Friday, May 17, 2019

Copper sediments in Texas HHSC water supply removed.

Copper sediments were removed from the Texas HHSC water supply in May 1, 2019. The process of removing copper sediment from the Texas HHSC water supply took a process of several months due to lack of state funding. The carpet was being redone on 5 floors of the HHSC building. That is why the removal of copper sediment took so long. The Texas HHSC building has had some major plumbing issues over the years it’s been open.

Forgotten history of Goebel School in St. Hedwig, Texas explored and explained by Mixerr Reviews.

Not much history is known or can be discovered about the Goebel School located in St. Hedwig, Texas. Little to no history of this school has been preserved by historians, educators, or professors. Goebel School was one of the lesser known schools of San Antonio and Bexar County. Not too historians have not covered this school written in books. Many citizens of San Antonio seemed to have forgotten about this school’s existence or its presence. Today Goebel School is one of the many forgotten schools of San Antonio and Bexar County.

Not only is Goebel School one of the many forgotten schools of San Antonio and Bexar County, it is one of the many forgotten schools of St. Hedwig, Texas. Goebel School and Midway School are examples of the many forgotten schools of St. Hedwig, Texas.

Goebel School was a rural school located way out in the county in St. Hedwig, Texas that operated from 1842 to 1964.


Goebel School was established as a two-room schoolhouse around 1842 on 1.95 acres of land owned by H. C. Weiters, Maria Weiters, and Adolf Boenig. H. C. Weiters and Adolf Boenig owned farmland where Goebel School was built near the intersection of FM 2538 & Miller Road. (Ref: Bexar County Official Public Records - Real Estate, Document No. 99990396541)

Grades 1 through 10 were taught at Goebel School. Senior high school students finished high school in San Antonio, Texas. Students living in St. Hedwig and Zuehl attended this school. Goebel School had once served as the northeast boundary for East Central Independent School District. Today East Central Independent School District covers 264 square miles.
(Ref: http://pacweb.alamo.edu/InteractiveHistory/projects/rhines/StudentProjects/2006/Boldtvolle/barnhill%20interview.html)

On the date of 12/30/1895, Adolf Boenig sold the property to H. C. Weiters and Maria Weiters by sale of a deed. In this deed, Adolf Boenig gave mineral rights and all property rights to H. C. Weiters by 100% percent. (Ref: Bexar County Official Public Records - Real Estate, Document No. 99991789940)



Goebel School had downgraded into an elementary school by 1920. San Antonio Express had Goebel School listed as an elementary school for a poling place during an election. Goebel School had served as a polling place also. (Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 6, February 16, 1920)


Howard Willie Luensman and Sharon J Luensman purchased the old Goebel School on the date of 6/1/1970 from a bank transfer. Shortly thereafter is when the building was renovated. The couple lived in the old Goebel School building until 1995. (Ref: Bexar County Official Public Records - Real Estate, Document No. 54546)

A garage sale was held at this location as reported by Seguin Gazette on the date of July 7, 1977. ”July 7-9. Furniture, toys, clothes, all kinds of things at Goebel School Building.” (Ref: Seguin Gazette, Page 22, July 7, 1977)

In 1995, the Howard Willie Luensman and Sharon J Luensman sold the property to Gerzon L Cabrera by a deed. The recorded date of the sale was 3/3/1995. Its gray colored roof was still intact. (Ref: Bexar County Official Public Records - Real Estate, Document No. 33028)

Gerzon L Cabrera was a trucker who used the property for his business called Chapin Enterprises Inc. which still is in operation today. He the last person known to have owned this land. (Ref: https://homemetry.com/house/16190+MILLER+RD,+Saint+Hedwig+TX)


According to aerial imagery from 2004 hosted by NETR Historical Aerials, the roof, windows, and furniture were already removed. It appears as if Gerzon L Cabrera or someone else had altered the old school building between 1995 and 2005.

On the date of 3/3/2016, Gerzon L Cabrera sold the land and building to Brenda Cabrera. Today Brenda Cabrera owns the former Goebel School property. (Ref: http://www.bcad.org/ClientDB/Property.aspx?prop_id=169443)



The old Goebel School building has been significantly altered. All of the windows and furniture have been stripped. Only the bricks walls remain. Any other furnishings that may have been left behind after closure were definitely stripped out.




Goebel School is located at the address of 16150 Miller Road, St. Hedwig, Texas, US 78152.


Thursday, May 16, 2019

Forgotten history of Bexar County Girls Home in San Antonio, Texas explored and explained by Mixerr Reviews.

Much history of the Bexar County Girls Home in San Antonio, Texas has not been preserved and long forgotten. Not too much history is known about this institution and detention facility. Bexar County Girls Home was a detention facility operated by Bexar County from 1919 up until 1972.


Bexar County Girls Home was established on Walker Ranch when it was owned by Ganahl Walker, Sr. in 1919. What is now known as Walker Ranch Historic Landmark Park was home to several acres of ranch land for Bexar County Girls Home. The purpose for Bexar County Girls Home was to serve as a detention facility for delinquent girls between the ages of 11 through 17 years. (Ref: Bexar County Official Public Records - Real Estate, Document No. 916)

Plans for the new girls home called Henrietta Joske Memorial Home were announced by San Antonio Express in spring 1919. Henry T. Phelps helped develop plans. The plans were approved by order of the County Commissioners’ Court. The contract was drawn on a basis of cost plus 8% percent. (Ref: San Antonio Express, Plans Approved For Girls’ Home, March 18, 1919)

In April 1919, San Antonio Express announced Walsh & Burney won a bid for the construction of Henrietta Joske Memorial Home. Henrietta Joske Memorial Home was constructed by Walsh & Burney. The county donated a sum of $130,000. (Ref: San Antonio Express, Renditions Ready For Huth, April 9, 1919)

A contract was given to the San Antonio Public Service Corporation to install a lighting plant in the Henrietta Joske Memorial Home, at a cost of $1,720 at a meeting of the Commissioners' Court. (Ref: San Antonio Evening News, Page 10, October 9, 1919)



Remodels and additions were constructed in 1923 by Walsh & Burney as reported by Manufacturer’s Record. The Manufacturer’s Record of 1923 listed Bexar County Girls Home as “Henrietta Joske Memorial Home” and was located on what was then North Loop. Bexar County Girls Home had first went under the name of Henrietta Joske Memorial Home before changing to the current name. (Ref: Manufacturer’s Record, 1923)

On the date of December 2, 1926, a moss-covered fountain which was located in the patio of the county courthouse was sent to the Joske Memorial Home to make room for expansion. (Ref: https://www.mysapl.org/Events-News/News-Media-Center/News/ArtMID/17281/ArticleID/11945/Deember-2-in-San-Antonio-history)


Over the years, Bexar County Girls Home went under a plethora of several names such as Bexar County Girls School, Bexar County School for Girls, Bexar County Home for Girls, Bexar County Juvenile Girls Home, and Henrietta Joske Memorial Home.

Bexar County planned for Henrietta Joske Memorial Home to be a county juvenile training school for girls from the beginning. This girls home eventually transformed into a detention facility despite there never being a high demand for housing juvenile female delinquents.

According to a thesis titled DETENTION HOUSES AND REFORMATORIES AS PROTECTIVE SOCIAL AGENCIES,

“The spirit of the agreement with the Government was kept and Live Oak Farm was operated and maintained according to its terms until August 1, 1920, when the inmates were transferred to the city jail. It became known in November 1919 that the city had transferred its interest in the property to the county and that the original building would eventually be used as the administration building for a county juvenile training school for girls to be known as the Joske Memorial Home. The erection Of a new building about 100 feet away was commenced about that time. The county officials interviewed contend that they never intended to carry on the work of the institution as a detention hospital after the close of the war and that they know of no contract with the Government which bound them to such a plan.”

(Ref: DETENTION HOUSES AND REFORMATORIES AS PROTECTIVE SOCIAL AGENCIES, MARY MACEY DIETZLER, JUNE 1922)




In the middle of 1945, nine inmates of the Joske Memorial Home on North Loop Road were booked at county jail for staging a free-for-all fight to get better food. The girls demolished furniture and broke windows in their demonstration. Some inmates were drunk. (Ref: http://sanantonioremembers.blogspot.com/2009/11/november-21-in-san-antonio-history.html)



By the mid 1940s, the Bexar County Home for Girls had a small working farm as a part of their rehabilitation program. Inmates helped with various duties of the working farm. Despite having a working farm, the detention facility was not very big. The girls who lived there had long juvenile records being held on trial or were being held for county juvenile authorities.

An auxiliary unit was established for Bexar County School for Girls called Bexar County School for Girls Auxiliary. The group was organized in 1952 to provide service to the girls and to integrate the school to the community. Bexar County School for Girls Auxiliary was a domestic nonprofit corporation. Bexar County School for Girls Auxiliary was disestablished in 1972.

“Members of the Bexar County School for Girls Auxiliary furnished school supplies, dental care, eye care, clothes, religious training, hand crafts and transportation for the girls who lived there. The group promotes social activities through monthly coffees and luncheons and stimulates participation in club-sponsored welfare work which include both Air Force and community services. Each year a Christmas party is given for students at Stonewall Elementary School and support was given to Christmas Clearing Bureau Brooks Youth Center and the Air Force Village.”  (Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 24, May 21, 1968)

Bexar County School for Girls Auxiliary provided many useful services for girls at the school. The auxiliary also hosted a picnic and a party. They also gave gifts to all the girls. The members of the auxiliary assisted with many activities at the school. They supervised the religious education of the students and see that each girl receives instruction in her faith

Mrs. Frank Jordan served as treasurer before being elected to the presidency of the Bexar County School for Girls Auxiliary. Geraldean Brown served a founding member and president of the Bexar County School for Girls Auxiliary. (Ref: https://porterloring.tributes.com/obituary/show/Geraldean-Brown-94304120)


In 1960, $8,350 worth of improvements were approved by the court for Bexar County School for Girls. It took months of decision making by commissioners to decide appropriate improvements. Shortly after, Bexar County School for Girls received $8,350 worth of improvements. (Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 12,  December 17, 1960 )

San Antonio Express shed light on a controversial protest that took place on the date of October 15, 1961 in a news article.

Members of the Bexar County School for Girls Auxiliary protested administration of Bexar County School for Girls. This was because Judge John Onion moved the auxiliary be abolished. The Bexar County School for Girls accommodated four students with 10 employees to look after them. Judges have discussed leasing the school to the state while some have talked of closing it. Auxiliary members objected. This caused friction between the parties involved. So members of the Bexar County School for Girls Auxiliary began to form a protest.

Members of the Bexar County School for Girls Auxiliary wanted the detention facility to remain open to rehabilitate delinquent girls. Judge John Onion wanted the auxiliary and Bexar County School for Girls to be closed due to low population.

Most board members feel the ladies have overstepped their bounds. Judge John Onion called the women “busy-bodies” and “troublemakers”. Judges claim the women were becoming “too involved”. The auxiliary, a charter organization, was formed to help with the girls, providing clothing, and other services. Judges had resented the women barging in on other matters. During time in court, judges studied Onion's proposal to abolish the club. However the organization had been chartered as a domestic nonprofit corporation with the city.

Members of the Bexar County School for Girls Auxiliary also accused Chief Probation Officer Jim Lewis of freeing delinquent girls. They had demanded for his dismissal. However the judges say girl delinquents are scarce. (Ref: San Antonio Express, October 15, 1961)


By 1963, Bexar County Girls Home had their own school district called Bexar County School for Girls Independent School District. By then the facility expanded to include ages 12 through 21. Then the age limit grew to 23. (Ref: Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Page 4, June 12, 1963)

The Directory of Catholic Special Facilities and Programs in the United States for Handicapped Children and Adults lists Bexar County Girls Home under the address of “Route 13, Box 292, San Antonio, Texas 78209” with Myrtle Bailey as the superintendent. (Ref: Directory of Catholic Special Facilities and Programs in the United States for Handicapped Children and Adults, 1965)

Bexar County Girls Home shut down in 1972 after Ganahl Walker, Jr sold much of the ranch property to a Dallas developer. Shortly after, the former site of Walker Ranch was added to the National Register of Historical Places.

Existing site structures including building foundations of the Walker Ranch and Bexar County Girls Home were demolished in 1997. The demolition process lasted from 1997 to May 10, 1999. The only remaining structure of Bexar County Girls Home is the Main Hall located more 20 feet from the public view of West Avenue. (Ref: https://www.sanantonio.gov/ParksAndRec/Parks-Facilities/All-Parks-Facilities/Parks-Facilities-Details/ArtMID/14820/ArticleID/2467/Walker-Ranch/Park/250)

Today the Bexar County Girls Home is now home to Walker Ranch Historic Landmark Park which is owned by City of San Antonio. Walker Ranch is now on National Register of Historical Places.


Bexar County Girls Home was located at 12603 West Avenue, San Antonio, Texas, US 78216. The original address for Bexar County Girls Home was Route 13, Box 292, San Antonio, Texas 78209.








History of Buena Vista School in San Antonio, Texas explored.

Buena Vista School was an elementary school once operated by Southside ISD in the city of San Antonio, Texas from 1915 to 1990.


Juan Antonio Chavez owned a 10.153 acre tract of land which Buena Vista School was located on. According to a deed dated October 25, 1909, Juan Antonio Chavez conveyed 10.153 acres of land to Alfred Duesler and Charles Graebner. Sometime during the 1910s is when Charles Graebner sold the land to S. W. Magee. This land was later sold to Southside Rural School District No. 17 during World War I. (Ref: Bexar County Official Public Records - Real Estate, Document No. 99990563318)

 

In 1915, the Espada School from Espada Mission and the hamlet of Buena Vista combined to form the Buena Vista School. Buena Vista School was operated as a schoolhouse in 1915 by Southside Rural School District No. 17 (now Southside Independent School District). Southside Independent School District had always operated Buena Vista School. (Ref: https://www.sanantonio.gov/Portals/0/Files/HistoricPreservation/arc_reports/SouthernBexarCounty-1445Acres.pdf)

Buena Vista School was a two-room school in the beginning. Each room had a wooden stove for heating. Wood for the school was brought in by truck. There was no central heating established inside the school building.

Buena Vista School was a K-12 school which educated students in grades kindergarten to high school. Although Buena Vista School was a K-12 school, Buena Vista School operated primarily as an elementary school catering to students in grades kindergarten through 7.


By 1949, Buena Vista School had absorbed the first and second grades of Carmen School (Carmen Elementary School), Borrego School, and Oakley School, with children in grades above second going to Southside Elementary School and Southside High School. Oakley School directed its students toward Buena Vista Elementary School in 1949. (Ref: https://athenaeum.uiw.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1288&context=uiw_etds)

1950 is when Buena Vista School became an elementary school called Buena Vista Elementary School which operated from the 1950s all the way through the 1980s. Buena Vista Elementary School operated as a K-7 school all the way until being shut down by Southside ISD. The room on the right held grades K-3 and the room on the left held grades 4-7.


A four classroom-one lunchroom wing was completed for Buena Vista Elementary School in 1960. The school was listed as being located on FM 1937.


In 1986, the principal of the Buena Vista Elementary School in San Antonio led a campaign to rename the school for Torribio Losoya, one of seven Mexican-Texans who died defending the Alamo in 1836 against the Mexican army of Santa Anna. (Ref: The American Kaleidoscope: Race, Ethnicity, and the Civic Culture, Lawrence H. Fuchs)

Buena Vista School was demolished in 1995 and was leveled in 1996. Only the concrete slabs of the old school buildings remained after demolition. 

Southside Independent School District sold the land property to Loren G. Adcock on an unrecorded deed dated December 11, 2002. The land was split into two tracts. Tract 1 is where a mobile home was parked over the concrete slab of where the school building used to be. Loren G. Adcock owns the land today. (Ref: Bexar County Official Public Records - Real Estate, Document No. 20070003014)





Buena Vista School was located at 14850 South Flores Road, San Antonio, Texas, US 78221. Their alternate address was 14727 FM 1937, San Antonio, Texas, US 78221.
















History of San Juan School in San Antonio, Texas explored and revisited.

San Juan School was one of the many forgotten schools of San Antonio and Bexar County next to Berg’s Mill School. Not much is known about the San Juan School in San Antonio, Texas. What is known is that San Juan School was a rural school located way out in the county in San Antonio, Texas. Many historians have not covered this school written in books. Many citizens of San Antonio seemed to have forgotten about this school’s existence or its presence.


San Antonio Independent School District established San Juan School sometime during the mid-to-late 19th century as a one-room wooden structure on a box frame building plan. Its exact year of establishment is unknown. San Juan School was possibly established in the 1840s before statehood.

What is known is that San Juan School was an elementary school that was known as San Juan Elementary School and was a co-ed school. Students in grades 1 through 6 were educated here. 7th grade was added later. 

School attendance boasted a small bumbling population. Attendance rate was very high. Student enrollment never went past 300. Most of the pupils were children of Mexican descent. 70% percent of the student population was Mexican. San Juan School was a “Mexican school” throughout much of its history.


As early as 1884, San Juan School had faced structural problems and health concerns. A San Antonio Light newspaper article had highlighted the issues in their newspaper that year. Citizens of San Antonio were protesting against San Antonio Independent School District dumping sewage into the San Antonio River. Many of whom were upset. (Ref: San Antonio Light, Page 1, Tuesday, January 29, 1884)

“The citizens below San Antonio assembled and met at San Juan School House for the purpose of protesting against throwing the sewerage into the San Antonio River. Such interference with the health and use of the water for their household purposes.

The meeting was called to order by Captain D. M. Poor. Ed Braden was appointed Chairman, and Frank Ashley Secretary. The following named gentlemen were appointed to draft a resolution and report the same next Saturday in the San Juan School House at 3 o'clock p.m. for a protest against throwing the filth of the city into the river and that a committee meet on Thursday in the County court room at 10 o'clock a.m.”


San Juan School was a rebuilt as a 4-5 room building in 1914. The "old schoolhouse” was replaced in 1914. The "old schoolhouse” was about 100 feet south of the 1914 building near the present fence line. After the 1914 building was built, the "old schoolhouse” was relocated to another location in San Antonio. Also the ”old schoolhouse” was once used as a SNAC headquarters. (Ref: https://npgallery.nps.gov/GetAsset/e390f8f1-2a60-4611-90a6-03fea6eb015d)

School attendance in the 1930s boasted a bumbling population. On average, 30 students attended this school daily. In the 1930s, San Juan School educated students in grades 1 through 6. 7th grade students attended school elsewhere.

Over 60% of the student population was Mexican by 1932. The PTA was very involved with the quality of education upon its students. Manual training and sewing were taught at this school. Boys were taught manual training while girls were taught sewing. Girls learned sewing at a young age. Girls held an intense interest in sewing. Classes in dancing were held. (Ref: San Antonio Express, February 13, 1932)

The 1940s is when 7th grade was added to the school. By the end of the 1960s, over 70% of the student population was Hispanic. Over 200 students had attended this school during that time. 7th grade classes were discontinued.

In 1952, parents complained to the school district and city council that students were being deprived and denied of outdoor activities due to air traffic and noise pollution from Brooks City Air Force Base. Students were deprived of outdoor activities by playing indoors due to air traffic. However nothing happened. The school continued classes and remained open.

John W. Small was the Presiding Judge of Election Precinct No. 114 at San Juan School during the 1954-1955 school term. He would remain the Presiding Judge of Election Precinct No. 114 at San Juan School until 1956 when he was replaced by another judge named Mrs. Clara Denton. Mrs. Clara Denton would remain Presiding Judge of Election Precinct No. 114 at San Juan School until sometime during the 1960s. (Ref: San Antonio Light, Thursday, October 7, 1954)


San Juan School closed in 1970 after the school building was found to be too closely located within the flight path of Brooks City Air Force Base. This led students to relocated to different schools across the school district (San Antonio ISD aka SA ISD).

It was at the suggestion of Frank Tejeda from the Southside Neighborhood Association who requested the school board consider leasing San Juan Elementary School (San Juan School) at $1 per year. San Juan Society offered to become a tenant and use the property on a lease from the school district.

San Juan Society began using this building on a lease in 1970. San Juan Society used the San Juan School building as a community center for a year with a lease of $1 a year. The San Juan Society received legal permission from the board to lease the old San Juan School building for community meetings, recreational and educational activities. San Juan School was the third retired school in the district (SA ISD) to be leased out in 1970 for such purposes. (Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 55, August 28, 1970)


In 1971, San Juan Society requested its lease be cancelled for some apparent reason. The school district delayed the lease. However San Juan Society pulled away slowly from the lease and took business elsewhere. This left the building to sit vacant for a few years until 1975. (Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 3, February 12, 1971)

San Antonio Express listed San Juan School located at the address of 8630 Old Corpus Christi Rd. Apparently the school has always been located at this address. (Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 45, June 23, 1971)

By 1975, San Antonio Express referred to the school property as improved land for sale by San Antonio Independent School District offers. The school building and property was up for sale. The building was still extant then. (Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 3, February 18, 1975)

San Antonio Express had the former school property listed on the market for sale a handful of times in their newspaper during the month of February. The real estate business was moving slowly due to the 1970s oil crisis. Which is why the property was listed on the market for almost 4 years. (Ref: San Antonio Express, Page 19, February 18, 1975)

San Antonio Independent School District sold the property to Barthold Gilbert in 1976. The school building was demolished in 1977. Barthold Gilbert would own this property until his death in 1981. The lot was sold to a woman named Fay A Kiln in 1982 by a quit claim deed via a warranty deed from Barthold Gilbert Jr., who was his son. (Ref: http://bexardata.com/property/id/eBkP3iQ4j)


Restrictions were put on the property as part of the special warranty deed issued on December 14, 1992. The pretty was not to be used for educational purposes meaning that a school could not be operated on such property. $3,000 dollars was paid to Fay A Kiln. A quorum was present. (Ref: Bear County Public Records Doc No. 2372965)

Many people have lived address over the years especially during the beginning of the 2000s. However Fay A Kiln remained on record as property owner. Many people have had their mailing address located at this location as well.

As of 2019, Fay A. Kiln remains owner of the former San Juan School property. She leases the property to various people in San Antonio and of Bexar County. The school building is no longer extant and no remains of the school are left. (Ref: http://bexardata.com/property/id/eBkP3iQ4j)


San Juan School was located at 8630 Old Corpus Christi Road, San Antonio, Texas, US 78223. Today its current address is located at 8638 Old Corpus Christi Highway, San Antonio, Texas, US 78223.

Other known addresses were 8632 Old Corpus Christi Highway, San Antonio, Texas, US 78223, 8632 Old Corpus Christi Road, San Antonio, Texas, US 78223 and 8600 Old Corpus Christi Road, San Antonio, Texas, US 78223. San Juan had a handful of different addresses over the years despite being located on the same property for decades.

Thursday, May 2, 2019

History of Battery Harlow in Honolulu, Hawaii explored.

Battery Harlow was one of the many batteries of which Fort Ruger operated during the early 20th century. Fort Ruger began in April 1907 with the construction of Battery Harlow. Construction for Battery Harlow was finished by March 1910. Battery Harlow was constructed using reinforced concrete embedded behind the outer slopes of Diamond Head Mountain. Battery Harlow is know for being a massive structure. (Ref: http://www.hawaiianencyclopedia.com/1900--1950.asp)

Three large bunkers were constructed and built in 1910. These three large bunkers were separated by "courtyards" that served as platforms. Stored in these "courtyards" were eight 12-inch mortars.  8 x 12" M1890M1 Motars at Battery Harlow were designed and aimed to fire within a range of 8 miles reaching both Honolulu and Pearl Harbor. This was done in effort to protect the island of O'ahu (Oahu) from enemy attacks by Imperial Japanese Navy. (Ref: http://www.diamondheadhike.org/militaryhistory.html)

Battery Harlow operated from 1910-1943. Battery Harlow was retired by US Army in 1943. The artillery was dismantled in 1950.

Battery Harlow has served as a set for scenes from movies and television shows.

In December 2018, KITV News announced the Department of Land and Natural Resources wants to open Battery Harlow as the pedestrian-only entrance into Diamond Head Mountain. (Ref: https://www.kitv.com/story/39685661/state-wants-to-make-improvements-diamond-head-state-monument)

Currently as of today, Hawaii National Guard uses Battery Harlow for storage and is still restricted to the public. Access via hiking trail is closed.

Battery Harlow is located at Diamond Head Road & Makapuu Road, Honolulu, Hawaii, US 96813.

Short history of Kamamalu of Honolulu, Hawaii explored.

The Kamamalu Building was constructed in 1956 and was equipped with fire-retardant asbestos within the interior walls. Hawaii Government bought property from the Hawaiian Trust Co. in 1968 for $2.5 million. Hawaii Government moved out of the Kamamalu Building in 2003. Asbestos was removed from the building in 2008. The state had problems finding enough money to fund the repairs. This included other hazardous substances as well. In 2016, new tenants moved in. New tenants included divisions of the Department of Human Services and the Department of Health.

Kamamalu is located at 1010 Richards Street, Honolulu, Hawaii, US 96813.

Kalakaua Plaza in Honolulu, Hawaii explored.

Kalakaua Plaza was built as a 4-story building and was designed by Architects Hawaii Ltd. in 1997 for about $45 million. The building itself is 82,390 square feet. 98% percent of this building was built using concrete. (Ref: https://www.hawaiibusiness.com/good-locations-lots-of-space-but-unused-for-years-and-years/)

This lovely shopping plaza included a variety of shops and businesses such as the Official All-Star Café, a coffee shop, a clothing store, and a Banana Republic store. Kalakaua Plaza once housed the former Niketown complex. A subterranean parking garage was built for public usage in later years. 30 feet of space was dug for 2 levels of underground parking.


In 2007, Kalakaua Plaza was listed as being “stocked with the latest fashions”. Banana Republic and Niketown were the top selling stores who leased from Kalakaua Plaza. However this would not last long for a variety of reasons. (Ref: Fodor's 2007 Hawaii)

Kalakaua Plaza tried to capitalize on the demand for space in the Waikiki neighborhood during the boom years. They thought this would be enough to draw tourists to walk several blocks away from their hotels. However competition from retailers outside of the Waikiki neighborhood drew tourists towards those storefronts instead. The fact that most of these stores were national retail chains did not help. Overall it was a change in shopping habits that caused a decline for both Kalakaua Plaza and Niketown.

"Monthly rents along Kalakaua range from as high as $25 per square foot near the center to $8 on the outskirts. While $8 on Kalakaua might seem attractive, it is more than double what a business owner can get in a residential shopping area on Oahu.  The relatively high rent and lower foot traffic in the remote areas of Waikiki restrict what type of businesses can succeed.” says Kim Scoggins, Colliers vice president.

(Ref: http://www.worldpropertyjournal.com/us-markets/commercial-real-estate-1/real-estate-news-waikiki-retail-market-king-kalakaua-place-niketown-hawaiian-island-creations-teddy-bear-world-colliers-monroe-friedlander-inc-kalakaua-avenue-2917.php)

Niketown closed in 2009 and the tenant lease was not renewed. Niketown occupied 35,000 square feet on there guided property prior to closure. A drop in pedestrian traffic and change in shopping habits is the reason why Niketown closed down. Both Niketown and Banana Republic were original tenants.


In 2010, Los Angeles-based developer Robertson Properties Group purchased the remaining property of the Kalakaua Plaza building for $10 million. According to tax records, that parcel has a total assessed value of about $3.1 million. (Ref: https://www.bizjournals.com/pacific/blog/morning_call/2015/12/ownership-change-for-waikikis-former-nike-town.html)

In 2012, the property was advertised for lease by its former owner Robertson Properties Group. In 2015, plans were announced by Star Advertiser for converting the Kalakaua Plaza into a seven-story, 230-room hotel tower. The owners of Kalakaua Plaza announced plans to redevelop its retail center into a hotel. The idea received strong support from the Waikiki Neighborhood Board. (Ref: https://www.staradvertiser.com/2016/10/11/breaking-news/king-kalakaua-plaza-hotel-gets-support/)

Oceanfront Hawaii acquired Kalakaua Plaza from Robertson Properties Group in early 2016. The owners of Kalakaua Plaza announced plans to redevelop its retail center into a hotel. Today Oceanfront Hawaii owns the property and is looking for any potential businesses to have as tenants on a lease for.

Kalakaua Plaza is located at 2080 Kalakaua Avenue, Honolulu, Hawaii, US 96815

History behind the property of 2714 Avenue H in Galveston, Texas explored.

J. C. Röhm was the first person to have owned the property of 2714 Avenue H, Galveston, TX. He was known as Pastor: J. C. Roehm, who was a Lutheran pastor. He was previously a pastor at Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church at Frelsburg, Texas. He purchased the property in 1842. (Ref: Geschichte der Evangel.-luth. synode von Iowa und anderen staaten: Abgefasst im auftrag des Synodal-ausschusses, Johannes Deindoerfer, Johannes Deindoerfer, 1897)

Much throughout the 20th, his land was used as industrial property. This is no surprise as much land located in Northwest Galveston is zoned as industrial. Oil drilling equipment was stored in the warehouse built on this property of his.

J. C. Röhm sold his property to Mrs. Paul J. Edwards sometime during the 1920s. Mr. Paul J. Edwards and Mrs. Paul J. Edwards also owned the property of 2714 Avenue H much throughout the 1960s. (Ref: Galveston Tribune, Friday, September 27, 1963)

Mitchell Energy Corp sold the property to Wagner Oil Co via bill of sale in 2002. Today Wagner Oil Co owns the property. Wagner Oil Co occupies the location of 2714 Avenue H, Galveston, Texas, US 77550. (https://propaccess.trueautomation.com/clientdb/Property.aspx?prop_id=103311)

Mixerr Album Reviews #1,776

Piece of Me/Come On In is a Lady Wray 7” vinyl single (45” vinyl single to be exact) and digital single that was released by Big Crown Records in 2019. For those who don’t know, Lady Wray is Nicole Wray. Both songs are definitely on fire! You will love her soulful voice and harmony as Piece of Me/Come On In follows the same old school soul formula of Queen Alone. (Hence the soulful sound.) Both of these songs on this single represent the few milestones she has encountered in life.


Nicole wrote Piece Of Me with songwriter Leon Michels before she gave birth to her daughter Melody. The song was written in 2018. This was before she became a mother. Her alto voice gives off a jazzy vibe.

Piece of Me is a sad heartbreaking love song that is filled with uncertainty and emotional attachment. Nicole and her man have been thru the best of times even through her darkest days. They’ve been through the best of times and the worst of times. Why must it turn around? She asks herself. Life has its uncertainties. Life is not fair. So many questions with so many answers. She’s not sure these days. He has been good to Nicole. That’s why it’s hard for her to walk away.

The song is a perspective of her world. Throughout the song, she sings about sacrificing for her family even if they don’t always help, contribute, or give back.


Come On In is a Nicole Wray composition full of heat! Not to mention deep. The song sounds very similar to Lean On Me by Bill Withers. Leon Michels produced the song Come On In. The instrumentation gives Come On In a throwback sound which is smoother than sandpaper.

The beginning of Come On In starts off with a couple of heavy piano notes which quickly turn into a piano solo. Its percussion selection is fairly balanced with not too many drums used.

Nicole has been waiting for a man to come into her life. She is accepting towards a man coming into her life. She is willing to be in a long term relationship. She says she’ll be waiting. Throughout the song is where Nicole talks about being committed to a long term relationship. She will move forward in life and progress if she has a man in her life.

I rate this single, Piece Of Me/Come On In, 5/5*****!!