Showing posts with label politics. Show all posts
Showing posts with label politics. Show all posts

Sunday, July 15, 2018

Woman who climbed Statue of Liberty was in federal custody.

Now the woman who climbed the Statue of Liberty was in federal custody after police ended up climbing the statue and risking their lives to remove her. Police removed this woman to prevent herself from being injured and to prevent others from being injured as well.

On the date of July 4, 2018, NYPD apprehended an African woman named Therese Patricia Okoumou after taking up a temporary residence on Lady Liberty's right foot on the Statue of Liberty. NYPD took Therese Patricia Okoumou downtown into federal custody at 5:00 PM. Therese Patricia Okoumou had been in federal custody for 1 day and was released on July 5, 2018.

Since then she has been released on bail but is still under the eyes of federal police. Legal officials are still monitoring her court case as charges are still pending. NYPD is keeping a close watch on her as well.

The members of Rise and Resist NY are going to continue on working to secure the best legal representation for Therese Patricia Okoumou. These are the plans as to what Rise and Resist NY are making for Patricia.



On July 5, 2018, Rise and Resist (@riseandresistny) released a statement on twitter and in public at the United States District Court Southern District of New York stating the following.:

[The members of Rise and Resist have listened to the criticism of the statement we released earlier Wednesday evening. On reflection, we realize that in our haste to complete the statement so that we could continue working to secure the best legal representation for Therese Patricia Okoumou (Patricia).

We unintentionally led people to believe that we were distancing the group from Patricia. Nothing could be further from the truth. Patricia is our friend, our comrade, our sister. From the moment that we realized that this amazing woman whom we have gotten to know, love, and respect was the person who had climbed to the foot of Lady Liberty, we had three concerns: one for her safety from falling, second, for her safety as a woman of color who was about to be engaged by law enforcement, and third, to find her the best legal representation that that we could. Our members will be at 500 Pearl Street at 2:00 PM today and we welcome any New Yorker who has been inspired by her utter and absolute fierceness to join us. We unequivocally support Patricia. We will have an additional statement later with updates.

Rise and Resist will be doing jail support for Patricia, and is arranging great legal representation for her. We will let everyone know how they can further support her as soon as we find out more info.

We’ve received several requests to help Patricia, a member of Rise and Resist who climbed the Statue of Liberty today. Once we find out her legal needs, we’ll post any efforts to help her on our Twitter feed. It’s reported that she’s been charged with federal misdemeanors.

Jay W. Walker, an organizer, told The Los Angeles Blade that “Patricia is a powerful, committed, and passionate activist. She has become an integral member of Rise and Resist over the course of the last several months.]


National Park Service spokesman Jerry Willis told New York Post the following below.:

National Park Service spokesman Jerry Willis said, “People are moved when they get here. So to have their visit cut short or denied is extremely unfortunate. I’m really sad for people who had to leave the island or who weren’t able to get over here at all.”

“You don’t need to tower like Lady Liberty to be able to see that there’s a security lapse at the National Park Service. But somebody with some climbing skills would be able to pull it off. An extremely dangerous stunt to pull. The NPS is assessing the possibility of a security breach.”

Federal government sources said that at the end of the day. The exact park officials are to blame due to the apparent lack of security and awareness.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

Rodessa High School history of Rodessa, Lousiana forgotten update!

Rodessa High School history of Rodessa, Lousiana forgotten update!

Rodessa High School was one of Louisiana’s many forgotten schools. In fact, Rodessa High School is one of Lousiana’s forgotten schools. Only so much is known about this high school. Many people have claimed the school to be “haunted”.


Rodessa High School was designed by Louisiana architect Seymour Van Os in 1937 as a two story brick building on a steel and concrete foundation and was built with acquired oil money and donations. The school building is about 33,437 square feet on 5 acres of land. Rodessa High School was built at a cost of $195,000. The two story building had 20 classrooms. The Rodessa High School building was a Public Works Administration building built in the 1930s as part of Lousiana’s New Deal heritage.

Classrooms for the 250 students were held in temporary buildings as the structure could not hold all of the students enrolled at this school at the time. 250 out of the 800 students attended classes in the temporary buildings until 1939.

Rodessa High School finally opened in September 1939. Enrollment in the beginning was 800 students. The first high school principal was Gladys Pitts Hendrick, a Rodessa native. Grades 1 through 11 were taught here. Rodessa High School (Rodessa School) was operated by Caddo Parish School District from 1939 to 1973 in Rodessa, Lousiana.

The first high school principal was Gladys Pitts Hendrick, a Rodessa native. Miss Gladys Hendrick was one of the first teachers at the school. (Ref: Shreveport Times, Page 7A, October 19, 1947)

In 1939, a tornado wiped out most of the town, but this school building somehow survived miraculously. Many people were killed in the tornado of 1939. Those killed in the 1939 tornado were buried in Tyson Cemetery, west of Rodessa High School.

A cemetery is located next to Rodessa High School and is called Tyson Cemetery. Tyson Cemetery was established sometime in the early 19th century. Several early 19th century interments can be found at this cemetery. This cemetery is still active. Modern headstones and fresh graves can be found.


Rodessa High School closed as a high school in 1955 when a new high school was built in nearby Vivian. The new North Caddo High School consolidated all of the high schools in the North Caddo Parish. The last senior class to graduate Rodessa High School was in 1955.

In 1956, Rodessa High School was renamed to Rodessa Elementary School (better known as Rodessa School) and remained that way until its closure. Rodessa School became a K-8 school for Caddo Parish School District. Once Rodessa High School closed, high school students had to start attending school in nearby Vivian, Louisiana to complete their education.

Rodessa High School was an all white school prior to 1965. The school desegregated in 1965 during the 1965-1966 school year.

After a high amount of asbestos was found in heater vent pipes by maintenance workers for the Caddo Parish School District, Rodessa High School was shut down effectively in 1973. Asbestos contributed to low test scores and appearent mesothelioma.Rodessa High School had also closed down due to a lack of funding, dwindling enrollment, and desegregation.

The gym had burned in a fire once after the school closed. So many people killed that they had to use the school as the morgue and also had to line the deceased up out front of the school as well as the back of the school. Many people have claimed Rodessa High School to be a “haunted school”. (Ref: HauntLA)

Someone at some point had set up a meth lab inside the former Rodessa High School. Exactly when is currently unknown. Over the years, the school was vandalized and stripped by scrappers. (Ref: uer.ca)


In 1996, there was a bit of debating about what to do with the former Rodessa High School property. However another discovery of asbestos was found. The heater vent pipes were made almost entirely of asbestos! So demolition would bankrupted the school district at the time. Nothing happened as a result. However the school district has evaluated the land and determined if there is a need for the land several times over the years.

In 2008, a group of ghost hunters were arrested for trespassing on the former Rodessa High School campus by the female sheriff deputy officer for the city of Rodessa. Several others have been given warnings by the female sheriff deputy officer to stay away from the property as it is unsafe.  Several others have trespassed on the property including paranormal experts, ghost hunters, and urban explorers curious about what was left behind.


In 2016, a handful of newspapers reported about the Caddo Parish School District considering having Rodessa High School demolished.

In August 9, 2016, Caddo Parish School Board considered demolishing the old Rodessa High School as a recommendation from district staff. Shreveport Times reports the building is too far gone to renovate and it is currently not economically viable for remodeling. Caddo Parish School District Superintendent Lamar Goree says officials, school board members, and administrators have concerns and fear the building is too dangerous to remain in the community because of its structural condition. Not because it’s a huge building.

(Ref: Washington Times, Superintendent: Caddo school almost looks haunted, Wednesday, August 10, 2016)
(Ref: Associated Press, Wednesday, August 10, 2016)
(Ref: Shreveport Times)
(Ref: uer.ca)

The property was fenced with a standard 6 foot chainlink fence and was overgrown with vegetation brush. Its interior had been vandalized severely. Most of windows were broken. The roof had deteriorated. The Rodessa High School building itself was contaminated with asbestos.

On April 8, 2018, the Rodessa High School building was demolished. All that remained was the concrete slab foundation which was later demolished. Caddo Parish School District still owns the property.


Rodessa High School is located at 9634 Rodessa Ida Road, Rodessa, Louisiana, US 71069.

Doak Spring School history exposed.

Vague information about the Doak Spring School is known. However it is one of the many numerous forgotten schools of Texas from the 19th century and 20th century. The tiny school was a negro school for African American students of Lincoln, Texas. This news article will explore the history behind Doak Spring School.


Doak Spring School was organized in 1897 in the African American community of Doak Springs located within Lincoln, Texas, which is outside of Lexington, Texas. The tiny school was a negro school for African American students serving elementary school grades and high school grades on 0.75 acres of land. Doak Spring School was a 1-11 school. Doak Springs supplied water to the Doak Springs School following 1897. Students took turns in bringing water to the school.


Doak Spring School was also known as Doak Springs School. The Doak Springs School name became more commonly used during the early 20th century. Throughout much of the 20th century, Doak Spring School was a 1-11 school that taught African American students in grades 1 through 11.

D.F. Smith and D.N. Smith served as principals at the Doak Springs School beginning at the 1908-1909 school year. Willie Smith was the only student during attending the Doak Springs School during the 1909-1910 school year.

The name for Doak Spring School was changed to Community School No. 49 when it was moved to the John Roberson place in 1909. Doak Springs formed its own school district called Doak Springs School District No. 33 during the same year. Doak Springs School District No. 33 operated Community School No. 49.

Doak Springs School was built at a cost of $3,000 in 1925 during the 1924-1925 school semester. This school was built using the Rosenwald Fund which provided buildings for the schools throughout the 1920s across the southern United States. The Rosenwald Fund provided for a new school building with expanded facilities. The 0.75 acres of land was expanded to 2 acres of land. (Ref: Fisk University, Rosenwald Database)

Student enrollment was around 150 into at least the 1950s. It was usually more than 100 students. (Ref: Handbook of Texas Online, Nolan Thompson, Doak Springs, TX, June 2, 2018)

The school board Lee County Common School District and Lexington ISD consolidated the Doak Springs school with the Lexington ISD school district on the date of Thursday, August 24, 1967. The school closed. (Ref: Rockdale Reporter, Page 1, Thursday, August 24, 1967)


From 1968 until the 1990s is when the school was used as a Baptist church. Sometime in the 1990s is when the Baptist church moved into another church building leaving the old school building abandoned. The school was sold to a private homeowner in 2004. Its building sat abandoned.

Today in the 21st century, the school now sits abandoned and overgrown by grass. The building still stands. The Doak Springs area is located in the southern end of the Lexington ISD school district.

Doak Spring School is located at 2432 FM 3403, Lincoln, Texas, US, 78948.


*[Doak Spring School was also known as Doak Springs School.]
*[Doak Spring School had its own school district.]

Rodessa High School history of Rodessa, Lousiana forgotten revisited!

Rodessa High School is one of Louisiana’s many forgotten schools. In fact, Rodessa High School is one of Lousiana’s forgotten schools. Only so much is known about this high school. Many people have claimed the school to be “haunted”.


Rodessa High School was designed by Louisiana architect Seymour Van Os in 1937 as a two story brick building on a steel and concrete foundation and was built with acquired oil money and donations. The school building is about 33,437 square feet on 5 acres of land. Rodessa High School was built at a cost of $195,000. The two story building had 20 classrooms. The Rodessa High School building was a Public Works Administration building built in the 1930s as part of Lousiana’s New Deal heritage.

Classrooms for the 250 students were held in temporary buildings as the structure could not hold all of the students enrolled at this school at the time. 250 out of the 800 students attended classes in the temporary buildings until 1939.

Rodessa High School finally opened in September 1939. Enrollment in the beginning was 800 students. The first high school principal was Gladys Pitts Hendrick, a Rodessa native. Grades 1 through 11 were taught here. Rodessa High School (Rodessa School) was operated by Caddo Parish School District from 1939 to 1973 in Rodessa, Lousiana.

The first high school principal was Gladys Pitts Hendrick, a Rodessa native. Miss Gladys Hendrick was one of the first teachers at the school. (Ref: Shreveport Times, Page 7A, October 19, 1947)

In 1939, a tornado wiped out most of the town, but this school building somehow survived miraculously. Many people were killed in the tornado of 1939. Those killed in the 1939 tornado were buried in Tyson Cemetery, west of Rodessa High School.

A cemetery is located next to Rodessa High School and is called Tyson Cemetery. Tyson Cemetery was established sometime in the early 19th century. Several early 19th century interments can be found at this cemetery. This cemetery is still active. Modern headstones and fresh graves can be found.


Rodessa High School closed as a high school in 1955 when a new high school was built in nearby Vivian. The new North Caddo High School consolidated all of the high schools in the North Caddo Parish. The last senior class to graduate Rodessa High School was in 1955.

In 1956, Rodessa High School was renamed to Rodessa Elementary School (better known as Rodessa School) and remained that way until its closure. Rodessa School became a K-8 school for Caddo Parish School District. Once Rodessa High School closed, high school students had to start attending school in nearby Vivian, Louisiana to complete their education.

Rodessa High School was an all white school prior to 1965. The school desegregated in 1965 during the 1965-1966 school year.

After a high amount of asbestos was found in heater vent pipes by maintenance workers for the Caddo Parish School District, Rodessa High School was shut down effectively in 1973. Asbestos contributed to low test scores and appearent mesothelioma.Rodessa High School had also closed down due to a lack of funding, dwindling enrollment, and desegregation.

The gym had burned in a fire once after the school closed. So many people killed that they had to use the school as the morgue and also had to line the deceased up out front of the school as well as the back of the school. Many people have claimed Rodessa High School to be a “haunted school”. (Ref: HauntLA)

Someone at some point had set up a meth lab inside the former Rodessa High School. Exactly when is currently unknown. Over the years, the school was vandalized and stripped by scrappers. (Ref: uer.ca)


In 1996, there was a bit of debating about what to do with the former Rodessa High School property. However another discovery of asbestos was found. The heater vent pipes were made almost entirely of asbestos! So demolition would bankrupted the school district at the time. Nothing happened as a result. However the school district has evaluated the land and determined if there is a need for the land several times over the years.

In 2008, a group of ghost hunters were arrested for trespassing on the former Rodessa High School campus by the female sheriff deputy officer for the city of Rodessa. Several others have been given warnings by the female sheriff deputy officer to stay away from the property as it is unsafe.  Several others have trespassed on the property including paranormal experts, ghost hunters, and urban explorers curious about what was left behind.


In 2016, a handful of newspapers reported about the Caddo Parish School District considering having Rodessa High School demolished.

In August 9, 2016, Caddo Parish School Board considered demolishing the old Rodessa High School as a recommendation from district staff. Shreveport Times reports the building is too far gone to renovate and it is currently not economically viable for remodeling. Caddo Parish School District Superintendent Lamar Goree says officials, school board members, and administrators have concerns and fear the building is too dangerous to remain in the community because of its structural condition. Not because it’s a huge building.

(Ref: Washington Times, Superintendent: Caddo school almost looks haunted, Wednesday, August 10, 2016)
(Ref: Associated Press, Wednesday, August 10, 2016)
(Ref: Shreveport Times)


Today the property is fenced with a standard 6 foot chainlink fence and is overgrown with vegetation brush. Its interior has been vandalized severely. Most of windows are broken. The roof has deteriorated. The Rodessa High School building itself is contaminated with asbestos. Caddo Parish School District still owns the property. It is considered trespassing to enter the property and the building is unsafe.

Here is what you need to know if you plan on visiting. There is a house next door and directly across the street and the occupants are going to be watching your every move. They will send pitbulls to chase after you.

(Ref: uer.ca)
(Ref: Shreveport Times)


Rodessa High School is located at 9634 Rodessa Ida Road, Rodessa, Louisiana, US 71069.

Friday, July 13, 2018

Revisiting Grove Trailer Court of Austin, Texas.

Grove Trailer Court is one of the many forgotten trailer parks of Austin, Texas. Not much at all is known about the Oak Grove Trailer Court. Very few Austinites know of or have whereabout of knowledge regarding Oak Grove Trailer Court itself. Only older Austinites know about this trailer park. This news article will attempt to explain the history behind Grove Trailer Court.


Prior to 1948, a man named Vernon Eugene Grove owned 363 acres of what used to be called Grove Trailer Court. Vernon Eugene Grove owned the land since 1922. Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. lived on the same land since birth.

In 1948, Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. purchased land via a deed from his father Vernon Eugene Grove from his estate via an estate deed after he passed away. After Vernon Eugene Grove Sr. passed away, the land reverted to Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. and his wife on a estate deed and residuary trust.

A road called Grove Drive was laid out and plotted in 1948 at the exact time the first bridge was constructed. Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. and his wife Joyce L. Grove built a house on the property later. Dr. Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. was a private practitioner from Austin, Texas.

Grove Trailer Court was established as a trailer park in 1950 by Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. and his wife Joyce L. Grove. They both owned land that was a part of their own farmland and decided to establish a trailer park that would become Grove Trailer Court. They used 11 acres out of 13.11 acres to create the trailer park. A 2 story house was built in 1950.

Grove Trailer Court was established at the address of 6200 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741 located near the intersection of Grove Drive & Montopolis Drive.

The scenic riverside view of the Colorado River made the trailer park an idea location for people to live there. Grove Trailer Court was located less than an acre away from the Colorado River.


Grove Trailer Court began showing up on maps by 1956. On the 1956 topographical map for Montopolis Quadrangle, “Grove Trailer Court” appeared under the name “Trailer Park”. A gaging station appeared west of Montopolis Bridge. A second bridge was built in 1956 which still stands today.

The trailer park would later grow to expand up to 13.11 acres by 1961. 2 new gaging stations were installed in 1970. Grove Trailer Court grew up to expand towards 15 acres by 1973. Over 100 residents lived at Grove Trailer Court by 1973.


Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. sold the land for Grove Trailer Court to the City of Austin on the date of 5/6/1981 on a warranty deed. By agreement on the warranty deed, the city could take over the land when Vernon and his wife Joyce were deceased.

By 1994, Grove Trailer Court was demolished and discontinued due to the location being located in a 25 year floodplain. 2 times every 25 years or so, it would flood. Or at least when Austin received heavy amounts of rain. This would flood the trailer park and cause heavy amounts of damage.

The City of Austin made part of the Grove Trailer Court become the Lakeshore Park in 1995. City of Austin replanted glass plats over the roads from the former trailer park.

The road that once connected to Grove Trailer Court continued onto Montopolis Bridge. The road was called Grove Drive. Grove Drive was named after Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. and his wife Joyce L. Grove. An actual road past the trailer park connected to Montopolis Bridge.

By 2003, all 32.53 acres of the property belonging to Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. had been demolished. The 363 acres of 6200 Grove Drive became Roy G. Guerrero Park and Montopolis Sports Complex in 2003. The land became vacant land by 2004 as the City of Austin took control over the Estate of Vernon Eugene Grove Jr. at the time from an executor deed and a special warranty deed.


Grove Trailer Court has been mention and reported on in the Austin American-Statesman newspaper a number of times over the years. For instance in 2015 about if Spanish missions really existing in Austin. (Ref: Austin American-Statesman, Did Spanish missions really exist on Austin bluffs in 1730?, Steven Gonzales keeps an eye out for evidence in the Montopolis hills., June 25, 2015)

The property of 6218 Grove Drive became Grove Gardens in 2015. This vacant lot was once home to Grove Trailer Court. Matt Simon owns this property today along with City of Austin. Old bamboo has been cut down and new bamboo has been planted in place. Grove Gardens was not cleared of bamboo in a single weekend.

Grove Gardens is a riverside lot in the historic Montopolis neighborhood of Austin undergoing a permaculturally minded transition to an ecological campground. Matt Simon has plans to turn this vacant lot into a community garden similar to the Cherry Creek Community Garden on Bayton Loop near Westgate Boulevard.

Today in the 21st century, Grove Trailer Court remains one of the many forgotten trailer parks of Austin, Texas. A weathered sign for the Grove Trailer Court is all that remains of this trailer park enclave.


Grove Trailer Court was located at the address of 6200 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741. Grove Trailer Court Headquarters were located at 6218 Grove Drive, Austin, Texas, US 78741.

History behind Rueben McCall Senior High School forgotten.

It seems the history behind Rueben McCall Senior High School in Tallulah, Louisiana has been forgotten. Rueben McCall Senior High School.

2 two story buildings were built for Rueben McCall Senior High School in 1964 during the 1964-1965 school year. Rueben McCall Senior High School held classes for students in grades 8 through 12. Reuben McCall Senior High School was also known as Reuben McCall High School and McCall High School.

Reuben McCall Senior High School was an all black high school in Tallulah prior to racial integration. Integration never really happened in Tallulah, Louisiana. Although the town had barely 10,000 people, Madison Parish School Board made a decision to keep both Tallulah High School (the former white high school) and Reuben McCall Senior High School open, with students having the right to choose either high school.

Integration was too much for a number of whites in Tallulah and the majority of white students soon left the public schools for Tallulah Academy. Eventually both public high schools were majority black. No white students chose to attend Reuben McCall Senior High School and only a handful of black students chose to go to Tallulah High School at first.

In 2001, the all black Thomastown High School was closed and merged into Reuben McCall Senior High School by Madison Parish School Board. Thomastown Elementary School merged into Tallulah Primary School.

Louisiana State Legislature passed bill RS 17:3229 (§3229) that allowed for the consolidation of Tallulah High School and Reuben McCall Senior High School into Northeast Delta Learning Center in 2004. Pupil expenditures was $1,735 per students.

Madison Parish School Board could no longer keep both high schools open by 2005. Both campuses needed replacement buildings and enrollment was continuing to decline so Rueben McCall Senior High School closed in 2005. Rueben McCall Senior High School had operated for 40 years at the time of its closure.

For one year the new school used the buildings and grounds of Rueben McCall Senior High School before moving to a new facility built along I-20 south of town.

Today Rueben McCall Senior High School sits abandoned in sprawling ruins. The campus was ultimately boarded up. The school has been vandalized overtime. Rueben McCall Senior High School will not reopen due to lack of local funding and declining enrollment in the Madison Parish School District.

Rueben McCall Senior High School is located at 800 Wyche Street, Tallulah, Louisiana, US 71282.

History of Eros High School in Eros, Louisiana forgotten.

Eros High School was a high school that operated in the small town of Eros, Louisiana from 1910 to 1967. Eros is located in the Jackson Parish.


Eros High School was established in the summer of 1910 at the end of the 1909-1910 school term. The cornerstone for the Eros High School building was laid out on the date of Thursday, May 26, 1910. The high school was built as a brick building in similar fashion to a church building. Eros Lodge No. 295 gave a big barbecue on the high school campus to commemorate the opening of the high school. Eros High School was named after the 433 Eros Asteroid which was discovered in 1898. (Ref: The Monroe News-Star, Page 1, May 7, 1910)

Former LSU president James Monroe Smith taught at Eros High School in the 1911-1912 academic year. James Monroe Smith served as a teacher at this school for 2 years.
(Ref: A Dictionary of Louisiana Biography, Louisiana Historical Association)

Eros High School was rebuilt in the year of 1920 and was Jackson Parish's first high school with 600 pupils. The high school was a center for social activity in the small town of Eros during the 20th century. (Ref: Busbice, 6).

Eros High School was shut down at one point during the 1920s due to Ku Klux Klan activity in the school affairs of Louisiana. It was due to interference by the Ku Klux Klan in school affairs of Louisiana that Eros High School was shut down by Jackson Parish School Board.

A new gymnasium was dedicated at Eros High School on the date of January 18, 1953. The new Crowell Gym was dedicated in memory of Jack Glendon Crowell who was killed in automobile accident. A new piano for the school was dedicated in the memory of Barbara Spillters, who was also fatally injured in the accident. (Ref: Monroe Morning World, Page 15, Sunday, January 18, 1953)

Eros High School closed in 1967 when its last class graduated during the 1967-1968. Its students continued classes elsewhere. When its last class graduated, students attended school in nearby Chatham.

Jackson Parish School Board decided to advertise the Eros High School buildings for sale during November 1968. It was decided to advertise the property for auction sale at the next regular meeting of the school board on December 5, 1968. The Eros High School buildings were not being used anymore for school purposes at the time. The school board transferred $1,000 from the general funds to the business education funds. (Ref: The Town Talk, Page 20, November 9, 1968)

The school has been abandoned since 1968. Today in July 2018 Eros High School continues to sit vacant and abandoned.

Eros High School is located at the junction of 2nd Street (LA 34) & Okaloosa Road, Eros, Louisiana.

Small history of Juliet Public School (Juliet Intermediate Public School) in Stratford, Canada explored.

Juliet Public School was an intermediate school that offered classes to students enrolled in grades 4 though 8 from 1950 to 2003. Juliet Public School was built in 1950. 5 classrooms were built at a cost of $150,000 (Canadian dollars) in 1960 as a five-room addition to Juliet Public School. Juliet Public School was also Juliet Intermediate Public School.

In September 2003, students in grades 7 and 8 began attending Stratford Northwestern Public School when Juliet Public School and King Lear Public School were being closed. Several parents protested the closure of this school. The school was demolished in 2007.

Juliet Public School was located at 347 Brunswick Street, Stratford, Ontario, Canada N5A3N1.

Whatever happened to Four Seasons Mobile Home Park in San Antonio, Texas?

For those of you wondering whatever happened to Four Seasons Mobile Home Park in San Antonio, Texas, this news article will explain in brief detail about what happened to this San Antonio trailer park.Four Seasons Mobile Home Park was a trailer park located in San Antonio, Texas that operated from 1963 to 2008.

In 1998, an administrative law judge from Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission held alleged violations against Four Seasons Mobile Home Park, LLC for unauthorized discharge of wastewater into the adjacent Salado Creek and by failing to submit an application to obtain a discharge permit. Salado Creek was the waterbed creek that Four Seasons Mobile Home Park was alleged to have discharged wastewater into. For 2 years, Four Seasons Mobile Home Park did nothing to obtain a discharge permit or correct legal errors on their part.

An order was entered on March 10, 2000 for $15,000 in administrative penalties to Four Seasons Mobile Home Park by Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission. A payment of $15,000 dollars for Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission was due.

On the date of 8/30/2006, Four Seasons Mobile Home Park was mailed a $15,150 dollar penalty charge from Texas Commission on Environmental Quality via an earlier notice from Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission. The additional $150 dollar charge came from failing to obtain a water discharge permit and for failing to pay additional charges.

The reasons why Four Seasons Mobile Home Park closed in 2008 is because of failure to pay fines from for unauthorized discharge of wastewater and by failing to obtain a discharge permit.

The City of San Antonio moved its then residents during a 2008 city buyout plan where residents whom lived in trailer parks located in floodplains were relocated. City of San Antonio moved its then residents to trailer parks across San Antonio while its other residents simply moved themselves.

As of July 2018, 2 trailers remain on the property. Chuck Weekly still owns, maintains, and lives on the Four Seasons Mobile Home Park property. His family members, along with a woman named Sarah Flores, live on the property. Today the trailer park is a former shell of itself and what it once was. No Trespassing signs are posted all over the fences at front entrance. The trailer park is private property.

Four Seasons Mobile Home Park is now inactive and no longer in business.

History behind Four Seasons Mobile Home Park in San Antonio, Texas nearly forgotten.

Four Seasons Mobile Home Park was a trailer park located in San Antonio, Texas that operated from 1963 to 2008.

Four Seasons Mobile Home Park was founded by Chuck Weekly, Mary McKay Weekly, and Charles T Weekly in 1962. Chuck Weekly, Mary McKay Weekly, and Charles T Weekly were directors and owners of Four Seasons Mobile Home Park. The idea to establish a trailer came about when there was a lack of trailer parks that were geared towards senior living in San Antonio, Texas.

Groundwork for the roads inside of this trailer park in the following year. 6 trailers were moved onto the property in 1963. By the end of the year 1963 is when 10 trailers were hauled onto the property. A swimming pool for its residents was installed in 1966.

The trailer park expand southbound in 1973 by just a few acres. In 1973, a water tower was installed for the trailer park and its residents. 100 residents lived at the trailer park at the time, many of which were senior citizens.


Four Seasons Mobile Home Park, LLC was established as a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC) on the date of 12/03/1993. Over 200 residents lived at Four Seasons Mobile Home Park during that time. Many of which were senior citizens.

In September 1993, a state-county detention facility was proposed to be built at the site of Four Seasons Mobile Home Park. However its residents highly opposed the proposed plan for state-county detention facility was proposed to be built and protested against it at San Antonio City Hall. Several hundred residents attended a meeting on a Thursday night at Judson High School.

(Ref: San Antonio Express-News, Metro Briefs Hearing tonight targets planned detention facility, September 13, 1993)


In 1998, an administrative law judge from Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission held alleged violations against Four Seasons Mobile Home Park, LLC for unauthorized discharge of wastewater into the adjacent Salado Creek and by failing to submit an application to obtain a discharge permit. Salado Creek was the waterbed creek that Four Seasons Mobile Home Park was alleged to have discharged wastewater into. For 2 years, Four Seasons Mobile Home Park did nothing to obtain a discharge permit or correct legal errors on their part.

An order was entered on March 10, 2000 for $15,000 in administrative penalties to Four Seasons Mobile Home Park by Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission. A payment of $15,000 dollars to Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission was due.

Chuck Weekly sold the land to Ernest M Dyal on the date of 1/28/2001 with the sale being finalized on the date of 1/29/2001. Samual Casanova and Kimberley Casanova purchased the land from Ernest M Dyal on the date of 1/29/2002. The water tower was disassembled in 2002. Its concrete slab foundation is the only thing remaining.

On the date of 8/30/2006, Four Seasons Mobile Home Park was mailed a $15,150 dollar penalty charge from Texas Commission on Environmental Quality via an earlier notice from Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission. The additional $150 dollar charge came from failing to obtain a water discharge permit and for failing to pay additional charges.

Four Seasons Mobile Home Park closed in 2008 after failing to pay fines from the 2000 administrative penalties issued against them for unauthorized discharge of wastewater and by failing to obtain a discharge permit. City of San Antonio moved its then residents to trailer parks across San Antonio while its other residents simply moved themselves. The City of San Antonio moved its then residents during a 2008 city buyout plan where residents whom lived in trailer parks located in floodplains were relocated.


As of July 2018, 2 trailers remain on the property. Chuck Weekly still owns, maintains, and lives on the Four Seasons Mobile Home Park property. His family members, along with a woman named Sarah Flores, live on the property. Today the trailer park is a former shell of itself and what it once was. No Trespassing signs are posted all over the fences at front entrance. The trailer park is private property.

Front main office building, the single story house visible by the front entrance, and another trailer are now abandoned. Those are the abandoned structures on this property. The pool has been emptied out and is now inactive.

Four Seasons Mobile Home Park is now inactive and no longer in business. However the company's filing status is listed as “In existence” online. (Which is odd.)


The address for Four Seasons Mobile Home Park is 9613 South Presa Street, San Antonio, Texas, US 78223-4348. Their other mailing address is PO Box 33713, San Antonio, Texas, US 78265-3713. The landline for Four Seasons Mobile Home Park is +1-210-633-3535. For those living in the United States and Canada, call 210-633-3535.

Short architectural history behind Queen Victoria School in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada explored.

Queen Victoria School was built for the Hamilton-Wentworth School District during 1964 in the middle of Corktown neighbourhood of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The school would open in 1965. Hamilton-Wentworth School District operated Queen Victoria School from 1965 to 2007.

Queen Victoria School was an elementary school (primary school) that also went under the name Queen Victoria Elementary School. At first it was known as Queen Victoria School and later Queen Victoria Elementary School.

The 1964 Queen Victoria School building was noted for its interesting architecture. All of its classrooms were built in trapezoid form in the shape of trapezoids. Parts of the school building were similar to a toblerone candy bar. The school had a unique parking lot layout. The parking lot was located underneath the school building itself. The building can be noted for its googie architecture.

Queen Victoria Elementary School used as a filming location for the movie Hairspray in 2005. The filming company used the site for 9 months to record school scenes for the movie Hairspray.

Queen Victoria School was closed in 2007. Plans were made by Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board to demolish Prince of Wales School and Queen Victoria school in May 2007. The school was demolished in July 2007. (Ref: Hamilton Spectator, Plan to demolish Prince of Wales and Queen Victoria schools, Spring 2007)

A new school building was rebuilt in place of the original school in September 2007. In 2009, the new Queen Victoria Elementary School opened and still operates today. Hamilton-Wentworth District School District takes credit for keeping their schools modern.


Architects and residents critiqued the old school building of Queen Victoria School as being built tough. Most local architects wanted the old school building to stand in place for continued use. Local architects claim “the school building could and would last hundreds of years if properly maintained”. Local architects criticized Hamilton-Wentworth District School for letting maintenance lapse just to have an excuse to get money from taxpayers.

Some residents criticized the school for its 60s architecture stating that the old Queen Victoria School was “built like a prison”. Some even criticized the roof and shape of its classrooms for built in form of trapezoids. Some residents have gone as far as to call the old Queen Victoria School building “ugly”. (Ref: uer.ca)

However most parents of students enrolled at Queen Victoria Elementary School are happy and satisfied with the new school building. A majority of parents and faculty supported the  construction of a new school building at the site of the original school building that was originally in place.

Queen Victoria School is located at 166 Forest Avenue, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Monday, July 9, 2018

African woman Therese Patricia Okoumou climbs the Statue of Liberty in New York to protest ICE.

On Wednesday, July, 4, 2018, African woman Therese Patricia Okoumou climbed the Statue of Liberty in New York City, New York, US to protest ICE. According to investigators, she was protesting Trump’s zero-tolerance policy on immigration, protesting ICE, immigration laws of the United States, and separating families at the Mexico-US border.

While taking up a temporary residence on Lady Liberty's right foot, she unfurled an ‘Abolish ICE’ banner at the base of the statue on Wednesday. Therese Patricia Okoumou vowed to stay until every illegal immigrant kid was released from ICE custody.

New York Daily News reported she was part of a “’Rise and Resist” protest on Independence Day. She had been taking part in the protest for about one week now with the Rise and Resist group. She was mainly protesting immigration laws and policies of the United States. Some activists and citizens claim she probably did that for attention. Some people state or claim that there was a good chance she was already receiving welfare from the government. However that is not the case here. She had been a part of Rise and Resist NY for four months.

What did this woman accomplish?
Police ended up climbing the statue and risking their lives to save her from injury and her own ignorance. Therese Patricia Okoumou was arrested after climbing to the base of the Statue of Liberty and taking up a temporary residence on Lady Liberty's right foot. She was under federal custody but now has been released.

Inside the extensive history of Austin State School - Farm Colony and Travis State School!

Travis State School (first known as Austin State School - Farm Colony) was a living center that was operated as a farm colony, work facility, and educational facility a farm colony becoming eventually a work facility and an educational facility for the mentally retarded citizens of Texas operating from 1934 to 1996. The institution taught the mentally retarded how to be self-sufficient.


Origins of the Austin State School - Farm Colony can be traced back to the location of Austin State School itself. Austin State School - Farm Colony was established on the campus of Austin State School itself in 1925 by Texas Board of Control and Dr. J. W. Bradfield. (Ref: State Board of Control, 1925).

Texas Government along Texas Mental Health Mental Retardation (TX MHMR) had felt a need to place mentally retarded citizens in a separate home away from the rest of society. The mindset of society was to place mentally retarded citizens far away from so they wouldn’t ever have a need to come into the metropolis as Austin State School was set up as an autonomous community. The ideology (idea) was for the mentally retarded to produce farm products for other ‘State Schools’ and institutions. This taught the mentally retarded how to be self-sufficient.


In 1930, Texas Governor Miriam A. Ferguson and Austin State School superintendent Dr. J. W. Bradfield proposed an idea to the Texas Board of Control along with Texas Mental Health Mental Retardation to create a farm colony, work facility, and educational facility for the mentally retarded citizens of Texas. This was because the farm colony on the Austin State School campus was running out of room and needed to be expanded elsewhere.

The Texas Government had purchased 241 acres of land from Greg Wilson, Annie LaRue Scott, and six other residents in the year of 1932 in the Decker neighborhood of East Austin. In 1933, the Texas legislature established Travis State School as the Austin State School - Farm Colony as an annex/branch of the Austin State School. (Ref: TXMHMR Public Information Office, 1989).

The farm colony itself was located at FM 969 and Decker Lane 8 miles east of Downtown Austin located near the Colorado River. East Austin, further away from US Highway 183 was all farmland with ranches which resulted in an ideal location for Austin State School - Farm Colony.

The farm colony started as a true farm community in 1934 when the first inmates were transferred from Austin State School to the Farm Colony in October 1934 which at the time had only one building. The first of several permanent dormitory buildings was erected in 1934. Austin State School - Farm Colony (Travis State School) was set up as an autonomous community.

At first, Austin State School - Farm Colony was just for men and eventually women. Children came later. ‘State School’ facilities were gender segregated due to a prevalent belief from the time period that associated mental retardation with promiscuity, alcoholism, and immoral behavior. However, there were female students even in 1934 despite the original intentions of the institutions for males only.

The Austin State School - Farm Colony was established for able-bodied, white males (including those who spoke Spanish), 8 years of age and older, who were unable to be “further  benefited” by the Austin State School, but who could “do manual work, help raise garden and farm products, care for livestock and poultry, and thus partially support themselves and the parent institution” (Ref: State Board of Control, 1936).

368 inmates were housed at Travis State School in 1938. 8 had grounds parole and were able to leave campus. The patients are all males. The buildings are two-floor brick and terrazzo construction and are well-equipped and furnished. (Ref: State Board of Control, 1938).

In 1939, student population was 450. Only 7-8 students had ground paroles. Salaries for farm work was $27 per month. Eventually due to inflation the pay rate was raised to $40 per month. Employees worked 12 hours a day. Dentists worked 8 hours a day. There were 45 female students working at the farm colony. A staff of 45 women employees and 90 male employees took care of 450 students on a daily basis. Conditions were not too primitive. (Ref: State Board of Control, 1939).

A graveyard was plotted by Texas Board of Control and was established where the water tower is today in the year of 1939. It was estimated that over 20 burials out of the dozens of residents and inmates were buried at this location.


However on January 14, 1941, the Texas Legislature and Texas Government were considering closing down the farm colony due to the fact that the farm colony was a total failure as the farm colony could not produce enough to maintain for the patients at the institution and other institutions run by the state. The Texas Legislature deemed Austin State School - Farm Colony as a “dismal failure”. However the farm colony continued operating and remained open. (Ref: State Board of Control, 1941).

By 1941, construction for the 6 two story buildings was completed. The farm colony then had around 480 inmates. The Texas Legislature deemed a need for Austin State School - Farm Colony to remain open during World War II in order to be self-sufficient.

By 1945, the farm colony had six buildings with offices. Small houses for the attendants and nurse were hauled in from other institutions across Texas.

1949 brought big changes to Travis State School.The farm colony became a separate institution from the Austin State School in 1949 despite having the name ‘Austin State School’ which it was always a part of. The farm colony was always called Austin State School - Farm Colony despite was others say. A plant nursery operated at Travis State School from 1933 to 1990. The school grew their own vegetables. Beef and pork were raised in the farm colony.

By 1955, TX MHMR had acquired an additional 195 acres from 8 more residents all of whom owned farmland. The Austin State School - Farming Colony campus eventually grew to encompass 68 buildings that spanned to the 436 acres you see today owned by KIPP Austin.

Austin State School - Farm Colony had a working farm and dairy in 1956. A cannery was built where the crops were canned and packaged for consumption for the other state institutions.


Farming operations at the facility slowly ceased in January 1961 due to the fact that the farm colony was a total failure. The farm colony could not produce enough to maintain for the patients at the institutions. The farming operations did not cease due to mental health care reforms in the 1960's from popular belief. To reflect this change, Austin State School - Farm Colony was renamed to Travis State School in January 1961.
(Ref: Handbook of Texas Online, Vivian Elizabeth Smyrl, TRAVIS STATE SCHOOL)

At this point is when the Austin State School - Farm Colony was limited to older, severely retarded males transferred from the Austin State School. Both mentally handicapped individuals and physically handicapped individuals lived at Travis State School. Mostly mentally handicapped individuals lived there. Most of the residents were non-verbal.

Travis State School is very similar in setup to Marbridge Foundation and Down Home Ranch. In fact, Marbridge Foundation was modeled after Austin State School and Travis State School itself.

A dairy was operated at Travis State School until 1965. The dairy herd was auctioned-off on October 5, 1965. The dairy farm was de-established and demolished in the same year. Austin State School - Farm Colony was intended to provide a home for mentally retarded male patients who could no longer further benefit from training at the Austin State School and who were able to do work.

In 1966, construction of a new workshop facility was planned and the site of the original cemetery plot was where the new building could be placed and utilized. The MHMR Board voted to formally “abandon” the old cemetery (which had not been used for interments for 25 years) and to remove the remains to the official long-established Travis State School Cemetery.

The water tower was constructed over the first cemetery (the old Travis State School Cemetery) and graveyard in 1966. In the process of relocation, the first cemetery had been partially destroyed. There are still burials intact beneath the water tower. The new Travis State School Cemetery was replotted and relocated in 1966. The water tower still remains standing today.

Travis State School had its highest peak of patient enrollment of 1,800 patients/students in 1968 all of whom had been transferred from other institutions. A swimming pool was installed at Travis State School in 1968. Travis State School was the first state school in Texas to have a swimming pool for therapeutic purposes. Later included was a sewing room, storerooms, more offices, and a carpentry shop.


In the year of 1970, Travis State School received a grant from the Hospital Improvement Project which made it possible for the use of a unit system of treatment. A new Vocational Evaluation and Training Center was opened and staffed through a grant from the Texas Rehabilitation Commission. Female students were first admitted in 1973 for the first time since the institution gradually opened in 1934.

The reasons why Austin State School - Farm Colony ceased operations was due to revisions in the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1974 and the oil recession of the 1970s that greatly effected the United States economy. Texas Government discovered the free labor residents and inmates provided was considered somewhat exploitive especially for the high functioning residents. High functioning residents were assigned to take care of low functioning residents. The State of Texas could not afford to pay residents and inmates as workers. So residents and inmates worked for free. This in turn was a violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1974.

The courts ruled in 1974 residents and inmates in these institutions run by the State of Texas (federal, state-run, or otherwise) were entitled to protections under the Fair Labor Standards Act. This was a tragedy for some of the residents and inmates residing in these institutions. They had no sense of purpose and had idle time sitting on the ward despite that state run programs were still readily available.

200 residents of the Travis State School lost their jobs and 266 more jobs were phased out at the Austin State School. Prior to the court ruling, state law prohibited the institutions from paying more than $5 a week to the patients who performed jobs. A federal court decision ordered the U.S. Department of Labor to begin enforcing wage and hour provisions in state-run mental institutions across the US. (Ref: Waxahachie Daily Light, Page 7, August 20, 1974)


The Texas Government and TX MHMR had began changing its focus from institutionalization to integrated placement in local communities as this trend was becoming nationwide in the United States in the 1980s. ‘State Schools’ began to see a decline in enrollment. This was a result from efforts in deinstitutionalization. By then, state officials began following this trend. The Texas Government and TX MHMR had began changing its focus from institutionalization to deinstitutionalization. (Ref: Handbook of Texas Online, Vivian Elizabeth Smyrl, TRAVIS STATE SCHOOL)

By 1981, all farming operations at the facility ceased for good. All what was left in its place was the institution and its shop buildings. The shop buildings became storage for maintenance utilities. Despite that, the nursery was still in operation until 1990.


The Travis State School functioned as an Independent School District (ISD) from 1981 to 1988. The school was mostly compromised of multi-handicapped students who were non-verbal. Several of them had suffered scoliosis. 25% percent of residents living at Travis State School were quadriplegic.

After the year of 1988 due to lack of enrollment and federal funding, Travis State School relied on the Manor Independent School District to provide academic instruction through its "mainstreaming" program instead. The Travis State School Independent School District and Austin State School Independent School District were shut down by the state due to lack of enrollment and deinstitutionalization.


In the 1990s, Travis State School was renamed to Austin State School Annex but still kept the name ‘Travis State School’ as many people referred to the institution by such name despite what others say. Texas has always historically been behind most US states to serve people with mental retardation within their own communities along with Alabama, Mississippi, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Illinois. 

The 1990s saw an even further decline in ‘State School’ enrollment due to deinstitutionalization and healthcare laws. Effects of deinstitutionalization became statewide. Statistics in newspapers, reports, and books showed otherwise. In 1992, Travis State School had 604 patients and 1,270 employees with a total of 86 buildings at its 436 acre property. In 1994, only 104 patients remained. They were unharmed.

In 1994, the State of Texas and City of Austin proposed a 1,000 inmate facility for a new state jail to alleviate crowding with the population in state jails. In 1996, the Travis County State Jail/Travis State Jail was built and completed. For a short while, Travis County State Jail/Travis State Jail was privately run by privatized prison industrial complex company Wackenhut Correctional Facilities from 1994 to 2001. The land where Travis County State Jail/Travis State Jail occupies is where the Farm Colony originally was for Austin State School - Farm Colony.

Due to an abuse case at Travis State School along with lawsuits such as Lelsz vs. Kavanagh and Ruiz vs. Estelle, Travis State School closed down as an agreement in a lawsuit settlement with the state of Texas and US Government in 1996. The lawsuit was both statewide and federal, thus resulting in the federal lawsuit of Lelsz vs. Kavanagh.

By 1996, Travis State School closed for good. By then all remaining 41 patients were relocated to nearby institutions such as the Austin State School (now Austin State Supported Living Center). Construction at Travis State School lasted from 1996 to 1998. Debris was left over from pervious construction teams who relocated nearly everything. Some items and various other objects were left onsite. Buildings fell into various states of decay and disrepair.

TX MHMR was involved in another lawsuit called Turner, Rona and EEOC (Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) vs. Travis State School in 1996 which alleged violations of the Equal Employment Act.

In 1996, local real estate developer Peter Barlin had bought the land Travis State School was located on from Texas Board of Control. The idea for Peter Barlin purchasing the Travis State School land and buildings was to create a private version of the public housing agency called Vision Village. His main intention was to create public housing. Vision Village was supposed to be a neighborhood for low income housing. The City of Austin gave him a $1 million dollar incentive for this land development. Organizers borrowed nearly $4 million from Austin, Travis County and a local bank in 1997.

However plans fell through when Vision Village lacked the management expertise and fund-raising ability to build the housing it promised. Local real estate developer Peter Barlin had been charged criminally with penalties such as embezzlement, conspiracy, money laundering, mismanagement, and fraud. More than $5 million had been poured into the project. Peter Barlin had owned the former Travis State School site that was once set aside for Vision Village, a project that never got off the ground despite more than $1 million from the city. The Vision Village costs had ran deeper than dollars however.

Travis State School sat abandoned and vacant for a period of time from 1997 to 2004. During that time is when the building became vandalized and squatted. Graffiti covered several buildings, some of which been demolished.


In 2004, KIPP Schools (KIPP Austin) had purchased the property from Peter Barlin and the State of Texas via TX MHMR from Texas Board of Control. Some buildings however were still abandoned. These buildings were renovated overtime. Only few buildings were demolished. The Travis State School Cemetery had fallen into disrepair. Security had not been set up to protect and secure property on a 24 hour basis yet. However most of the property still sat vacant and abandoned.

This made it easy for scrappers to steal and vandalize the buildings for copper metal in order to gain a profit. One famous example would be local criminal Reginald Dane Parker. Local criminal Reginald Dane Parker had apparently been stealing copper wire there from the location site before for years. The timeframe Reginald Dane Parker had been stealing copper wire from Travis State School was from 2001 to 2005. Reginald Dane Parker was arrested and jailed by law enforcement officials in 2005.

By 2011, KIPP Austin had fully settled onto the land of the former Travis State School site. However the 8 dorms that weren’t in use were boarded up and closed off. The 9 warehouses are in various states of disrepair. Austin Police Department had set up their Child Protective Services division there in the year of 2011 as well.

In 2015, KIPP Schools contracted with local business ASC Management to secure the property as an effort in security measures. Closed-Camera surveillance cameras are now present and 24 hour security is actively on sight. Gates now hover over the buildings. Unoccupied buildings that were boarded up or abandoned are now currently in use. These building have been upgraded by being renovated. Currently businesses such as KIPP Austin, Austin Discovery School, KIPP Cafe, Austin Police Department, and Child Protective Services now occupy the land property. A small handful of former warehouses are in various states of disrepair.



[Here’s why Travis State School really closed!]

[John Lelsz Sr. with his wife, Ruth Lelsz, had filed a lawsuit that claimed Texas ‘State Schools’ along with other institutions of this kind violated the constitutional rights of their residents in 1974. Abuse was rampant in these institutions. criminal negligence, Patients were living in unsanitary condition provided by extremely inadequate living conditions. The lawsuit was Lelsz vs. Kavanagh. The lawsuit was eventually settled in 1991.

Travis State School closed down due a federal lawsuit called Lelsz vs. Kavanagh. Complainant John Lelsz Sr. and his wife Ruth Lelsz alleged their son, John Lelsz Jr. was physically abused and overtly medicated. John Lelsz Jr. was housed at Travis State School and Austin State School. John Lelsz Jr. was a blind and retarded patient who was physically aggressive with others and prone to violent outbursts. As a result he was overmedicated by Travis State School and Austin State School staff and the medical faculty.

When his parents went to visit him at Travis State School and Austin State School, they notices bruises, scars, and various other lacerations on his body.John Lelsz Jr. had acquired a head gash requiring six stitches, a black eye and swollen face while at Austin State School. Austin State School staff had used cattle prods to administer electroshock therapy on John Lelsz Jr. was a very difficult patient. Both parents filed a lawsuit against the state of Texas. Such said lawsuit eventually reached Federal Court. This led to the closure of the Travis State School in 1996.

By 1998, Travis State School closed for good. By then all remaining 41 patients were relocated to nearby institutions such as the Austin State School (now Austin State Supported Living Center). By 1999, lawsuits of Lelsz vs. Kavanagh and Ruiz vs. Estelle were mostly settled with the fact most of the complainants, plaintiffs, defendants, defenders, lawyers, and attorneys, were somewhat not satisfied with the Texas Governments’ actions with some justice being unserved to the victims and those whom were harmed.

As a result of delayed justice, John Lelsz Jr. was removed from Austin State School to a psychiatric institution in Arkansas in 1997. Since then his family relocated him back to Texas. His parents have since passed away. John Lelsz Sr. passed away in June 1995.]


[As for the government properties of Austin State School - Farm Colony and Travis State School…]

[The Travis State School Cemetery still remains onsite hidden away from KIPP Austin campus. The cemetery has fallen into disrepair. Many graves, tombstones, and other identifiers such as markers remain untouched despite the future plans from the Texas Government to remove such graves. The Texas Government decided to leave the graves untouched. The Travis State School Cemetery has fallen into disrepair.]

[Austin State School - Farm Colony had moved back to its original location at the “original” Austin State School (now Austin State Supported Living Center) in 1998. Austin State School - Farm Colony has now been reduced to a garden to a size of 4 rows as of 2016. The farm colony is a former shill of what it once was. No longer are extreme amounts of tax dollars being poured into the farm colony. The farm colony no longer exists.]


Austin State School - Farm Colony and Travis State School was located at 8509 FM 969, Austin, Texas, US 78725.

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

2 university shootings every month recorded as new average in the United States revealed and revisited again.

There are at least 2 university shootings every single month that occur with the confines in the United States. On average, there have been 2 university shootings every month in the United States. We're already halfway into 2018, and there already have been 24 school shootings where people are hurt or killed for that matter.

A portion of all the school shootings that have occurred this year have occurred college campuses and at universities. 25% of school shootings have taken place or took place at a university or a college campus. Most school shootings occurred on school grounds involve at least one person being shot.

It is not uncommon for 2 university shootings to occur during the same month. For instance, the Norfolk State University shooting at Norfolk, Virginia during February 27, 2018 and the Mississippi Valley State University shooting incident in Itta Bena, Mississippi that happened on the same day during February 27, 2018. And let’s not forget the Alabama University shootings of March 7, 2018.

In rare cases, a university shooting can last up to 2 days. For instance, read about the Alabama University shootings of March 7, 2018 and March 8, 2018. 2 shootings were reported at Alabama University on the date of March 7, 2018.

University related shootings occur twice each month in the United States alone. Most university shootings take place at college, preparatory schools, and universities. Most university shootings occur in the states of Alabama, Texas, Virginia, and California. Alabama has more university shootings than any other state in the United States. 

History of abuse at Sunmount Developmental Center overlooked.

There have been cases of abuse reported at Sunmount Developmental Center in Tupper Lake, New York that have gone unsolved over the years. Abuse is a contentious issue. In many cases, cases of abuse go unsolved. Sunmount Developmental Center is no exception. It was not all good with parents of the residents that resided in this institution.

Sunmount Developmental Center suffers from a high amount of injury from staff onto residents. Staff often assaults the residents that live here. There is also a high injury rate amongst residents. Many residents aren’t adequately fed. The mentally and physically disabled go through enough on their own.

In the 1970s, a handful of cases regarding abuse appeared in newspapers such as Rochester Times, The Tribune, Buffalo Times, and Watertown Daily Times (Watertown Daily). Parents raised concern about questionable treatment practices on residents.


During an interview with Watertown Daily Times in June 1973, former resident John Boyer recalled the only  marked abuse he saw was when he lining up with his ward mates to get their teeth brushed. “When they'd line us up to brush our teeth. If anybody was talking, the attendant would come down the line slapping us all in the face." 

The routine punishments consisted of "walking the halls" by having the residents walk in a long continual line about the wards until they were quiet. Attendants would get the noisy residents "walking the halls" by having the residents walk in a long line around the wards until they were quiet. This way attendants could assure residents kept quiet.

John Boyer witnessed residents being straight-jacketed to air heaters along ward walls. Slaps to the face occurred on a monthly basis. Dental care was poor and skin infections were rampant.

In another case of abuse, the parents of Pat Burns noticed the body of their own son had questionable scars and bruises when visiting him at Sunmount State School. They began noticing scars on Pat’s neck. No official answers were ever give as to how Pat obtained scars on his neck. How the bruises got there are questionable.  "They told us Pat was not a 'fighter' and other boys picked on him." Mrs. Burns said.

The Burnses photographed their son's neck and complained to the school authorities. After his parents complained, Pat was put into isolation as administration at the school decided this was a solution. He remained in an isolation ward for an extended period of time.

Pat's parents also noticed their son had developed a fear of older men, which led Mrs. Burns to suspect he may have been abused by school attendants. They also noticed he had a fear of stairs. Now 65 years old, Pat Burns is still afraid of stairs and unable to walk down them. 
(Ref: Watertown Daily Times, Page 13, June 1973)

According to Adkins family and from an internal report provided to The Times by the family,
Sunmount Developmental Center resident Eddie Adkins was set upon by several staff members after he grew upset that he was not allowed to go to the bathroom. A melee soon ensued by four state four state employees punching Eddie Adkins while he was sitting on a couch.

A deaf resident nearby told state investigators that he saw four state employees punching Eddie Adkins while he was sitting on a couch. He was so disturbed that he turned his hearing aid off during the melee. The assault took place in October 2011 when the staffers took down a male resident in the dining hall.

Two former employees of the Sunmount Developmental Center were sentenced to jail stemming from an October 2013 cover-up on the date of December 6, 2016. Jessica Rice and Suzanne Decheine assaulted an 18-year-old resident and gave him a head injury, which resulted into a seizure and a concussion. Both Jessica Rice and Suzanne Decheine covered this up from their superiors.

History of Pine Valley School in Rodessa, Louisiana.

Pine Valley School is one of Louisiana’s forgotten schools. Not much is know about the Pine Valley School in Rodessa, Louisiana. The Caddo Parish School District operated Pine Valley School as a public school from 1920 to 1987.


Pine Valley School was built and opened as a “Rosenwald school” for African American students in 1920 during the 1920-1921 school year at a cost of $2,300. This Rosenwald school was built on land owned by Catherine Tippins Watson and Robert Tippins. Robert Tippins served as trustee of Pine Valley School in 1920.

The first building for Pine Valley School was built as a four room school building with two teachers teaching grades 1 through 12. One teacher taught elementary grade (1-6) and the other teach taught high school grades (7-12). There were no middle school grades or junior high school grades at the time. The first Pine Valley School building was expanded into a four room school building in 1922.

Catherine Tippins Watson and Robert Tippins relinquished their property on a quit claim to the Caddo Parish School District on March 7, 1936. Although the heirs never had or claimed an interest in said property, this property has always belonged to Caddo Parish School District.  R.T. Tippins was named as trustee of Pine Valley School in said deed from Jeff Tyson to Pine Valley School, as recorded in Conveyance Book 116, Page 736, for Caddo Parish, Louisiana. (Ref: Caddo Parish Conveyance Book 116, Page 736)

1951 is when Caddo Parish School District officials decided making plans for a new school building to built. The old Pine Valley School building was overcrowded and too compressed for student population to expand. Its facilities could not accommodate the growth of the student population. By the 1952-1953 school term, 120 students were enrolled at Pine Valley School. Plans for a new school building were laid out and contracted in 1952.


Pine Valley School was originally rebuilt in 1953 for the Caddo Parish School District. The school building was 30,802 square feet on 13.15 acres of land. The building was built as a one story masonry building on standard concrete foundations. The architecture resembles Ellerbe Road School (aka George Washington Carver Primary School) a huge deal. The layout of the actual school is similar too as this school is conjoined in the middle by a breezeway.

The exterior walls and interior walls were constructed of concrete masonry blocks with a brick veneer. The exterior doors are a combination of wood and steel units with both mixed usage of wood and steel frames. Windows were held structurally by steel frames.

A basketball court was aligned behind the school in 1970. This basketball court was built on a 20 ft x 20 ft concrete slab. The basketball court was later converted into a tennis court in 1978.

Pine Valley School was closed in 1987. Pine Valley School was abandoned in 1988. Staff of school board then declared that Pine Valley School is not needed for school purposes. It is unclear as to why Pine Valley School shut down in the first place.


On October 3, 1998, Zion Human Services signed an agreement of lease to use the former school property on a lease plan for their business. Staff recommended the president of Zion Human Services to sign the Agreement of Lease. Staff recommended the resolution by approving the lease of its Pine Valley School property to Zion Human Services. Zion Human Services was a non-profit corporation.

In 2006, the school was abandoned again and has been since then. As to why the school was abandoned again after leasing the school to a non-profit corporation is unknown. What is known is that Zion Human Services left the property abandoned in 2006.

By 2008, Pine Valley School fell victim to rural decay from being abandoned for so long. Moss spread across classrooms. Vines grew over the hallways. Shrubs came about in certain areas.


Today a fence has been put up around the perimeter of Pine Valley School. The school building is now filled with cows. All the plant life is somehow well trimmed. A man who lives near the former school campus fires off gunshot rounds with rock salt. So be careful when exploring this school.

Other sections of the school have been damaged by minor vandalism. Some areas of the roof deck have collapsed or are missing. Several areas of the exterior walls have missing, broken masonry. These walls are in overall poor condition. Most of Pine Valley School has deteriorated beyond repair and is in need of demolition.


Pine Valley School is located at 16535 Hosston Rodessa Road, Rodessa, Lousiana, US 71044. Its other known address is 16535 Hosston Rodessa Road North, Ida, Louisiana, US 70144.

Rodessa High School history of Rodessa, Lousiana forgotten.

Rodessa High School is one of Louisiana’s many forgotten schools. In fact, Rodessa High School is one of Lousiana’s forgotten schools. Only so much is known about this high school. Many people have claimed the school to be “haunted”.


Rodessa High School was designed by Louisiana architect Seymour Van Os in 1937 as a two story brick building on a steel and concrete foundation and was built with acquired oil money and donations. The school building is about 33,437 square feet on 5 acres of land. Rodessa High School was built at a cost of $195,000. The two story building had 20 classrooms. The Rodessa High School building was a Public Works Administration building built in the 1930s as part of Lousiana’s New Deal heritage.

Classrooms for the 250 students were held in temporary buildings as the structure could not hold all of the students enrolled at this school at the time. 250 out of the 800 students attended classes in the temporary buildings until 1939.

Rodessa High School finally opened in September 1939. Enrollment in the beginning was 800 students. The first high school principal was Gladys Pitts Hendrick, a Rodessa native. Grades 1 through 11 were taught here. Rodessa High School (Rodessa School) was operated by Caddo Parish School District from 1939 to 1973 in Rodessa, Lousiana.

The first high school principal was Gladys Pitts Hendrick, a Rodessa native. Miss Gladys Hendrick was one of the first teachers at the school. (Ref: Shreveport Times, Page 7A, October 19, 1947)

In 1939, a tornado wiped out most of the town, but this school building somehow survived miraculously. Many people were killed in the tornado of 1939. Those killed in the 1939 tornado were buried in Tyson Cemetery, west of Rodessa High School.

A cemetery is located next to Rodessa High School and is called Tyson Cemetery. Tyson Cemetery was established sometime in the early 19th century. Several early 19th century interments can be found at this cemetery. This cemetery is still active. Modern headstones and fresh graves can be found.


Rodessa High School closed as a high school in 1955 when a new high school was built in nearby Vivian. The new North Caddo High School consolidated all of the high schools in the North Caddo Parish. The last senior class to graduate Rodessa High School was in 1955.

In 1956, Rodessa High School was renamed to Rodessa Elementary School (better known as Rodessa School) and remained that way until its closure. Rodessa School became a K-8 school for Caddo Parish School District. Once Rodessa High School closed, high school students had to start attending school in nearby Vivian, Louisiana to complete their education.

Rodessa High School was an all white school prior to 1965. The school desegregated in 1965 during the 1965-1966 school year.

After a high amount of asbestos was found in heater vent pipes by maintenance workers for the Caddo Parish School District, Rodessa High School was shut down effectively in 1973. Asbestos contributed to low test scores and appearent mesothelioma.Rodessa High School had also closed down due to a lack of funding, dwindling enrollment, and desegregation.

The gym had burned in a fire once after the school closed. So many people killed that they had to use the school as the morgue and also had to line the deceased up out front of the school as well as the back of the school. Many people have claimed Rodessa High School to be a “haunted school”. (Ref: HauntLA)

Someone at some point had set up a meth lab inside the former Rodessa High School. Exactly when is currently unknown. Over the years, the school was vandalized and stripped by scrappers. (Ref: uer.ca)


In 1996, there was a bit of debating about what to do with the former Rodessa High School property. However another discovery of asbestos was found. The heater vent pipes were made almost entirely of asbestos! So demolition would bankrupted the school district at the time. Nothing happened as a result. However the school district has evaluated the land and determined if there is a need for the land several times over the years.

In 2008, a group of ghost hunters were arrested for trespassing on the former Rodessa High School campus by the female sheriff deputy officer for the city of Rodessa. Several others have been given warnings by the female sheriff deputy officer to stay away from the property as it is unsafe.  Several others have trespassed on the property including paranormal experts, ghost hunters, and urban explorers curious about what was left behind.


In 2016, a handful of newspapers reported about the Caddo Parish School District considering having Rodessa High School demolished.

In August 9, 2016, Caddo Parish School Board considered demolishing the old Rodessa High School as a recommendation from district staff. Shreveport Times reports the building is too far gone to renovate and it is currently not economically viable for remodeling. Caddo Parish School District Superintendent Lamar Goree says officials, school board members, and administrators have concerns and fear the building is too dangerous to remain in the community because of its structural condition. Not because it’s a huge building.

(Ref: Washington Times, Superintendent: Caddo school almost looks haunted, Wednesday, August 10, 2016)
(Ref: Associated Press, Wednesday, August 10, 2016)
(Ref: Shreveport Times)


Today the property is fenced with standard 6 foot chainlink and is overgrown with vegetation brush. Its interior has been vandalized severely. Most of windows are broken. The roof has deteriorated. The Rodessa High School building itself is contaminated with asbestos. Caddo Parish School District still owns the property. It is considered trespassing to enter the property and the building is unsafe.

Here is what you need to know if you plan on visiting. There is a house next door and directly across the street and the occupants are going to be watching your every move. They will send pitbulls to chase after you.

(Ref: uer.ca)
(Ref: Shreveport Times)


Rodessa High School is located at 9634 Rodessa Ida Road, Rodessa, Louisiana, US 71069.

History of Creedmoor Mexican School long forgotten revisited.

Creedmoor Mexican School is one of the many forgotten schools of Austin and Travis County. Not much is known or can be found out about the Creedmoor Mexican School. The school was operated by what is considered today as Del Valle ISD.


Creedmoor Mexican School was established on land owned by A. D. Williams Estacio Moran. A. D. Williams sold the land to Estacio Moran via a deed on the date of February 23, 1925 for the Creedmoor Mexican School to be constructed. A. D. Williams was the trustee for Creedmoor Common School District at the time. Creedmoor Common School District opened Creedmoor Mexican School in 1926 just 1 block near the intersection of FM 1327 & FM 1625 in Creedmoor, Texas.

Address for the Creedmoor Mexican School was 12307 SH 29, Creedmoor, Texas. Creedmoor Common School District operated this school from 1926 to 1950.

Creedmoor Mexican School educated Hispanic students living in the town of Creedmoor. There was one teacher for every 20 students. There were 10 to 20 students in each classroom. Most of the students ages ranged from 7 to 12 at average. It is unknown if the school was a 1-12 school or either a 1-6 school.

In 1931 during the 1931-1932 school year, a soccer field was laid out. A field of grass was plotted around the school. Lucy H. Montgomery took ownership of the school property on the date of July 24, 1934. She was the independent executrix for the Estate of Lillian H. Williams and as stated on a quit claim deed. A. D. Williams still served as trustee for the school district. A. L. Hughes served as trustee for the school in 1941.


Creedmoor Mexican School was shut down in 1950 as mandated by the 1948 court case Delgado v. Bastrop ISD and Brown vs. the Board of Education decision ruling segregation in public schools illegal. LULAC brought suit against several school districts in Texas for denying Hispanic students the use of school facilities and educational services. The lawsuit claimed Hispanic students were separated and segregated from white students even though under state law they were considered "White" or "Caucasian".

A man named Stephen Richard Griffin bought the schoolhouse from Creedmoor Common School District for $11,510 dollars in 1950. Stephen Richard Griffin and his son Billie L Griffin Griffith lived in the house for more than 30 years.

By 1985, Stephen Richard Griffin was the only person recorded to be living in that house. His son had already moved out by then. 

On the date of 11/17/2005, Stephen Richard Griffin sold the house and property to Austin based CLAF CO LLC via a warranty deed. Stephen Richard Griffin moved in 2006. The house was posted to the internet using loopnet on the date of 02/06/2006. The house sat vacant from 2006 to 2007.

The house was demolished by CLAF CO LLC in 2007. All that remained by 2008 was the gravel driveway that connected to the house. Stephen Richard Griffin was the last person to have been recorded living at this residence.


Today the gravel driveway is the only remnant left of Creedmoor Mexican School remaining intact with the property along with the grass field. The house has since been removed and leveled.

Creedmoor Mexican School was located at 12307 FM 1625, Creedmoor, Texas, US 78610.

Hudson Bend School history long forgotten revisited again.

The Hudson Bend School in Bee Cave, Texas and its history have been long forgotten with time. Many people do not know of the history of this school or are aware of existence. Hudson Bend School is one of the many early schools of the Lake Travis community, Travis County, Austin, and Bee Cave of course.


Wiley Hudson and his family settled in Hudson Bend near the Colorado River (now Lake Travis) in 1830. In 1860, men from the community built a one-room schoolhouse. Lumber was donated from nearby. Albert Kendrick Stewart was responsible for building the Hudson Bend School. A man named Mr. Watson was hired to be the teacher by the school.

By 1890, Hudson Bend community boasted 2 schools called Hudson Bend School and Hurst Creek School. What was once a one-room schoolhouse was later rebuilt into a two-room schoolhouse. Hudson Bend School expanded to having two rooms and gradually grew to three rooms by the end of the 19th century.

Hudson Bend School was never a district school nor did the Hudson Bend community have its own school district as several other communities around had their own school districts at that time. (Hudson Bend never had its own school district.)

In 1901, both Hudson Bend School, Lone Ives School, and Hurst Creek School were consolidated into Teck School via Teck Common School District. Hudson Bend School and Hurst Creek School consolidated into each other with Lone Ives School consolidating in 1902. Although Hudson Bend School still operated however. Hudson Bend School would continue to operate from 1901 to 1911.

Hudson Bend School stopped operating in 1911. The building was sold off to a private homeowner in the same year. Hurst Creek School was demolished. Both schools no longer exist. Hudson Bend School, Lone Ives School, and Hurst Creek School were consolidated into Teck Common School District.

In 1985, a new middle school was opened by Lake Travis ISD. Lake Travis ISD officials decided to name the new middle school Hudson Bend Middle School after the former Hudson Bend School in an effort to remember their 19th century historic roots. After all, the name “Hudson Bend Middle School” originated from “Hudson Bend School”. The first school term Hudson Bend Middle School operated on was the 1985-1986 school year.

Today the legacy and name of Hudson Bend School live on at Hudson Bend Middle School at the location of 15600 Lariat Trail, Austin, Texas, US 78734. This middle school proudly boasts a high school graduation rate of 96.5% (96 ½ percent).

Friday, June 15, 2018

History of Richland School in Pflugerville, Texas almost forgotten.

Richland School is one of the many forgotten schools of Pflugerville, Texas few are aware of and only longtime local citizens know about. The school operated from 1878 to 1945 before being consolidated into Pflugerville ISD. This news article explains the history behind Richland School.


German immigrant Franz Schmidt purchased land in the Pflugerville area in 1867. There was demand for a school and education, but not enough funds to build a schoolhouse. Classes were held at the home of Franz Schmidt prior to the schoolhouse being built. Franz Schmidt donated land for a schoolhouse in 1868.

By 1877, there were enough Germans in the area to establish a school. The schoolhouse would become known as Richland School. The school was named Richland in honor of the rich soil in the region of Pflugerville. All its residents were very receptive of naming the school “Richland School”.

Richland School was built as a one-room schoolhouse structure built in 1878 on the Franz Schmidt farm and was located east of Pflugerville, Texas. Richland School was a 1-12 school that taught students in grades 1 through 12. The first teacher at Richland School was Catherine Margaret Schlitter.

The school became a county public school in 1881 and was operated by Travis County Public Schools until 1908. St. John Evangelical Lutheran Church donated an acre of land, and a new building was built just south of the church on Cameron Road. Richland School was predominantly German at first. Students were not allowed to speak their native languages—only English.


In 1908 is when Richland School consolidated into Highland School as was later consolidated by Plfugerville ISD shortly after. During the 1908-1909 school year is when Pflugerville ISD began having Highland School admitting students from Richland School as the Pflugerville ISD consolidated Richland School in 1908.

Richland School was predominantly German, but it was also mixed with Swedish students and Mexican students. However the school was predominantly German students and Mexican students. There were no African-American students because there was a separate “Negro School” located at Cameron Road and Schmidt Lane called Richland Negro School for African-American students enrolled in grades 1 through 7. The range of students ages were from 7-12.

Pflugerville ISD took full control over Richland School in 1919. In 1920, Pflugerville ISD continued to operate Richland School. Despite Richland School being consolidated into Pflugerville ISD, Richland School continued to operate. By 1921, 100 students attended this school.

In the 1930s, many Pflugerville schools were about to lose certification because there were not enough families to support the tax base. This included Richland School. Clarence Bohls negotiated with Travis County education officials of Travis County Public Schools to keep the rural Pflugerville schools open. Several small schools around Pflugerville were consolidated into the Pflugerville Independent School District as a solution. This allowed Richland School to operate until 1945.

By the 1940s, enrollment was dwindling at Richland School. Its days were numbered. Enrollment was dwindling at rural schools due to statewide consolidation of school districts in Texas. However the district continued to operate the school.

Pflugerville ISD shut down Richland School in 1945. In 1945, Richland School building was purchased by LaRue Ward, and was moved to its current location at the intersection of Fourth Street & Main Street in Pflugerville, Texas. Part of the original building was torn down and the materials were used to build a barn on a local dairy farm.

Several former Pflugerville ISD schoolhouses were moved onto private properties between the 1920s and 1940s. Many Pflugerville ISD schoolhouses were sold in auctions to bidders.


A dedication ceremony was held for Richland School at St. John Parish Hall located outside of Pflugerville, Texas on the date of Saturday, November 12, 2016. Richland School was granted a marker during the dedication ceremony. Travis County Historical Society sponsored the event and called it the Richland School Marker Dedication Ceremony.

Today Richland School is located at 198 4th Street North, Pflugerville, Texas, US 78660. The current owner reported Richland School to be in good condition.