil School, McNeil Mexican School, and McNeil School District were consolidated into Round Rock Independent School District (Round Rock ISD). McNeil School was consolidated into Round Rock ISD due to declining enrollment, loss in property taxes, and lack of funding. (The economic base of the community was centered on the Austin White Lime Company.) Students were buss into Round Rock ISD schools to continue their education. 1951 is the year when the McNeil School closed.


In 1995, the school property was converted into Robinson Ranch which is near the McNeil Store and US Post Office. The former McNeil School building has been converted into a cattle barn. A baseball field remains intact. The Robinson Family owns the ranch along with Austin White Limestone Company which has been in the family for generations.

Today Robinson Ranch owns the property while Austin White Limestone Company owns the mineral rights. The property is off limits to the public. The former McNeil School building is hidden behind trees and has been converted into a cattle barn. Several cattle can be seen roaming the property in summertime.

The McNeil School is located northeast of Howard Lane and McNeil Road, Austin, Texas, US 78728.


*McNeil School operated under Round Rock ISD for a short while.
*McNeil School was also known as the McNeil Schoolhouse.

Carlson School history forgotten.

Carlson School was first built in 1881 to serve the Manda Common School District. Miss Mitchell was one of the first teachers to have taught students at Carlson School. Her teaching career at Carlson School lasted from years 1881 to 1900. L. C. Nelson and K. H. Eklund were the school’s trustees. Mrs. Bert Nanguson served as the principal. Students who lived in Manor, Coupland, Lund, and Manda attended this school. Carlson School was a K-7 where grades 1st through 7th were taught.

In 1900, Miss Edna Slaughter taught the school. Miss Edna Slaughter was a strict school teacher who expected students to work hard during the school year. She did mete out corporal punishment when needed. Miss Edna Slaughter was strict and stern with her students. Students were often reprimanded if they were to get out of line with their behavior. She accepted no flaw from students in their own classwork.

A newer school building was built in 1907. Construction to build the school took less than a year. The new school building replaced the old school building. The old school building was demolished in 1907. The original 1881 Carlson School was demolished.

In 1934, Carlson School had an attendance rate of 41 students. Average daily attendance was 32 students per day.There was one teacher for 41 students. The cost per year for student was $11.68 per year on average. 120 days was the average school semester. The teachers who taught got paid for six months.

The 1930s is when Carlson School became a K-8 where grades 1st through 8th were taught. Students who wanted to complete their high school education past the 8th grade had to go into town in Manor, Texas. 9th grade was taught here for a short period in the mid 1930s. However that didn’t last long due to shortages in funding.

1947 is Carlson School was consolidated into Manor ISD and in 1952 the Carlson School was demolished. 2 private homes have since been built next to the former Carlson School campus. By 1964, all that remained was the gravel from demolition. The original Carlson School has been demolished and no longer intact. Remnants of this school are no longer in tact. An empty field of green grass took over where Carlson School once was.

Carlson School was located at the intersection of Manda Carlson Road & Lund - Carlson Road, Manor, Texas, US 78653.

History of Pilot Knob School long forgotten.

Pilot Knob School began in 1892 subsequently situated 1 ¼ miles south of the Pilot Knob settlement and Colton settlement located southeast of Austin, Texas way out in the country. Pilot Knob School began in 1892 subsequently situated 1 ¼ miles south Pilot Knob located at the intersection of FM 1625 & McKenzie Road. Pilot Knob School was named after a volcano that is located on top of a hill. Several volcanoes were active at this location some 3,000 years ago. Pilot Knob believed to be settled on top of the remains of a cretaceous volcano. This cretaceous volcano serves as a geological feature in the nearby area.


The Pilot Knob Schoolhouse building was built as an L-shaped building similar in the form to a house of a private residence in 1892 on two acres of land. The Pilot Knob School was built as from an L-shape building plan similar to former Lamar School in Del Valle, Texas. This L-shaped building was a school that was served inside a single story structure unit. The building would later turn into a C-shape building. Sanitary needs were met with outhouses.

The first school term for Pilot Knob School was 1892 with a small student population of 15 students. Mrs. McKuen was the first teacher to teach at Pilot Knob School. These students came from various rural areas, subdivisions, and neighborhoods in Travis County/Austin. The settlement of Pilot Knob had its own school district called Pilot Knob School District also known as School District No. 67, School District #67, District #67, and District No. 67 from 1892 to 1956.

In 1893 is when 20 students attended this school. Enrollment grew within the first year. In the beginning, Pilot Knob School was a K-8 school serving grades 1 through 8. For those students who wanted to complete their high school education past the 8th grade had to go into town or transfer to the Creedmoor Common School District.


Population figures of 2 teachers and 99 students were reported in 1907. The school boasted a student population of 100 students in 1908. The 1907-1908 school semester faced growth in enrollment. 1907 and 1908 were the peak years for this school.

The cost per year was $346 with an average of $11.53 per student per year in 1934. The 1934-1935 school semester has 41 students. Two teachers taught seven grades for 120 days and got paid for six months. The school period was later extended to 8 months.

In 1936, Former pupil Joe Sassman became a school teacher and principal at Pilot Knob School. John D. Foster served as vice principal while Joe Sassman served as principal. When Joe Sassman served as a school teacher to fill in for a teacher who was absent, John D. Foster would serve as the school’s principal for that time. Miss Nan Gilbert taught at the school from the mid 1934 to 1956. Miss Nan Gilbert was a well known notable teacher to have taught as Pilot Knob School.

In 1937, Pilot Knob School became a K-7 serving grades 1 through 7. Students who wanted to complete their junior high school education past the 7th grade had to go into town or transfer to the Creedmoor Common School District. There were no junior high schools/middle schools or high schools in the Pilot Knob School District. Senior high schools were not available in this school district. Miss Minnie C. Overton also served as school principal for Pilot Knob School from the late 1930s to 1956. Mrs. Joe Sassman and Mrs. J. D. Foster served on the PTA.


In 1940, Pilot Knob School became a K-6 serving grades 1 through 6. Students who wanted to complete their junior high school education past the 6th grade had to go into town or transfer to the Creedmoor Common School District. 1940 is when Pilot Knob School became Pilot Knob Elementary School. Pilot Knob Elementary School served grades 1 through 6 from 1940 to 1956.

The Pilot Knob school is underwent repairs in 1940 and again in 1950. The repairs were modest in nature. Not too many were made though. Indoor plumbing was never added or equipped with this school. Outhouses still remained in use. An outhouse was added southeast of the school building. The school had no indoor toilet or electricity.


In 1956, Pilot Knob School District was consolidated into Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle Independent School District) due to dwindling tax revenue from decreasing property taxes, lack of funding, and lack of enrollment. It was mainly due to decreasing property taxes that rural school districts such as Pilot Knob, Creedmoor, Dry Creek, Niederwald, and Maha were consolidated into bigger school districts such as Del Valle ISD and Austin ISD.

Pilot Knob School was shut down in 1957. Pilot Knob School District was already shut down by then. The school was demolished later that year. The school only sat abandoned for a short period of time. Pilot Knob School campus property land was vacant from 1957 to 1995.

In 1995, building contractors and landscaping companies paved over the former Pilot Knob School campus for a bus barn to be surveyed and laid out. Land was resurfaced and flattened the same year. This Del Valle ISD bus barn would become known as the “McKenzie Yard”. The “McKenzie Yard” serves as a parking lot for the Del Valle ISD buses. Several portables and trailers have been hauled onto the property. Trailers are now on this property.


Pilot Knob School campus is now owned by Del Valle Independent School District (Del Valle ISD). Pilot Knob School campus now operates as a bus barn for Del Valle ISD with a chain link fence that surrounds the property and is off limits to the public. McKenzie Yard is a Del Valle ISD bus barn. Arivify states this parcel of land is owned by Del Valle ISD.

Today there are no indications visible of proof that the school was built here. There are no remains left of the school. No visible remains are evident for proving that the school existed. Remnants of the school have been paved over. A parking lot for the Del Valle ISD buses is currently over the former remnants of  Pilot Knob School.The original location for the Pilot Knob School was at Austin, Texas, US 78744.


Notable teachers to have taught at this school were John D. Foster, E. C. Kieke, Nan Gilbert, and Joe Sassman. Former pupil Joe Sassman became a school teacher and principal at Pilot Knob School. Miss Nan Gilbert was a well known notable teacher to have taught as Pilot Knob School.

Notable students who attended this school were Wilroy Kieke of the well known Kieke familiy, Mildred Sassman, Theo Smith, school teacher Marietta Cowan, Lois Kieke, and Joe Sassman just to name a few. Joe Sassman Sr. also received his education at Pilot Knob School along with his wife and relatives that lived in the area.

History about the Cedar Valley School in Austin, Texas revisited.

History about the Cedar Valley School in Austin, Texas revisited.

Early settler Mark Thomas gave land for a school in 1867 where modern day Thomas Springs Road is located. This school would be held in a log cabin. This school would become known as the Thomas Springs School. Thomas Springs School operated from 1867 to 1898 before being consolidated and renamed to Cedar Valley School. The Cedar Valley School can be described as one tiny room as the school originally operated in one room at the very beginning. Cedar Valley School was originally to be as a one-room schoolhouse as planned. Cedar Valley School was a K-7 that taught grades 1 through 7 at first.

1875 is when a box frame building would be constructed. Lumber was hauled in from a donor named R. S Young. John W. Young, George M. Heisner, and Adolph J. Trautwein were the first trustees. A spring on the property provided and furnished water for the school. The Cedar Valley School operated as a tiny one room schoolhouse where classes were held in one tiny room. (The school originally operated in one room at the very beginning as Cedar Valley School was originally a one-room schoolhouse.)

In 1887, W. H. Bishop was employed to teach both schools in a 4 month period at a salary of $33.33 per month. The average rate a school teacher earned per month at the time was $33.33 per month which was usual and not uncommon. 1887 is when another teacher was employed by Austin ISD.

1891 was when a portion of a box frame from the one room Mud School (Mud Schoolhouse) from Bee Cave School District/Teck Common School District was moved to the site of Cedar Valley School. (Mud School was a one room school building.)


However the Cedar Valley School would not be built or opened until late 19th century. The Cedar Valley School was built in 1898 to serve the Oak Hill community and Cedar Valley community as a schoolhouse operating from 1898 to 1953. Overall Cedar Valley School operated from 1867 to 1953.

It was in the year of 1898 that the first consolidation of schools in Travis County took place. Thomas Springs School was consolidated into Cedar Valley School in the year of 1898 was renamed Cedar Valley School. The Cedar Valley School was also known as the Cedar Valley Schoolhouse. 1898 was the same year the Thomas Springs School building was torn down and rebuilt into the Cedar Valley School building. From thereon out, Cedar Valley School operated from 1898 to 1953. The Cedar Valley School building currently still stands as is.


1st grade through 7th grade were taught at the Cedar Valley School. Middle school grades/junior high school grades 6th grade through 7th grade were taught at Cedar Valley School. Cedar Valley School operated as an elementary school and middle school. Each class was made up of 6 to 7 students. Ratio was 6:1 on occasion with being a 7:1. (6 being students and 1 being the teacher.)

Some students who lived in the Oak Hill community did not attend school until the 5th grade because students would have to help their families grow crops during harvesting season. After 7th grade, students were bussed into Austin ISD schools. Upon graduation from both Cedar Valley and Oak Hill Schools, students would be bussed off into Fulmore Junior High School (now known as Fulmore Middle School) which continues to be operated by Austin ISD.


In 1903, several former students that attended Cedar Valley School with no further schooling offered by these schools, passed the State teacher’s examinations test. Several former students had no further schooling past a 6th grade education or a 7th grade education. Which was not uncommon in those days. 1903 was the highlight year for this school.

Plans to close Cedar Valley School and consolidate the school into the Oak Hill School District were announced publicly in 1950. Austin ISD planned to consolidate Cedar Valley School and Oak Hill School into their school district.

Right before Cedar Valley School closed, another room was built. The second room was built in 1952. A third room was built later that year. Plans to close Cedar Valley School already in effect as planned by Austin ISD to consolidate into their school district. 1952-1953 was the last school year Cedar Valley School

The Oak Hill School and Cedar Valley School consolidated in 1953. Cedar Valley School was closed and consolidated into the Oak Hill School District in 1953. The reason why Cedar Valley School was closed down and consolidated was due to lack of funding directly from dwindling property taxes in direct attribution also by Oak Hill School District consolidating various schools in the Oak Hill community and Cedar Valley community. Students who attended Cedar Valley School were bussed to Oak Hill School on US 290.


In 1960, Cedar Valley joined Oak Hill and Manchaca to form a rural school district, but got annexed by Austin ISD in 1967. 1960 is where Oak Hill School District and Manchaca School District attempted to form a short-lived school district that lasted from 1960 up until 1967 in a 6 to 7 year timespan. 1967 is the year when Austin ISD annexed the school districts of Oak Hill and Manchaca.
Despite being operated and supervised indirectly by the Oak Hill School District itself, the Cedar Valley School was directly associated with the Oak Hill community itself. Nevertheless, the Cedar Valley School was always considered a part of the Oak Hill School District regardless of consolidation and closing.


From 1968 to 2001, the former Cedar Valley Schoolhouse ran as a community center under the title of Cedar Valley Community Hall. In 2001, the Cedar Valley Community Hall closed and became abandoned falling into disrepair. Over the years, the Cedar Valley Community Hall has fallen into a state of disrepair. Jim Connelly Masonry, Inc. bought the land in the mid 2000s.

Currently as of April 2017, the Cedar Valley School sits abandoned in a large field of overgrown grass from resulting vegetation. Brush covers the lot. All entrances to the school building are boarded up. The front entrance is still boarded up to this day. Several windows are reported to be broken. Jim Connelly Masonry, Inc. owns the land where Cedar Valley School is. It is unclear if current owner Jim Connelly Masonry, Inc. has any plans for future development.


Cedar Valley School holds an important place in the history of Oak Hill that has long been forgotten. Lack of historic preservation and political interest is what led to the demise of Cedar Valley School. The City of Austin should have designated Cedar Valley School as a/or with a “City of Austin Historical Landmark”. Cedar Valley School remains as one of the few surviving public school buildings associated with development of Oak Hill with the former 1924 Oak Hill School building. The Cedar Valley School is regarded as a prominent historic structure being one of few remainders of rural Oak Hill.

The location is 7901 Thomas Springs Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78736.

City of Lago Vista plans to preserve Cox Springs School building.

City of Lago Vista is currently working on plans to preserve the Cox Springs School building in a better more efficient manner. North Shore Heritage & Cultural Society and former students are working with the City of Lago Vista, City of Jonestown, and Travis County Historical Commission to move the school building onto a permanent location into the city of Lago Vista, Texas.

North Shore Heritage & Cultural Society wants to save this building in an attempt of historic preservation so students of today can see how students who lived in Lago Vista and Jonestown during the early 20th century received their education. Both commissions plan to keep the old school in tact. North Shore Heritage & Cultural Society and former students are working to restore the former school building.

Both the City of Lago Vista and City of Jonestown consider Cox Springs School to be a historical building despite no Texas Historic Landmark marker. Although there is no Texas Historic Landmark marker, a brown metal sign about the school’s history is located behind the school building facing Old Burnet Road. Cox Springs School is one of the oldest buildings in Lago Vista next to the Lago Vista School which is commonly known as “the little red schoolhouse” to local citizens and historians.


Cox Springs School was built in 1908 as a one-room building for Lago Vista Common School District No. 2 better known as Lago Vista Common School District. Cox Springs School was known as Cox Springs School House when the school district first opened this school. Grades 1 through 11 attended this school with Grade 12 eventually being included. Cox Springs School had its own school district called Cox Springs School District (District #2) from 1908 to 1950 before being consolidated into Lago Vista Independent School District.

Originally the Cox Springs School was located closely near the intersection of Lohman Ford Road & Sylvester Ford Road in Lago Vista, Texas from 1908 to 1940. In 1940, the school relocated to Old Burnet Road in Jonestown, Texas in a modern day neighborhood called The Bluffs. Although the Cox Springs School is considered to be in Lago Vista, Texas, the actual location the school building is currently located at is 18842 Old Burnet Road, Jonestown, Texas, US 78645. The alternate address is 18842 Old Burnet Road, Leander, Texas, US 78645.

In 1940, the Cox Springs School building was moved from the intersection of Lohman Ford Road & Sylvester Ford Road in Lago Vista, Texas to Old Burnet Road in Jonestown, Texas. Grade 12 was added in 1949 due to Gilmer-Aiken Law mandated by the State of Texas. More funds went towards the school district that following year. 1950 is when Cox Springs School District was abolished and consolidated into Lago Vista Independent School District (Lago Vista ISD).

In 1960, the last group of students from grades 1st through 12th were moved to Lago Vista School which was known then to Lago Vista citizens and locals as the “the little red schoolhouse” on 7610 Lohman Ford Road. Lago Vista School was a K-12 school then.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

History about the Highland School in Pflugerville, Texas way long forgotten.

Highland School in Pflugerville, Texas is one of the many Austin/Travis County institutions that have been long forgotten which has faded away with time and history. Most local citizens have forgotten about  Highland School in Pflugerville, Texas. In fact, most have never knew about this school’s existence. For those who didn’t remember and for those who did not know, Highland School was a public school that operated from 1873 to 1936. Highland School was located near the intersection of Vision Drive & Foothill Farms near I-35 (IH 35) out on the rural countryside.


In early 1873, Highland School was built as a one room school building. At one point Highland School was built as a log cabin before becoming a modern one room school building. 1880 was the year Highland School was rebuilt and modernized into a one room school building. Overall Highland School was a rural school. 1902 is when some children from Merrilltown School in the Merrilltown School District were transferred to Highland School.

Highland School had its own school district (as many rural schools in Travis County/Austin did) called the Highland School District aka Highland School District No. 56 (School District No. 56). Highland School District operated as a school district from 1882 to 1936 for Pflugerville and Austin.

Highland School met its fate as most rural school across the United States did. The school was consolidated into a larger school district. Highland School and its school district were consolidated into Pflugerville Independent School District (Pflugerville ISD) in 1936. The building was moved onto to the site of where Timmerman Elementary School is now located. The building was destroyed by a tornado that hit Pflugerville in 1957. Highland School is no longer extant today.


The location of Highland School was Vision Drive, Pflugerville, Texas, US 78660.

Sunday, August 6, 2017

History about Oak Grove Church in Austin, Texas nearly long forgotten.

Origins for Oak Grove Church date back to 1861 when the building was know as Oak Grove School. Oak Grove Church was the former Oak Grove School that was located on the end of Spicewood Springs Road in Austin, Texas which served as aa rural schoolhouse that had served Travis County and rural Austin from 1861 to 1970. Oak Grove School taught grades 1 through 8 as Oak Grove School was a K-8 school.

In 1970, the for Oak Grove School was converted from a 110 year old schoolhouse into a neo-classical modern church which would become the Oak Grove Church we know today. No known modifications were made to the church.

Over the years, the Oak Grove School was set on fire several times by vandals. The Oak Grove School finally burned to the ground on the date of August 31, 1992 after being set on fire several times. Report of arson to the Oak Grove Church had appeared in an August 31, 1992 edition of the Austin American-Statesman newspaper in an article titled “Congregation mourns loss of old church”. Today only a shed, cement foundations, and a basketball court remain. The shed is currently being used for storage.

Now Oak Grove Cemetery was first plotted in 1885. Earliest burial found at this cemetery dates back to the year 1887. Today the cemetery is maintained by the donations of friends and family. Oak Grove Cemetery is private property and off limits to the public.

Oak Grove Church was/is located at 7901 Spicewood Springs Road, Austin, Texas, US 78759. Both the Oak Grove Church and Oak Grove Cemetery are located at this address. Oak Grove Cemetery is now property of Oak Grove Church. Today both Oak Grove Church and Oak Grove Cemetery are private property and are currently off limits to the public.

History about the Elroy School in Del Valle, Texas nearly long forgotten.

Elroy School was built in the community settlement of Elroy located in Del Valle, Texas in summer of 1894. Lumber to construct the Elroy School was donated by citizens in the community. Many citizens in the community helped build this school. Elroy School was a K-12 school which primarily operated as a K-9 school although older students attended. Mainly Elroy School operated as a K-9 school under the school districts of Elroy School District and Colorado Common School District. Older students often went into town to continue their education.

Mr. Daniel Ross was the first trustee for the Elroy School then. Mr. Daniel Ross then hired Mrs. A Pettis to teach at the Elroy School in 1894. Mrs. A Pettis was the first teacher to teach at Elroy School. Mr. Daniel Ross was in charge of Elroy School at the time.

Semesters were run in a six month time period. It was an agreement with Travis County Common School District superintendents that the rural school districts semesters were to run on a minimum of six months yearly per school term. Elroy School was one of the many Travis County rural schools than operated in such fashion.

Elroy School was a K-12 school which primarily operated as a K-9 school although older students attended. Sometimes students who wanted to continue their high school education had to transfer into school districts such as Creedmoor Common School District, Garfield School District, Del Valle Independent School District, or go the largest school district in town called Austin Independent School District. Sometimes students had to transfer to other school districts to continue their high school education depending on the availability of such said school districts stated above.


Two teachers were employed to the Elroy School in 1901. These two teachers had to teach in the same room. After 1903, the school term was extended to 7 months instead of the average 6 months most school districts in Texas had at that time. Elroy School was described as “one of the prettiest schoolhouses in the county” in the 1905 Travis County School Annual. A second room was added the summer of 1906. The third room was added in 1909. A third teacher was added that same year. The 1911 school term was lengthened to 8 months. In 1916, the wooden Elroy School was demolished and replaced as red brick schoolhouse which still stands today. That was when Elroy School was a three room schoolhouse.


The Elroy School on 9019 Elroy Road was the “main school”. For a while, the Elroy School on 9019 Elroy Road served primarily as an elementary school. Swing sets out in the front indicated that Elroy School was an elementary school. When Elroy School was an elementary school, grades 1 through 9 were taught and older students had to go into town to continue their education.
That Elroy School served primarily as an elementary school called Elroy Elementary School from where grades 1 through 9 were taught. Later the Elroy School only taught grades 1 through 8 even though older students attend this school when there was no open space available in other schools.


The Elroy School District had its own segregated schools which were separated by race. Such as the Elroy Negro School, Elroy White School, and Elroy Mexican School for instance. Segregation law of the land in Texas State. Small community settlement Elroy, Texas was no exception to this case.

The Elroy White School was the Elroy School located on 9019 Elroy Road which still stands today. The Elroy White School was the “main school”. This is the school that served as the Elroy Community Center from years 1965 to 1988. Elroy White School had a ratio of 2 teachers to 107 white students with the ratio being 2:107 in the year of 1907.

Elroy Negro School served as a school for black/African-American students who lived in the Elroy community located on 14107 FM 812. Elroy Negro School had a ratio of 2 teachers to 61 black students with the ratio being 2:61 in the year of 1907. Elroy Negro School taught elementary grades primarily. Elroy Negro School was converted into Elroy Elementary School in 1950. From 1950 to 1963, Elroy Elementary School was taught here. In 1963 after consolidating with Del Valle ISD, the Elroy Negro School was demolished. No traces of Elroy Negro School exist today.

These schools were eventually consolidated into Colorado Common School District in 1961 which eventually was restructured into Del Valle Independent School District (Del Valle ISD) in 1963. The schools separated by race were demolished, shut down by Del Valle ISD, auctioned off, or sold to private homeowners.

In 1961 Elroy School and Elroy School District were consolidated into Colorado Common School District in 1961 and consolidated & restructured into Del Valle Independent School District (Del Valle ISD) in 1963.


1963 is when Elroy School was closed. In 1965, the Elroy School became the Elroy Community Center. From 1965 to 1988 the Elroy School operated as a community center. In 1980, the school building received a series of renovations from Del Valle Independent School District bond elections. For a short time in the 1980s, Y Knot Ranch owned and leased the building to various businesses and organizations. Both Y Knot Ranch and Del Valle ISD own the property together through a joint venture.

In late 1988, Travis County Fire Rescue purchased the Elroy School from Del Valle Independent School District and Y Knot Ranch. In 1989, the former Elroy School building became a fire station for Travis County. Fire station Travis County Fire Rescue ESD #11 currently serves a majority of southeastern Travis County. In recent years buildings were added onto Elroy School. 2 buildings were added next to the former Elroy School building.

In an August 24, 1989 edition of the Austin American-Statesman newspaper explains the red brick schoolhouse has been converted to a fire station. (The red brick schoolhouse is Elroy School.)

On the date of September 21st, 2016, an upgrade to existing electric services was made and added on.
Only the existing fire house received an eud. A couple of more renovations were added on approval from Travis County commissioners. On this date, the building was declared up to code by Travis County commissioners.


Today Travis County Fire Rescue owns the former Elroy School building and property operating under the name of Travis County Fire Rescue ESD #11. The school is located at 9019 Elroy Road, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617. The alternate addresses are 9019 Farm to Market Road 812, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617 and 9019 FM 812 Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.

History of Schiller School in Elgin, Texas long forgotten.

In October 1885, a man named Joseph Schiller purchased 95.5 acres in Travis County. Joseph Schiller later donated this land for the Schiller School and the Schiller Cemetery. The school was named after Joseph Schiller. The Schiller School was first organized in 1889. The Schiller School was built as a one room schoolhouse during the same year. The Schiller School was located on Old Kimbro Road aka Old Highway 20 (State Highway 20) which is now known as FM 1100 near the Travis County-Bastrop County border.

Grades 1 through 9 were taught at Schiller School. Grade 10 was added on eventually later. Although Schiller School was primarily a K-9 school, Grades 10 through 12 also attended this school. Students ages had ranged from 6 to 17 years of age. Sometimes students who were 18 attended this school.

At first the school was referred to as the Bohemian School because most of the students were children of area Bohemian farmers. Many children of farmers in the Elgin area and Manor area who attended this school had either German ancestry, Bohemian ancestry, came from a German background of course, or were of Bohemian ancestry and came from a Bohemian background. Student population was mainly compromised of German and Bohemian origins. Student population was mainly caucasian/white. Although there were black/African-American students who attended Schiller School as some historians report in history reports.

Schiller School had operated its own school district from 1889 to 1947 before being consolidated through a series of school district consolidations. School district for Schiller School was Schiller School District better known as School District No. 31 or District No. 31. Manor ISD and Elgin ISD helped fund this school district when there was a lack of funds.

The room was enlarged to a size of 60 x 30 feet in 1894. In 1916, a new one building was acquired by the school district. Henry Neidig purchased the 1889 school building for a price of $100. A second room was added in 1926. The second room was built by Fred Rose.

In 1947, the Schiller School consolidated into the Manda Common School District. The Manda School District was dissolved in 1960 and was divided among Manor ISD, Pflugerville ISD, and Elgin ISD. Most students were bussed to Manor ISD and Elgin ISD though. Rather than Pflugerville ISD. Although a majority of students were bussed to Elgin ISD being that the Schiller School was located closer to Elgin than Manor.

Only the Schiller Cemetery remains today in tact with 15 burials. Graves are still in tact with markers. A chain link fence surrounds the Schiller Cemetery. The Schiller Cemetery is surrounded by a barrage of trees. The Schiller School had been demolished long ago.

The Schiller School and the Schiller Cemetery was located next to 17500 FM 1100, Elgin, Texas, US 78621.

*Schiller School District was better known as District No. 31.
*Schiller School mostly consolidated into Elgin ISD.
*Manda School District also went under the title of Manda Common School District.
*Old Highway 20 was US 290.

Former New Sweden School in Manor, Texas long forgotten.

New Sweden School was built as a one room schoolhouse in the summer of 1916. Classes started in the fall later that same year. Construction for the New Sweden School lasted from summer to fall.

New Sweden School had its own school district called New Sweden School District (School District No. 22) before being consolidated into Manda School District. New Sweden School and several other schools along with school districts were consolidated to form the Manda Common School District in 1947. The Manda School District was dissolved in 1960 and was divided among Manor ISD, Pflugerville ISD, and Elgin ISD. Most students were bussed to Manor ISD though.

From 1948 to 1985, New Sweden School had served as a church. In 1985, the school building was all but abandoned. Over the years, the former school building fell into a horrendous state of rural decay. Overtime the building burned down from natural wildfire. Top roof perished from the flames. Top roof for this former school is no longer extant. Today the school is surrounded by shrubs, bushes, wild brush, and a slew of trees in the country breeze.

The former New Sweden School was located 7 miles north of Manor, Texas. The address for the New Sweden School was 12178 New Sweden Church Road, Manor, Texas, US 78653.

*New Sweden School District was School District No. 22 better known as District #22.
*New Sweden School and New Sweden School District eventually consolidated into Manor ISD.
*New Sweden School and New Sweden School District was abolished in 1947 even thought the building was still in operation.
*Manda School District also went under the title of Manda Common School District.

History about Oak Grove School in Austin, Texas long forgotten.

Oak Grove School was a rural schoolhouse that served Travis County and Austin from 1861 to 1970. The former Oak Grove School was located on the end of Spicewood Springs Road in Austin, Texas. From 1861 to 1970, Oak Grove School had operated its own school district called Oak Grove School District simply known as School District #5 or District No. 5. Oak Grove School taught grades 1 through 8. The former Oak Grove School was a K-8 school.

After 1900, students who graduated 8th Grade wanted to continue their high school education were transferred to the Nichols School in the Nichols School District (School District #62/District No. 62). Some had simply transferred to Austin ISD high schools such as Austin High School, Allan High School, McCallum High School, or Lanier Junior-Senior High School (now Lanier High School).

Due to lack of enrollment and dwindling tax revenue, Oak Grove School District was consolidated into Austin Independent School District (Austin ISD) in 1970. In 1970, the schoolhouse for Oak Grove School was converted into a church which would become the Oak Grove Church we know today. No known modifications were made to the church.

Over the years, the Oak Grove School was set on fire several times by vandals. The Oak Grove School finally burned to the ground on the date of August 31, 1992 after being set on fire several times. Today only a shed, cement foundations, and a basketball court remain.

The shed is currently being used for storage. Today the Oak Grove School property has been repurposed into a private church called Oak Grove Church. Oak Grove Cemetery is now property of Oak Grove Church. Both Oak Grove Church and Oak Grove Cemetery are private property and are currently off limits to the public.

As for the Oak Grove Cemetery, the Oak Grove Cemetery was first plotted in 1885. Earliest burial found at this cemetery dates back to the year 1887. Today the cemetery is maintained by the donations of friends and family. Oak Grove Cemetery is private property and off limits to the public.

Oak Grove School was located at 7901 Spicewood Springs Road, Austin, Texas, US 78759. Both the Oak Grove Church and Oak Grove Cemetery are located at this address.


*Oak Grove School District was also known as School District No. 5.
*Report of arson to the Oak Grove Church had appeared in an August 31, 1992 edition of the Austin American-Statesman newspaper in an article titled “Congregation mourns loss of old church”.
*Nichols School District was known as District #62/District No. 62. Nichols School operated in this school district from 1900 to 1951.
*Lanier Junior-Senior High School is now Lanier High School.

History of Nichols School in Leander, Texas long forgotten.

1 acre of land was donated by Samuel Houston Nichols for a school to be built on in the year of 1900. The school was named after Samuel Houston Nichols. Samuel Houston Nichols donated building materials for Nichols School to be built. The Nichols School building was built from logs in a lumber yard in 1900. Men from the Leander community helped construct the school building. The lumber used to build the Nichols School was cedar from cedar trees. Cedar was the choice for lumber since cedar grew nearby in the area. Construction for Nichols School was completed on Christmas Day during the date of December 25, 1900.

Samuel Houston Nichols and Dick Preece were the first trustees for the Nichols School. Although it was Samuel Houston Nichols that served as the school’s main trustee. Dick Preece served as school trustee in the 1930s. Ms. Florence Harvey was the first teacher to have taught at Nichols School.

Prior to 1900, students attend Oak Grove School located in the Oak Grove School District (District #5). Nichols School operated as a school district called Nichols School District better known as District #62 from 1900 to 1951. The school has been located at various locations throughout the years. Nichols School had often relocated at various times throughout the years.


In January 1929, the school building had burned from fire. The fire damaged the school building so badly to where the building itself was determined by fire marshals to be structurally unsafe. Fire marshals determined Nichols School was deemed unfit for human life. Luckily the furniture was miraculously saved from the fire. The outside walls structures caved in from the fire of course.

Nichols School was rebuilt in September 1931 in a different location closer to the community. This time Tom Gillman donated land for the Nichols School to be rebuilt on. Tom Gillman donated building materials for Nichols School to be built.

The new Nichols School building was destroyed by fire again near the close of the 1932-1933 school semester. The new Nichols School was burned by fire in late 1932. The fire damaged the school building so badly to where the building itself was determined by fire marshals to be structurally unsafe and uninhabitable. County fire marshals deemed the school building to be a safety hazard. Teachers could not teach nor could education or classwork resume as the school building was deemed unfit for human life. None of the furniture was saved from the fire.

Nichols School District was without a school until the 1934-1935 school semester. School was held at the “Old Preece Place” in a small log cabin from 1923 until 1934-1935 school semester. Old fashioned board benches and wooden boxes were used as seats. There were no funds to buy desks at that time. During the 1936-1937 school semester, A. F.. Maechel consented with the school district to use his house as a temporary school building until funds could be received to build a new school building for Nichols School. The school district deemed the house unsuitable to fulfill their needs, but A. F.. Maechel’s house was the only building available at the time.

A quote from the 1936 yearbook of Travis County Rural Schools - The Defender yearbook states the following: “Several unsuccessful efforts have been made to rebuild the Nichols School on the original site, but so far funds are insufficient.”


A new bus was purchased to accommodate the Nichols School in Leander, Jonestown, and rural Travis County in the year of 1950. A new bus came under contract with the Leander Independent School District school board later that coming year. Demand for a new school bus was very high during that time.

In the same year, Leander ISD Superintendent O. J. Faught required all 1st graders to have their health immunization shots and also to have their birth certificates before entering school. Immunization shots had become a new requirement for students before entering school. This was due to health concerns from the school board.


1951 is the year when Nichols School was consolidated into Leander Independent School District. The former students attended classes in the Leander schools during that time. 1951 was the same year Nichols School closed following school consolidation into Leander ISD. Nichols School was closed down by Leander ISD. In 1952, the Nichols School building was later demolished. The school had been located at various locations throughout the years before being consolidated into Leander Independent School District.


*Nichols School District was known as District #62/District No. 62.
*Oak Grove School District was known as District #5/District No. 5.

History behind the small Cox Springs School in Lago Vista, Texas.

Cox Springs School was built in 1908 as a one-room building for Lago Vista Common School District No. 2 better known as Lago Vista Common School District. Cox Springs School was known as Cox Springs School House when the school district first opened this school. Grades 1 through 11 attended this school with Grade 12 eventually being included. Originally the Cox Springs School was located closely near the intersection of Lohman Ford Road & Sylvester Ford Road in Lago Vista, Texas from 1908 to 1940.
Cox Springs School had its own school district called Cox Springs School District (District #2) from 1908 to 1950 before being consolidated into Lago Vista Independent School District.

In 1940, the Cox Springs School building was moved from the intersection of Lohman Ford Road & Sylvester Ford Road in Lago Vista, Texas to Old Burnet Road in Jonestown, Texas. Grade 12 was added in 1949 due to Gilmer-Aiken Law mandated by the State of Texas. More funds went towards the school district that following year. 1950 is when Cox Springs School District was abolished and consolidated into Lago Vista Independent School District (Lago Vista ISD).

In 1960 the last group of students from grades 1st through 12th were moved to Lago Vista School which was known then to Lago Vista citizens and locals as the “the little red schoolhouse” on 7610 Lohman Ford Road. Lago Vista School was a K-12 school then.

Currently as of August 2017, the North Shore Heritage & Cultural Society and former students are working with the City of Lago Vista, City of Jonestown, and Travis County Historical Commission to move the school building onto a permanent location. North Shore Heritage & Cultural Society and former students are working to restore the former school building. North Shore Heritage & Cultural Society wants to save this building in an attempt of historic preservation so students of today can see how students who lived in Lago Vista and Jonestown during the early 20th century received their education. Both commissions plan to keep the old school in tact.


Both the City of Lago Vista and City of Jonestown consider Cox Springs School to be a historical building despite no Texas Historic Landmark marker. Although there is no Texas Historic Landmark marker, a brown metal sign about the school’s history is located behind the school building facing Old Burnet Road. Cox Springs School is one of the oldest buildings in Lago Vista next to the Lago Vista School which is commonly known as “the little red schoolhouse” to local citizens and historians.


Originally the Cox Springs School was located closely near the intersection of Lohman Ford Road & Sylvester Ford Road in Lago Vista, Texas from 1908 to 1940 before relocating to Old Burnet Road in Jonestown in a modern day neighborhood called The Bluffs. Although the Cox Springs School is considered to be in Lago Vista, Texas, the actual location the school building is currently located at is 18842 Old Burnet Road, Jonestown, Texas, US 78645. The alternate address is 18842 Old Burnet Road, Leander, Texas, US 78645.


*Lago Vista Common School District is now know as Lago Vista Independent School District.
*Local historians, realtors, politicians, local citizens, and history buffs often refer to Cox Springs School as a one-room school building.
*Cox Springs School District was known as School District No. 2/District No. 2.

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Mopac toll road expected to be completed by 2020. (Revisited)

The Mopac toll road is expected be completed by the year 2020. By 2020, construction will have been completed and the toll road will be totally functional by then. Going directions northbound and southbound, Mopac toll road will merge in those regular lanes on Mopac Highway (Loop 1) north of the Colorado River. However due to budget cuts enacted by the Texas State Legislature, construction for the Mopac toll road has been delayed slightly. Thus moving Mopac toll road completion date to 2020.

Construction on Mopac Highway alongside Mopac toll road has been rather moving at a sluggish pace. Progress remains slow as usual. Rain weather from previous months in 2017 have delayed construction for the Mopac toll road as well other factors. May rain weather delayed construction the most. Construction for the Mopac toll road begins at nighttime. News reports that construction on Texas highways and roads move at a rather slow sluggish pace. That is nothing new. The Mopac toll road is expected be completed by the year 2020.

Unverified claims about Rice’s Crossing School uncertain.

An article from newspaper Austin American Statesman claims “Rice’s Crossing School building has long ago been destroyed or carried away.”. Though no verified claims can back up whether the Rice’s Crossing School building has destroyed or carried away. [Minimum wage woes; Looking for refund; Stop ripping on Davis : Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014] More than likely, the school was carried away before it could ever be destroyed.


In 1882, a single story school building called Rice’s Crossing School was constructed in the settlement of Rice’s Crossing, Texas near Round Rock, Texas. The school building itself was located next to three gins. Grades 1 through 8 were taught at this school. Once students passed 8th grade, they were bussed off to Manor High School to finish their high school education. The school boasted a population of 50 pupils in 1910.

In February 19, 1950, the Rice’s Crossing School went up for a bid. The school and land property went up for a bid. Bids were received by the Rice’s Crossing School Board for sale of the Rice’s Crossing School. The building and land were sold together by March 15, 1950. Students whom attended Rice’s Crossing School were now bussed to Manor ISD schools to complete their education. Rice’s Crossing School was later then consolidated into the school districts of Manor ISD, Coupland ISD, Thrall ISD, and Taylor ISD due to a lack of enrollment.

Newspaper Austin American Statesman claims “Rice’s Crossing School building has long ago been destroyed or carried away.”. Though no verified claims can back up whether the Rice’s Crossing School building has destroyed or carried away.

Forgotten history of Rice’s Crossing School.

In 1882, a single story school building called Rice’s Crossing School was constructed in the settlement of Rice’s Crossing, Texas near Round Rock, Texas. The school building itself was located next to three gins. Grades 1 through 8 were taught at this school. Once students passed 8th grade, they were bussed off to Manor High School to finish their high school education. The school boasted a population of 50 pupils in 1910.

In February 19, 1950, the Rice’s Crossing School went up for a bid. The school and land property went up for a bid. Bids were received by the Rice’s Crossing School Board for sale of the Rice’s Crossing School. The building and land were sold together by March 15, 1950. Students whom attended Rice’s Crossing School were now bussed to Manor ISD schools to complete their education. Rice’s Crossing School was later then consolidated into the school districts of Manor ISD, Coupland ISD, Thrall ISD, and Taylor ISD due to a lack of enrollment.

Newspaper Austin American Statesman claims “Rice’s Crossing School building has long ago been destroyed or carried away.”. Though no verified claims can back up whether the Rice’s Crossing School building has destroyed or carried away.

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

History of Garfield School in Del Valle, Texas revealed and revisited.

The first Garfield School in Del Valle, Texas was built out of logs thus becoming a log cabin school called Haynie School better known as Haynie Chapel School which was also used as a church. Haynie Chapel School only had 1 door and 1 window. This school was also used as a church as many rural schools across Travis County and the state of Texas were purposed as at one point in time.

The name for Haynie Chapel School was changed to Garfield School later in honor of US President James A. Garfield. The Garfield School was named for US President James A. Garfield.

The log cabin Garfield School employed one teacher to teach 30 students. Instead of having a blackboard or paper, students wrote on slates. Later on the school district employed 2 teacher to teach at the Garfield School. Average daily attendance for Garfield School was 45 students at best. Two teachers split classes into a 120 day period. This teaching period was split in half.

In 1892, the Garfield School was erected as a one-room school building. A stage for speeches and performances was built. Improvements were made tot he school in 1902. More improvements followed in the year of 1903. The one-room school building was used until 1915. 1915 is when the old school building was demolished. In 1916 a newer school building was built. Garfield School then became a three-room school. Ratio for this school was 41 students per teacher.

Garfield School counted 82 students in the 1934-1935 semester. Garfield School counted 80 students in the 1935-1936 semester. Student enrollment during the Great Depression more or less stayed the same despite economic turmoil. Rural Travis County was hit hard by the Great Depression as was the rest of the country.

From the 1890s until the 1930s, Garfield School accepted high school students up to grade 11. High school students were taught here until the mid 1930s were they were bussed into Austin to attend Austin High School or Allan High School. By the middle of the Great Depression era, grades 1 through 7 were taught at Garfield School. Those students who wanted to continue their education past the 7th grade went to Austin High School, Allan Junior, High School, or Allan High School in Austin Independent School District or went to Colorado School in the Colorado Common School District now known as Del Valle Independent School District. Some went to attend school in places so far such as Creedmoor or Bastrop. Some students were either bussed to Bastrop Independent School District or Creedmoor Common School District depending how crowded their schools were and based on availability of space.

The Garfield schools and original Garfield School itself were consolidated into the Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle Independent School District) in 1954 following the school consolidation movement in Texas State. During that same year, Garfield School shut down. The school operated as a community center from 1954 to 2007. The school prorerty itself went through a series of owners over the years. In 2007, the property was sold for $237,500 dollars. Tom Cronin, Betty Cronin, and Clinton R Alberthal were the last sole proprietors known to have owned the land Garfield School was on.


On June 7, 2010, the Garfield School was transformed into the Garfield Library. Today the Garfield School serves as Garfield Library and Hit The Spot Cafe. The school has been split in half into 2 businesses with the left half being Hit The Spot Cafe and the right half being Garfield Library. Garfield Library operates under East Travis Gateway Library District. Garfield School sits at its historic location at 5121 Albert Brown Drive, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.

Old Fowler Cemetery uncovered by Austin Genealogical Society and Mixerr Reviews.

The old Fowler Cemetery was plotted in 1875. Most burials took place here in the 1880s. Several Fowler family members were buried here in the late 19th century and early 20th century. B.R. Fowler was the last person known to be buried at the old Fowler Cemetery. His date of death was July 26, 1920. Infant son of B. R. Fowler was buried here during the same year.

In 1985 this cemetery was all but abandoned. Vegetation such as grass took over along with other natural growth. Today in July 2017, the Fowler Cemetery lay under a canopy of trees that have since grown over looming taking a place of shade for the small cemetery.

Austin Genealogical Society had transcribed and transcripted where they did write down the names and dates of these graves for Austin Genealogical Society’s Cemetery Transcription Project during 2003. This information was compiled by volunteers who either transcribed historical records or visited the cemetery. Fowler Cemetery is one of the many Fowler Cemeteries in Travis County with the name "Fowler Cemetery". There are at least 3 cemeteries that carry the name "Fowler Cemetery" within Travis County.

The address is Buck Lane and Highway 71, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.