Sunday, August 13, 2017

Lefty Williams deemed best kept hidden secret in the music industry.

Lefty Williams is the best kept hidden secret in the music industry. He knows how to play the guitar left-handed. Playing the guitar left-handed is not something many people can do, play, or perform at. Lefty Williams has a truly unique talent in that aspect. (He is famous at Guitar World.) Lefty Williams is the lead singer for the Lefty Williams band. He has been the lead singer in the Lefty Williams band for a number of years now.

Music from Lefty Williams band is available on iTunes. Most of their music is going to be available online via the internet. That is how many artists and bands handle their independent distribution in this day and time.

Saturday, August 12, 2017

US President Donald Trump to declare war on Korea.

It’s official! As of August 10, 2017, Donald Trump has declared war on Korea. Donald Trump has declared the US is running out of patience with Korea over its nuclear drive. Trump claims its ballistic missile programs have gotten out of hand. United States calls on other regional powers in other countries from across the globe to implement sanctions against Korea. Sanctions will be employed in a phased and comprehensive approach. He wants all “responsible nations” to join in. So does the US.

“Today we are facing the threat of the reckless and brutal regime of Korea. The Korean dictatorship has no regard for the safety and security of its people, for its neighbors, no respect for humanity, and has no respect for human life.” said Trump.

Things have gone out of hand. Donald Trump has made declaring war on Korea a top priority over nearly everything else in politics. He warns that the Korean dictatorship regime “better choose a better path do it quickly”. Russia is ready to do whatever they can to help United States against Korea. Russia is ready to render aid to the United States.

History about Oak Grove Church in Austin, Texas nearly long forgotten. (Revisited)

Origins for Oak Grove Church date back to 1861 when the building was know as Oak Grove School. Oak Grove Church was the former Oak Grove School that was located on the end of Spicewood Springs Road in Austin, Texas which served as aa rural schoolhouse that had served Travis County and rural Austin from 1861 to 1970. Oak Grove School taught grades 1 through 8 as Oak Grove School was a K-8 school.

In 1970, the former Oak Grove School was converted from a 110 year old schoolhouse into a neo-classical modern church which would become the Oak Grove Church we know today. No known modifications were made to the church.

Over the years, the Oak Grove Church was set on fire several times by vandals. The Oak Grove Church finally burned to the ground on the date of August 31, 1992 after being set on fire several times. Report of arson to the Oak Grove Church had appeared in an August 31, 1992 edition of the Austin American-Statesman newspaper in an article titled “Congregation mourns loss of old church”. Today only a shed, cement foundations, and a basketball court remain. The shed is currently being used for storage.

Now Oak Grove Cemetery was first plotted in 1885. Earliest burial found at this cemetery dates back to the year 1887. Today the cemetery is maintained by the donations of friends and family. Oak Grove Cemetery is private property and off limits to the public.

Oak Grove Church was/is located at 7901 Spicewood Springs Road, Austin, Texas, US 78759. Both the Oak Grove Church and Oak Grove Cemetery are located at this address. Oak Grove Cemetery is now property of Oak Grove Church. Today both Oak Grove Church and Oak Grove Cemetery are private property and are currently off limits to the public.

History of the small McNeil School in Austin, Texas, forgotten.

The McNeil School is one of Austin’s many forgotten institutions from almost 2 centuries ago. Most never really heard or seen the former McNeil School. McNeil School was one of the many schools historians never wrote a book about or news stations have either covered. More so or less, McNeil School has faded away with ongoing time.


The McNeil School first opened and operated in 1887. 1887-1888 was the first school year McNeil School operated on from. The McNeil School was built as a single story one-room log cabin building in 1887. From thereon out, the McNeil School operated from 1887 to 1951. McNeil School operated on a full year schedule in 1887 under the name “McNeil Schoolhouse”. The McNeil Schoolhouse was located southeast of the intersection of the A&NW  Railroad  and north of McNeil-Jollyville Road.

The McNeil School taught grades 1st through 6th in 1887 from thereon out. Students who desired to continue their education had to transfer to Round Rock Independent School District or to Merrilltown School in the Merrilltown School District. McNeil School had its own school district called McNeil School District before being consolidated into Round Rock Independent School District (Round Rock ISD) in 1950.

1888 is when more improvements were added to the log cabin. McNeil School did not have indoor plumbing, electricity, central heating, lead painting, or even phone service until the mid 20th century. McNeil School received indoor plumbing and electricity in the 1940s. 1888 saw growth in enrollment for the McNeil School.

Children who attended this school were primarily of Mexican descent. Although the majority of the student population was of Mexican descent, white students attended McNeil School. Children of workers/employees from Austin White Limestone Company attended McNeil School. In fact at one time, 100% of the students were children of Austin White Limestone Company employees. Company housing was provided and termed “the flats” by local McNeil residents.
of $1,200 and

In 1906, McNeil School was rebuilt into a new one-room schoolhouse built of native stone. The native stone schoolhouse replaced the earlier school building. The 1906 McNeil School building was built out of limestone.


As for the McNeil Mexican School, McNeil Mexican School was built in 1932. In 1932 the school opened. Children who attended this school were primarily of Mexican descent. All of the student population was of Mexican descent. White students had attended this school as well. The school never went past the 7th grade. Grades 1st through 6th were taught at McNeil Mexican School. Students who desired to continue their education had to transfer to Round Rock Independent School District.

In 1939, a new school (McNeil Mexican School) was built again due to structural errors the first Mexican School had. A 1939 news article from the Austin American-Statesman newspaper describes the construction of a new school for Mexican Americans in McNeil. The new one-room schoolhouse was built of native stone for a cost of $1,200 and replaced the earlier school building.


In 1940, both McNeil School and McNeil Mexican School received indoor plumbing and electricity. Although there was no central heating system installed in the school. Property taxes were raised significantly to in order to receive funds to install indoor plumbing and electricity.

1950 is when McNeil School, McNeil Mexican School, and McNeil School District were consolidated into Round Rock Independent School District (Round Rock ISD). McNeil School was consolidated into Round Rock ISD due to declining enrollment, loss in property taxes, and lack of funding. (The economic base of the community was centered on the Austin White Lime Company.) Students were buss into Round Rock ISD schools to continue their education. 1951 is the year when the McNeil School closed.


In 1995, the school property was converted into Robinson Ranch which is near the McNeil Store and US Post Office. The former McNeil School building has been converted into a cattle barn. A baseball field remains intact. The Robinson Family owns the ranch along with Austin White Limestone Company which has been in the family for generations.

Today Robinson Ranch owns the property while Austin White Limestone Company owns the mineral rights. The property is off limits to the public. The former McNeil School building is hidden behind trees and has been converted into a cattle barn. Several cattle can be seen roaming the property in summertime.

The McNeil School is located northeast of Howard Lane and McNeil Road, Austin, Texas, US 78728.


*McNeil School operated under Round Rock ISD for a short while.
*McNeil School was also known as the McNeil Schoolhouse.

Carlson School history forgotten.

Carlson School was first built in 1881 to serve the Manda Common School District. Miss Mitchell was one of the first teachers to have taught students at Carlson School. Her teaching career at Carlson School lasted from years 1881 to 1900. L. C. Nelson and K. H. Eklund were the school’s trustees. Mrs. Bert Nanguson served as the principal. Students who lived in Manor, Coupland, Lund, and Manda attended this school. Carlson School was a K-7 where grades 1st through 7th were taught.

In 1900, Miss Edna Slaughter taught the school. Miss Edna Slaughter was a strict school teacher who expected students to work hard during the school year. She did mete out corporal punishment when needed. Miss Edna Slaughter was strict and stern with her students. Students were often reprimanded if they were to get out of line with their behavior. She accepted no flaw from students in their own classwork.

A newer school building was built in 1907. Construction to build the school took less than a year. The new school building replaced the old school building. The old school building was demolished in 1907. The original 1881 Carlson School was demolished.

In 1934, Carlson School had an attendance rate of 41 students. Average daily attendance was 32 students per day.There was one teacher for 41 students. The cost per year for student was $11.68 per year on average. 120 days was the average school semester. The teachers who taught got paid for six months.

The 1930s is when Carlson School became a K-8 where grades 1st through 8th were taught. Students who wanted to complete their high school education past the 8th grade had to go into town in Manor, Texas. 9th grade was taught here for a short period in the mid 1930s. However that didn’t last long due to shortages in funding.

1947 is Carlson School was consolidated into Manor ISD and in 1952 the Carlson School was demolished. 2 private homes have since been built next to the former Carlson School campus. By 1964, all that remained was the gravel from demolition. The original Carlson School has been demolished and no longer intact. Remnants of this school are no longer in tact. An empty field of green grass took over where Carlson School once was.

Carlson School was located at the intersection of Manda Carlson Road & Lund - Carlson Road, Manor, Texas, US 78653.

History of Pilot Knob School long forgotten.

Pilot Knob School began in 1892 subsequently situated 1 ¼ miles south of the Pilot Knob settlement and Colton settlement located southeast of Austin, Texas way out in the country. Pilot Knob School began in 1892 subsequently situated 1 ¼ miles south Pilot Knob located at the intersection of FM 1625 & McKenzie Road. Pilot Knob School was named after a volcano that is located on top of a hill. Several volcanoes were active at this location some 3,000 years ago. Pilot Knob believed to be settled on top of the remains of a cretaceous volcano. This cretaceous volcano serves as a geological feature in the nearby area.


The Pilot Knob Schoolhouse building was built as an L-shaped building similar in the form to a house of a private residence in 1892 on two acres of land. The Pilot Knob School was built as from an L-shape building plan similar to former Lamar School in Del Valle, Texas. This L-shaped building was a school that was served inside a single story structure unit. The building would later turn into a C-shape building. Sanitary needs were met with outhouses.

The first school term for Pilot Knob School was 1892 with a small student population of 15 students. Mrs. McKuen was the first teacher to teach at Pilot Knob School. These students came from various rural areas, subdivisions, and neighborhoods in Travis County/Austin. The settlement of Pilot Knob had its own school district called Pilot Knob School District also known as School District No. 67, School District #67, District #67, and District No. 67 from 1892 to 1956.

In 1893 is when 20 students attended this school. Enrollment grew within the first year. In the beginning, Pilot Knob School was a K-8 school serving grades 1 through 8. For those students who wanted to complete their high school education past the 8th grade had to go into town or transfer to the Creedmoor Common School District.


Population figures of 2 teachers and 99 students were reported in 1907. The school boasted a student population of 100 students in 1908. The 1907-1908 school semester faced growth in enrollment. 1907 and 1908 were the peak years for this school.

The cost per year was $346 with an average of $11.53 per student per year in 1934. The 1934-1935 school semester has 41 students. Two teachers taught seven grades for 120 days and got paid for six months. The school period was later extended to 8 months.

In 1936, Former pupil Joe Sassman became a school teacher and principal at Pilot Knob School. John D. Foster served as vice principal while Joe Sassman served as principal. When Joe Sassman served as a school teacher to fill in for a teacher who was absent, John D. Foster would serve as the school’s principal for that time. Miss Nan Gilbert taught at the school from the mid 1934 to 1956. Miss Nan Gilbert was a well known notable teacher to have taught as Pilot Knob School.

In 1937, Pilot Knob School became a K-7 serving grades 1 through 7. Students who wanted to complete their junior high school education past the 7th grade had to go into town or transfer to the Creedmoor Common School District. There were no junior high schools/middle schools or high schools in the Pilot Knob School District. Senior high schools were not available in this school district. Miss Minnie C. Overton also served as school principal for Pilot Knob School from the late 1930s to 1956. Mrs. Joe Sassman and Mrs. J. D. Foster served on the PTA.


In 1940, Pilot Knob School became a K-6 serving grades 1 through 6. Students who wanted to complete their junior high school education past the 6th grade had to go into town or transfer to the Creedmoor Common School District. 1940 is when Pilot Knob School became Pilot Knob Elementary School. Pilot Knob Elementary School served grades 1 through 6 from 1940 to 1956.

The Pilot Knob school is underwent repairs in 1940 and again in 1950. The repairs were modest in nature. Not too many were made though. Indoor plumbing was never added or equipped with this school. Outhouses still remained in use. An outhouse was added southeast of the school building. The school had no indoor toilet or electricity.


In 1956, Pilot Knob School District was consolidated into Colorado Common School District (now Del Valle Independent School District) due to dwindling tax revenue from decreasing property taxes, lack of funding, and lack of enrollment. It was mainly due to decreasing property taxes that rural school districts such as Pilot Knob, Creedmoor, Dry Creek, Niederwald, and Maha were consolidated into bigger school districts such as Del Valle ISD and Austin ISD.

Pilot Knob School was shut down in 1957. Pilot Knob School District was already shut down by then. The school was demolished later that year. The school only sat abandoned for a short period of time. Pilot Knob School campus property land was vacant from 1957 to 1995.

In 1995, building contractors and landscaping companies paved over the former Pilot Knob School campus for a bus barn to be surveyed and laid out. Land was resurfaced and flattened the same year. This Del Valle ISD bus barn would become known as the “McKenzie Yard”. The “McKenzie Yard” serves as a parking lot for the Del Valle ISD buses. Several portables and trailers have been hauled onto the property. Trailers are now on this property.


Pilot Knob School campus is now owned by Del Valle Independent School District (Del Valle ISD). Pilot Knob School campus now operates as a bus barn for Del Valle ISD with a chain link fence that surrounds the property and is off limits to the public. McKenzie Yard is a Del Valle ISD bus barn. Arivify states this parcel of land is owned by Del Valle ISD.

Today there are no indications visible of proof that the school was built here. There are no remains left of the school. No visible remains are evident for proving that the school existed. Remnants of the school have been paved over. A parking lot for the Del Valle ISD buses is currently over the former remnants of  Pilot Knob School.The original location for the Pilot Knob School was at Austin, Texas, US 78744.


Notable teachers to have taught at this school were John D. Foster, E. C. Kieke, Nan Gilbert, and Joe Sassman. Former pupil Joe Sassman became a school teacher and principal at Pilot Knob School. Miss Nan Gilbert was a well known notable teacher to have taught as Pilot Knob School.

Notable students who attended this school were Wilroy Kieke of the well known Kieke familiy, Mildred Sassman, Theo Smith, school teacher Marietta Cowan, Lois Kieke, and Joe Sassman just to name a few. Joe Sassman Sr. also received his education at Pilot Knob School along with his wife and relatives that lived in the area.

History about the Cedar Valley School in Austin, Texas revisited.

History about the Cedar Valley School in Austin, Texas revisited.

Early settler Mark Thomas gave land for a school in 1867 where modern day Thomas Springs Road is located. This school would be held in a log cabin. This school would become known as the Thomas Springs School. Thomas Springs School operated from 1867 to 1898 before being consolidated and renamed to Cedar Valley School. The Cedar Valley School can be described as one tiny room as the school originally operated in one room at the very beginning. Cedar Valley School was originally to be as a one-room schoolhouse as planned. Cedar Valley School was a K-7 that taught grades 1 through 7 at first.

1875 is when a box frame building would be constructed. Lumber was hauled in from a donor named R. S Young. John W. Young, George M. Heisner, and Adolph J. Trautwein were the first trustees. A spring on the property provided and furnished water for the school. The Cedar Valley School operated as a tiny one room schoolhouse where classes were held in one tiny room. (The school originally operated in one room at the very beginning as Cedar Valley School was originally a one-room schoolhouse.)

In 1887, W. H. Bishop was employed to teach both schools in a 4 month period at a salary of $33.33 per month. The average rate a school teacher earned per month at the time was $33.33 per month which was usual and not uncommon. 1887 is when another teacher was employed by Austin ISD.

1891 was when a portion of a box frame from the one room Mud School (Mud Schoolhouse) from Bee Cave School District/Teck Common School District was moved to the site of Cedar Valley School. (Mud School was a one room school building.)


However the Cedar Valley School would not be built or opened until late 19th century. The Cedar Valley School was built in 1898 to serve the Oak Hill community and Cedar Valley community as a schoolhouse operating from 1898 to 1953. Overall Cedar Valley School operated from 1867 to 1953.

It was in the year of 1898 that the first consolidation of schools in Travis County took place. Thomas Springs School was consolidated into Cedar Valley School in the year of 1898 was renamed Cedar Valley School. The Cedar Valley School was also known as the Cedar Valley Schoolhouse. 1898 was the same year the Thomas Springs School building was torn down and rebuilt into the Cedar Valley School building. From thereon out, Cedar Valley School operated from 1898 to 1953. The Cedar Valley School building currently still stands as is.


1st grade through 7th grade were taught at the Cedar Valley School. Middle school grades/junior high school grades 6th grade through 7th grade were taught at Cedar Valley School. Cedar Valley School operated as an elementary school and middle school. Each class was made up of 6 to 7 students. Ratio was 6:1 on occasion with being a 7:1. (6 being students and 1 being the teacher.)

Some students who lived in the Oak Hill community did not attend school until the 5th grade because students would have to help their families grow crops during harvesting season. After 7th grade, students were bussed into Austin ISD schools. Upon graduation from both Cedar Valley and Oak Hill Schools, students would be bussed off into Fulmore Junior High School (now known as Fulmore Middle School) which continues to be operated by Austin ISD.


In 1903, several former students that attended Cedar Valley School with no further schooling offered by these schools, passed the State teacher’s examinations test. Several former students had no further schooling past a 6th grade education or a 7th grade education. Which was not uncommon in those days. 1903 was the highlight year for this school.

Plans to close Cedar Valley School and consolidate the school into the Oak Hill School District were announced publicly in 1950. Austin ISD planned to consolidate Cedar Valley School and Oak Hill School into their school district.

Right before Cedar Valley School closed, another room was built. The second room was built in 1952. A third room was built later that year. Plans to close Cedar Valley School already in effect as planned by Austin ISD to consolidate into their school district. 1952-1953 was the last school year Cedar Valley School

The Oak Hill School and Cedar Valley School consolidated in 1953. Cedar Valley School was closed and consolidated into the Oak Hill School District in 1953. The reason why Cedar Valley School was closed down and consolidated was due to lack of funding directly from dwindling property taxes in direct attribution also by Oak Hill School District consolidating various schools in the Oak Hill community and Cedar Valley community. Students who attended Cedar Valley School were bussed to Oak Hill School on US 290.


In 1960, Cedar Valley joined Oak Hill and Manchaca to form a rural school district, but got annexed by Austin ISD in 1967. 1960 is where Oak Hill School District and Manchaca School District attempted to form a short-lived school district that lasted from 1960 up until 1967 in a 6 to 7 year timespan. 1967 is the year when Austin ISD annexed the school districts of Oak Hill and Manchaca.
Despite being operated and supervised indirectly by the Oak Hill School District itself, the Cedar Valley School was directly associated with the Oak Hill community itself. Nevertheless, the Cedar Valley School was always considered a part of the Oak Hill School District regardless of consolidation and closing.


From 1968 to 2001, the former Cedar Valley Schoolhouse ran as a community center under the title of Cedar Valley Community Hall. In 2001, the Cedar Valley Community Hall closed and became abandoned falling into disrepair. Over the years, the Cedar Valley Community Hall has fallen into a state of disrepair. Jim Connelly Masonry, Inc. bought the land in the mid 2000s.

Currently as of April 2017, the Cedar Valley School sits abandoned in a large field of overgrown grass from resulting vegetation. Brush covers the lot. All entrances to the school building are boarded up. The front entrance is still boarded up to this day. Several windows are reported to be broken. Jim Connelly Masonry, Inc. owns the land where Cedar Valley School is. It is unclear if current owner Jim Connelly Masonry, Inc. has any plans for future development.


Cedar Valley School holds an important place in the history of Oak Hill that has long been forgotten. Lack of historic preservation and political interest is what led to the demise of Cedar Valley School. The City of Austin should have designated Cedar Valley School as a/or with a “City of Austin Historical Landmark”. Cedar Valley School remains as one of the few surviving public school buildings associated with development of Oak Hill with the former 1924 Oak Hill School building. The Cedar Valley School is regarded as a prominent historic structure being one of few remainders of rural Oak Hill.

The location is 7901 Thomas Springs Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78736.

City of Lago Vista plans to preserve Cox Springs School building.

City of Lago Vista is currently working on plans to preserve the Cox Springs School building in a better more efficient manner. North Shore Heritage & Cultural Society and former students are working with the City of Lago Vista, City of Jonestown, and Travis County Historical Commission to move the school building onto a permanent location into the city of Lago Vista, Texas.

North Shore Heritage & Cultural Society wants to save this building in an attempt of historic preservation so students of today can see how students who lived in Lago Vista and Jonestown during the early 20th century received their education. Both commissions plan to keep the old school in tact. North Shore Heritage & Cultural Society and former students are working to restore the former school building.

Both the City of Lago Vista and City of Jonestown consider Cox Springs School to be a historical building despite no Texas Historic Landmark marker. Although there is no Texas Historic Landmark marker, a brown metal sign about the school’s history is located behind the school building facing Old Burnet Road. Cox Springs School is one of the oldest buildings in Lago Vista next to the Lago Vista School which is commonly known as “the little red schoolhouse” to local citizens and historians.


Cox Springs School was built in 1908 as a one-room building for Lago Vista Common School District No. 2 better known as Lago Vista Common School District. Cox Springs School was known as Cox Springs School House when the school district first opened this school. Grades 1 through 11 attended this school with Grade 12 eventually being included. Cox Springs School had its own school district called Cox Springs School District (District #2) from 1908 to 1950 before being consolidated into Lago Vista Independent School District.

Originally the Cox Springs School was located closely near the intersection of Lohman Ford Road & Sylvester Ford Road in Lago Vista, Texas from 1908 to 1940. In 1940, the school relocated to Old Burnet Road in Jonestown, Texas in a modern day neighborhood called The Bluffs. Although the Cox Springs School is considered to be in Lago Vista, Texas, the actual location the school building is currently located at is 18842 Old Burnet Road, Jonestown, Texas, US 78645. The alternate address is 18842 Old Burnet Road, Leander, Texas, US 78645.

In 1940, the Cox Springs School building was moved from the intersection of Lohman Ford Road & Sylvester Ford Road in Lago Vista, Texas to Old Burnet Road in Jonestown, Texas. Grade 12 was added in 1949 due to Gilmer-Aiken Law mandated by the State of Texas. More funds went towards the school district that following year. 1950 is when Cox Springs School District was abolished and consolidated into Lago Vista Independent School District (Lago Vista ISD).

In 1960, the last group of students from grades 1st through 12th were moved to Lago Vista School which was known then to Lago Vista citizens and locals as the “the little red schoolhouse” on 7610 Lohman Ford Road. Lago Vista School was a K-12 school then.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

US President Donald Trump declares war on Korea.

It’s official! As of August 10, 2017, Donald Trump has declared war on Korea. Donald Trump has declared the US is running out of patience with Korea over its nuclear drive. Trump claims its ballistic missile programs have gotten out of hand. United States calls on other regional powers in other countries from across the globe to implement sanctions against Korea. Sanctions will be employed in a phased and comprehensive approach. He wants all “responsible nations” to join in. So does the US.

“Today we are facing the threat of the reckless and brutal regime of Korea. The Korean dictatorship has no regard for the safety and security of its people, for its neighbors, no respect for humanity, and has no respect for human life.” said Trump.

Things have gone out of hand. Donald Trump has made declaring war on Korea a top priority over nearly everything else in politics. He warns that the Korean dictatorship regime “better choose a better path do it quickly”. Russia is ready to do whatever they can to help United States against Korea. Russia is ready to render aid to the United States.

History about the Highland School in Pflugerville, Texas way long forgotten.

Highland School in Pflugerville, Texas is one of the many Austin/Travis County institutions that have been long forgotten which has faded away with time and history. Most local citizens have forgotten about  Highland School in Pflugerville, Texas. In fact, most have never knew about this school’s existence. For those who didn’t remember and for those who did not know, Highland School was a public school that operated from 1873 to 1936. Highland School was located near the intersection of Vision Drive & Foothill Farms near I-35 (IH 35) out on the rural countryside.


In early 1873, Highland School was built as a one room school building. At one point Highland School was built as a log cabin before becoming a modern one room school building. 1880 was the year Highland School was rebuilt and modernized into a one room school building. Overall Highland School was a rural school. 1902 is when some children from Merrilltown School in the Merrilltown School District were transferred to Highland School.

Highland School had its own school district (as many rural schools in Travis County/Austin did) called the Highland School District aka Highland School District No. 56 (School District No. 56). Highland School District operated as a school district from 1882 to 1936 for Pflugerville and Austin.

Highland School met its fate as most rural school across the United States did. The school was consolidated into a larger school district. Highland School and its school district were consolidated into Pflugerville Independent School District (Pflugerville ISD) in 1936. The building was moved onto to the site of where Timmerman Elementary School is now located. The building was destroyed by a tornado that hit Pflugerville in 1957. Highland School is no longer extant today.


The location of Highland School was Vision Drive, Pflugerville, Texas, US 78660.