Friday, August 17, 2018

Peter Nic to leave Australia to promote the Late Night Transmitter album in late 2018.

Peter Nic is planning on leaving the country of Australia later in 2018 in order to promote the Late Night Transmitter album. Peter has expressed desire to extend his roots in the United States as an effort of promoting his 4th studio album towards American audiences. He wants to push the details of this album over the internet. Late Night Transmitter will also be an internet album available online.

The album Late Night Transmitter has an R&B/pop vibe to it with a fairly deep level of production. The production and sound are very high definition. Australian artist Peter Nic is going on a different musical route for this album. Peter Nic is an artist from the country of Australia.

Lena Coleman. Protecting her child or a case of injustice? (Revisited)

Lena Renae Coleman aka female rapper Da Misses supposedly attempted to kill her ex-boyfriend, David Mitchell aka rapper Ballin’ A$$ Dame for trying to protect herself and her baby in an act of self defense in the year 2003. However that is not the case. Her friends and family state she was only trying to protect herself and her baby while defending her apartment. She was not in any way trying to kill her ex-boyfriend. Friends and family claim her being incarcerated is a case of injustice to her. They demand answers.

Yet, however, the United States District Court Eastern District of California charged Lena Coleman for attempted murder after having Lena Coleman attempted to kill her ex-boyfriend David Mitchell out of jealousy.



According to the US Supreme Court of Northern California, David Mitchell and Lena Renae Coleman began living together in an apartment, but then separated a few months later.  They eventually reconciled, but never lived together again.

However, Lena had moved some of David’s belongings back into her apartment. Eventually David decided to end the relationship with Lena and remove his belongings from her apartment. David asked his old girlfriend, Sherry Johnson, and her son, James Dixon, to help him move out of the apartment. David Mitchell dropped Sherry off at a nearby store.

David drove to Lena’s apartment with James. He feared Lena and Sherry would fight if the two met. They walked up to the landing outside the apartment. Lena answered the door and David told her things were not working out and he thought it would be best to move out. Angrily, Lena told James to leave before she did something. So he left. James Dixon left to wait with his mother as she waited at a nearby store.

Lena followed David and told him she did not want him to leave. When Lena tried to prevent him from retrieving his belongings, David pushed her out of the way and went into the bedroom to collect his clothes. Lena was angry boyfriends decision to move out of their apartment.

After David and Lena exchanged angry words at the doorway of their apartment, David pushed his way past her.  Lena pulled a gun from her pocket and pointed it at David. He told her he knew the gun was not real and he was leaving.  Lena pulled out a gun from her pocket and shot David in the chest after telling him, “If I can't have you, nobody can have you.” Mitchell had been shot in the stomach with a .22 then. David dropped his clothing and left the apartment.

David escaped to the store at which Sherry Johnson and James Dixon were waiting for him. Sherry had called 911 at the store. As he left, he heard another gunshot. He drove to the store where he had left Sherry, stopped the car, and laid down on the ground. David told Sherry he had been shot and asked her to call for an ambulance. Sherry Johnson told the dispatcher, “My husband got shot.” She said David Mitchell had been shot in the stomach with a .22.

After the dispatcher gave Johnson some instructions, the 911 operator asked Sherry Johnson who had shot David Mitchell. Sherry stated it was the woman who lived at Lena’s address and said “They call her Da Misses.”.

Dr. Mark Owens treated David Mitchell in the emergency room. David suffered a gunshot wound in his right chest and bleeding in his right lung. The bullet traveled through his right lung, diaphragm, liver, and stomach. The bullet missed his heart by half an inch. Had the bullet struck Mitchells heart, he would have died before reaching the hospital.

The path of the bullet was right to left and downward, from front to back. The trajectory was consistent with David facing Lena who shot him and bending slightly at the waist. David spent a week in the hospital, and Dr. Owens estimated it would take David around 3 months to make a full recovery.


Police arrived 20 minutes later at the apartment. Deputy Victor Jones went to her apartment to arrest her. Another police officer kicked in the apartment door. Nobody was present in the apartment, but the lights, television, and stereo were on.

During a search of this apartment, Deputy Abbott found the second bullet in the trim board of a window just outside the apartment door. Sheriffs Deputy John Lopes examined the bullet hole found at the crime scene. He determined that the bullet was fired from the living room of defendants apartment. Deputy Lopes did not determine the caliber of the bullet.

10 days after the shooting, Sheriffs Deputy Victor Jones went to the apartment to arrest her. Deputy Jones knocked on the door several times, identifying himself as a deputy. No one responded. The apartment manager gave Deputy Jones a passkey. When Deputy Jones attempted to use the key, he felt resistance on the other side of the door. As he turned the key, Deputy Jones felt it being turned back in the other direction. Deputy Jones called out a warning and kicked in the door. Deputy Jones found Lena Renae Coleman and a man inside the apartment, arrested her, and took her into custody.


During the trial David Mitchell testified that he and Lena Coleman became romantically involved in 2003. Mitchell moved into defendants apartment. It was an argument a few months later that Lena requested David to move out. While at trial, David Mitchell stated he was confused and disappointed about his relationship with Lena Coleman. David Mitchell admitted he was uncomfortable and did not want to testify at trial. He had also received a threat about testifying from one of the defendants relatives.

Sacramento County Sheriffs Deputy Kevin Mickelson testified that he asked David Mitchell who shot him. David Mitchell told him that Da Misses had shot him. David Mitchell had been shot in the stomach with a 22.

A transcript of the 911 call was entered into evidence. Now the 911 call involved only basic information about what had happened and who had committed violence – two topics about which emergency responders should inquire.

James Dixon testified about the shooting. When Lena answered the door, both her and David appeared kind of mad. Lena angrily told David, “You ain’t getting nothing.” She told James Dixon to leave. As James walked back to the store where his mother was, he heard a gunshot.

Deputy Abbott showed James Dixon a photographic lineup, and he identified either defendant or another woman as the person at the apartment. Deputy Abbott showed David a different lineup, and he selected her photograph.

Sheriffs Detective Michael Abbott interviewed David Mitchell in the hospital. David told Detective Abbott Lena had ordered a frightened James Dixon off the landing. Lena pulled a gun out of her pocket that David thought it was a toy. Lena shot David and he heard a second shot, which missed. David told Detective Abbott defendant was known by the nickname Da Misses. David also stated that after the shooting he received a phone call from Lena and was concerned for the safety of his ex-girlfriend and her son.

Further, the Constitution simply ensures that state court criminal proceedings are fundamentally fair and the category of actions which violate this standard is narrow. Because the second bullet did not affect the prosecution's basic argument that defendant shot Mitchell as he attempted to leave.

In 2003, a jury found Lena Coleman guilty of attempted murder and assault with a firearm. She was sentenced to 32 years to life in prison.

Lena accused the court by citing numerous alleged errors during the trial: (1) admission of a tape recording of a 911 call, (2) denying defendants motion for a new trial based on juror misconduct, (3) denying defendants motion for a new trial based on a claim that a ballistics test should have been performed, (4) limiting defendants cross-examination of the victim, (5) failing to instruct on self-defense or voluntary manslaughter, and (6) giving an instruction on evidence of flight. Her defense counsel argued defendant acted in the heat of passion and had not formed the intent to murder Mitchell. It was not out of malice

The trial court denied the defendants motion for a new trial and sentenced her to the middle term of seven years for attempted murder. For the section 12022.53, subdivision (d) firearm enhancement, the court sentenced defendant to a consecutive term of 25 years to life. The court also imposed the middle term of three years for assault with a firearm; a term of three years for the section 12022.5, subdivision (a) enhancement; and a term of four years for the section 12022.7, subdivision (e) enhancement. The sentences for assault were stayed pursuant to section 654. Defendants sentence in case No. 04F02937 is 32 years to life.

The trial court correctly decided not to grant Petitioner’s motion for a new trial. In sum, the trial court did everything constitutionally required in these circumstances because no federal issue
is alleged nor was any federal law violated.


In 2004, the district attorney filed a motion for an order revoking defendants probation. Lena admitted being on probation at the time of the offenses against David. The court found Lena in violation of probation and sentenced her to be served concurrently. Lena Coleman was admitted to Chowchilla Female Prison on the date of July 7, 2005 as inmate X12620.

A motion for a rehearing was denied by US District Judge Terry J. Hatter, Jr. on the date of  September 18, 2013 after finding she not presented the court with newly discovered evidence. She was unable to afford the costs of suit as a petitioner for her court case.

At this present moment, she is serving a life sentence in Chowchilla Female Prison in Chowchilla, California.

Remembering the Colorado Mexican School.

Colorado Mexican School is one of the many forgotten schools and institutions of Austin and Del Valle that have faded away with time and from people's memories. This news article explains the history behind Colorado Mexican School


The Colorado Mexican School was constructed in 1934 as a one-room  school facing south of the Colorado White School (Colorado School). The Colorado Mexican School was built on Old Del Valle Road near US 183 & Highway 71. Blacks student had sometimes attended the Colorado Mexican School. The school educated students in grades 1 through 7.

Average daily attendance was 26 to 30 students on daily basis. The attendance rate still remained low as it historically was and has been. Almost 100 students attended this school.

Prior to the opening of Colorado Mexican School, Hispanic students attended the Colorado White School before a separate school for Hispanics became available. Hispanic students were not required to attend school. Hispanic students had either attended the negro schools or white schools.

Of course racial segregation was implemented by law in Texas and southern United States, so schools were separated by race. Separate schools were built for white, black, and Hispanic students. Black students attended separate schools from white students. White students attended separate schools from black students. That is the reason why the "Colorado White School", "Colorado Mexican School", and "Colorado Negro School" existed.

Although the Colorado School had an Austin address, it served students from the communities of Del Valle, Austin, Montopolis, Bergstrom Village, Glenbrook, and Colton.


By the 1940s, the Colorado White School and Colorado Mexican School received indoor plumbing with 2 separate toilets inside the brick building. Water pipes were upgraded and fixed.

The Colorado Mexican School eventually became combined into one school by 1942. Roof replacement was installed in the same year. The Colorado Mexican School had a daily attendance rate of 100 students in 1944. 100 students was the average on a daily basis. A huge increase from the 1930s attendance rate. The rate remained the same even in 1945.

By the late 1940s, the segregated Colorado Mexican School experienced extreme overcrowding. Colorado Common School District was 1 of 4 school districts listed as a defendant in the 1948 court case of Delgado v. Bastrop ISD. Colorado School was listed as a prime example of racial segregation in the lawsuit against the state of Texas. LULAC brought suit against several school districts for denying Hispanic students the use of school facilities and educational services. The suit claimed Hispanic students were separated and segregated from white students even though under state law they were considered "White" or "Caucasian".

Although US Court found both the Colorado Mexican School and Colorado Common School District to be operating within the terms of the decree, overcrowding of the school witnessed would contradict the provision for “equal school instruction.”

By the late end of 1948, the school was closed due to overcrowding conditions. Travis County Schools Superintendent Irving W. Popham described conditions at Colorado Mexican School as “the worst Travis County has ever known.” Travis County Schools, Austin Independent School District (then Austin Public Schools which is now known as Austin ISD) and Colorado Common School District deemed the Colorado School unfit and inadequate for a learning environment due to overcrowding from a lack of space and growth in enrollment. Overcrowding was extreme. Travis County government officials determined the Colorado School deemed to be unfit and antiquated.

The Nuestra Senora La Luz Catholic Mission Church in Montopolis offered the use of its chapel for 53 first-grade students. The remaining 40 students stayed at the Colorado Mexican School until the school district finally closed down the school. Its students were shipped to other schools.

From 1948 to 1950, the Colorado Mexican School was used as a community center and church. As part of the land agreement with Travis County and City of Austin, the school was to be zoned as a church and community if in the event the school were to close down due to overcrowding, structural error, or declining enrollment. Colorado School held religious services during operation as a church.

(Ref: Austin American Statesman, Crowded Rural Schools Lack Pioneer Facilities, January 26, 1947)
(Ref: Austin American Statesman, Latin-American school segregation outlawed, June 15, 1948)
(Ref: Handbook of Texas Online, V. Carl Allsup, "Delgado v. Bastrop Isd”)


In 1950, the old Colorado Mexican School was all but abandoned by the school district. Grass was kept untrimmed. Windows and window panels were boarded with thin plywood. Vegetation had sprawled all over.

The Colorado Common School District along with Travis County Schools & TEA were consolidating school districts & schools in Southeastern Travis County in the 1950s in an effort to collect more on property taxes, declining enrollment, and lack of funding. Schools and school districts that were consolidated into Colorado Common School District were Elroy, Creedmoor, Pilot Knob, Dry Creek, Hornsby-Dunlap, Maha, and Garfield.

1950 is also when the Del Valle schools became slowly integrated. Some schools were no longer separated by race or ethnicity.

1952 is the year when the city of Austin began annexing portions of the Colorado Common School District in both Austin and Del Valle. The Colorado Mexican School was within the city limits causing confusion with Austin ISD and Del Valle ISD school district boundaries. Because the Colorado Mexican School was within he Austin city limits, the school district had to find a new location for its own schools.

In 1958, grass vegetation took over the driveways as Colorado Mexican School was totally abandoned. The buildings were still standing by then. 1958 is also the year when the Del Valle schools became integrated. Schools were no longer separated by race or ethnicity. Integration was slow to come to liberal Austin and Del Valle, but it came easy as the racial integration process went smooth with no trouble.

In 1958, Austin Public Schools (Austin Independent School District bka Austin ISD) sold the land to United States Government as the school was located dangerously close in a flight path being near Bergstrom Air Force Base. Davidson tract was located outside the former Bergstrom Air Force Base.

In 1964, the Colorado Mexican School was demolished after years of being abandoned. All that remained in 1965 was a gravel pit located on site of the former Colorado Mexican School. That gravel pits sat out there for years before becoming overgrown by vegetation. All outbuildings have been demolished. No traces of the school or cistern remain today.


Schools such as this one should be preserved as a museum, converted to a dance studio, bank, or revitalized into government offices. This can be listed as an example of priorities placed in the wrong place. Historic preservation should be a secondary priority for a school district.

Something needs to be done to commemorate the Colorado Mexican School as a part the 1948 Federal Court ruling on Delgado v. Bastrop ISD. People don't recognize how LULAC fought for equal school instruction, services, and facilities. Efforts of LULAC also need to be brought to attention.

Colorado Mexican School was located at 1601 Old Del Valle Road, Austin, Texas, US 78742.



*Colorado Common School District was known to Travis County Schools officials and civilians as Colorado Common School District No. 36 or as School District No. 36.
*The Colorado School was simply just called "Colorado School" at one point in history.
*Colorado School had an Austin address despite being zoned to Del Valle ISD.
*Colorado School was adjacent to 2 other schools before the schools became molded into one school called "Colorado School" due mainly to racial integration following 1948. Thus Colorado Mexican School and Colorado Negro School were eventually combined into the Colorado White School.
*Old Del Valle Road was also known as Old Austin-Del Valle Road, Austin-Del Valle Road, and Del Valle Road.

Mixerr Album Reviews #1,515

Homage: I Love Hip-Hop is the long-awaited special EP from L-Storm, where he pays homage to hip hop's musical and lyrical pioneers in freestyle form. The EP was released digitally on his bandcamp page on January 4, 2018. Homage: I Love Hip-Hop was produced By Damien White & Professor DLC.
   
Drunken Zoo Style pays homage and tribute to deceased Wu-Tang Clan rapper O.D.B. in lyrical form. The song of course has that East Coast hip hop sound, vibe, and flavor. Drunken Zoo Style is also a freestyle as well. So expect the madd drunk O.D.B. style of rap.

The World is Yours pays homage and tribute to New York rapper Nas hence its upbeat mid tempo nature, sound, and vibe. Enter The Storm homage and tribute to 90s rap group Black Moon hence the dark eeriesound and vibe.

I rate this EP, Homage: I Love Hip-Hop, 5/5*****!

Mixerr Album Reviews #1,514

This is Michael Mixerr. Today I will review Mia X - Sista Stories 2007.

Sista Stories showcased the raw sista side of Mia X which was written from a sista's point of view and perspective. Mia X shares her experience about womanhood in form of rap. Tales of conflict and tales of confusion are told. It's also about dealing with pain during the struggle of life. For those who don't know, Sista Stories picks up where Unladylike left off which is what Mia X intended. In fact, Sista Stories revisits Unladylike in a more explicit manner.

This No Limit album is different as there are not as many radio friendly tracks on this album. Only 3 of the 17 tracks that were on this album are radio friendly. Mia X decided to take a more darker explicit approach when recording this album. While album seems to have a Burlesque theme, Mia X might have been inspired by R. Kelly during the time. She brought out that raw uncut hip hop sound with this album. 

Sista Stories did not get an official release but a few promo copies were pressed up for record company executives and radio stations instead.  However a lot of songs from this album had leaked about 10 years ago. Mia X leaked songs from her old twitter account in 2007. That is one of the reasons why this album from No Limit did not receive an official release to the public.


Mia X did a remake of the 1987 Cover Girls hit Show Me. Show Me was one of the 3 radio friendly cuts that were on the album. The remake is filled with rawness as Master P lent a hand in production of course. Mia X did a good job.

Somethin New featured Devin The Dude and No Limit Top Dog Snoop Dogg when he was in his prime. Somethin New was a funky smooth cut with the loopy Devin The Dude to add in with the quirkiness.

The Feel Good Song has an upbeat reggae vibe to it. The piano used in this song helps give the mood an upbeat reggae vibe. The song is dedicated to family and friends. The song also sheds light on enjoying the company of your favorite people you love and cherish.

After The Pain is a Mix A remake of the Betty Wright song After The Pain. This version is cover song laced over updated beats produced by KLC with a fresh new sound.

I rate this album, Sista Stories 2007, 4/5****!

Mixerr Album Reviews #1,513

This is Michael Mixerr. Today I will review Geza X - We Need More Power.

Geza X is a forefather of the underground LA punk rock scene. He is known for his production work with Black Flag and Dead Kennedys. This sound is reminiscent of experimental rock rather than punk rock. However We Need More Power isn’t the best rock album. In fact, We Need More Power is a mediocre rock album with song that are too short in terms of timespan and duration. Most of the lyrics seem to have been written by a middle school student rather than an actual rock musicians.

We Need More Power is a revolutionary cry and call for an evolutionary leap. Civilization is in deep. Society wants to win, but the price is too steep to pay. So metaphorically in the song, society is backed into a corner. We have got make an evolutionary leap. The future has a grim outlook as out moral ethics are in shambles. History is in shambles. But there’s a problem. We Need More Power!

Mean Mr. Mommy Man is a grotesque song with violent lyrics describing how a doctor had a deal with “Mean Mr. Mommy Man” to cut the worms out of Geza X’s head.

I rate this album, We Need More Power, 3/5***.

Mixerr Album Reviews #1,512

This is Michael Mixerr. This afternoon I will review Partners In Rhyme - Push N Pull.

One would expect Partners In Rhyme to be a hip hop super group from an East Coast state in the US such as New York, New Jersey, or Pennsylvania. However that’s not the case. Partners In Rhyme hails from Tusla, Oklahoma surprisingly. One would have never thought or expected a group such as this one to hail from Oklahoma State with a group name such as Partners In Rhyme. Partners In Rhyme can be cited as early pioneers of Oklahoma hip hop/rap and Tulsa rap.

Push N Pull was released a single on 12 inch vinyl in 1990 on Northland Records. The single itself is filled with super dope funky fresh rhymes with funky dope beats. High powered heavy bass is accompanied by the rap especially on the tracks Push N Pull and Cold Chillin' In The Middle.

Push comes to shove on Push N Pull. The song itself is filled with super dope funky fresh rhymes with funky dope beats. And of course high powered bass. Cold Chillin' In The Middle is a funky hip hop song with a touch of East Coast flavor.

I rate this single, Push N Pull, 5/5*****!

Thursday, August 16, 2018

Mixerr Album Reviews #1,511

The album Mortal Combat by L-Storm is a mixture of storytelling and comedy over hot beats fresh from New York State. 99% percent of this album is filled with hip hop beats fresh for 2018. The album itself is a hip hop journey similar to Da Youngstas, Necro, Jeru Da Damaja, Shyhiem, or Biz Markie. The album was released digitally on his bandcamp page on February 22, 2017.


It’s That Life begins with the usage of an old school soul song sample with a jazzy punch. The violin arrangements are perfectly fitting for this track as they fit in appropriately with the sampled song. This one is for all the real Hip-Hop heads out there.

L-Storm gets very personal on It's This Life as this song he wrote himself was written straight from the heart. When L-Storm laughs when he thinks about the past. He has improved his craft of rapping. Countless MC’s did it. The ones called friends turned their backs on him. This was once he started staring facts. These were true facts. Some people just can’t handle the truth. L-Storm brings back the classic sound of East Coast hip hop on It’s That Life.


Who's Ya Top 5 begins with a single flute for the woodwind selection. The beats and bass are bangin’ and will rattle your speakers! L-Storm brings back the boom bap sound on this song. Arrangements for the samples used for this track are laid out perfectly. The song was produced by Iron Wind.

Not only does L-Storm bring back the boom bap sound on this song, but he brings back the classic sound of East Coast hip hop. Who's Ya Top 5 is for all the real Hip-Hop heads out there. Who's Ya Top was written straight from the heart.


Blood Reign is a dark hip hop song that is an original L-Storm song. This is where Storm brings back the classic sound of East Coast hip hop. The album’s mood transitions into a dark mood with this song of his.

Severe Thirst To Kill is too low quality as the treble is reduced too low. The treble in the vocals is reduced too much. You can hardly hear the sample used in the background. However the vocal quality is up to standard.

The sound quality for Guess What I'm Thinking is subpar and up to quality standard. The vocals, treble, and bass are reduced way too low. Much work could have been done to improve the track.

Rollercoasters is a song that discusses the ups and downs of life. Life brings smiles and frowns. We all have ups and downs.

Mortal Combat is a lyrical freestyle rap song that brings back that classic East Coast hip hop sound. The bass is definitely phat! L-Storm goes to war against fake emcees on Mortal Combat. Overall Mortal Combat is a dark hip hop song.

Beast Coast Warning is similar to a song you would hear from Method Man, Necro, Run The Jewels, Black Moon, or Jean Grae. Beast Coast Warning is a dark hip hop song with dark sounds.

I rate this album, Mortal Combat, 4/5****.

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

History pertaining to the small Colorado School long forgotten revisited.

History about the Colorado School in Austin, Texas has been long forgotten as the Colorado School is one of the many forgotten educational institutions of Austin that have faded away with time. Only longtime Austinites from generations ago may remember the Colorado School located in rural Travis County. Colorado School is one of the many schools in Austin/Travis County that did not receive a Texas Historic Landmark plaque or was revitalized to house school district offices. Colorado School is also historically significant and important because the Colorado School was listed as a defendant in the 1948 court case of Delgado v. Bastrop ISD regarding racial segregation in public schools. That court case declared segregation illegal in Texas public schools.


The Colorado School was one of Del Valle's earliest schools as it was the oldest school in the Del Valle ISD school district at one point in time dating back to 1874. Colorado School was the first school operated by Del Valle ISD. Years of operation for Colorado School ran from 1876 to 1948. The Colorado School itself was located at the present day intersections of US 183 & SH 71 near Austin Bergstrom International Airport (ABIA).

The Colorado Common School District in Austin was established in 1874. A school house was needed. Land where Colorado School was located on land owned by the Martin Family and Andrew M. Davidson. Enoch Martin, Sarah Elizabeth Martin, and Andrew M. Davidson deeded land to S.G. Sneed, Travis County, and the Colorado Common School District for a school house to be built on in the year of 1874 along with land for a city cemetery which would later become the Greenwood Cemetery. 5.6 acres of land were deeded to Colorado Common School District in the same year by F.A. Maxwell and Andrew M. Davidson. Colorado School was located on the Davidson tract named after Andrew M. Davidson.

Martin Family Cemetery had preceded the small school by a couple of years as their cemetery was plotted in 1874. The Colorado School was to be located north of the Martin Family Cemetery as a part of a land agreement with Travis County and City of Austin. Cemeteries called Martin Family Cemetery and Greenwood Cemetery were plotted south of the Colorado School.

A cistern was built in 1875 predating the school but not the cemetery. Water was gathered from a cistern from the years of 1875 to 1895 until the cistern got old and needed replacement. The 1875 cistern was built fairly well under a sturdy foundation.

Building a log cabin school was no easy task. It took a few months for the school to open after construction was completed. The log cabin was built and completed in 1876. Local citizens and several businesses donated wood for a log cabin school to be built. Colorado School was built in to serve as a public school which was operated under Colorado Common School District now known as Del Valle Independent School District bka Del Valle ISD. The Colorado School along with the Colorado Common School District itself were named after the Colorado River.

Colorado School was built as a single story log cabin in 1876. The log cabin School was located near Colorado River adjacent to a large group of live oak trees and a clear spring. The school itself was 12 feet tall at maximum height as the school was only 1 story tall. The school was a one room school. Originally grades 1 through 8 were educated there. Later on, grades 1 through 12 were taught at this school.

Average daily attendance was 26 to 30 students for the Colorado School. Some days 30 students attended school at best. Attendance was never very high due to the agricultural lifestyle. Students had to tend to family farms during harvesting season. Students had to pick cotton and work in the fields.

Students had to use outhouses located not too far away from the school as the Colorado School did not receive indoor plumbing until near mid-20th century. 2 separate outhouses were located outside the Colorado School. The wait to use these facilities was long and time consuming. Some students and teachers simply used the forest that surrounded the area.

Of course racial segregation was implemented by law in Texas and southern United States, so schools were separated by race. Separate schools were built for white, black, and Hispanic students. Black students attended separate schools from white students. White students attended separate schools from black students. That is the reason why the "Colorado White School", "Colorado Mexican School", and "Colorado Negro School" existed. The Colorado Mexican School was built adjacent to the Colorado White School.

Despite being racially segregated, black and white students shared the one room School with Hispanic students. Black students were taught alongside with white students here at this school. Some of the other schools were like this. Hispanic students had either attended the negro schools or white schools. Usually Hispanic students attended both the negro schools or white schools.

A new cistern was built to replace the old cistern in 1895. The school district decided to eventually to drill a new water well in 1895. The well had to be drilled away from the cemeteries for sanitary purposes. So this led to a controversy to where the school district would locate the new water well. Another new water well and a cistern were installed in 1905.


1921 was the year the log cabin school was demolished. In 1921, the Colorado School was built on top of a concrete cement slab foundation that was built over an old graveyard. A single story brick building at a height of 12 feet was constructed in to replace the log cabin school to accommodate growth in enrollment as the log cabin school became overcrowded due to lack of space in classrooms. A sign with the words "Colorado School" had been placed on top of the school painted in a blackish brown color.

The Colorado Mexican School was built next to the Colorado White School in 1934 which eventually became combined into one school. Black students had sometimes attended the Colorado Mexican School. Roof replacement was installed in the same year.

Prior to the Colorado Mexican School operating, Hispanic students attended the Colorado White School before a separate school for Hispanics became available. Hispanic students were not required to attend school. Hispanic students had either attended the negro schools or white schools. The Colorado Negro School was added as an additional building to accompany black students.

An additional room was added to the Colorado School in 1935. A number of additional rooms were later added to be expanded. Average daily attendance was 26 to 30 students on daily basis during the 1930s. But the attendance rate still remained low as it historically was and has been.


By the 1940s, the Colorado School received indoor plumbing with 2 separate toilets inside the brick building. Water pipes were upgraded and fixed.

By the late 1940s, both the Colorado Mexican School, Colorado Negro School, and Colorado White School had experienced extreme overcrowding. Extreme overcrowding was common for schools in the Colorado Common School District such as the Elroy School, the Garfield School, Lamar School, Cloud School, and Popham School unfortunately. The Colorado School had a daily attendance rate of 100 students in 1944. 100 students was the average on a daily basis. A huge increase from the 1930s attendance rate. The rate remained the same even in 1945.

Colorado Common School District was 1 of 4 school districts listed as a defendant in the 1948 court case of Delgado v. Bastrop ISD. Colorado School was listed as a prime example of racial segregation in the lawsuit against the state of Texas. LULAC brought suit against several school districts for denying Hispanic students the use of school facilities and educational services. The suit claimed Hispanic students were separated and segregated from white students even though under state law they were considered "White" or "Caucasian". Although US Court found both the Colorado School and Colorado Common School District to be operating within the terms of the decree, overcrowding of the school witnessed would contradict the provision for “equal school instruction.”

By the late end of 1948, the school was closed due to overcrowding conditions. Travis County Schools Superintendent Irving W. Popham described conditions at Colorado School as “the worst Travis County has ever known.” Travis County Schools, Austin Independent School District (then Austin Public Schools which is now known as Austin ISD) and Colorado Common School District deemed the Colorado School unfit and inadequate for a learning environment due to overcrowding from a lack of space and growth in enrollment. Overcrowding was extreme. Travis County government officials determined the Colorado School deemed to be unfit and antiquated.

From 1948 to 1950, the Colorado School was used as a community center and church. As part of the land agreement with Travis County and City of Austin, the school was to be zoned as a church and community if in the event the school were to close down due to overcrowding, structural error, or declining enrollment. Colorado School held religious services during operation as a church.

When the Colorado School was closed, elementary students attended the Popham School while the junior high students attended Del Valle Junior High School. The high school students had attended Del Valle Senior High School which was later Del Valle Junior-Senior High School which had eventually became Del Valle High School. Other students were sent to Austin ISD schools to relieve overcrowding.


In 1950, the old Colorado School was all but abandoned by the school district as students were being shipped to other schools as part the consolidation into Del Valle ISD on part of Texas Education Agency (TEA) and Colorado Common School District. Grass was kept untrimmed. Windows and window panels were boarded with thin plywood. Vegetation sprawled over Colorado School.

The Colorado Common School District along with Travis County Schools & TEA was consolidating school districts & schools in Southeastern Travis County in the 1950s in an effort to collect more on property taxes, declining enrollment, and lack of funding. Schools and school districts that were consolidated into Colorado Common School District were Elroy, Creedmoor, Pilot Knob, Dry Creek, Hornsby-Dunlap, Maha, and Garfield.

1950 is also when the Del Valle schools became slowly integrated. Some schools were no longer separated by race or ethnicity. Integration was slow to come to liberal Austin and Del Valle, but it came easy as the racial integration process went smooth with no trouble.

1952 is the year when the city of Austin began annexing portions of the Colorado Common School District in both Austin and Del Valle. The Colorado School was within the city limits causing confusion with Austin ISD and Del Valle ISD school district boundaries. Because the Colorado School was within the Austin city limits, the school district had to find a new location for its own schools. Although the Colorado School had an Austin address, it served students from the communities of Del Valle, Austin, Montopolis, Bergstrom Village, Glenbrook, and Colton.

Enrollment stood at 600 students in 1952 for the Colorado Common School District. That created a demand for new schools in Del Valle. The new renovated Popham School was open by then. Del Valle High School and Del Valle Junior High were underway.

In 1958, grass vegetation took over the driveways as the school was totally abandoned. The buildings were still standing by then. 1958 is also the year when the Del Valle schools became integrated. Schools were no longer separated by race or ethnicity. Integration was a smooth process for the large Del Valle school district with no hassle or race riots.

In 1958, Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD) sold the land to United States Government as the school was located dangerously close in a flight path being so close to Bergstrom Air Force Base. Davidson tract was located outside the former Bergstrom Air Force Base. The Colorado Common School District was renamed the Del Valle Independent School District in 1964.

In 1964, the Colorado School was demolished after years of being abandoned. All that remained in 1965 was a gravel pit located on site of the former Colorado School. That gravel pits sat out there for years before becoming overgrown by vegetation. Outbuildings sat in their positions. All outbuildings have been demolished. A portion of an outbuilding for the Colorado School was added to the Del Valle ISD district offices on Shapard Lane in Del Valle, Texas in 1967 which remains there today. To this day, the school district boundaries for Austin ISD and Del Valle ISD remain chaotic.


Colorado School is one of the many forgotten schools and institutions of Austin & Del Valle that have faded away with time and from people's memories unfortunately. Schools such as this one should be preserved as a museum, converted to a dance studio, bank, or revitalized into government offices. This can be listed as an example of priorities placed in the wrong place. Historic preservation should be a secondary priority for a school district.

Something needs to be done to commemorate the Colorado School as a part the 1948 Federal Court ruling on Delgado v. Bastrop ISD. People don't recognize how LULAC fought for equal school instruction and facilities. Efforts of LULAC also need to be brought to attention.

The old Colorado School is was located at 1601 Old Del Valle Road, Austin, Texas, US 78742.

*Colorado Common School District was known to Travis County Schools officials and civilians as Colorado Common School District No. 36 or as School District No. 36.
*The Colorado School was simply just called "Colorado School" at one point in history.
*Colorado School had an Austin address despite being zoned to Del Valle ISD.
*Colorado School was adjacent to 2 other schools before the schools became molded into one school called "Colorado School" due mainly to racial integration following 1948. Thus Colorado Mexican School and Colorado Negro School were eventually combined into the Colorado White School.
*Old Del Valle Road was also known as Old Austin-Del Valle Road, Austin-Del Valle Road, and Del Valle Road.
*The Martin Family Cemetery preceded the Colorado School.
*Popham School bka Popham Elementary School was built in 1948 to relieve overcrowding from other schools located in the Colorado Common School District. From 1952 to 1953, Popham School went under construction during an extensive renovation period. In 1953 the school was finally open to the public again.



As for the Martin Family Cemetery, the Martin Family Cemetery was plotted and constructed in 1874 by Enoch Martin and Andrew M. Davidson when they deeded land to Travis County for a school to be built on and a city cemetery. Many family members from the Martin Family were buried there. Last recorded burial in the Martin Family Cemetery was Walter Martin in 1909.

The Martin Family Cemetery is now behind a secure fence located southeast of the US 183 & SH 71 intersection near the northwest corner of Austin Bergstrom International Airport (ABIA). Martin Family Cemetery is located 140 feet north of Greenwood Cemetery also. Permission must be obtained to view the Martin Family Cemetery due to Homeland Security restrictions. Homeland Security restrictions require visitors to be escorted by ABIA staff to the site.


Enoch Martin, Andrew M. Davidson, and F.A. Maxwell deeded land to Travis County and City of Austin for another cemetery that was to become a city cemetery in 1907. Other acres were purchased in 1910. This cemetery would eventually become Greenwood Cemetery. Austin-Del Valle Road served as the northeast boundary between separating the Martin Family Cemetery from the Greenwood Cemetery. Martin Family members are also buried in Greenwood Cemetery.

Greenwood Cemetery operates as a public cemetery owned by the City of Austin to this day. ABIA staff and Homeland Security staff patrol both cemeteries on a daily basis. Greenwood Cemetery is located directly south of the Martin Family Cemetery adjacent near ABIA. Both Greenwood Cemetery and Martin Family Cemetery are located at 1927 Old Lockhart Road, Austin, Texas, US 78742.

*Martin Family Cemetery is located near Old Del Valle Road.
*Also Martin Family Cemetery is located less than 1 acre north of Greenwood Cemetery.

Sunday, August 12, 2018

Exploring the lost history of Colorado School No. 3 in Del Valle, Texas.

History about Colorado School No. 3 in Del Valle, Texas has been long forgotten as the Colorado School is one of the many forgotten educational institutions of Austin that have faded away with time. Only longtime Austinites from generations ago may remember the Colorado School located in rural Travis County.  Colorado Common School District operated Colorado School No. 3 from 1875 to 1957.


Colorado School No. 3 was established as Colorado Negro School No. 3 in 1875. The location for Colorado School No. 3 was located at the junction of where modern day Puebla Street is facing Falwell Lane. Falwell Lane once served as Bastrop Road aka Highway 71 (SH 71) before being realigned in 1960.

Colorado School No. 3 was a negro school that served black students in grades 1 through 8 living in the Del Valle area. The quality of school buildings and equipment followed racial lines. Rural schools for black children were typically between one-room frame buildings to three-room frame buildings.

Colorado School No. 3 went under the names and was referred to as the following names of Colorado Colored School No. 3, Colorado Negro School No. 3, Colorado Colored School #3, and Colorado School #3. (Ref: 1932 Travis County Map)


Colorado School No. 3 had  63 students with an average daily attendance of 48 students. There was one teacher for 63 students. The cost per year was $526 with spending expenditures of $12.52 for student per year. The teacher taught eight grades for 120 days.

On the date of September 9, 1937, a water well was dug by hand. The well was built using top concrete casing and the water well itself was built 2 cubic feet above the ground surface. Its rings were 36 inches in diameter. The water well was hand operated. Texas Water Development Board had the Colorado School water well recorded as Well Number 5851601. Texas Water Development Board has this water well recorded as a “Historical Observation Well”.
(Ref: Texas Water Development Board)

By 1957, Colorado School No. 3 was no longer needed as the Lamar School had a newly constructed building open across Highway 71. Colorado Common School District decided to demolish the school and its water well. Colorado School No. 3 was destroyed in 1958. Its students were sent to Lamar School (Lamar Elementary School) effectively.

No traces of Colorado School No. 3 remained by 1960. The water well was paved over and destroyed by TXDot after Highway 71 was realigned. The water well was plugged prior to realignment of Highway 71.


Colorado School No. 3 was located at the junction of Falwell Lane & Puebla Street, Del Valle, Texas, US 78617.