Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Sales of ivory to be banned in the United Kingdom.

MSN reports the sale of ivory is to be banned in the United Kingdom. It is part of the UK government plan to help protect elephants as a humanitarian effort towards animal rights. The ban will cover ivory items of any age, not just containing new ivory. This will be the toughest ban in the UK to date.

The number of wild elephants has dropped by almost ⅓rd in the last decade. 20,000 elephants are slaughtered each year for their tusks which are valuable to poachers. Poachers hunt endangered species of elephants for their tusks. The international trade of illegal ivory is $16 billion (USD)/£17 billion (UK pounds) each year.

Legislation will be placed in soon as possible. 88% of UK citizens support the ban. It is unclear when the UK ban will come into effect. However UK citizens hope the ban will com into effect sometime by 2018. Parliament has not come to a conclusion or has made a final decision yet. 

Edith Marie Johnson of Vidor, Texas files for bankruptcy due to 1994 lawsuit from HUD.

On June 5, 2017, a Chapter 13 bankruptcy case was filed by Edith Marie Johnson in the jurisdiction of U.S. Bankruptcy Courts, Texas Southern Bankruptcy. The case is pending along with another pending case from a separate lawsuit not related to HUD vs. Edith Marie Johnson.

She filed for Chapter 13 Bankruptcy due to the expensive charges brought against her in the 1994 lawsuit of HUD vs. Edith Marie Johnson where she was both criminally and civilly charged for engaging in discriminatory housing practices. She used threats of violence when engaging in these discriminatory housing practices.

Edith Marie Johnson is indigent and undoubtedly she will not be able to pay the awards to both parties involved in the HUD vs. Edith Marie Johnson lawsuit for engaging in discriminatory housing practices. She more or less stays away from news media and cannot be reached for comment because she has no phone.


Here is the backstory to Edith Marie Johnson’s Chapter 13 bankruptcy case.

In 1993 when Bill Simpson was living at the Vidor Villas housing complex in Vidor, Texas, Edith Marie Johnson made his life into a living terror regularly on a daily basis. 

Edith Marie Johnson taunted Bill Simpson with racial slurs. She had threatened his life through a campaign of intimidation. Edith Marie Johnson regularly threats at him along with those hurled obscenities. She also threatened the life of Ross Dennis, president of the resident council.

Edith Marie Johnson told The Beaumont Enterprise, "If I had a gun, I'd kill that nigger.” If he comes into my yard, I'll kill him with my baseball bat.” “Look at those niggers. I could just puke."  She even went as far as to appear on the Phil Donahue show in 1993.

It has been reported that Edith Marie Johnson was an avowed racist and a white supremacist. She was a member of the Vidor Original Knights of the Ku Klux Klan and a member of the White Nationalist Movement. She believed blacks did not belong in Vidor. Over the years, she associated herself with separatist organizations.

Bill Simpson and Ross Dennis later submitted an affidavit to the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development in 1993.

Edith Marie Johnson moved out in January 1994 amid finding out about renewed efforts to bring more blacks in to the HUD housing complex. Edith Marie Johnson was a former resident of the Vidor Villas HUD complex. She moved to Lumberton, Texas in the same year. She more or less stayed away from news media and cannot be reached for comment because she has no phone.

The complaint against Edit Marie Johnson was brought by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. On July 26, 1994, Edith Marie Johnson of Vidor was ordered by federal Administrative Law Judge Alan Heifitz to pay $175,000 to the estate of Bill Simpson and $125,300 to Ross Dennis for emotional distress. She was also assessed a $10,000 civil penalty for engaging in discriminatory housing practices. White supremacist Edith Marie Johnson was sentenced to 40 hours of community service.

Edith Marie Johnson moved out in January 1995 amid finding out about renewed efforts to bring more blacks in to the HUD housing complex. She moved to Lumberton, Texas in the same year. She had began attending classes teaching racial sensitivity.

On June 5, 2017, a Chapter 13 bankruptcy case was filed by Edith Marie Johnson in the jurisdiction of U.S. Bankruptcy Courts, Texas Southern Bankruptcy. The case is pending along with another pending case from a separate lawsuit not related to HUD vs. Edith Marie Johnson. She realized she could not pay off these court fines which ultimately led her to file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

What happened to Billy Calhoun from the Children Of Darkness documentary? (Revisited)

To rehash from the previous news article written by Michael Mixerr for Mixerr Reviews called “What happened to Billy Calhoun from the Children Of Darkness documentary?”, some words have been changed upon request from family members.

Patient William Calhoun (Billy Calhoun) was featured in the 1983 documentary called Children of Darkness. Billy Calhoun was the patient who was hurting himself so badly from his self-injurious behaviors and being escorted by orderlies around the hospital at the very beginning of the Children Of Darkness documentary.

Billy Calhoun was another star of the documentary as he was featured all over the place in regard to this documentary. Richard Kotuk focused a portion of his time filming Billy Calhoun due to his strange behavior. Billy Calhoun has a profound case of severe autism.

The Children of Darkness documentary was broadcasted nationally on television in the United States on PBS that same year. The Children of Darkness documentary explored the lack of mental health care in America for juvenile psychiatry. Many seriously emotionally disturbed youth were shown. Richard Kotuk filmed and directed Children of Darkness documentary.


William Calhoun (Billy Calhoun) was born in 1963. At the age of 4, he was labeled severely mentally retarded. He was then later diagnosed with autism. As a child, Billy was suffering from severe autism. His severe autism caused him to act out in an aggressive manner as he was dangerous around others and himself. His family could no longer handle him or his dangerous destructive behavior. At the age of 7, he was placed in a state institution called Sagamore Children’s Hospital. His mother, Mary Calhoun, saw him every week until she died. He was in a state of constant panic being unaware of what was going on around him.

During his stay as a patient at the Sagamore Children’s Hospital, his self-injurious behaviors worsened as he acted more aggressive towards staff. Every 2 to 3 hours, Billy would be “walked” by orderlies around the hospital so his muscles would not atrophy or deteriorate. Billy had attacked hospital staff and orderlies in the past as described in the documentary. Most of the time he was strapped to his bed at the time of during the filming session for this documentary. While at Sagamore Children’s Hospital, Billy underwent intense therapy while being in restraints for 2 ½ years long.

When he was 19, he was transferred over to South Beach Psychiatric Care Center in Brooklyn, New York. Since then he has stayed at that hospital which is not too far from South Beach Psychiatric Hospital.


Billy Calhoun is still alive and is now at the age of 54. Things have changed. Billy has undergone several behavioral interventions and therapy sessions. Some of his phases eventually passed. The lobotomy and shock therapy never happened. As a result, Billy Calhoun now receives 24 hour care around the clock. He is well cared for.

The self-injurious behaviors and self-destructive behavior is still evident and present. Just to a level that lets him function to the point where he can function to be not as aggressive or dangerous as he once was earlier in his lifetime. Billy is now heavily medicated by fair amounts of drugs.

Things have changed, but we can never undo the abuse, trauma, pain, suffering, and torture he went through as a child. What happened there is beyond words.

History of Fawcett School in Fawcett, Alberta, Canada forgotten.

Fawcett School is one of the many forgotten schools of Alberta and Canada. Not much is known about this school or can be researched online and offline. Search results turned up with no information about the Fawcett School.

Fawcett School opened in 1970 on Township Road (642A) as a rural school in a single story titanium building located on top of a concrete foundation. Fawcett School was K-9 school for many years that taught grades Kindergarden through 9th grade. After 9th grade, students would be transferred to Westlock to complete their high school education.

Around 100 students attended this school daily. Its peak point for student population was at 110 students. Student population never went past 200 students.

In 2014 during the 2014-2015 school year, the school closed and students continued their education in the town of Westlock. It was lack of enrollment that caused the school to close. While Fawcett School was closed, the school board tried to repurpose it. However that ultimately failed due to a lack of potential buyers. It fell victim of neglect shortly thereafter. Building infrastructure fell apart causing parts of Fawcett School to collapse in certain areas. Today the school is abandoned.

Fawcett School was located on Township Road 642A, Fawcett, Alberta, Canada.

Stampede Pontiac in Calgary, Alberta, Canada forgotten.

Stampede Pontiac was a car dealership located in Calgary that operated from 1968 to 2014. It was known as the Stampede Pontiac Car Dealership for decades. The building is larger than it looks on the outside. It’s one of those building that looks bigger outside than the inside. The two floors remain intact. This was deemed as a high maintenance building.

2011 is when General Motors killed off the Pontiac car brand. This building turned into a Bowcycle dealership in 2011. The car dealership eventually would become a furniture store in 2013. The furniture store would close in 2014. The building was subsequently abandoned by then. Sometime in 2016 is when the building was demolished.

Stampede Pontiac was located at 1111 9th Avenue SW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Bancroft Orchard in Burnaby, Canada forgotten.

Bancroft Orchard was an orchard house located on 25 acres of land built in 1923. It was built without a bathroom surprisingly. A pioneer couple owned Bancroft Orchard until they were deceased. There was also a farm. An old craftsman farmhouse was found on this site.

The kitchen used to be in adjoining room towards the house. The current kitchen and a bedroom were added sometime in the 1940s. The original sink from the 1920s was added on and not salvaged.


They sold a sizable portion of land to the City of Burnaby to be used as a community park sometime during the 20th century. This park still bears numerous trees from the original orchard. They later subdivided their property to support a large housing complex. The large housing complex was built using the same colours as the old home.

Bancroft Orchard used well water until the mid-1980s. The house finally received indoor plumbing in 1984. Other buildings had been connected to plumbing by 1985.

The then-widowed wife of the Bancroft Orchard passed away in this home back in 2001. Noort Developments took control of ownership of the property in 2001. Surrounding neighborhood development and urban development made the area a desirable location. The Bancroft Orchard house was demolished in 2006.

Bancroft Orchard was located at 6801 Rumble Street, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.

Krawchyk School history of Manitoba, Canada forgotten.

Krawchyk School was an elementary school that operated from 1911 to 1998 in the city of Winnipeg. St. James-Assiniboia School Division owned and operated Krawchyk School for operated for 87 years.

Krawchyk School was originally built to educate students in grades 1 to 3. The original building had one entrance for boys and one for girls with separate staircases. These were two stairs cases inside the school. An addition later was added on the south side of the building. The connecting wing and gym was added on the north side of the building.

Sometime later during the 20th century is when 4th grade added to this school. The homeroom for the 4th grade class was located right to the library in a straight shotgun styled hallway. The two doors at the end of the hallway led down to the gym.

The school closed in 1998. Krawchyk School was 1 of 26 schools that the James-Assiniboia School Division had closed within the last 40 years. The school sat vacant for 11 years before getting demolished on the date of February 6, 2009.

During demolition is when all the ballasts were removed. Ballasts contain toxic PCBs so they are removed before general demolition. Only older ballasts made prior to the 1980's were considered toxic. The newer ones were not so much.

Krawchyk School was located at 1950 Pacific Avenue West, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Indigenous Indian history of Peace Point, Alberta, Canada explored.

Peace Point has been occupied by boreal forest and plains over the last 7,000-8,000 years. Boreal forest surrounds the plains of northern Canada. Indigenous peoples were said to have occupied the land over the last 7,000-8,000 years. Beaver Indians were first among the indigenous tribes to have first occupied this land. Boreal forest surrounds the plains of northern Canada.

*(Ref: Mark G. Stevenson, The formation of artifact assemblages at workshop/habitation sites: models from Peace Point in northern Alberta, American Antiquity 5063-8 1, 1985)
*(Ref: Mark G. Stevenson, Window on the Past: Archaeological Assessment of the Peace
Point Site, Wood Buffalo National Park, Alberta, 1986)


Peace Point was founded by the Cree Indians in 1750. In the mid-1750s, the Cree tribe was the first among Indian tribes of Canada to obtain access to firearms. The Cree tribe displaced the Beaver Indians to the northwest.

By 1760, the western front of Cree expansion eventually pushed the Danezaa people to the north and west. This led to what was called The Cree-Danezaa conflicts. The Cree-Danezaa conflicts lasted for 2 decades until the smallpox epidemic in 1781 decimated the Cree Indian Tribe in the region. The Cree Tribe displaced the Beaver Indians.

The Cree-Danezaa conflicts were resolved with a peace treaty in 1782, a year after the smallpox epidemic in 1781 wiped out nearly the entire population of the Danezaa people and Cree tribe. The peace treat was ratified in the same year. A peace pipe ceremony was held at Peace Point. Peace Point was the site of a peace agreement between the Cree and Chipewyan in 1784.

Peace River served as a boundary for both indigenous Indian tribes. The river became the boundary with the Danezaa tribe on the left bank (to the north and west) and the Cree tribe on the right bank (the south and east). Peace River served as a cultural boundary between the two indigenous tribes.

Much controversy has arisen over the displacement of aboriginal groups from their traditional territories at the outset of the fur trade during the 18th century. This never has been resolved.


By the beginning of the 21st century, less than 20 people were living in the small settlement of Peace Point. Industry Canada shows that Peace Point had a total population of 15 people in 2001 within the rural area. 15 people were living within 6 dwellings in where they reside. Many still speak the Cree language.
(Ref: Industry Canada, 2001)

Today in the 21st century, Peace Point is an unincorporated community in Alberta, Canada within Wood Buffalo National Park. Peace Point is a historical settlement with historic value.

History of Peace Point, Alberta, Canada explored and explained.

Peace Point has been occupied by boreal forest and plains over the last 7,000-8,000 years. Boreal forest surrounds the plains of northern Canada. Indigenous peoples were said to have occupied the land over the last 7,000-8,000 years. Beaver Indians were first among the indigenous tribes to have first occupied this land. Boreal forest surrounds the plains of northern Canada.

*(Ref: Mark G. Stevenson, The formation of artifact assemblages at workshop/habitation sites: models from Peace Point in northern Alberta, American Antiquity 5063-8 1, 1985)
*(Ref: Mark G. Stevenson, Window on the Past: Archaeological Assessment of the Peace
Point Site, Wood Buffalo National Park, Alberta, 1986)


Peace Point was founded by the Cree Indians in 1750. In the mid-1750s, the Cree tribe was the first among Indian tribes of Canada to obtain access to firearms. The Cree tribe displaced the Beaver Indians to the northwest.

By 1760, the western front of Cree expansion eventually pushed the Danezaa people to the north and west. This led to what was called The Cree-Danezaa conflicts. The Cree-Danezaa conflicts lasted for 2 decades until the smallpox epidemic in 1781 decimated the Cree Indian Tribe in the region. The Cree Tribe displaced the Beaver Indians.

The Cree-Danezaa conflicts were resolved with a peace treaty in 1782, a year after the smallpox epidemic in 1781 wiped out nearly the entire population of the Danezaa people and Cree tribe. The peace treat was ratified in the same year. A peace pipe ceremony was held at Peace Point. Peace Point was the site of a peace agreement between the Cree and Chipewyan in 1784.

Peace River served as a boundary for both indigenous Indian tribes. The river became the boundary with the Danezaa tribe on the left bank (to the north and west) and the Cree tribe on the right bank (the south and east). Peace River served as a cultural boundary between the two indigenous tribes.

Much controversy has arisen over the displacement of aboriginal groups from their traditional territories at the outset of the fur trade during the 18th century. This never has been resolved.

A man named Alexander Mackenzie set foot on in Peace Point while making a stop while traveling westwards towards the Yukon River on the date of October 12, 1792. Alexander Mackenzie came from Scotland, United Kingdom of Great Britain. Alexander Mackenzie's overnight stop was on the date of October 13, 1792.

*(Ref: Mark G. Stevenson, Window on the Past: Archaeological Assessment of the Peace
Point Site, Wood Buffalo National Park, Alberta, 1986)

People from Fort Chipewyan brought their horses to Peace Point to graze upon its extensive prairie in the 18th century. Most of these people emigrated from Scotland and England during the 18th century to Fort Chipewyan. From here they migrated to Peace Point.


More people and settlers from Scotland came from Fort Chipewyan during the 19th century. The population of Peace Point began shrinking in the 20th century. The settlement had a population of 200 at one point.

By the beginning of the 21st century, less than 20 people were living in the small settlement of Peace Point. Industry Canada shows that Peace Point had a total population of 15 people in 2001 within the rural area. 15 people were living within 6 dwellings in where they reside.
(Ref: Industry Canada, 2001)

Today in the 21st century, Peace Point is an unincorporated community in Alberta, Canada within Wood Buffalo National Park. Peace Point is a historical settlement with historic value. Many still speak the Cree language.

Recent history of Quinpool Education Centre in Halifax, Canada explored.

Quinpool Education Centre was once the St. Patrick's High School which was a non-denominational Roman Catholic school. The school was centrally located on a triangular plot of land located less than one block from Queen Elizabeth High School, a public school. 2,300 students were enrolled at this school at one time.

In September 2007, St. Patrick's High School was renamed to Quinpool Education Centre and merged into Queen Elizabeth High School to form Citadel High School at the former site of the Halifax Nova Scotia Community College campus. The moves generated controversy due to the land size. Historical rivalries were had between the schools.

In October 2008, new music programs were added. The building housed the Halifax All-City Music Centre along with several other educational programs offered by the city of Halifax.

Quinpool Education Centre closed in December 2013 due to its high maintenance costs. The school board decided it was too costly to keep the school active. The school often flooded due to multiple floods which occurred each year. Quinpool Education Centre was demolished sometime in 2014. Today no remains are extant on the former school campus.

Quinpool Education Centre was located at 6137 Quinpool Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.