Showing posts with label history. Show all posts
Showing posts with label history. Show all posts

Friday, June 15, 2018

Bob Ward and May Schmidt of Save Austin Cemeteries discover former foundations of Longview School at Longview Cemetery.

One the date of March 12, 2014, Bob Ward and May Schmidt of Save Austin Cemeteries uncovered foundations of the long lost old Longview School building where Longview School was one located. Longview School was located inside the perimeter of Longview Cemetery.

Cleanup was performed at the 5 acre cemetery and park on Saturday, March 29, 2014. There are remains of old sections of fencing that were uncovered along with the remains of the Longview School.

Save Austin Cemeteries is currently involved in a project to document, protect and preserve Longview Cemetery located inside Longview Park located in southwest Austin, Texas.The project began with a request from Save Austin’s Cemeteries very own Dale Flatt to the city to secure and define the cemetery portion of the site and develop a long term preservation plan.

Both Longview Cemetery and Longview Park were donated to the city years ago and have been part of the city park system for many years now. The cemetery portion was never adequately defined and today the boundaries were encroached upon by trails near a basketball court. The concern was inadequate protection and definition.


Longview School was established and opened in 1897 near Longview Cemetery. The school started appearing on maps in 1898. Travis County Common School District (Travis County Public Schools) operated the school from 1898 until 1922. Longview School was located where 7609 Longview Road is today. Longview School was also known as Longview Schoolhouse or Longview School House.

Although Longview School was a 1-10 school, Longview School primarily taught grades 1-8. Students left school upon graduating 10th grade. Most of its students were enrolled in grades 1 through 8.

Sadly Longview School was destroyed by a tornado in 1922. Two members of the Bargsley family were killed in the tornado. After the tornado, nothing was left of the Longview School. Longview School was never rebuilt. It was a total loss for the Longview community.

Instead of rebuilding the school, Travis County Public Schools sent its students to Manchaca School in Manchaca, Texas, St. Elmo School, or simply to Austin ISD schools.

Its foundation was the only structure remaining in 1923. Travis County Public Schools discontinued services for the school during the same year. At the same time, the school and cemetery became abandoned.

Both Longview Cemetery and Longview Park were donated to the city in 1985 and have been part of the city park system for many years now.

Patti Hansen of Travis County Historical Commission reported there were no Mexican-American schools (Mexican Schools) west of I-35. Many of the schools were north, south, and east of town. No Hispanic children are known to have attended Longview School.


Longview School and Longview Cemetery are located inside of modern day Longview Park. Today Longview Cemetery is one Austin’s forgotten cemeteries and is still one of Austin’s many cemeteries.

Longview School and Longview Cemetery are 7609 Longview Road, Austin, Texas, US 78745.

History of Creedmoor Mexican School long forgotten.

Creedmoor Mexican School is one of the many forgotten schools of Austin and Travis County. Not much is known or can be found out about the Creedmoor Mexican School. The school was operated by what is considered today as Del Valle ISD.


Creedmoor Mexican School was built and established in 1920 just 1 block near the intersection of FM 1327 & FM 1625 in Creedmoor, Texas. Address for the Creedmoor Mexican School was 12307 SH 29, Creedmoor, Texas. Creedmoor Common School District operated this school from 1920 to 1950.

Creedmoor Mexican School educated Hispanic students living in the town of Creedmoor. There was one teacher for every 20 students. There were 10 to 20 students in each classroom. Most of the students ages ranged from 7 to 12 at average. It is unknown if the school was a 1-12 school or either a 1-6 school.

In 1921 during the 1921-1922 school year, a soccer field was laid out. A field of grass was plotted around the school.


Creedmoor Mexican School was shut down in 1950 as mandated by the 1948 court case Delgado v. Bastrop ISD and Brown vs. the Board of Education decision ruling segregation in public schools illegal. LULAC brought suit against several school districts in Texas for denying Hispanic students the use of school facilities and educational services. The lawsuit claimed Hispanic students were separated and segregated from white students even though under state law they were considered "White" or "Caucasian".

A man named Stephen Richard Griffin bought the schoolhouse from Creedmoor Common School District for $11,510 dollars in 1950. Stephen Richard Griffin and his son Billie L Griffin Griffith lived in the house for more than 30 years.

By 1985, Stephen Richard Griffin was the only person recorded to be living in that house. His son had already moved out by then. 

On the date of 11/17/2005, Stephen Richard Griffin sold the house and property to Austin based CLAF CO LLC via a warranty deed. Stephen Richard Griffin moved in 2006. The house was posted to the internet using loopnet on the date of 02/06/2006. The house sat vacant from 2006 to 2007.

The house was demolished by CLAF CO LLC in 2007. All that remained by 2008 was the gravel driveway that connected to the house. Stephen Richard Griffin was the last person to have been recorded living at this residence.


Today the gravel driveway is the only remnant left of Creedmoor Mexican School remaining intact with the property along with the grass field. The house has since been removed and leveled.

Creedmoor Mexican School was located at 12307 FM 1625, Creedmoor, Texas, US 78610.

Friday, June 8, 2018

History of Sunmount Developmental Center overlooked.

Sunmount Developmental Center was built in 1922 on a typical cottage plan common for institutions of that time period. Its architectural style is Classic Revival. Construction for Sunmount Developmental Center was a 2 year period from 1922 to 1924.

Sunmount Developmental Center opened up as Sunmount Veterans Administration Hospital for treatment of veterans with tuberculosis in 1924. Sunmount Veterans Administration Hospital had operated as a tuberculosis hospital from 1924 to 1965. In 1924, tuberculosis cases among veterans of World War I was extremely high. Previously many veterans had been housed by contract with the Veterans Administration in private hospitals.
(Ref: asylumprojects.org)


Sunmount Veterans Administration Hospital closed as a tuberculosis hospital in 1965. The hospital was renamed to Sunmount State School and was turned into a private hospital ending its tenure as a public hospital. (Ref: asylumprojects.org)

Sunmount State School reopened as private nonprofit facility on the date of September 1, 1965 for people with developmental disabilities as an immediate care facility for the mentally retarded. Sunmount State School started admitting patients by transfer from other State Schools in New York State on the date of September 20, 1965. Most staff, attendants, and doctors, no previous experience with the mentally retarded but the period of transitioning was smooth with much cooperation.

Dr. Oleh Wolansky was the first director of Sunmount State School. Richard L. Francis, M.D was director for the entire school. Both Dr. Oleh Wolansky and Richard L. Francis, M.D were in charge of this State School. Its medical consisted staff of 40 specialists in practically all the fields of medicine known to humankind. The school provided full rehabilitation services for the residents of any age.

The population was 511 residents in March 30, 1967. Its 511 residents consisted of 233 females and 278 males. 10% percent of the residents have been permanently placed in the community in March 10, 1967. Patients long considered to be bedridden thanks to intensive physical therapy, were now beginning to walk. By 1967, Sunmount State School was full 'open door' facility and had enjoyed excellent relations with the community. A garment textile factory was constructed in 1967. (Ref: Buffalo Times)



However it was not all good with parents of the residents that resided in this institution. There have been cases of abuse reported at Sunmount Developmental Center that have gone unsolved over the years. Abuse is a contentious issue. In many cases, cases of abuse go unsolved. Sunmount Developmental Center is no exception.

Sunmount Developmental Center suffers from a high amount of injury from staff onto residents. Staff often assaults the residents that live here. There is also a high injury rate amongst residents. Many residents aren’t adequately fed. The mentally and physically disabled go through enough on their own.

In the 1970s, a handful of cases regarding abuse appeared in newspapers such as Rochester Times, The Tribune, Buffalo Times, and Watertown Daily Times (Watertown Daily). Parents raised concern about questionable treatment practices on residents.


During an interview with Watertown Daily Times in June 1973, former resident John Boyer recalled the only  marked abuse he saw was when he lining up with his ward mates to get their teeth brushed. “When they'd line us up to brush our teeth. If anybody was talking, the attendant would come down the line slapping us all in the face." 

The routine punishments consisted of "walking the halls" by having the residents walk in a long continual line about the wards until they were quiet. Attendants would get the noisy residents "walking the halls" by having the residents walk in a long line around the wards until they were quiet. This way attendants could assure residents kept quiet.

John Boyer witnessed residents being straight-jacketed to air heaters along ward walls. Slaps to the face occurred on a monthly basis. Dental care was poor and skin infections were rampant.

In another case of abuse, the parents of Pat Burns noticed the body of their own son had questionable scars and bruises when visiting him at Sunmount State School. They began noticing scars on Pat’s neck. No official answers were ever give as to how Pat obtained scars on his neck. How the bruises got there are questionable.  "They told us Pat was not a 'fighter' and other boys picked on him." Mrs. Burns said.

The Burnses photographed their son's neck and complained to the school authorities. After his parents complained, Pat was put into isolation as administration at the school decided this was a solution. He remained in an isolation ward for an extended period of time.

Pat's parents also noticed their son had developed a fear of older men, which led Mrs. Burns to suspect he may have been abused by school attendants. They also noticed he had a fear of stairs. Now 65 years old, Pat Burns is still afraid of stairs and unable to walk down them. 
(Ref: Watertown Daily Times, Page 13, June 1973)



Doctors reported on July 20, 1972 that Sunmount State School was in dire need of a good used portable sewing machine. Richard L. Francis, M.D requested for a good sewing machine to be installed.

Richard L. Francis, M.D requested programs for mentally retarded crippled children at Sunmount State School in 1973. In 1973, programs for mentally retarded crippled children were initiated at the Sunmount State School, specifically at the “crippled ward”.

Sunmount Developmental Center has been a private nonprofit facility that has been a Medicad participant since 1975. Sunmount State School was renamed to Sunmount Developmental Center in 1976. Sunmount Developmental Center received between $70,000 and $80,000 per year for each person in 1976.

Sunmount Developmental Center later assumed the added responsibilities of coordinator of client programs by hiring more qualified staff during the 1980s.

Today the population of Sunmount Developmental Center is 105 residents. Sunmount Developmental Center receives between $80,000 and $120,000 per year for each person. Most of which is through Medicaid money.


Sunmount Developmental Center is located in Tupper Lake, New York, US.

Bancroft Orchard in Burnaby, Canada forgotten revisited.

Bancroft Orchard was an orchard house located on 25 acres of land built in 1923. It was built without a bathroom surprisingly. A pioneer couple owned Bancroft Orchard until they were deceased. There was also a farm. An old craftsman farmhouse was found on this site.

The kitchen used to be in adjoining room towards the house. The current kitchen and a bedroom were added sometime in the 1940s. The original sink from the 1920s was added on and not salvaged.

They sold a sizable portion of land to the City of Burnaby to be used as a community park sometime during the 20th century. This park still bears numerous trees from the original orchard. They later subdivided their property to support a large housing complex. The large housing complex was built using the same colours as the old home.

Bancroft Orchard used well water until the mid-1980s. The house finally received indoor plumbing in 1984. Other buildings had been connected to plumbing by 1985.

The then-widowed wife of the Bancroft Orchard passed away in this home back in 2001. Noort Developments took control of ownership of the property in 2001. Surrounding neighborhood development and urban development made the area a desirable location. The Bancroft Orchard house was demolished in 2006.

Bancroft Orchard was located at 6801 Rumble Street, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.

Short history of Hoelscher Elementary School in San Antonio, Texas overlooked.

Hoelscher Elementary School is one of the many schools of San Antonio, Texas where its history has been overlooked. This news article explores the history of Hoelscher Elementary School.


Regina Hoelscher Elementary School opened in 1961 just adjacent to Brentwood Middle School in Thompson Field. Prekindergarten classes were offered at this school. Hoelscher Elementary School was named for Regina Hoelscher who was an educator for 47 years.

During the 2000s is when Virginia Kinney served as the principal for Regina Hoelscher Elementary School. She would serve as its principal until the school closed in the spring of 2005. The school's mascot was the Little Rockets and its colors were green and white.

Edgewood Independent School District closed Hoelscher Elementary School in the spring of 2005 due to high maintenance costs. Its low declining enrollment is another factor that led to the school’s closure. At the time of the closure, Hoelscher Elementary School was a K-5 school which operated from 1961 to 2005 in the Edgewood Independent School District. 97% of the student body was Hispanic.

After Hoelscher Elementary School closed, the school merged into Brentwood Middle School to accommodate more room for class space in summer of 2006. The school district used portions of the building as office spaces.

Today the building still stands and has now been merged into Brentwood Middle School. Edgewood ISD officials now use the building as office space.

Hoelscher Elementary School is located at 1602 Thompson Pl, San Antonio, Texas, US 78226.


*[Hoelscher Elementary School is Regina Hoelscher Elementary School.]

History of Goliad School in Galveston, Texas forgotten.

Goliad School is one of the few forgotten schools of Galveston, Texas that was operated by Galveston ISD. Not very much is known about this Galveston ISD school. Its own history seems to have been forgotten.


Goliad School was built in 1890 during the 1880-1881 school year. The Goliad School would open in 1881 during the 1880-1881 school year. The 1880-1881 school year was the first school year Goliad School would operate on.

The Goliad School started appearing on topographical maps in the 1890s as “Goliad School”. Goliad School would start appearing on topographical maps for Galveston County as “Goliad School” in 1891. (Ref: Galveston County 1891 Wall Map)

Goliad School was first known as the 3rd District School before being renamed to Goliad School. Goliad School operated as an elementary school called Goliad Elementary School.


The installation of a boiler was added at Goliad school on a bid of $15,985 in 1962. A roof was installed and repaired at Goliad Elementary School in 1963. Goliad School was renamed to Morgan Elementary School sometime in the 1970s. From then on, the school would operate as Morgan Elementary School until 1978. Jewell Banks was principal of Morgan Elementary School until 1978.

A report of the education committee includes a discussion of the proposed closing of Goliad School was reported in the Galveston Daily in 1973. However nothing happened. Goliad School still continued to operate. (Ref: Galveston Daily, Page 6, Saturday, March 17, 1973)

Goliad School was deemed inferior physically and academically by the Galveston ISD school board in 1975. The school was replaced in with L. A. Morgan Elementary School in the year 1975.
Goliad School was 94% black before closing. Racial imbalance is why Goliad School closed as mandated by the Brown vs. the Board of Education decision.
(Ref: Galveston Daily, Page 2, Thursday, May 28, 1981)

Goliad School was sold at the closing end of 1978. The Galveston ISD School Board accepted the high bids for the sale of Lovenberg Junior High School and Goliad Elementary School on the night of Wednesday, December 6, 1978. Thomas J. Green, of Green's Funeral Home, had the highest bid of $62,000 for the Goliad School.
(Ref: Galveston Daily News, Page 1, Thursday, December 7, 1978)


Sometime before 1994 is when Goliad School was demolished. By 1995, all that was left was a vacant field of grass.

In 1997, Galveston Housing Authority's Hoskins Square low-cost home development/subdivision was built and developed on the old Goliad Elementary School site at 31st Street and Avenue K. Funding was through the Public Housing Assistance Corp. of the Galveston Housing Authority. Nearly 21 homes were built on the site at the one-block area.

Today nothing remains of the former Goliad School site. All remnants have been paved over and removed from vicinity.

Goliad School was located at 30th Street and Avenue L, Galveston, Texas, US 77550.

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Short history of Onion Creek School in Doss, Texas forgotten.

Onion Creek School was established and opened in 1881 in Doss, Texas just right outside of Fredericksburg, Texas. The first Onion Creek School building was in a temporary building near the stone building that served as the third Onion Creek School building. The stone building that served as the third Onion Creek School building is still standing. Onion Creek School operated in School District No. 1 as recorded in the Gillespie County Commissioners Court Minutes of 1890.

Onion Creek School was consolidated into Doss Consolidated Common School District (Doss Common School District) in 1947. The school has maintained its small student-teacher ratio well throughout the years before consolidating with Doss Common School District.

Jim Faught purchased the property in 1948. Jim Faught later sold the property to Kad Gilbert sometime during the late 20th century. During the late 20th century is when Kad Gilbert began using the property for storage. Kad Gilbert used the building for storage of hay and wood.

Today Kad Gilbert owns the building and is using the Onion Creek School building for hay storage.

Onion Creek School is located at 2053 Salt Branch Loop, Doss, Texas, US 78618.

*[Onion Creek School was never a “district school”. It operated under School District No. 1.]
*[Doss Consolidated Common School District has gone under the names of Doss Common School District and Doss Independent School District.]

Monday, June 4, 2018

Danville School history of New Braunfels, Texas explained.

Danville School is one of the most widely known schools of Comal County and rural New Braunfels, Texas. Nearly everyone in Comal County can recall Danville School. Danville School operated from 1863 to 1946.


Danville School is an original one-room schoolhouse built in 1863 in New Braunfels, Texas. The building is 865 square feet. The school had porches on all four sides of a 24’ x 36’ classroom. Danville School was originally established at the location of 7030 FM 482, New Braunfels, Texas, US 78132. Danville School was operated by Solms School District. (Ref: History of New Braunfels and Comal County, Texas, 1844–1946, Oscar Haas)

In the 1870s, Danville School was a 1-8 school educating students in grades 1 through 8. Students attended their first eight grades at Danville School before attending high school in New Braunfels. 

Later in the 19th century, Danville School became a 1-12 school. Although Danville School was a 1-12 school throughout its history, Danville School primarily focused on educating students in grades 1 through 8. The original one-room Danville School building was part of the original Comal Settlement area which was established in the mid-1840s.


Danville School operated until after World War II, when it was consolidated with other school districts in the area to form Comal Independent School District (then Comal Rural High School District aka Comal Rural School District) in 1956. 1956 is when Danville School shut down and was consolidated into Comal Independent School District and New Braunfels Independent School District. Students attending Danville School would now attend Comal Elementary School.

Comal Rural High School District approved and voted on November 12, 1956 to consolidate the schools of Bulverde, Danville, Davenport, Fischer, Goodwin, Mountain Valley, Sherwood and Solms to become a part of the new Comal Rural High School District.

The Danville School building and a storage shed that used to be part of the Solms School District were moved to Comal Elementary School in 1956. Those buildings are still in use today.
(Ref: New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung, Page 4,  November 14, 1996).

The school was consolidated along with Solms School District. Solms School District would no longer operate Danville School as it had for 93 years. Danville School was a 1-8 school at the time of school district consolidation. A portion of attended the New Braunfels ISD schools.

The Comal Rural High School District was renamed to Comal Independent School District in 1958. 1958 is when Danville School consolidated with Davenport School which was also consolidated into Comal Independent School District to form Comal Elementary School.

After 1958, the former Danville School building had been serving as a music room for several years since it had become obsolete for classes.


In 1989, New Braunfels Conservation Society approached New Braunfels city council about the possibility of its leasing the old Danville School building as a place to have their monthly meetings and activities. Sandy Schlameus gave a presentation of the proposed Danville School moving and restoration. 1989 is when New Braunfels Conservation Society made an effort to clean the building in an attempt of restoration.

The Danville School building was purchased at an auction in 1990 by Margaret “Margy” Waldrip at a price of $1,600 was moved to a ranch property 12 miles north of New Braunfels. It costed Margy $6,800 to move it to her property.

1990 is when the schoolhouse was restored. A clear glass window was restored along with the sink and copper countertop.2 beautifully restored oval glass front doors can be seen when entering the building. The kitchen was restored. It became the Historic Kuebler Waldrip Haus Bed and Breakfast in the same year.

(Ref: Kuebler Waldrip Haus Bed and Breakfast website)


Today Danville School is now located at 1620 Hueco Springs Loop, New Braunfels, Texas, US 78132. The Danville School retains the beautiful original wood ceiling, walls, and floor. It presently serves as Historic Kuebler Waldrip Haus Bed and Breakfast.

*[Comal Rural High School District also went under the names Comal Rural School District, Comal County Rural High School District No. 705, and Comal County Rural High School District before being renamed to Comal Independent School District in 1958.]

History of Brewton Springs School in Austin, Texas explained and explored.

Brewton Springs School was one of the many forgotten educational institutions of Austin/Travis County that have been long forgotten. In fact, Brewton Springs School was one of the many Travis County rural schools. As a school, Brewton Springs School operated from 1879 to 1950. Brewton Springs School was devoted to education.

Brewton Springs School was also called Bruton Springs School which that school was sometimes referred to as. Brewton Springs School went under several names over the years as its time operating as a school such as Snuff Box School, Snuff Box, and Bruton Springs School.


Brewton Springs School was established in 1879 as a 1-12 school which taught grades 1 through 12. School was taught in an old picket house located on the Allen Farm taught by Miss Annie Gambee. Miss Annie Gambee was the first teacher. Students sat on benches made of elm logs. Each bench furnished seats for 5 to 6 students. Its earliest school trustees were Herbert H. Allen, Joe Hutson, and Pate Patterson.

The school was granted its own school district in 1879. Although Brewton Springs School was within bounds of present day Eanes ISD boundaries, Brewton Springs School had its own school district called School District #50 that was not connected with Eanes School or to the Eanes School District #48 (now known as Eanes ISD) at that time.

Brewton Springs School was a completely autonomous school operated as cited in the book Eanes: Portrait of a Community. Brewton Springs School instead operated as a “county school” under Travis County Public Schools for the Travis County Common School District.

(Ref: Eanes: Portrait of a Community, Linda Vance, 1986)
(Ref: Eanes: A History of the School and Community, Linda Vance, 1976)


In 1881, the first school was built as a 15’ x 10’ foot box square building designed as a one-room schoolhouse located on the Jim Brewton farm. Hence the name Brewton Springs. The school only had one door. By 1881 Brewton Springs School had county funding and state funding allocated towards the school.

The architectural design of the school building was built as a snuff box. Because the school was shaped similarly to a snuff box, students called the school Snuff Box. However the name Snuff Box did not derive from the architecture of the school building itself. The name Snuff Box came about because so many of its students chewed tobacco and dipped snuff.

The old picket house reverted back to the Allen Farm in 1881 as part of their agreement in terms of ownership. No deeds were created. The school district gave the house back to Jack Allen.

As cited in the book Lone Star Travel Guide to Texas Hill County, Brewton Springs School was also known as Snuff Box. The Brewton Springs School was located east of Bee Cave. Brewton Springs School was located east of Bee Cave and west of Cuernavaca Drive near Patterson Road less than 0.2 miles of the junction of Cuernavaca Drive & FM 2244.
(Ref: Lone Star Travel Guide to Texas Hill County, 2011)

During its earliest years when tax funds ran low and there was not enough money to pay a teacher, students from Brewton Springs School attended school at Bee Caves School, Teck School, Cox Springs School, and Eanes School. It was only on occasion that Brewton Springs School students were sent to Bee Cave to attend the Bee Cave School.

In 1888, the State of Texas closed down Brewton Springs School because when tax funds ran low, there was not enough money to pay a teacher or 2 teachers. This was only temporary. Brewton Springs School students were sent to Bee Cave to attend the Bee Cave School until 1890. The school reopened in 1890. This time the school had 3 teachers. Enrollment was 80 students.

A split caused by a change and shift in scholastics resulting in a small house to be built at Walnut Springs. 2 houses in the school district proved to be too many. School terms were split. One term was taught half at one house and half at the other. So the school moved back to the Allen farm and away from the Jim Brewton farm. Brewton Springs School moved a series of several times during its history throughout the 19th century and 20th century.

1892 is when the Walnut Springs house had burned. It is unclear how the school burned. It could have been antics by local children or its students. This fire had no documentation or produced leads as to who had done it.

Around 1896 is when Brewton Springs School was moved to the Thomas Riley Place. At this point the school moved several times. The school district hired 3 more teachers to teach at the school.

(Ref: The Defender, 1936)
(Ref: Eanes: Portrait of a Community, Linda Vance, 1986)
(Ref: Eanes: A History of the School and Community, Linda Vance, 1976)


Brewton Springs School was moved again in 1904. During the same year, the school was remodeled with more lumber from leftover donations. Benches were donated. 14 teachers were hired throughout the 1904-1905 school term. 34 students attended this school during the 1904-1905 school term.

Even in the 1920s when most schools were 1-8 schools, Brewton Springs School was a 1-12 school unlike Eanes School were school stopped at 7th grade. From the 1920s on, Eanes School did not go beyond the 7th grade. The 1920s is when Eanes School began changing its scholastics by primarily teaching elementary school grades.

(From the 1920s on, Eanes School did not go beyond the 7th grade. The 1920s is when Eanes School began changing its scholastics by primarily teaching elementary school grades. 8th grade students were bussed to Allan Junior High School. Although Eanes School did not go beyond the 7th grade, Eanes School still taught middle school students and high school students until 1943. After 1943, high school students attended Austin High School and Allan High School. Middle school students attended Allan Junior High School and later O. Henry Middle School. Some had remained at Eanes School as the school had taught middle school grades until 1950.)

(Ref: Eanes: Portrait of a Community, Linda Vance, 1986)
(Ref: Eanes: A History of the School and Community, Linda Vance, 1976)


1936 is when the school district began making plans to tear down and rebuild the then-current Brewton Springs School building. Meetings were held with the Superintendent of Travis County Public Schools.

In 1937 the school was torn down and rebuilt on John Teague’s property located on FM 2244 (Bee Cave Road) near Cuernavaca Drive by Patterson Road near Patterson Ranch. Homer Teague moved into the old schoolhouse afterwards. The other old schoolhouse remained as a private residence. While the school was being moved, classes were held in Watson Springs Baptist Church. Watson Springs Baptist Church was a single-room frame church. The church was also nicknamed “Snuff Box Church” because members of the congregation used to spit tobacco juice out of the window during services.


In 1948, Brewton Springs School began attempting to merge and consolidate into Eanes School District #48. Some Brewton Springs School students began attending the Eanes School. Eanes School District then operated both Eanes School and Brewton Springs School.

In 1949, both Brewton Springs School and its school district were consolidated into Eanes ISD under Gilmer-Aiken Law. Gilmer-Aiken Law consolidated many rural school districts, including Brewton Springs & Bee Cave, had reformed many Texas public schools. Eanes School students who wanted to continue their education past 7th grade either went to Brewton Springs School or to Allan Junior High School and Austin High School in Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD). However Brewton Springs School continued to operate under Eanes ISD until 1950.

1950 was the year the Travis County Schools Superintendent and State of Texas closed down Brewton Springs School and its school district during the 1950-1951 school year. The school district itself was consolidated and abolished during the same year. Brewton Springs School students were merged with Eanes School and to Bee Cave School. Brewton Springs School students were merged to both Cox Springs School, Dripping Springs School, and Lago Vista School as well. Brewton Springs School shut down due to lack of enrollment.

In 1950, Brewton Springs School was shut down by the State of Texas due to Gilmer-Aiken Law after Bill No. 116 of the 50th legislature was passed. After Brewton Springs School shut down, its students were transferred to Eanes School. Eanes School then had 80 students. A third room to the two-room rock building of Eanes School was constructed in the same year to relieve overcrowding. Classes were now held at the Eanes School.

In 1950, Homer Teague and his two sons, Robert Teague and Jackson Teague, lived in the building under rough conditions. They would live their until they moved. In 1960, the building was abandoned on the Teague Land next to Commons Ford Ranch.

It is unknown and unclear whether or not anyone else besides the Teague family lived in the original Brewton Springs School building after consolidation with Eanes ISD whereas the other school building became a private residence.


In 1985, Robert Teague gained ownership of the property from a handwritten gift deed produced in 1942 by the wife of Homer Teague.

In 1988, the (old) 5th Brewton Springs School building was moved to the Commons Ford Metropolitan Park in the Cuernavaca neighborhood by Robert Teague. Robert Teague donated Brewton Springs School to the City of Austin as an attempt of historic preservation. No known further work or renovations were done or made to the old Brewton Springs School building after 1988.

By 1990, the former school building fell victim to rural decay. Its windows were boarded up with plywood. No use was made.

Today the 5th Brewton Springs School building sits at the entrance of Commons Ford Metropolitan Park. Its windows are boarded up with plywood. A chimney was added to the building as an extra. It is highly possible that Homer Teague built the chimney.


Although the original school building of Brewton Springs School may no longer be extant or the memories of the Brewton Springs School may have been forgotten, Brewton Springs lives on as a historic name under the street name of Bruton Springs Road located in the Cuernavaca neighborhood.

Brewton Springs School was located near FM 2244 & Cuernavaca Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78733. Brewton Springs School is now located at 614 North Commons Ford Road, Austin, Texas US 78733.

History of Prairieview School in Tulia, Texas by long forgotten.

It is unknown of exactly when the Prairieview School was built or what grades this school had served during its time of operation. However this school was never a “district school” operating within the confines of its own school district. Not anything else can be found out about this school online or offline.

Prairieview School was built as a brick schoolhouse with two classrooms sometime in the 20th century. An auditorium was built on the inside. The building was two stories tall. Prairieview School was located in the Northeast part of Hale County 1 mile North of Ranch Road 788 (RR 788) and 2 miles west of the Hale County-Floyd County line.

The school closed in 1940. 1940 was the exact same year when Prairieview School began being used a community center. By 1958 the building was demolished. Nothing remains of the school site today.

Prairieview School was located near 3062 TX 86, Tulia, Texas, US 79088.

History of Indian Village School of Woodville, Texas forgotten.

Indian Village School is one of the forgotten of few Indian schools of the State of Texas. Only so much information is known about this school in particular. This news article will explain the history behind Indian Village School in Woodville Texas.


Indian Village School as an “Indian school” for Native American Indian students living within the confines of the Alabama-Coushatta Indian Reservation beginning in 1906. School was taught in a wooden shack that was constructed out of pine wood. Indian School Village operated under the Indian Village School District No. 17 located in Woodville, Texas. The Indian Village School was not eligible for rural aid since the school district did not levy a tax. Languages taught at the school were English, Spanish, and Koasati (Coushatti).

Up until 1916 all of the teaching was done by Mrs. C. W. Chambers for six months each year. The school term was only a six month period. Mrs. C. W. Chambers was the main teacher for this school and she was well respected. Teacher for this school were Mr. J. H. Wilbanks, Mrs. J. H. Wilbanks, and Mrs. C. W. Chambers

60 scholastics enumerated the 1924-1925 school year. Over 50 students were counted for daily attendance.

At the beginning of the 1927-1928 school year is when the State of Texas made the Indian Village School District eligible to receive rural aid. Appropriations of $1,035 were given in state apportionment. Industrial aid was $256 dollars. By 1928 two small frame buildings compromised the Indian Village School. One building was specifically for the primary school grades (elementary school grades).

Appropriations were used to build an equipped modern school building sometime during the 20th century. The wooden shack was removed from the site. In its place is a new modern school building.

Indian School Village is located 319 US 190 West, Woodville, Texas, US 75979.

Doak Spring School history exposed.

Vague information about the Doak Spring School is known. However it is one of the many numerous forgotten schools of Texas from the 19th century and 20th century. The tiny school was a negro school for African American students of Lincoln, Texas. This news article will explore the history behind Doak Spring School.


Doak Spring School was organized in 1897 in the African American community of Doak Springs located within Lincoln, Texas, which is outside of Lexington, Texas. The tiny school was a negro school for African American students serving elementary school grades and high school grades on 0.75 acres of land. Doak Spring School was a 1-11 school.

Doak Springs supplied water to the Doak Springs School following 1897. Students took turns in bringing water to the school.


Doak Spring School was also known as Doak Springs School. The Doak Springs School name became more commonly used during the early 20th century. Throughout much of the 20th century, Doak Spring School was a 1-11 school that taught African American students in grades 1 through 11.

D.F. Smith and D.N. Smith served as principals at the Doaks Springs School beginning at the 1908-1909 school year. Willie Smith was the only student during attending the Doaks Springs School during the 1909-1910 school year.

The name for Doak Spring School was changed to Community School No. 49 when it was moved to the John Roberson place in 1909. Doak Springs formed its own school district called Doak Springs School District No. 33 during the same year. Doak Springs School District No. 33 operated Community School No. 49.

Doak Springs School was built at a cost of $3,000 in 1925 during the 1924-1925 school semester. This school was built using the Rosenwald Fund which provided buildings for the schools throughout the 1920s across the southern United States. The Rosenwald Fund provided for a new school building with expanded facilities. The 0.75 acres of land was expanded to 2 acres of land. (Ref: Fisk University, Rosenwald Database)

Student enrollment was around 150 into at least the 1950s. It was usually more than 100 students. (Ref: Handbook of Texas Online, Nolan Thompson, Doak Springs, TX, June 2, 2018)

The school board Lee County Common School District and Lexington ISD consolidated the Doak Springs school with the Lexington ISD school district on the date of Thursday, August 24, 1967. The school closed. (Ref: Rockdale Reporter, Page 1, Thursday, August 24, 1967)


From 1968 until the 1990s is when the school was used as a Baptist church. Sometime in the 1990s is when the Baptist church moved into another church building leaving the old school building abandoned. The school was sold to a private homeowner in 2004. Its building sat abandoned.

Today in the 21st century, the school now sits abandoned and overgrown by grass. The building still stands. The Doak Springs area is located in the southern end of the Lexington ISD school district.

Doak Spring School is located at 2432 FM 3403, Lincoln, Texas, US, 78948.


*[Doak Spring School was also known as Doak Springs School.]
*[Doak Spring School had its own school district.]

Berryhill School history of Albany, Texas overlooked.

Berryhill School is one of the many rural schools and community schools located in the State of Texas. Berryhill School served a portion of Shackelford County. Lueders ISD once operated Berryhill School.


Berryhill School was established in Lueders, Texas during the 1900s in a single story wood frame building. Berryhill School was a 1-8 school that educated students in grade 1 through 8. After 8th grade is when students transferred to Lueders High School. School ran on a 9 month session which was uncommon among rural schools.

Berryhill School was located in the Berryhill School District which Shackelford County Common School District oversaw. There were two teachers for 21 students making it a 21:2 student-teacher ratio along with a principal and vice principal. Berryhill School District was a 46 square-mile area which Berryhill School was located in.

What’s unique and interesting about Berryhill School is that this school had a storm cellar prepared for weather emergencies such as rainstorms and tornados. The storm cellar was 20 feet deep and 10 feet across. A large coal burning stove kept students warm.


Berryhill had a lot of oil wells in its district in the 1930s and 1940s. The school was located near the oilfield. Berryhill's oil prosperity dates from discovery of the Ivy Oil Field in 1937. There were approximately 65 producing oil wells of the Ivy pool at one time.

In 1938, Berryhill had 39 students and 3 teachers. Elmer Cox became the bus driver for this school district. Board Chairman E. W. Carlson says the school owns $5,000 in war bonds during 1939.

The old frame building burned in 1940. After the building went up in smoke, nothing was left. A new school building was much needed for the Berryhill School District. Construction of the new school building was begun in the spring. It was replaced by the present limestone structure we see today.

In the 1940s, Alexene Rodriguez was the principal, Aileen Alexene Rodriguez was the vice principal and teacher, and Mrs. Bess Wood was the teacher for grades 1st through 3rd. Aileen Alexene Rodriguez was the teacher for grades 4th through 8th.

Trustees had provided some transportation in the fall of 1945. Students rode a Packard station wagon to and from school. The Packard station wagon was radio equipped. The two teachers, Alexene Rodriguez, principal, and Mrs. Bess Wood, alternate as drivers every other day. They traverse a 26-mile route It is divided into two loops, and two trips must be made to get all the students to school and deliver them home

(Ref: Abilene Reporter News, Page 1, Sunday, April 21, 1946)


In 1949 Gilmer-Akin Law required school districts to consolidate with a contiguous school district. Berryhill School merged into Lueders ISD and Albany ISD in 1950. However several Berryhill families moved into Lueders, Texas in Jones County so their children could attend the Lueders School (and Lueders schools) which was only 3 miles from Berryhill. Berryhill School continued its elementary school classes for its elementary school students.

Lueders ISD continued to maintain Berryhill School after consolidation in. After the school closed, school reunions, family reunions, and other social functions were held there until the 1990s. By the 1990s, this school was abandoned.


In 2007, the roof caved into the storm cellar. Nature elements such as vegetation has now filled the storm cellar. The Berryhill School House is still standing.

Berryhill School is located at the intersection of CR 174 & CR 175, Lueders, Texas, US 79533.

History of Red Creek School in San Angelo, Texas long forgotten.

Red Creek School is one of the many forgotten schools of San Angelo and the State of Texas. Very little information can be found out about this school or researched. Not much is known about this school.

Red Creek School was established as a rural community school sometime at the beginning of the 20th century during the 1900s. The exact year when the school was built is unknown. It is unknown if this school operated within its own school district or not. Red Creek School was an elementary school that was a 1-7 school. Red Creek School was also known as Red Creek Elementary School.

Red Creek School was built as a one-room country school northeast of San Angelo. The building was built using native limestone hence its greyscale color scheme. The foundation was first built out of limestone in the early 20th century and later repaved with cement. The school had an outdoor grill for students to use during lunchtime.

Miss Lula Russell was a popular teacher who was said to have taught as Red Creek School beginning in the early 1900s throughout the 1920s.

Exactly when the school closed is currently unknown. It is unknown if Red Creek School consolidated or merged into San Angelo ISD during the 20th century. What is known is that the school is now abandoned and is now a storage building for a farmer/rancher. The limestone school building no longer has its roof or windows. Nature has taken over the building. Trees are growing inside the school room.

Red Creek School is located at 3267 East Red Creek Road, San Angelo, Texas, US 76905.

Exploring the forgotten history of Kenney-New Whedem School in Bellville, Texas.

Kenney-New Whedem School is one of the many forgotten schools of Bellville and one of the many forgotten schools of Texas. This news article explains and explores the history of Kenney-New Whedem School in Bellville, Texas.


Origins of the Kenney-New Wehdem School began in 1922 after the 1921 school merger when Kenney School and New Wehdem School merged their schools and schools districts to form a new school district in an effort to save money as many school districts in Texas and across the United States do today. When New Wehdem School and Kenney School merged their schools into each other, a new school district called Kenney-New Wehdem School District was created and established in the 1922-1923 school year. 

Both the Kenney School and New Wehdem School were shut down effectively in a timely manner during the summer of 1922. Kenney School and New Wehdem School were elementary schools prior to merging. Both schools never went past 9th grade.

Prior to merging, Kenney School was a 1-9 school that taught students in grades 1 through 9. Kenney School was a 1-9 school throughout much of its history. After 9th grade is when students would attend high school/senior high school at Bellville High School and Bellville Senior High School.

However, Kenney School was a 1-8 school at the time of merging because the 1920s is when Kenney School became a standardized accredited 1-8 school that taught students in grades 1 through 8. Kenney School itself was demolished after merging with New Wehdem School. The building no longer exists today.

Prior to merging, New Wehdem School served the New Wehdem community as a 1-6 school  that taught students in grades 1 through 6 for this rural community. Students would continue to attend junior high school/middle school/intermediate school at Bellville Junior High School in Bellville.

The New Wehdem School was moved onto the current property to serve as a teacherage building in 1923. The New Wehdem School building became a teacherage building until the property was sold in 1973. In 1974, the New Wehdem School building (then teacherage building) became a residence (home).


Kenney-New Wehdem School was established in 1923 as a two-room school building that was one single story in height located on a 260,489 square foot lot size. Kenney-New Whedem School was located at the address of 1433 South Loop 497, Bellville, Texas, US. Kenney-New Whedem School was located in its own school district called Kenney-New Wehdem School District.

The Kenney-New Wehdem School had a musical program and a livestock program that was widely known in the Bellville area. The graduating classes always had less than 10 students every year. (Ref: THE BELLVILLE TIMES, THURSDAY, APRIL 1, 1952)

Kenney-New Wehdem School was a standardized accredited 1-8 school that taught students in grades 1 through 8 for this rural community. Grade 9 was no longer taught.


In 1939, one bus was acquired by Kenney-New Wehdem School District to transport children to Bellville High School, Bellville Senior High School, and Bellville Junior High School. This bus together with a new bus acquired later is now used to transport children to the Kenney-New Wehdem School and high school children to Bellville.
(Ref: THE BELLVILLE TIMES, PAGE 5, FEBRUARY 1, 1943)

Sometime during the 1940s is when Kenney-New Wehdem School became a 1-8 school which taught students in grades 1 through 8. 9th grade was added back for the first time in 20 something odd years. That resulted in Kenney-New Wehdem School to become a 1-9 school.

The Kenney-New Wehdem School always held its annual school closing program and 9th grade graduation ceremonies. After 9th grade is when students would attend high school/senior high school at Bellville High School and Bellville Senior High School.


On the date of Tuesday, May 8, 1952, the Kenney-New Wehdem School District voted 65 to 17 on a $40,000 bond issue for a new elementary school and building for its community. The bond issue was to erect a modern elementary school. The bond issue did not pass during election due to school district consolidation with Bellville ISD.

On the date of Friday, May 9, 1952 is when the Kenney-New Wehdem School District consolidated into Bellville ISD. Its programs were consolidated during the summer of 1952.

Kenney-New Wehdem School District embraced 6 original white schools and 3 original negro schools at the time. No Mexican schools or Indian schools were operated by this school district. Kenney Negro School (aka Kenney Colored School) is an example of a negro school operated by this school district. Kenney Elementary School and Kenney High School were operated by this school district as well.
(Ref: THE BELLVILLE TIMES, THURSDAY, APRIL 1, 1952)

Despite consolidation, Bellville ISD continued to operate the rural school for 10 years under its supervision and guidance. Kenney-New Wehdem School continued to be operated by Bellville ISD throughout the 1950s.


During the 1960s is when Kenney-New Wehdem School reverted back to being a 1-8 school. 9th grade was sent attend school at Bellville Junior High School and Bellville High School. Kenney-New Wehdem School was renamed to "Kenney-New Wehdem Elementary School" sometime during the 1960s. Exactly when is unknown.

Kenney-New Wehdem School desegregated in 1968 during the 1968-1969 school year. The city school board announced that tentative plans call for the same schools to conduct classes in the coming school year. (Ref: THE BELLVILLE TIMES, FEBRUARY 15, 1968)

Kenney-New Wehdem School shut down in 1972. The Kenney-New Wehdem School building became a home when the property was sold in 1973. In 1974, the New Wehdem School building (then teacherage building) became a residence (home).


An untimely fire that had occurred on the date of April 29, 2015 destroyed the old Kenney-New Wehdem school building. While the residents of the house and one of their dogs escaped the blaze of the fire, 45 dogs perished during the fire. According to fire officials, some of the dogs were loose but many were in kennels.

The building was destroyed and dismantled by the 2015 fire. Very few items were found remaining after the untimely fire. Wooden walls that supported the building and structure collapsed. Everything inside burned.

(Ref: THE BELLVILLE TIMES, PAGE 4, THURSDAY, APRIL 30, 2015)

The only remains left today is a scattered pile of wood from the Kenney-New Wehdem School building and the teacherage building. Metal can be found poking out of the ground, covered in dirt, at varying angles.


Kenney-New Whedem School was located at 1433 South Loop 497, Bellville, Texas, US 77418.

History of Frydek School in Sealy, Texas forgotten.

Frydek School is one of the many forgotten schools in the US State of Texas. Frydek School was a school that served as a community school for the small community of Frydek which is southeast of Sealy, Texas. However not much is known about the Frydek School. This news article will explain the history of Frydek School. 


Frydek School was built in 1923 as a single story building with resemblance bearing similarities to a single family home. This single story building served as a two-room schoolhouse in the Czech settlement of Frydek, Texas which is southeast of Sealy, Texas.
(Ref: Sealy News, YE OLDE FRYDEK SCHOOL, August 17, 1972)

The Frydek School was a 1-9 school that had educated students in grades 1 through 9. Students would finish high school at Sealy High School. At one point Frydek School became a 1-8 school serving students in grades 1 through 8. However that was only for a short period of time.

Frydek School was known also as Frydek Public School which operated in its own school district called Frydek School District. Many students in that school district lived in Sealy.
(Ref: Sealy News, July 1969)

Two expansions were added in 1932. After 1932, no more expansions or known modifications were made to the school.

On the date of March 10, 1964, Frydek School was consolidated into Sealy ISD. The school closed in 1965. The school property was purchased in 1967 by Mr. and Mrs. James Pomikol. They used the old teacherage building for their home.
(Ref: Sealy News, YE OLDE FRYDEK SCHOOL, August 17, 1972)

As reported by Sealy News in 1972, “Frydek Public School is heading for its complete demise this fall.” The school building was planned to be razed within the next year. With the razing of this building marked the end of on era for rural school education. Frydek School was located in one of Texas' earliest Czech settlements.
(Ref: Sealy News, YE OLDE FRYDEK SCHOOL, August 17, 1972)

1973 was the year the Frydek School was demolished. In 1974, a new house was built on its former site. The house was built as a 2,128 square foot single family home on 2.07 acres of land.
(Ref: movoto)

Today the new house still stands in perfect condition. The two-room building no longer stands. Only the teacherage building remains. The teacherage now serves as the home for Mr. James Pomikol.

Frydek School was located at 9905 FM 1458, Sealy, Texas, US 77474.

Mary Allen Seminary College lays in ruins today.

Today, Mary Allen Seminary College, which is located in a thicket wood forest on the north side of Crockett, Texas now lays in ruins today. All windows no longer exist. The roof has collapsed into the building. Its floors have since collapsed. The roof collapsing into the building has caused its floors to have collapsed.

Mary Allen Seminary College was built as a female college for African American students in 1886. Mary Allen Seminary College was known then as a “negro college”. Only female students were allowed to attend.

Mary Allen College became a 4-year liberal arts institution in 1944.  Mary Allen Seminary College was plagued by a series of financial setbacks causing the school to close in 1972. By 1973, Mary Allen Seminary College was abandoned.

Mary Allen Seminary College went under several names such as: Mary Allen Seminary College, Mary Allen Seminary, Mary Allen School, Mary Allen Female College, and Mary Allen Negro Female College to name a few.

Mary Allen Seminary College is located at 808 North 4th Street, Crockett, Texas, US 75835.

History of Mixville Colored School in Sealy, Texas forgotten.

Mixville Colored School is one of the many forgotten schools in the US State of Texas. This news article will explain the history of Mixville School. 

Mixville Colored School was created on the date of August 7, 1916 in Sealy, Texas. Around the same time Frydek School and St. Mary’s Church School were created. Mixville Colored School was operated by San Felipe School District #5 from 1916 to 1949.

Mixville Colored School was an elementary school that was a 1-8 school that taught grades 1 through 8. After 8th grade is when students attend high school at Sealy Colored High School aka Sealy Negro High School or at Austin County High School. Mixville Colored School was a school for black students living east of Sealy.

Mixville Colored School opened in August 7, 1916 during the 1916-1917 school year. In 1916, Mixville Colored School had 48 students enrolled. In 1917, Mixville Colored School had 50 students enrolled. In 1917, Mixville Colored School had 58 students enrolled. Enrollment was never past 70 students.

In 1949, Mixville Colored School was consolidated into Sealy ISD. From thereon afterwards is when Mixville Colored School was operated by Sealy ISD from 1949 to 1962. Mixville Colored School was closed in 1962 during the 1961-1962 school year. No trace of the Mixville Colored School exist today.

History of Mixville School in Sealy, Texas forgotten.

Mixville School is one of the many forgotten schools in the US State of Texas. This news article will explain the history of Mixville School. 

Mixville School was created on the date of August 7, 1916 in Sealy, Texas. Mixville Colored School was created on the date of August 7, 1916, which is around the same time Frydek School and St. Mary’s Church School were created. Mixville School was operated by San Felipe School District #5 from 1898 to 1949.

Mixville School was an elementary school that was a 1-8 school that taught grades 1 through 8. After 8th grade is when students attend high school at Sealy High School. Mixville School was a school for white students only.

On the date of Thursday, May 20, 1909 is when Mixville School closed. School trustees attended  the closing of the Mixville School. Mixville School reopened in 1911 during the 1910-1911 school year.

In 1916, Mixville School had 48 students enrolled. In 1917, Mixville School had 50 students enrolled. Enrollment was never past 70 students.

In 1949, Mixville School was consolidated into Sealy ISD. From thereon afterwards is when Mixville School was operated by Sealy ISD from 1949 to 1962. Mixville School was closed in 1962 during the 1961-1962 school year. No trace of the Mixville School exist today.

Sul Ross School history of Waco, Texas revealed by Michael Mixerr.

Sul Ross School was one of the many top public schools in Waco, Texas for that was renown for being one of the top schools in the Waco ISD school district from the 19th century to the 21st century. Sul Ross School operated from 1889 to 2012. Although Sul Ross School is one of Waco’s most known schools, the history of this particular Waco school has been somewhat forgotten.


Sul Ross School was built to serve as a community school in 1882 for Waco Public Schools (now Waco ISD). Construction period for this school lasted 1 year from 1885 to 1886. The school was built as a 2 story red brick building with a concrete foundation. Wood was used for its interior structure. Sul Ross School finally opened in 1885. The 1885-1886 school year was its very first school year.

Sul Ross School was built to serve as an elementary school which was known to Waco residents as Sul Ross Elementary School. Sul Ross School was a 1-7 school which taught grades 1 through 7. This is what grades were taught at this particular Waco ISD school for over 90 years.


As Waco News-Tribune reported in 1951, “Negotiations with property owners around the Sul Ross School have been under way for several months and the board may have to resort to condemnation of that property if more progress is not made soon.”
(Ref: Waco News-Tribune, Page 16, February 7, 1951)

Students used the 1885 school during construction. Conditions were overwhelming citing overcrowding and availability in classroom space. Completion for the remaining wing of the new building was about a month. One wing of the new Sul Ross Elementary School building was occupied when school opened on the date of September 4, 1952.

Waco ISD officials anticipated a record enrollment of 750 for the Sul Ross School on the date of August 29, 1952 as cited in the Waco News-Tribune.

A new feature of the Sul Ross School was the homemaking suite where elementary school students were taught simple courses. The homemaking suite had three rooms equipped with a sink and cabinets. Teachers instructed personal cleanliness and good health habits. What was built were 12 classrooms, the auditorium-cafeteria, library, health rooms and the suite of offices. Shower rooms were installed.

Smith Building Company and Easterwood and Easterwood architects were the contractors that built the new school building. Total contract price for the building was $499,408.

(Ref: Waco News-Tribune, Sul Ross Wing Will Be Ready For Students, Page 10, August 29, 1952)


On the date of March 5, 1953, several opening ceremonies were held at the new Sul Ross School building. Sul Ross School was torn down and rebuilt into single story brick buildings The new building was a replacement for the old building. The 1885 building was reported to be still standing as a 2 story red brick building facing Ross Avenue.

Sul Ross Elementary School was the largest grade school in the Waco Independent School District. It’s enrollment rate was higher than any other Waco ISD school at that time from 1953 to 1955.

Sul Ross School had received several transfer students in 1954. For instance, Hilda Rios and John Huseby had been transferred from the South Waco School to Miss Bettye Hooper’s third grade room at Sul Ross School. Frank Rios was a new student in Mrs. Charlotte Beane’s 6th grade class.Frank Rias was a new student in Mr. Charles Beane’s 6th grade class. Gene Tanksley was a new student in Mrs. Mary Joyce Wooldridge’s sixth grade room

(Ref: Waco News-Tribune, Dedication Set Tonight at 6:30 For Sul Ross, Page 7, March 5, 1953)
(Ref: Waco News-Tribune, Sul Ross School Receives Several Transfer Pupils, Page 38, January 17, 1954)


By the mid-1950s, Sul Ross Elementary School was the largest grade school and elementary school located in the Waco Independent School District. It’s enrollment rate was higher than any other Waco ISD school at that time. Several additions, modifications, and renovation were made to Sul Ross School during the 1950s.


By the 1980s, Sul Ross School was no longer a 1-7 school teaching students in grades 1 through 7. Sul Ross School would become then known as what was a “1-5 school” teaching students in grades 1 through 5. Throughout the 80s, Sul Ross School was known as Sul Ross 1-5 School.

On the date of Tuesday, August 28, 1984, about 50 parents staged a march from Bell’s Hill School to Sul Ross School to protest no bus service for their children. The students attended Bell’s Hill last year, but it was closed to students in grades 1-5 that year and the kindergarten was left in the new wing of the facility. The 1-5 students were changed to Sul Ross School at 8th Street and Cleveland Avenue.

Parents expressed their concerns about the young children having to cross South 17th Street and South 18th Street which are one-way streets and walking in the South 11th Street areas which parents consider dangerous.

(Ref: The Waco Citizen, Page 1, Tuesday, August 28, 1984)


Dallas-based Leon Capital Group bought the property from Waco ISD in 2013. Demolition began to the old Sul Ross Elementary School on the date of January 11, 2014. Asbestos removal was done to the Sul Ross School campus. Leon Capital Group had built several single family units and apartment dwellings after the school buildings were demolished. The property had surplus property for a while.
(Ref: Waco Tribune-Herald, Old Sul Ross school comes down, Jan 11, 2014)

Today in the 21st century, Tinsley Place now occupies the former campus of Sul Ross School (Sul Ross Elementary School). The school buildings no longer exist. No traces of this are extant today.


The address for Sul Ross School was 901 South 7th Street, Waco, Texas, US 76706. Sul Ross School was located at the intersection of Cleveland Avenue & South 7th Street, Waco, Texas, US 76706.