Saturday, September 8, 2018

Old Browning Hangar in Austin, Texas now revitalized.

An airplane hangar called the Browning Hangar in Austin, Texas has now been revitalized. For much of 2018 the old Browning Hangar was under construction. Work on revitalizing the Browning Hangar was completed in early August 2018. Today the Browning Hangar has now been revitalized while maintaining its historic design and is now serving as a mixed use structure.

Browning Hangar was once in service for the Robert Mueller Municipal Airport from 1945 to 1999. In 2000 the airplane was abandoned. Architectural Engineers Collaborative revitalized the airplane hangar in 2007. The sides and doors were removed in the same year. A protective roof cover was added. Restoration was started in 2007 and had ended in 2008. By 2017, the airplane hangar was completely open to both the public and private.

Browning Hangar still stands strong as 1 of the 3 remaining structures from the former Robert Mueller Municipal Airport including the control tower.

Exploring the forgotten history of the Elroy Negro School.

Elroy Negro School is one of the many forgotten schools and institutions of Austin & Del Valle that have faded away with time and from people's memories. Not much is known about the Elroy Negro School.


The exact date of when Elroy Negro School built and constructed is unknown. However the school itself dates back to the early 20th century. Both Elroy School District and Colorado Common School District #36 operated this school. Elroy Negro School was a county school that primarily taught elementary school grades. Elroy Negro School served as a school for black/African-American students who lived in the Elroy community.

Elroy Negro School had a ratio of 2 teachers to 61 black students with the ratio being 2:61 in the year of 1907. In 1908 Elroy Negro School had a ratio of 2 teachers to 41 black students with the ratio being 2:41.

Elroy Negro School was converted into Elroy Elementary School in 1950. From 1950 to 1961, Elroy Elementary School was taught here and high school was taught at the Elroy White School (Elroy School). Elroy Negro School closed in 1961 when Del Valle ISD absorbed the Elroy School District into its school district. When the school closed its students were sent elsewhere. The school sat vacant for a short period of time.

In 1963, Del Valle ISD sold the property to Fred C. Morse, Jr. after sitting vacant. No one would live in the school building despite it being already sold. This left the school building vacant without any use or purpose. 

On the date of August 13, 1964, Fred C. Morse, Jr. and First Texas Savings Association sold the propriety to Elizabeth Stahl Croy and her husband Truman H. Croy at the sum price of $4,500.00. Both her and the husband began living in that house the same year.

Today Elizabeth Stahl Croy and her family still live in the schoolhouse today. Elizabeth Stahl Croy is listed as the owner of the former school building.

Elroy Negro School is located at 14107 FM 812, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.

Mixerr Album Reviews #1,528

Kamikaze is the hottest album of September 2018. Eminem’s album Kamikaze dissed the new school mumble rappers of today. He dissed them lyrically in a hardcore way it shocked the public. The album has such ferocity and aggression. The Kamikaze album has charted at #1 on the Billboard Charts in 34 countries including Zimbabwe and Yemen.

However the album has not shied away from controversy. It has sparked the Machine Gun Kelly vs. Eminem feud. Eminem destroyed Machine Gun Kelly lyrically. Ja Rule responded by posting on social media which refueled a feud from the beginning of millennium. Which was irrational as that only added fire to the fuel by adding into the controversy. Of course people will do anything to relaunch or revive their music careers. Eminem has been criticized for using anti-LGBTQ slurs on songs from his Kamikaze album. His lyrics have been described as homophobic.

Artwork for the front cover design parodies the 1986 album Beastie Boys - Licensed to Ill. The front album cover features a F-86 Sabre fighter jet fighter pilot. LT. Mathers III is the fighter pilot flying the F-86 Sabre fighter jet aircraft.= Eminem pays homage and tribute to the Beastie Boys while parodying them at the same time. Eminem has cited them as an inspiration for several years.

Friday, September 7, 2018

History of Colorado White School No. 2 explored in-depth.

The Colorado White School No. 2 was located north of Highway 71 in Austin, Texas. This school was known as Colorado School No. 3 aka Colorado White School No. 2. Colorado White School No. 2 was located slightly northeast of No. 2. Colorado White School No. 1 which was near Austin Bergstrom International Airport. Colorado Common School District operated this school from 1921 to 1952.


A short History of this school and Colorado School date back to the 1830s. Although the Colorado Common School District wasn’t established until after the Civil War. Most of the Colorado Schools were established after the Civil War.

In 1921, a single story masonry brick building at a height of 12 feet was constructed in to replace the log cabin school to accommodate growth in enrollment as the log cabin school became overcrowded due to lack of space in classrooms. A sign with the words "Colorado School" had been placed on top of the school painted in a blackish brown color.Roof replacement was installed in the same year.

Average daily attendance was 26 to 30 students for Colorado White School No. 2. Some days 30 students attended school at best. Attendance was never very high due to the agricultural lifestyle. Students had to tend to family farms during harvesting season. Students had to pick cotton and work in the fields.

Students had to use outhouses located not too far away from the school as Colorado White School No. 2 did not receive indoor plumbing until near mid-20th century. 2 separate outhouses were located outside the school. The wait to use these facilities was long and time consuming. Some students and teachers simply used the forest that surrounded the area.

An additional room was added to the Colorado White School No. 2 in 1935. A number of additional rooms were later added to be expanded. Average daily attendance was 26 to 30 students on daily basis during the 1930s. But the attendance rate still remained low as it historically was and has been.

By the 1940s, the Colorado White School No. 2 received indoor plumbing with 2 separate toilets inside the brick building. Water pipes were upgraded and fixed.

From 1947 to 1950, Colorado White School No. 2  was used as a community center and church. As part of the land agreement with Travis County and City of Austin, the school was to be zoned as a church and community if in the event the school were to close down due to overcrowding, structural error, or declining enrollment. Colorado School held religious services during operation as a church.

(Ref: Austin American Statesman, Crowded Rural Schools Lack Pioneer Facilities, January 26, 1947)


In 1950, the old Colorado White School No. 2 was all but abandoned by the school district as students were being shipped to other schools as part the consolidation into Del Valle ISD on part of Texas Education Agency (TEA) and Colorado Common School District.

The Colorado Common School District along with Travis County Schools & TEA was consolidating school districts & schools in Southeastern Travis County in the 1950s in an effort to collect more on property taxes, declining enrollment, and lack of funding. Schools and school districts that were consolidated into Colorado Common School District were Elroy, Creedmoor, Pilot Knob, Dry Creek, Hornsby-Dunlap, Maha, and Garfield.

1950 is also when the Del Valle schools became slowly integrated. Some schools were no longer separated by race or ethnicity. Integration was slow to come to liberal Austin and Del Valle, but it came easy as the racial integration process went smooth with no trouble.


The first 3 grades of the school were moved to another site on Vargas Road in 1954. The site is where Allison Elementary School is located today.  This was because the school was located dangerously close to Bergstrom Air Force Base. (Ref: Bill Brammer, Austin American-Statesman, 1954)

As cited from an Austin American-Statesman news article written by Bill Brammer from 1954, the “first three grades of the school were moved to another site about two miles away on Vargas Road.”
(Ref: Austin American-Statesman, 1954)


In 1955, the Colorado White School No. 2 was demolished after years of being abandoned. All that remained in 1956 was a gravel pit located on site of the former Colorado White School No. 2. That gravel pits sat out there for years before becoming overgrown by vegetation. Outbuildings sat in their positions. All outbuildings have been demolished. No trace of the Colorado White School No. 2 exist today.

In 1958, Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD) sold the land to United States Government as the school was located dangerously close in a flight path being so close to Bergstrom Air Force Base. Davidson tract was located outside the former Bergstrom Air Force Base.

1958 is the year when the Del Valle schools became integrated. Schools were no longer separated by race or ethnicity. Integration was a smooth process for the large Del Valle school district with no hassle or race riots.

Today no trace remains of the Colorado White School No. 2. The site had been buried in 1955 with the construction of Popham school (Popham Elementary School) and Del Valle Junior High School. The site is now home to Travis County Fire Rescue and Austin Fire Department.

Revisiting the lost history of Colorado School No. 3 in Del Valle, Texas.

History about Colorado School No. 3 in Del Valle, Texas has been long forgotten as the Colorado School is one of the many forgotten educational institutions of Austin that have faded away with time. Only longtime Austinites from generations ago may remember the Colorado School located in rural Travis County.  Colorado Common School District operated Colorado School No. 3 from 1875 to 1957.


Colorado School No. 3 was established as Colorado Negro School No. 3 in 1875. The location for Colorado School No. 3 was located at the junction of where modern day Puebla Street and Falwell Lane connect. Falwell Lane once served as Bastrop Road aka Highway 71 (SH 71) before being realigned in 1960.

Colorado School No. 3 was a negro school that served black students in grades 1 through 8 living in the Del Valle area. The quality of school buildings and equipment followed racial lines. Rural schools for black children were typically between one-room frame buildings to three-room frame buildings.

Colorado School No. 3 went under the following names of and was referred to as Colorado Colored School No. 3, Colorado Negro School No. 3, Colorado Negro School #3, Colorado Colored School #3, and Colorado School #3.

(Ref: 1932 Travis County Map)
(Ref: http://www.twdb.texas.gov/publications/reports/bulletins/doc/B5612.pdf)


Colorado School No. 3 had 63 students with an average daily attendance of 48 students during the 1934-1935 school year. There was one teacher for 63 students. The cost per year was $526 with spending expenditures of $12.52 for student per year. The teacher taught eight grades for 120 days.

On the date of September 9, 1937, a water well was dug by hand. The well was built using top concrete casing and the water well itself was built 2 cubic feet above the ground surface. Its rings were 36 inches in diameter. The water well was hand operated. Texas Water Development Board had the Colorado School water well recorded as Well Number 5851601. Texas Water Development Board has this water well recorded as a “Historical Observation Well”.
(Ref: Texas Water Development Board)

By 1957, Colorado School No. 3 was no longer needed as the Lamar School had a newly constructed building open across Highway 71. Colorado Common School District decided to demolish the school and its water well. Colorado School No. 3 was destroyed in 1958. Its students were sent to Lamar School (Lamar Elementary School) effectively.

No traces of Colorado School No. 3 remained by 1960. The water well was paved over and destroyed by TXDot after Highway 71 was realigned. The water well was plugged prior to realignment of Highway 71.


Colorado School No. 3 was located at the junction of Falwell Lane & Puebla Street, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.

History of Pilot Knob Negro School visited, explained, and explored again.

Pilot Knob Negro School was constructed and built by Dee Gabriel Collins in 1910. The schoolhouse was a single one-story building. Dee Gabriel Collins donated land for a one-room schoolhouse and hired a teacher. At that time Travis County did not want to provide any other schools or teachers to educate black children. African Americans called the school Pilot Knob Schoolhouse.

Pilot Knob Negro educated students in grades 1 through 7. School stopped after 7th grade. Students would attend either Elroy Negro School or transfer to Austin to continue 8th grade. Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle ISD) operated Pilot Knob Negro School from 1910 to 1956. (Ref: https://www.mystatesman.com/news/local-education/del-valle-district-opens-newest-school-named-for-twice-freed-slave/tfyCqkcYr33a51FBpSxdwO/)

He eventually deeded the school property to Travis County. Travis County began paying the teacher’s salary. The exact date of when Dee Gabriel Collins deeded the school property to Travis County is unknown. Sanitary needs were met with outhouses.


The new Pilot Knob Negro School was built in 1930 on two acres of land during the 1930–1931 school year. The Pilot Knob Negro School was a two-story Rosenwald School that replaced a former one-room school house constructed and built by Dee Gabriel Collins. The new Pilot Knob Negro School included two classrooms, a library, and outhouses. The total cost was $3,600 dollars with insurance costing $2,000 dollars.

Pilot Knob Negro School had 41 students during the 1934-1935 school year. Weekly attendance was 30 to 32 students weekly. Daily attendance was 30 to 31 students on average per daily basis. There was one teacher for 41 students. The cost per year was $346. Average spending on each student was $11.53 for student each year. The teacher taught seven grades for 114 days to 120 days and got paid for six months tops.

Pilot Knob Negro School had 42 students during the 1935-1936 school year. The teacher taught all seven grades for 114 days. Pilot Knob Negro School was already an elementary school by then as it had been since the beginning. Pilot Knob Negro School had no athletic program.

Ada Cecilia (Collins) Anderson was an honor graduate of Pilot Knob Negro School to high school and was an honor student from day one.

Bad behavior was not tolerated or taken lightly. If a student got out of line, the teacher would mete out corporal punishment or receive a sharp reprimand. Good behavior was rewarded with early recess and less homework.


Colorado Common School District (Del Valle ISD) closed down the school in 1956 and relocated its students into other schools across the school district. Colorado Common School District closed the school down as an attempt to racially integrate its public schools. Racial integration came smoothly in the school district.

In 1966, Del Valle ISD sold the building and land property to famous Spanish singer Augustine Ramirez. The school had been converted into a residence in 1966. Augustine Ramirez and his family have lived there for years. Mary Ann Ramirez has lived in the house since 1967. (Ref: Daily Dispatch, 2016)


On the date of June 7, 2016, Austin firefighters worked for hours that Tuesday night, battling a two-alarm house fire. The fire began around 7:30 PM at 7902 Dee Gabriel Collins Road. 

According to an Austin Fire Department spokesperson, the home on fire was connected to an auto body shop called A & S BODY SHOP located at 8503 Dee Gabriel Collins Road. Luckily no one was injured in the fired. Mary Ann Ramirez was present in the home when a man ran inside yelling that there was a fire.

The smoke from the fire was visible from multiple directions around the city.Austin Fire Department had to fill trucks with water to extinguish the blaze as hydrants were a good distance from the property.

As firefighters worked to extinguish the fire, the former Pilot Knob Negro School building had unfortunately burned to the ground. Nothing had remained after the fire. It was a total loss for the Ramirez family. The only reminder left of the school building that is visible is the brick chimney which is still standing. (Ref: KXAN, Heroic efforts save family from 2-alarm house fire, June 7, 2016)

Today only the chimney remains standing. Its concrete foundation remains visible from aerial view. Today Augustine Ramirez and Mary Ann Ramirez own the property and still do to this day.


Pilot Knob Negro School was located at 7902 Dee Gabriel Collins Road, Austin, Texas, US 78744.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Mixerr Album Reviews #1,527

Str8 No Chaser is an album from Detroit’s finest entertainer Eeyanjae. This album is his life story meaning that the Str8 No Chaser album is an autobiography of his life. Eeyanjae went the Prince route in the liner notes explaining the message behind this album. The album has sound similar to the “Motown sound”. This album blends the musical genres of hip hop/rap, jazz, R&B/soul, and rock.

Detroit’s Finest is about how and exactly why Eeyanjae is Detroit’s finest entertainer. He does not hold back while explaining in this song. Detroit’s finest entertainer Eeyanjae is one of the most underrated rappers from Detroit who is often overlooked with many others.

1st 2 Switch is about betrayal. It’s funny and scary how you never know which of your friends will be the first to switch their personalities by becoming different in a cold way because it’s a cold world. The mood for this song is cold hence a cold vibe along with a theme of betrayal. That is why this Eeyanjae song has such coldness.

Role Playa is about learning what life has to offer. Eeyanjae takes the listener(s) on a journey through life on this song of his. At some point in life we all have to be a role player. It’s funny how that works. Life is funny that way sometimes.

Cold World has a cold mood hence the cold vibe. That is why this Eeyanjae song has such coldness. The song is about surviving in a cold world. My Therapy is a song about how Eeyanjae uses music as his therapy.

The biggest concern of his is wanting to know his destiny until his future is clear. Eeyanjae searches for an answer to a clear future with no bleak outlook on the song I Wanna Know.

I rate this album, Str8 No Chaser, 5/5*****!

Thursday, August 30, 2018

El Paso Congressman Beto O’Rourke ran 10k from US to Mexico.

In early 2018, Congressman Beto O’Rourke from El Paso, Texas ran 10k from US to Mexico as a symbol of unity. All this is to gain the Hispanic vote across the United States. He does want to work in our economy. Beto O’Rourke is also running for US Senate against Ted Cruz.

History of Robertson Hill School in Austin, Texas explained and examined. (Revisited)

Robertson Hill School is one of the many forgotten schools of Austin, Texas from the 19th century and 20th century. Only old timers of Austin known about this school and history. Not many people today know about the history of this school. Robertson Hill School was home to both Robertson Hill Elementary School and Robertson Hill High School. The school itself was designated by Austin ISD as a “negro school”.


Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD) allocated funds for a negro school to be built for black students living in East Austin in March 1883. Construction for this school to all summer to complete. At first, Robertson Hill School consisted of two rooms and later expanded to include four rooms inside of a two story building. It was a shotgun styled house.

Robertson Hill School opened on the southeast corner of 11th Street & San Marcos Street in 1883. Teachers taught students in grades 1 through 8 at Robertson Hill School during the first 5 years from 1883 to 1888. Hightower Theodore Kealing was the first principal of Robertson Hill School from 1883 to 1888. He served as a teacher was well.

Heating for Robertson Hill School was provided by old potbelly stoves. Janitors would come fill the old potbelly stoves with coal and they would get red-hot. This proved to be a fire hazard as the school burned on several occasions.

Tax records indicate that the school owned Lots 1-5 of Block 8 by 1885. (Ref: Austin City Lot Register 1885: 130).


This description of the Robertson Hill School by A. P. Wooldridge, superintendent of Austin Public Schools, was published in the Austin Daily Statesman in 1887.:

Our Public Schools: Their Condition and Their Wants.

“I said in my former article that the state of the colored schools "was a condition rather than a progress." This is in part an exact truth, for while we have a frame building on Robinson Hill neatly furnished, the house is not painted on the interior, and the grounds are unfenced; this is the only colored school building in really good condition.

Exactly the same state of affairs (children crowded onto backless benches) exists in Miss Beaulah Gibbs room on Robertson Hill. In these rooms the children are rather packed or penned than seated, to the great detriment of heath as well as manners. A. P. Woolridge”

(Ref: Austin Daily Statesman, June 2, 1887).


Robertson Hill School included high school grades their school in 1889 which were 9th grade and 10th grade. By then elementary school classes were held on the first floor and high school classes were held on the second floor. In 1896, the school had an enrollment of 84 students. (Ref: Brewer 1940:33).

At one point during the 19th century, Robertson Hill High School was the only high school for black people in Austin. Robertson Hill School served as an elementary school and high school for black students in Austin. Enrollment for this high school was very low as the student population was never or never went past 600 students. It was usually around 100 students to 200 students.


The initial location of Robertson Hill High School was in an area with at least 4 surrounding Black communities. White residents continually complained about the effects of the school (high school) on their quality of life beginning in the early 20th century.

In 1902, White Austinites implored the school board to build the black high school in Gregorytown. Their argument rested on the notion that the school should be in the center of the black community and not in an area populated by whites as well as blacks. (Ref: Austin Statesman: Gregorytown Gets the New Colored High School, 1902)

Despite efforts to relocate the school, further complaints culminated into a meeting between a committee of concerned white citizens and the school board on September 14, 1905. These citizens requested that the board find a more suitable location for the high school, arguing that on many occasions the police station had to be called on for protection”. Many white families lived in the neighborhood of the high school and argued that the school board should find a different location for it within a black neighborhood. (Ref: Austin Statesman, Removal of Robertson Hill School a Problem, 1905)

At one point during the early 20th century, Robertson Hill High School and L.C. Anderson High School were the only high schools for black people in Austin at the time. By 1904 the number had risen to 177 students. (Ref: Brewer 1940:33). Enrollment for Robertson Hill School was 105 students in 1905.

Robertson Hill High School was renamed to L.C. Anderson High School in 1907 to honor educator L.C. Anderson. This caused Robertson Hill School to remove Robertson Hill High School students from its building into a newly built building located at Olive Street and Curve Street in the Robertson Hill neighborhood of East Austin.

Robertson Hill School burned in 1938. Robertson Hill School was an elementary school when it burned. The school burned down due to red-hot coal in the old potbelly stoves. Heating for Robertson Hill School was still provided by old potbelly stoves and not central A/C  heating as the white schools were. Janitors would come fill the old potbelly stoves with coal and they would get red-hot. This proved to be a fire hazard as the school burned on several occasions.


Robertson Hill School was located the junction of 11th Street & San Marcos Street, Austin, Texas, US 78702.

Mixerr Album Reviews #1,526

That Throwed Yung Playa album by Yungstar was pretty much a compilation disguised and promoted as an album by Straight Profit Records and Epic Records in 2000. Yungstar can't hold down his own lyrical weight or solo tracks on an album by himself. He can’t hold down his own weight on an album by himself.

He only rapped on tracks such as Knockin’ Pictures Off Da Wall, Out Of Sight Out Of Mind, I’m Still A Baller, TYP, Gots To Be Everything, and Keep It Real. He barely rapped on any of this album. Just maybe a verse here and there. Or a few verses. The album features 21+ different rappers from the Houston area. 18 of which were from Southwest Houston. 2 from Missouri City (Mo City).

However the album does have its standout moments and highlight tracks such as Knockin’ Pictures Off Da Wall, Out Of Sight Out Of Mind, I’m Still A Baller, TYP, Gots To Be Everything, and Keep It Real. Music collectors have cherished and purchase this album for years. However they only purchase this album for replay value and for completion sake.

To sum it all up, the album is 50% gibberish and 50% features vice versa. The album is mainly a collectors item for completionists. Despite the downsides this album is a classic! This album is energetic but not too hedonistic.


The intro is where Yungstar comments on the importance of keeping his name in the rap game. At the time he was riding high on the success of Lil' Troy's Wanna Be a Baller song. He was in his prime back then.

Lil Flip and C-Note go on a lyrical freestyle for Grippin’ Grain. Lil Flip takes control of verses for the first 1/4th of the duration for this track. C-Note takes control halfway. The track samples Tony! Toni! Toné! - It Never Rains In Southern California. Solo D was responsible for production and musical arrangements. Grippin Grain is about money and living the high life.

TYP is a Straight Profit posse cut with Lil Flex, Black 1, and Slikk Breeze. TYP samples Michael Jackson - PYT hence the inspiration and title for this track. The track is laced with a dance pop sound over nonchalant hip hop beats and rap lyrics.

Knockin Pictures Off Da Wall was the hit single that caught a buzz over the radio stations in Houston, Texas. It was played continuously on the radio in 1999 and early 2000s. Yungstar held down his own weight lyrically on this song with Lil Flex providing background vocals. Knockin Pictures Off Da Wall was a Yungstar/Lil Flex duo cut.

I’m Still A Baller is where Yungstar revisits Lil Troy’s smash hit from 1998 called Wanna Be A Baller. Yungstar rode high on the success of that Lil Troy song. I’m Still A Baller picks up where Wanna Be A Baller left off. It’s cool how Yungstar incorporated the lyrics of his used in Wanna Be A Baller without using any samples. The song itself is a perfect Yungstar original. The song is a tale of materialism and gloss. It’s about money and living the high life. This is where he does floss.

Keep It Real is another Straight Profit posse cut. The song was produced by H-Town legendary producer Jhiame. R&B group Deep Threat provides backing as that soulful chorus you hear. Keep It Real samples Bills, Bills, Bills by Destiny’s Child.

Out Of Sight Out Of Mind has a banging bass line that you will surely remember. Lil Flex and Yungstar hold down the weight for most of the track. Particularly 1/4 of the track.

June 27 was the 18 minute freestyle that was included on the original 1999 pressing. This freestyle was originally created by DJ Screw. It was not included on the 2000 re-release due to sample clearance issues which is why Epic left the 18 minute freestyle off the nationwide release.


I rate this album, Throwed Yung Playa, 3/5***!