Showing posts with label politics. Show all posts
Showing posts with label politics. Show all posts

Friday, November 3, 2017

Mopac toll road halfway completed.

The northern portion of the Mopac toll road, located north of Colorado River, is already completed as of November 2017. Construction crews have already begun cleaning up. However construction equipment and vehicles are still present from public view on Mopac. Construction on Mopac toll road going southbound has been rather moving slow at a sluggish pace. Construction for the Mopac toll road always begins at nighttime.

The Mopac toll road is expected be completed by the year 2019. By 2019, construction will have been completed and the toll road will be totally functional by then going both directions northbound and southbound. Mopac toll road will merge in those regular lanes on Mopac Highway (Loop 1) north of the Colorado River.

Travis Peak School history not forgotten.

Travis Peak School is one of the many forgotten schools of Travis County in the State of Texas. The history of Travis Peak School has been long forgotten and erased away with time. Only longtime residents and citizens of Travis County know about Travis Peak School. Those who were born prior to the 1930s will know what exactly this news article is explaining in historical context.


In the hot July summer of 1880, a school called Travis Peak School was built. Travis Peak School opened in the autumn fall of 1880 as Travis Peak School No. 1 at the intersection of Singleton Bend Road & FM 1431 in 1880 on the Hensel property.

Travis Peak School was built out of native stone and brick. The roof was covered with hand-made shingles. All building materials were donated by Mr. W. L. Hensel. W. L. Hensel, Bob Turner, and Geo. West were the selected trustees. Mr. W. L. Hensel was the chairman. The Travis Peak School District was established the following year.

At first Travis Peak School No. 1 only taught grades 1 through 10. 11th grade was added later. Although Travis Peak School No. 1 taught grades 1 through 11, 12th grade students had to complete their senior year at Marble Falls High School or at Marble Falls Senior High School. Mostly grades 11 and 12 would attend Marble Falls High School in Marble Falls, Texas. Later 7.


Herman Ludwig Hensel gave property to the Travis Peak School District in 1888 for another new school to be built. In 1889, a wood structure that was moved from Turkey Bend Road to Bee Creek and was reorganized as Travis Peak School No. 2. Travis Peak School No. 2 was located on the Turner Ranch on a “35 yard by 35 yard square piece of land”. A cemetery was located next to Travis Peak School No. 2. Travis Peak School No. 2. was located FM 1431 which is a road that connected to Leander.

At some point in time, Travis Peak School No. 2 moved on the property next to Travis Peak School No. 1 which was on the Hensel property. This had to have been between the 1930-1933 because that is when Travis Peak School No. 2 moved.

Later in the 1930s, what specific schools taught what grades were rearranged. Travis Peak School No. 1 taught grades 8 through 10 while Travis Peak School No. 2 taught grades 1 through 7.

1941 is when Travis Peak School and Travis Peak School District were consolidated into Marble Falls ISD. High school students went to attend Marble Falls High School in Marble Falls, Texas. All the other students attend Marble Falls ISD schools. Both the Travis Peak School No. 1 and Travis Peak School No. 2 after 1941.


Travis Peak School No. 1 is located on the Hensel property where Hensel Youth Camp is today located at 7890 Singleton Bend Road, Marble Falls, Texas, US 78654 and 7891 Singleton Bend Road, Marble Falls, Texas, US 78654. The school building for Travis Peak School No. 1 has been restored by the Hensel family The interior structure has been restored by the Hensel family.

Today the Travis Peak School No. 2 building has been revitalized and renewed into the Travis Peak Church of Christ located at 7893 Singleton Bend Road, Marble Falls, Texas, US 78654. Travis Peak School sits at its original location of Singleton Bend Road & FM 1431.

History of Manda School/Manda Community Center explained in hindsight.

The Manda School is one of the most well known schoolhouses of Austin/Travis County. Manda School has truly stood the test of time by still being in existence for the past 137 years located northeast of Manor, Texas. What was once a school became a community center shortly after. Both the Manda School and Manda Community Center have a unique interesting history that sets it apart from all the other schoolhouses in the area.

There were 32 rural school houses with similarity to the one in Manda at one point in time, but the Manda Schoolhouse is the only one that remains in all of Travis County/Austin. (Minus the Eanes School and Montopolis School.) Manda School is the only remaining two room school house in Travis County in Austin, Texas from the 20th century and 1910s decade.

Every single year the Friends of Manda School hold meetings here at the Manda Community Center. Mainly meetings are about future regards of Manda Community Center and funding for historic preservation toward this building which are held by the Board of Directors for Friends of Manda School. Community functions, social gatherings, programs, and various meetings are still held inside this building. Friends of Manda School plans to keep the Manda School open as the Manda Community Center in Manda, Texas which is near the town of Manor, Texas.

Every single year the Friends of Manda School clean the school building and land property by mowing the grass and terminating insects from hidden corners. Flooring has been resurfaced by volunteers from Friends of Manda School.

The Manda Community Center is a fine example of historic preservation done right. We need to urge commissioners of the Travis County Historic Commission to preserve historic buildings such as the Manda School. With help from both local citizens and volunteers, we can keep and preserve buildings such as this one. To this day, the Manda School operates as the Manda Community Center. The school building now serves as the reminder of the early settlement of Manda, Texas.



Manda School began its cycle as a school and community center in 1880 in the settlement of Manda, Texas. It is very unclear in what exact type of building structure Manda School taught classes in its pupil stages. The school building structure is probably presumed to have been located in a 2-room log cabin. At first the Manda School did not operate as a district school. Manda School operated as a 1-10 school teaching grades 1st through 10th.

In 1888 is when 1st grade through 10th grade was taught at Manda School. Daily enrollment was 10 to 15 students a day. In 1890, 1st grade through 10th grade was taught at Manda School with a daily attendance rate of 20 to 25 students per day. 1890 truly saw an increase in student enrollment. And just by 15 students!

By 1898, the Manda School had operated under New Sweden School District No. 24 and also as Manda School District No. 24. In 1898 is when New Sweden School District hired a teacher named Miss Zena Slaughter to teach grades 1st through 8th at Manda School.

From 1898 to 1901 is when a teacher named Miss Zena Slaughter taught elementary grades 1st and 8th. A teacher named Miss Edna Slaughter taught high school grades 9th through 11th.

The 1898-1899 school semester is when 11th grade was added with Manda School teaching 1st grade through 11th grade. Miss Zena Slaughter taught elementary grades 1st and 8th along with high school grades 9th through 11th whenever the other teacher was unavailable. Later in 1899 is when Miss Edna Slaughter taught elementary grades 1st and 8th. Miss Edna Slaughter is one the schools earlier teachers to have taught at this school. H. C. Albert and J. Carlson were trustees of Manda School during the school year of 1899-1900.


April 24, 1900 is when Miss Zena Slaughter became the teacher in charge of Manda School. She was appointed as a head teacher by school trustee H. C. Albert in 1900. H. C. Albert appointed P. Carlson from Carlson School as another trustee for Manda School on the date of April 27, 1900. J. Carlson and P. Carlson eventually oversaw trustee duties.

In 1901, school trustee H. C. Albert appointed Miss Edna Slaughter as the head teacher for Manda School if anything were to happen to Miss Zena Slaughter. Both Miss Edna Slaughter and Miss Zena Slaughter served as head teachers for the Manda School.

Paul Albert and Otto Larsson were one of the notable pupils who attended Manda School. Paul Albert was a relative of H. C. Albert, a New Sweden School and Manda School trustee.


Citizens from the Manda community urged commissioners from the Travis County Public Schools (Travis County Common School District) to build a new schoolhouse in the Manda community in 1914. Superintendents and commissioners were receptive to their demanding a new school be built.  Commissioners from the Travis County Public Schools agreed to allocate funding construction of a schoolhouse in Manda, Texas. 


The Manda School was built as the New Sweden School in 1915 to serve students in New Sweden School District #22. Exact first school year that the Manda School operated on was the 1914-1915 school semester at the zenith peak of 1915. Though the school did fully start operating until 1916, students from Manor and the nearby surrounding communities attended. Manda School operated possibly in a 2-room log cabin until sometime during the 1915-1916 school year. Exact dates are unclear.

By 1915, the Manda community voted on a one issue to construct a new school building that was during the spring of that year. Construction for the Manda School building lasted from the summer to the fall of 1915. Although the construction for the Manda School building mostly operated during the summer, it continued in the fall season. School was held in the New Sweden Lutheran Church on New Sweden Church Road during construction. Construction was completed later in that year.

1915 was the first full year altogether that Manda School operated on as under the name “New Sweden School” for which it operated as under at first. The New Sweden School sign located on the top roof of the school building faced front towards Manda - Carlson Road.

The Manda School was named after Amanda Bengtson Gustafson who was sister of the settlement’s postmaster the same year. Manda is a short diminutive for Amanda. The name Manda was shortened from the name Amanda. Many students who had attended this school had Swedish ancestry in their family background and came from Swedish families. Most of the students were children of Swedish sharecroppers on the ranch or Swedes who owned farms in the area.    

The name New Sweden/Manda Schoolhouse has given to the school by local historians. Sometimes historians have labeled the Manda School as “New Sweden/Manda Schoolhouse”, “New Sweden Schoolhouse”, “New Sweden Schoolhouse No. 2”, “New Sweden School No. 2”, and “New Sweden/Manda School”. The name of the school has changed over the course of several years however.

From a February 26, 1933 radio program ran by Texas Extended School and Community Health Education Program for New Sweden School states the following.:  “The first pupil school in this community was held in the old New Sweden Lutheran Church (the church that was is where the cemetery is now at FM 973 and New Sweden Church Road)…… the present two room school was erected in the summer and fall of 1915…. this building was made possible by a bond issue voted by the community in the spring of that year.”


1916 is when the Manda School was opened as a two-room schoolhouse which was a single story building structure for the Manda Common School District in the settlement of Manda, Texas. Manda School was spread out into a 2 room plan incorporated in the school building structure.

Prior to 1916 the Manda School building was used as the New Sweden School building in the New Sweden School District. The New Sweden School sign located on the top roof facing Manda - Carlson Road had been changed to Manda School. The Manda School eventually became known as the Manda Schoolhouse to locals in 1916.

1916 is the year when Manda School and New Sweden School swapped buildings. The then-present New Sweden School building became the Manda School with the New Sweden School being relocated by moving into a church building located on 12178 New Sweden Church Road in Manor, Texas near the New Sweden community and settlement. Manda School was located inside the former New Sweden School building built in 1915. Historians have agreed that the Manda School was the original New Sweden School building. Many historians claim this statement as a fact.

1916 was the same year the community of Manda, Texas was granted its own school district by the State of Texas and Travis County Public Schools which was called Manda Common School District with Manda School separating from New Sweden School District. Manda Common School District included students from neighboring communities such as Manor, New Sweden, Littig, Kimbro, Carlson, and Elgin.

1917 is when the Manda School had an attendance rate of 30 students per day. 2 teachers taught 30 students with 15 students on the lefthand side of the school building and 15 students on the righthand side of the school building. One side taught elementary grades and the other side taught middle school grades and high school grades.


By 1920, the attendance rate had dropped to 20 students per day. However in the middle of the 1920-1921 school year is when the attendance rate had started beginning to pick up with a rate of 25 students per day in daily attendance.

12th grade was added in 1923. Manda School operated as a 1-12 school by then with Manda School teaching 1st grade through 12th grade in that two-room schoolhouse. This was unusual as most schools in the state of Texas either stopped at 10th grade or either 11th grade. Even high schools never went past 10th grade level or the 11th grade level.


The Manda School District had a negro school called Manda Colored Public School which also went under the names Manda Colored School, Manda Negro School, and Kimbro Negro School. According to Manda School Board Records 1947-1963, the Manda Negro School went under several names. The Manda Negro School was located next to Manda School. The Manda Negro School was jointly operated by the Kimbro School District even after 1947 when the Kimbro School District consolidated into the Manda Common School District. 

Once Kimbro School District consolidated into the Manda Common School District, both Kimbro White School and Kimbro Negro School were operated by the Manda School District including the Kimbro School on FM 1100 as well. The Manda Negro School was the former Kimbro Negro School. Kimbro Negro School became the Manda Negro School in 1948 as the Kimbro Negro School was consolidated into Manda Common School District in 1947. Not much is known about the Manga Colored Public School or its history, but county records indicated this school certainly existed.

From the 1947-1948 school year up until 1963 is when the Kimbro Negro School was operated by Manda School District. Walter Banks was elected as principal for the Manda Negro School in 1959. The Manda School Board made a motion to move Manda Negro School into one building with telephone service included in the year of 1960. 1960 is when the former Kimbro Negro School relocated next to Manda School (Manda White School). Manda Negro School consolidated into Elgin ISD in 1963. Sometime after 1963 is when the Manda Negro School was demolished.


In 1942, the Austin American-Statesman newspaper credited and condemned Henry Munson, Albert Munson, Victor Bengston, Martin Anderson, Albin Holmburg, and Edwin Berggren as active pallbearers from New Sweden Lutheran Church. They were active in church services and the New Sweden School Board as well as Manda School Board.

The Austin American-Statesman newspaper had credited and condemned Henry Munson, Albert Munson, Victor Bengston, Martin Anderson, Albin Holmburg, and Edwin Berggren as honorary pall bearers from New Sweden Lutheran Church the same year. They served on the Board of Deacons of the Church.

New Sweden School was consolidated into the Manda Common School District in 1947. New Sweden School students attended school in Manor or Manda School. When New Sweden School was consolidated with the Manda School in the Manda Common School District, New Sweden School was a K-7 school. Kindergarden was added to Manda School and New Sweden School in 1945 prior to consolidation. As a result of school district consolidation, the tax rate was raised from 47¢ to 50¢.

In 1947, Manda Common School District became School District No. 25 for a short time. New Sweden School District No. 22 was dissolved into Manda School District No. 25 by then. Harry Lind of Lund School became vice principal of Manda School.

More schools and school districts were consolidated into the Manda Common School District over time and in the same year as well. Gregg School, Carlson School, Kimbro School, Willow Ranch School, and several other schools along with school districts were consolidated into the Manda Common School District

A vocational building was built next to the school in 1949. The vocational building is where students learned skills and crafts for the workplace. Woodcraft was taught inside this vocational building. Farming and sewing were taught here.


From an Austin American-Statesman newspaper article written in June 3, 1950 under the headlines of “Board To Close School At Merrilltown”, Travis County Public Schools Superintendent Irvin. W. Popham said, “The 13 students in the Merrilltown School will be distributed between the Pflugerville ISD Schools and New Sweden Schools. He said the school was closed because the enrollment had dropped too low.”

As a result overall, 13 students were distributed to Pflugerville ISD Schools, Round Rock ISD schools, and New Sweden Schools. Most students from Merrilltown School were distributed to New Sweden School and Manda School as a result of Merriltown School District consolidation with Round Rock ISD and Pflugerville ISD in 1950. By the 1950-1951 school year, Merrilltown School closed due to a lack of enrollment.

Merrilltown School was an elementary school that served grades 1 through 7. Merrilltown School was known as Merrilltown Elementary School. The Merrilltown School was no longer the 1-12 school it was once known as.

In 1951, the Manda School contributed $20,000 towards the Travis County polio campaign and program. Half of the monetary amount of $20,000 was sent to the national foundation (Polio Foundation) which performed the research for a cure to polio. A news article from the February 01, 1951 edition of the Austin American-Statesman newspaper argued that the monetary amount the amount contributed in the drive won’t even pay their salaries.

Transfers to Elgin High School began in May 1958 at a cost between $20 to $25 dollars at a rate of $248.85 per student. High school students transferred to Elgin ISD to attend Elgin High School. Walter Banks was elected as principal for Manda Negro School. Sid Carwright was appointed as school board trustee in 1959.


The Manda Common School District was dissolved in 1960 during the school district consolidation movement of the 1960s in Texas in an effort to save taxpayers cost. Most students who attended the Manda School were bussed to Elgin ISD though due to proximity towards Elgin. Some students were bussed to Manor ISD.

Manda School had 1,394 students during the 1962-1963 school year. Cost per pupil was $303.46 a year at the balance of $54.61 per pupil raised from local sources. Transfer cost per each student was $54.61 raised from local sources.

During the December 3, 1962 Elgin ISD board meeting, it was established “tuition charged for transfer students in the Elgin Public Schools will be the actual cost as calculated from the budget of last preceding school year.” The State was to furnish $346,896 dollars for each student at a rate of $248.85 per student. $423,627 was divided among the 1,394 students during the 1962-1963 school year. Transfers would begin next year. Transfers to Elgin High School started at 9th grade or 10th grade.

Although the Manda Common School District was dissolved permanently in 1960, the Manda School continued operate until 1963. 1963 is when Manda School was finally closed and stopped operating. Students were sent to schools in Elgin or Manor based where they resided. Elgin ISD permanently closed down Manda School in 1963.

1963 is the same year Manda Community Club was formed. Despite the Manda Community Club being formed, the Manda School building more or less sat abandoned. Manda Community Club tried their hardest to preserve the historic Manda Schoolhouse but ultimately the organization dissolved in 1968. From 1968 onwards, the Manda School more or less sat abandoned with no meaningful use.


The school building still stood in 1969. In 1969 the Manda School was more or less abandoned with no purpose for almost 40 years falling into a state of disrepair. That was until the Friends of Manda School (Friendship of Manda School) decided to make the former Manda School building into a community center which would become the Manda Community Center in 2006. David E Erickson Jr became the trustee for Manda Community Center as of 2009.


From 2016 to 2017, the Friends of Manda School have began maintenance and upkeep of the former Manda School building as an attempt of historic perseveration. Several window panels have been replaced and window screens have been added to all windows of this school. All wooden floors have been flattened and resurfaced to be up to code for building standards and code standards. Central AC heating is now connected to this building.

Today the Friends of Manda School and David E Erickson Jr. own and maintain the Manda Community Center. David E Erickson Jr is the trustee for Manda Community Center as of no. David E Erickson Jr is responsible for the finances and maintenance of the Manda School.

Manda School is now operated, owned, and preserved by the Friends of Manda School (Friendship of Manda School). Friends of Manda School is responsible for the upkeep and maintenance of this school building. Every single year the Friends of Manda School clean the school building and land property by mowing the grass and terminating insects from hidden corners. The Manda community along with several volunteers have been restoring the Manda School building to its original condition as found decades earlier.

Every single year the Friends of Manda School hold meetings here at the Manda Community Center. Mainly meetings are about future regards of Manda Community Center and funding for historic preservation toward this building which are held by the Board of Directors for Friends of Manda School. Community functions, social gatherings, programs, and various meetings are still held inside this building. Friends of Manda School plans to keep the Manda School open as the Manda Community Center in Manda, Texas which is near the town of Manor, Texas.

Manda School/Manda Community Center is located at 16717 Manda Carlson Road, Manor, Texas, US 78653. The other address for the Manda Community Center is 16306 Manda Carlson Road, Manor, Texas, US 78653.

Webberville School history revealed by Michael Mixerr.

Webberville School history of Webberville, Texas has been long forgotten and nearly erased with time. Not many people knew Webberville had schools or even had its own school district. Webberville held it school classes often in churches such as the Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church or First Baptist Church on FM 969. Webberville School operated from 1870 to 1967.

White landowner Matthew Duty donated one acre of land for a church and school for the recently freed African Americans in the year of in 1868 shortly after emancipation. Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church was established on the property the same year.  His handwritten deed indicated that “as long as there are any members of the church, the land cannot be sold.”.  Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church was  organized that year as a mission church of the St. John Regular Missionary Baptist Association.

Webberville School and Webberville School District began in 1870 in Webberville, Texas as one-teacher school consisting of grades 1 through 7 and later grades 9 through 11. Webberville School originated in the Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church in 1870 where both church and school were held. Black students used one side of the church and white students used the other. The school had no indoor plumbing or lunchroom facilities.

Webberville had its own school district called Webberville School District which was known as School District No. 32. Students from the Hornsby-Dunlap School and Bastrop County often attended Webberville Schools after completing 5th grade.

1878 is when 8th grade was added to the Webberville School. In 1880, high school grades 9 through 11 were added to the Webberville School. Both church and school were held at Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church.


At one point Webberville Negro School and Webberville White School there were on the same property as Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church. Things would remain this way until the year of 1911. In 1911, the Webberville School District saw an increasing need for a new school. Specifically a new white school.

Owners of Colorado Lodge #96 offered a lease to the Webberville School District for a fair price where the Webberville White School would continue classes for students to get their education. Colorado Lodge #96 was a Masonic Lodge. Class was held on the first floor. From then on, only Webberville Negro School operated inside Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church.

By the early 1920s, Webberville School had a baseball team. The baseball even had “husband and wife teams”. Teachers even participated in the baseball team. By the 1920s, Webberville Schools had 200 to 300 students attend school each year.


The Hornsby-Dunlap School and Hornsby-Dunlap School District consolidated into the Webberville School District in 1952 with students now attending both Webberville Schools including Webberville School. Hornsby-Dunlap School continued to operate under Colorado Common School District #36.

After the consolidation of Hornsby-Dunlap School in 1952, a fundraiser was held to purchase visual-aid equipment and a movie projector. A bus was purchased to transport the children to Webberville from the Hornsby-Dunlap community in the same year. However the school still had no indoor plumbing or lunchroom facilities.

The Webberville School was integrated for a short period of time. However Webberville Schools were segregated by choice and by law. By the 1956-1957, school year, Webberville School became slowly integrated.


Sometime in the 1960s is when Webberville White School moved into the Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church which housed Webberville Negro School.  Webberville White School moved into a school building located southwest of the church. The schools were located on the same property once again. Another school building was built for Webberville Negro School housing grades 1 through 8. That other school building.

In 1967, the Webberville School and Webberville School District were consolidated into Del Valle Independent School District (Del Valle ISD). Due to racial integration and school district consolidation, the Webberville School closed down during the 1967-1968 school year.

The Webberville Negro School building was sold to the church the following year. The Webberville Negro School building was a separate structure southwest of Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church until after 1973. The original school building of Webberville Negro School was added to the church in 1973. The side-gabled wing of church building was the original school building of Webberville Negro School. The other school building was demolished prior to 1973.


To this day, the Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church in Webberville, Texas remains an active congregation. The church building stands in its original location at 1314 Weber Street, Webberville, Texas, US 78653. Today Colorado Lodge #96 and Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church remain in tact.



Webberville Schools were segregated by choice and by law. This led to the creation of Webberville Negro School and Webberville White School. The Webberville Schools of Webberville School, Webberville White School and Webberville Negro School were divided into three departments: Primary (grades 1 through 4),  Intermediate (grades 5 through 8), and Secondary (grades 9 through 11).


Webberville Negro School was held in the Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church on 1314 Weber Street in Webberville, Texas from 1880 to 1967. By the end of the 1950s is when Webberville Negro School (Webberville School) ended as a two teacher school. At one point, there were two schools on the property.

The Webberville Negro School was divided into three departments: Primary with Mrs. Lydia Scales as the teacher for grades 1 through 4;, Intermediate with Mrs. Effie R. Edwards as the teacher for grades 5 through 8 for the Webberville School; and Secondary with Mr. Roosevelt H. King as the teacher for grades 9 through 11.

The Webberville Negro School became a K-8 school in the 1930s. School stopped after 8th grade. Students who wanted to continue onto high school were sent to attend Manor Colored High School in Manor, Texas, Littig High School in Littig, Texas, or simply attended high school in Austin, Texas.

During the 1934-1935 school year,  Webberville School (Webberville Negro School) had 67 students with an average daily attendance of 40 students. There was one teacher for 67 students. The cost per year for each student was $659 with an average of $16.25 per student per year. The teacher taught grades 1 through 7, and later 8th, for 146 days.

Webberville Negro School (Webberville School) closed in 1967 ending as a two teacher school. The school was given back to Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church. The Webberville Negro School building was a separate structure southwest of Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church until after 1973. The original school building of Webberville Negro School was added to the church in 1973. The side-gabled wing of church building was the original school building of Webberville Negro School.


Webberville White School was held in Colorado Lodge #96 located on 19011 FM 969 from 1911 until sometime in the 1960s. In 1923, the Webberville White School (Webberville School) grew to incorporate high school grades 10 through 12. School enrollment grew to 200 to 300 students by the 1922-1923 school year. This school had no indoor plumbing or lunchroom facilities.

Sometime in the 1960s is when Webberville White School moved into the Ebenezer Missionary Baptist Church which housed Webberville Negro School. Webberville White School moved into a school building located southwest of the church. Another school building was built for Webberville Negro School housing grades 1 through 8.

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Future for old Don’s Grass property in Austin, Texas remains unknown.

The future for Don’s Grass property remains unknown currently as of November 2017. Many citizens, activists, council members, and preservationists from both Austin and Oak Hill wonder about the future of the old site.

However Don Farmer plans to demolish the old Oak Hill School so he can build a new modernized storefront for his business Don's Grass & Landscape Inc. But nothing has materialized yet. All buildings have remained in tact. He has not made comment to the public regarding the future outcome for his business or those 2 buildings. Don Farmer and his landscape business Don’s Grass occupied the former site from 2005 to 2012.

The building Don’s Grass occupied was none other than the old Oak Hill School located at 6240 West US 290, Austin, Texas, US 78735. The Oak Hill School was the old Oak Hill Elementary School that taught grades 1 through 7 operated by Austin ISD from 1923 to 1985.

The former Oak Hill School and its school buildings remain in tact leaving many Austin and Oak Hill citizens to wonder about the future of the Don’s Grass site. Future for the former Don’s Grass property or its buildings is unknown.


The old Oak Hill School has gone through a series of landowners and has operated as a front for several businesses. Once the former Oak Hill School operated as a grocery store that sold pumpkins during autumn, a mail department, once as a hardware store, and once as an automobile repair station.

Austin 1825 Fortview Inc owned the property prior to Don Farmer who purchased the property through a warranty deed on the date of 6/4/2005. Don Farmer sold the property back to Austin 1825 Fortview Inc on the date of 1/16/2012.

Bulldozers occupy the property site of the old Oak Hill School which was Don’s Grass. The buildings have permit papers attached indicating improvements are being made. There are building permits for interior non-structural demolition around the vacant school buildings. It is unlikely that the former Oak Hill School will be demolished as the City of Austin has zoned the Oak Hill School property as a historic property back in 2001.


It’s last tenants was Don Farmer and Austin 1825 Fortview Inc. Don Farmer has not occupied the property since 2012. Don’s Grass has not been in business since 2012.

The future January 12, 2012 Austin City Council meeting regarding Don Farmer violations were reported in the December 30, 2011 edition of Austin Chronicle and again in another issue of the Austin Chronicle. A foreclosure notice was filed to the Travis County Courthouse on January 14, 2012.

Back in January 12, 2012, the City of Austin shut down Don’s Grass by giving Don Farmer a citation for alleged violations of failure to install a water meter and failing to accurately record & submit monthly reports of groundwater withdrawals from a permitted Middle Trinity water well.

On January 12, 2012, City of Austin council members held a public hearing related in reference towards alleged violations that Don Farmer failed to install a water meter and for failing to accurately record & submit monthly reports of groundwater withdrawals from a permitted Middle Trinity water well. District Rules required the permittee to appear before the District’s Board of Directors and show cause why it should not be subject to an enforcement action by the Board.


Bulldozers occupy the site of the old Don’s Grass. Piles of dirt can be seen from road-view off of US 290 visible to the public eye. As of now, BGSIX Holdings LLC and City of Austin own the property. Both BGSIX Holdings LLC and City of Austin are keeping an eye on the property for any potential buyers willing to purchase the property.

For now the former Don’s Grass sits vacant and unoccupied at 6420 West US 290, Austin, Texas, US 78735.

Oak Hill School history touched by Mixerr Reviews.

Oak Hill School history and Oak Hill in Austin, Texas have been reported in the local news time and time again. Well here is an in-depth look at the history of Oak Hill School and the Oak Hill School District none with similarities to other new reports about Oak Hill School.

The Oak Hill School served as an elementary school where grades 1 through 7 from 1856 to 1985 for the students that lived or resided in the Oak Hill neighborhood. Oak Hill School was operated by Austin Independent School District. The old Oak Hill School building was the former building for Oak Hill Elementary School prior to 1985.


In 1856 Oak Hill School was started a log cabin school  called Live Oak Springs. The school was named after the community. This name was used for 9 years from 1856 to 1865 when the Civil War ended. Mr. George Hirsner was the first teacher of this school.

In 1865, the Shiloh School was built a log cabin to replace the Live Oak Springs School. Although the Shiloh School was built to replace the Live Oak Springs School, the Shiloh School remained right next to Live Oak Springs School as an annex building if overcrowding occurred.

Major landowner named B. F. Oatman had settled in Oak Hill around 1869. The area and the school and community were renamed Oatmanville. Which is where Oatmanville School came from.

A wooden frame building built by Williamson Creek replaced the Shiloh School in 1879. This one-room schoolhouse was enlarged to two rooms simply by hanging a curtain across the center.

On the date of August 16, 1897, the first trustees for the Oatmanville School were elected and charged with building a new school. Trustee Peter Thompson gave two acres of land and Columbus Patton, supervised the construction of a one room building which served as both the new Oatmanville School as well as a church on Sundays.


In 1920, a vote was held for construction of a new school building to replace the Shiloh School, Live Oak Springs, and Oatmanville School buildings. Citizens of Oak Hill were adamant for a new school to be built. Land for the present school was donated by James A. Patton and limestone donated by Norwall Mowinkle. James Andrew Patton and Norwall Mowinkle helped build the Oak Hill School building.

The Oak Hill School District was created in 1922. James Andrew Patton held a position as school trustee. Norwall Mowinkle was made secretary and assistant trustee.

The “new” Oak Hill School was built in 1923 as an elementary school for grades 1 through 7. The Oak Hill School was a 1-7 school. Each class consisted of 6 to 7 students. Three teachers were employed at Oak Hill School. The school was located in the middle of farmland.

Oak Hill School got its second school building as enrollment expanded in 1933. The large room on the west side of the building was added in 1933 and used for the cafeteria. A stage and library were installed in the same year.

Enrollment was 200 students in the 1932-1933 school year. By the 1932-1933 school year, Oak Hill School was a 1-8 school (K-8 school) that taught grades 1 through 8. Students continued high school at Austin High School. Five teachers were employed at Oak Hill School.

According to the Statistical Study of Travis County Schools, Oak Hill School listed 59 students and 3 teachers in the 1934-1935 school year. By 1935, 60 students attended this school.

At one point in the 1940s, Oak Hill School reverted back to a 1-7 school after being a 1-8 school. After finishing 7th grade, students were bussed to Fulmore Junior High School (now Fulmore Middle School) in the Austin Public Schools District (now Austin ISD) to finish their junior high school/middle school education. High school continued high school at Austin High School.


Cedar Valley School was closed and its school district was consolidated with the neighboring Oak Hill School into the Oak Hill School District in 1953. Oak Hill School then expanded the same year as a result of school consolidation.

Cedar Valley School was closed down and consolidated was due to lack of funding directly from dwindling property taxes in direct attribution also by Oak Hill School District consolidating various schools in the Oak Hill community and Cedar Valley community. Students who attended Cedar Valley School were bussed to Oak Hill School on US 290.

In 1957, Oak Hill School became a 1-6 school teaching grades 1 through 6 permanently which Oak Hill Elementary School does today. School never went past 6th grade by then.


In 1960, Oak Hill School District and Manchaca School District formed a rural school district called “Manchaca - Oak Hill Rural High School District“ bka “Manchaca - Oak Hill School District“. An attempt to form a short-lived school district that lasted from 1960 up until 1967 in a 6 to 7 year timespan.

1967 is the year when Austin ISD annexed the Oak Hill School District and Manchaca School District along with the Manchaca - Oak Hill School District itself. Oak Hill School was now operated by Austin ISD.


There were nine teachers in the school by 1971. A tenth teacher was employed in 1972. Only one school bus picked up and dropped off students. The one school bus was the only method of transportation for Oak Hill School.

In 1974, land was donated to Austin ISD by the James A. Patton family to build a newer modern elementary school where Oak Hill School would relocate on 6101 Patton Ranch Road. During construction of the newer modern Oak Hill Elementary School, grades Kindergarden through 5th along with 6th were housed at the old Oak Hill School. 5th and 6th grade students were housed in the building northeast of the school less than a stones throw a way.

From 1974 to 1985, the former Oak Hill School building continued to operate. Only this time, grades 5 and 6 occupied the two buildings. This practice would last until 1985 when the property was sold.

1975 is the year when the newer modern Oak Hill School opened. The first school year Oak Hill Elementary School operated on was 1975-1976. Oak Hill Elementary School was then a K-6 school.


In 1985 is when Austin 1825 Fortview Inc bought the property and school building from Austin ISD for $200,000. From 1985 to 1997 is when the old Oak Hill School building operated as a grocery store.

From the 1980s to the 1990’s, the old Oak Hill School had gone through a series of landowners and has operated as a front for several businesses. Once the former Oak Hill School operated as a grocery store that sold pumpkins during autumn, Pizza Garden, Stone Garden, Cherry Tree Farm LTD, Austin Ballet, a mail department, once as a hardware store, and once as an automobile repair station.

Oak Hill School became Oak Hill Elementary School in 1986. Additional buildings were added on the same year. From 1986 onwards, Oak Hill Elementary School only taught grades K through 5 and no longer 6th grade. 6th grade attended middle school at Small Middle School down the road or elsewhere. Oak Hill Elementary School became a K-5 school which it still is to this day.


Don Farmer and his landscape business Don’s Grass occupied the former Oak Hill School building from 2005 to 2012. Don Farmer purchased the property from Austin 1825 Fortview Inc through a warranty deed on the date of 6/4/2005. Austin 1825 Fortview Inc owned the property prior to Don Farmer.

It’s last tenants was Don Farmer and Austin 1825 Fortview Inc. Don Farmer has not occupied the property since 2012. Don’s Grass has not been in business since 2012.


As reported in the December 30, 2011 edition of Austin Chronicle and again in another issue of the Austin Chronicle, the future January 12, 2012 Austin City Council meeting regarding Don Farmer’s violations were referenced and reported on.

On January 12, 2012, City of Austin council members held a public hearing related in reference towards alleged violations that Don Farmer failed to install a water meter and for failing to accurately record & submit monthly reports of groundwater withdrawals from a permitted Middle Trinity water well. District Rules required the permittee to appear before the District’s Board of Directors and show cause why it should not be subject to an enforcement action by the Board. (A foreclosure notice was filed to the Travis County Courthouse on January 14, 2012.)

Back in January 15, 2012, the City of Austin shut down Don’s Grass for good by giving Don Farmer a citation for alleged violations of failure to install a water meter and failing to accurately record & submit monthly reports of groundwater withdrawals from a permitted Middle Trinity water well.

After Don’s Grass was shut down by the city for alleged violations for failing to accurately record & submit monthly reports of groundwater withdrawals, Don Farmer sold the former Oak Hill School property back to Austin 1825 Fortview Inc (from he purchased the property from 7 years prior) on the date of 1/16/2012 from a substitute trustee deed. Austin 1825 Fortview Inc sold the property to BGSIX Holdings LLC on a warranty deed basis.

According to the City of Austin, on April 2, 2014, the old Oak Hill Elementary School became a City of Austin Historical Landmark by ordinance 20010719-029. This meant the former school building could not be demolished.

Austin 1825 Fortview Inc sold the property to BGSIX Holdings LLC on a warranty deed basis on the date of 9/18/2015. BGSIX Holdings LLC has owned the property and school buildings since late 2015.


As of November 2017, bulldozers occupy the site of the old Oak Hill School. Piles of dirt can be seen from road-view off of US 290 visible to the public eye. As of now, BGSIX Holdings LLC and City of Austin own the property. Both Don Farmer, BGSIX Holdings LLC and City of Austin are keeping an eye on the property for any potential buyers willing to purchase the property.

For now the former Oak Hill School sits vacant and unoccupied at 6420 West US 290, Austin, Texas, US 78735. Oak Hill Elementary School now operates a K-5 school located on 6101 Patton Ranch Road, Austin, Texas, US 78735.


The Preservation Potential of Building states, “Historic stone school building appears to be in good condition, and can readily be adapted to a new commercial or office use. As a historic landmark building, the property would be eligible for an annual city property tax abatement equal to approximately 30 percent of the assessed taxes. A rehabilitation of the building could also be eligible for federal historic tax credits with a sales tax exemptions for labor costs of rehabilitation.”

Oak Hill School remains as one of the five surviving public buildings associated with development of Oak Hill and a prominent historic structure located centrally in the historic core of Oak Hill. School was the center of activity in the community for 62 years from 1923 to 1985.

Oak Hill School holds an important place in the history of Oak Hill and Cedar Valley community. Oak Hill School deserves a better fate than that of the Cedar Valley School.

Saturday, October 28, 2017

Future for old Oak Hill School in Austin, Texas remains unknown.

The future for the Oak Hill School, which once served as the old Oak Hill Elementary School which taught grades 1 through 7 operated by Austin ISD in Austin, Texas, remains unknown currently as of November 2017. Don Farmer and his landscape business Don’s Grass occupied the former Oak Hill School building from 2005 to 2012.

However Don Farmer plans to demolish the old Oak Hill School so he can build a new modernized storefront for his business Don's Grass & Landscape Inc. But nothing has materialized yet. He has not made comment to the public regarding the former Oak Hill School property or its buildings. The former Oak Hill School and its school buildings remain in tact leaving many Austin and Oak Hill citizens to wonder about the future of the old Oak Hill School site. Many activists, council members, and preservationists from both Austin and Oak Hill wonder about the future of the old site as well.

The old Oak Hill School has gone through a series of landowners and has operated as a front for several businesses. Once the former Oak Hill School operated as a grocery store that sold pumpkins during autumn, a mail department, once as a hardware store, and once as an automobile repair station. Austin 1825 Fortview Inc owned the property prior to Don Farmer who purchased the property through a warranty deed on the date of 6/4/2005.

Bulldozers occupy the property site of the old Oak Hill School. The buildings have permit papers attached indicating improvements are being made. There are building permits for interior non-structural demolition around the vacant school buildings. It is unlikely that the former Oak Hill School will be demolished as the City of Austin has zoned the Oak Hill School property as a historic property back in 2001.


It’s last tenants was Don Farmer and Austin 1825 Fortview Inc. Don Farmer has not occupied the property since 2012. Don’s Grass has not been in business since 2012.

The future January 12, 2012 Austin City Council meeting regarding Don Farmer violations were reported in the December 30, 2011 edition of Austin Chronicle and again in another issue of the Austin Chronicle. A foreclosure notice was filed to the Travis County Courthouse on January 14, 2012.

Back in January 12, 2012, the City of Austin shut down Don’s Grass by giving Don Farmer a citation for alleged violations of failure to install a water meter and failing to accurately record & submit monthly reports of groundwater withdrawals from a permitted Middle Trinity water well.

On January 12, 2012, City of Austin council members held a public hearing related in reference towards alleged violations that Don Farmer failed to install a water meter and for failing to accurately record & submit monthly reports of groundwater withdrawals from a permitted Middle Trinity water well. District Rules required the permittee to appear before the District’s Board of Directors and show cause why it should not be subject to an enforcement action by the Board.

After Don’s Grass was shut down by the city for alleged violations for failing to accurately record & submit monthly reports of groundwater withdrawals, Don Farmer sold the former Oak Hill School property back to Austin 1825 Fortview Inc (from he purchased the property from 7 years prior) on the date of 1/16/2012 from a substitute trustee deed. Austin 1825 Fortview Inc sold the property to BGSIX Holdings LLC on a warranty deed basis.

According to the City of Austin, on April 2, 2014, the old Oak Hill Elementary School became a City of Austin Historical Landmark by ordinance 20010719-029.

Austin 1825 Fortview Inc sold the property to BGSIX Holdings LLC on a warranty deed basis on the date of 9/18/2015. BGSIX Holdings LLC has owned the property and school buildings since late 2015.


Bulldozers occupy the site of the old Oak Hill School. Piles of dirt can be seen from road-view off of US 290 visible to the public eye. As of now, BGSIX Holdings LLC and City of Austin own the property. Both Don Farmer, BGSIX Holdings LLC and City of Austin are keeping an eye on the property for any potential buyers willing to purchase the property.

For now the former Oak Hill School sits vacant and unoccupied at 6420 West US 290, Austin, Texas, US 78735.

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Mackenzie High School could see new revitalized life.

The old Mackenzie High School at 9275 Wyoming Avenue could new life a newly built revitalized building in the future. A new modern school building could be built on the former site. However Detroit Public Schools crashed and burned due to the 2014 bankruptcy. As of 2017, nothing has happened yet. The old Mackenzie High School was demolished in June 28, 2012 so a new modern school building could be built.

The old Mackenzie High School was located at 9275 Wyoming Avenue, Detroit, Michigan, US 48204.

History of Lowell Junior High School revealed by Mixerr Reviews.

Lowell Junior High School served as both a junior high school and middle school in the city of Flint, Michigan. Lowell Junior High School had operated from 1929 to 2003. Lowell Junior High School went under the names Lowell Middle School and Lowell School during its time of operation.

Lowell Junior High School is where the former farmland owned by the Perry family was once formally. This land used to be farmland and also was a dairy farm owned by the Perry family. The Flint Community Schools had purchased the land where Lowell Junior High School is today from the Perry family back in 1900.

In 1927, Alice Moss Perry had a petition she had signed by local citizens of the community in order to have Lowell Junior High School built. Several local citizens were in favor of building a new junior high school in the Eastside Village.

1929 is the year Lowell Junior High School was built and opened less than 2 blocks from Lewis School with an enrollment of 200 students in 7th grade through 9th grade. In the 1929-1930 school year, the student population soared to 300 students.

In 1930, enrollment was 300 students in 7th grade through 9th grade. A new shop class building with a 40 foot long chimney was built. The shop class building had an underground tunnel that connected to Lewis School which served as a maintenance tunnel and as a fallout shelter during wartime. Both Lewis School and Lowell Junior High School shared this building with each other.


Prior to 1950, Lowell Junior High School was an all-white school even though black students lived just blocks away. Lowell Junior High School was originally intended for whites only as Eastside Flint was historically planned out to be by city planners and urban development. The year of 1950 is when Lowell Junior High School integrated allowing black students to attend. By then Lowell Junior High School had became an integrated school.

Lowell Junior High School was a feeder school for many elementary schools on the Eastside Village and also the Rollingwood area. Williams Elementary would later on feed into Lowell Junior High School as many elementary schools in the Eastside community would. That's how the Flint Community Schools had designed Lowell Junior High School.


In 1978 is when Flint Community Schools closed down Lewis School due to statewide budget cuts and lack of enrollment which led the remaining students to attend Williams Elementary School and the surrounding elementary schools. Lewis School was closed for good.

During that same year, Flint Community Schools later repurposed and renamed Lewis School to Lowell Junior High School Annex. Lewis School severed as an annex building for Lowell Junior High School. This lasted from 1978 to 1991.

In 1988, Lowell Junior High School closed down due to budget cuts by the Michigan Board of Education. Lowell Junior High School closed down as part of the largest school closing plan in Flint Community Schools district history at the time along with Northern High School.

In 1991, Lowell Junior High School would later be rezoned to be an alternative middle school for troubled students. Fights were common. Metal detectors were later on put in Lowell Junior High School. From 1991 to 2003, Lowell Junior High School served as an alternative middle school/junior high school for the Flint Community Schools district during that time. Lowell served as a high school for a shortened brief amount of time as well.

Due to the declining enrollment of students in the Flint Community Schools and financial budget cuts, the administration decided to close Lowell Junior High School in 2003. These actions made were also due to administrative decisions and budget cuts.


The school went through many land owners. First as a community center, alternative school, church, and a non-profit organization.

In 2005, Church of ROC - Flint rented Lowell Junior High School from Flint Community Schools on their lease. In 2008, Flint Community Schools found out that Church of ROC - Flint had failed to provide documentation on whether or not they were paying their rent lease.

In 2009, Lowell Junior High School was set on fire by a home barbeque pit that had spread from someones home from the area to the school. 2009 was also when an arsonist set fire to Lowell Junior High School. These drastic events alone made Flint Community School board up Lowell Junior High School all together thus leaving it abandoned for criminal activity to occur. By 2010, all of Lowell Junior High School was boarded up and still is.


As of right now currently, the entire property of the Lowell Junior High School building is boarded up by plywood to prevent theft and trespassing. The former educational institution known as Lowell Junior High School is constantly being vandalized and tagged with graffiti all over the property. Windows are missing. Doors inside are missing too.

The building now sits vacant as a former shill of itself with broken wood panels that line directly within the windows. The outside building structure is still intact. This building is a case of urban decay where the outside looks fine but the inside is deplorable.

Lowell Junior High School is located at 3301 North Vernon Avenue, Flint, Michigan, US 48506.

History of Lewis School in Flint, Michigan.

Lewis School is one of many schools in Flint, Michigan that have been forgotten and faded away with time. The Lewis School itself served as one of the many early educational institutions of Flint, Michigan along with many others. Flint Community Schools operated the school from 1911 to 1991. Years of operation for this school were 1911 to 1978. Not much is known about the Lewis School itself except it was less than a stones throw away from Lowell Junior High School. 


Flint School Board began devising plans to build a new school in 1911. The Flint School Board chose to build a new school on former farmland where a dairy farm that was owned and operated by the Perry family once was. Alice Moss Perry had sold the land to Flint Community Schools school district. She had previously owned the land prior to selling the farmland to the school district. The land had been in the Moss family for 200 years prior to 1900. The Flint School Board decided to name the school after W. C. Lewis, former Secretary of the Flint School Board.

Construction began in 1911. The construction period for building this school took surprisingly less than a year. Lewis School was built as a 3 story red brick building with a basement below. The Lewis School sat on a cement foundation. Lewis School opened 1911 less than 2 blocks directly across from where Lowell Junior High School currently is. Lewis Elementary School was known as Lewis School when it first opened. Lewis School served as an elementary school teaching 1st grade through 6th grade.

1916 is when the school received building improvements. The cement foundation was renovated, new windows were installed in upstairs classrooms, plumbing was installed, and old furniture was exchanged for new furniture.

Lewis School went under various name changes over the years with names such as WC Lewis Community School, WC Lewis School, Lewis Elementary School, Lowell Junior High School Annex, and WC Lewis Elementary School. From 1950 to 1991, the name for Lewis School changed to Lewis Community School.


In 1927, Alice Moss Perry had a petition she had signed by local citizens of the community in order to have Lowell Junior High School built. 1929 is the year Lowell Junior High School was built and opened less than 2 blocks from Lewis School. Lowell Junior High School went under the names Lowell Middle School and Lowell School. Lowell Junior High School operated from 1929 to 2003.

A new shop class building with a 40 foot long chimney was built. The shop class building had an underground tunnel that connected to Lewis School which served as a maintenance tunnel and as a fallout shelter during wartime. Both Lewis School and Lowell Junior High School shared this building with each other.


From 1950 to 1991, the name for Lewis School changed to Lewis Community School. Lewis School was an all-white school at one time even though black students just had lived blocks away from school grounds. Lewis School was originally planned to be an all-white school which it was in the beginning of the 20th century. By 1950, Lewis Elementary was an integrated school. Black students and white students attended this school with no incident. Integration was not a huge problem for this school.

The walls were caving in from lack of repairs and increasing enrollment in the 1960s. The walls were not sound or structurally safe. Increasing enrollment led to overcrowding conditions at Lewis School. So Flint Community Schools decided to build Williams Elementary School in 1966 to relieve overcrowding conditions at Lewis School. 1967 is when Williams Elementary School first opened to students attending the Lewis School and students living in Eastside Flint.


In 1978 is when Flint Community Schools closed down Lewis School due to statewide budget cuts and lack of enrollment which led the remaining students to attend Williams Elementary School and the surrounding elementary schools. Lewis School was closed for good.

During that same year, Flint Community Schools later repurposed and renamed Lewis School to Lowell Junior High School Annex. Lewis School severed as an annex building for Lowell Junior High School. This lasted from 1978 to 1991.

By 1988, the school building serving as an annex building sat deteriorating from years of neglect and lack of maintenance. Walls were reported to be caving in from a lack of maintenance. The building would then become a storage building for maintenance owned by Lowell Junior High School known as Lowell Junior High School Annex. From 1988 to 1991, Lewis School was still known as Lowell Junior High School Annex.


By 1990 however, the administration of the school board for Flint Community Schools decided to demolish Lewis School as a cost cutting move to relieve the budget for the school district. Plans to demolish Lewis School came out of the blue. This unannounced move did not bother the community.

1991 is when Lewis School was demolished due to structural problems from lack of maintenance.  Lewis School was also demolished to save on resources and utilities. The administrative decision to close down Lewis School was an unplanned move. Many residents were not notified. Few were saddened by this. Others didn’t seem to much care.


The only building structure that remains of Lewis School is the shop class building with the giant 40 foot chimney which also was a part of Lowell Junior High School. The shop class building is where trash was burned. Lewis School shop class building lays in an unverifiable state or ruin as a result from urban decay. Plywood has been installed on several window panes and window tiles to prevent vandalism and fire. The underground tunnel located beneath the shop class building has been filled with cement and is no longer accessible. All access points have been blocked.

All that remains is the square asphalt ground that was once where the school building was located along with the asphalt parking lot covered by grass which has crumbed from weathering effects overtime making the parking lot ground uneven. The concrete structures haves decayed and crumbled from urban blight. Basically all that remains is the ground and square frame structures. All infrastructure has been demolished.


WC Lewis Elementary School was located at Franklin Avenue & Colorado Street, Flint, Michigan, US 48506.

History of Beckwith School in Flint, Michigan.

Beckwith School is one of many schools in Flint, Michigan that have been forgotten and faded away with time. The Beckwith School itself served as one of the many early educational institutions of Flint, Michigan along with many others. Not much is known about the Beckwith School itself.

Beckwith School began its life in Flint, Michigan in 1896 as a single story house. This single story house was a one-room school where 1st grade through 6th grade were taught. At that time, Beckwith School was a 1-6 school. 7th grade was added later. After students completed 6th grade, students were bussed into Flint to attend Flint Community Schools. Westwood Heights School District (Westwood Heights Schools) operated the school from 1896 to 2001.

Beckwith School had its own school district called Beckwith School District which it operated on. The school district was never well off financially. So they relied on Westwood Heights School District and Flint Community Schools for help.

1920 is Beckwith School moved to location on Clio Avenue between Carpenter Road and Pierson Road. 7th grade was added in 1920. School was taught in a two story house this time as opposed to a one story house. After students completed 6th grade and 7th grade, students transferred over to Flint Community Schools to attend Flint Central High School.

During the 1931 is when Westwood Heights School District, Beckwith School District, and Flint Community Schools had an agreement to pay the tuition of the students attending high school at Flint Central High School. Not many school districts could not pay the tuition of their high school students. Especially the rural school districts. That had meant many students didn’t get a chance to go to high school,

In 1950, Beckwith School moved to a different location on Ridgeway Avenue near the intersection of Doran Street & Ridgeway Avenue. This building was a single story red and brown brick building with a black and brown roof. For the most part, the color of the roof was black though. 1950 is when Beckwith School became a K-8 school.

Students began attending Beecher High School operated by the Beecher Community School District in Beecher, Michigan in 1952. After 8th grade is when students transferred over to Beecher Schools to attend Beecher High School.

2001 is when Beckwith School was demolished. The parking lot was repaved over with cement. The asphalt has been covered up.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Mixerr Reviews discovers Wade Cave in Austin, Texas.

On the date of October 15, 2017, Michael Mixerr of Mixerr Reviews discovered Wade Cave at Goat Cave Karst Preserve in Austin, Texas while during a caving outing. Wade Cave is one of the many forgotten caves of Austin/Travis County being that Wade Cave is one of the lesser known caves. Not much is known about the history of Wade Cave or the discovery backstory for it.

Wade Cave is difficult to enter group to due to the steep drop inside the cave and not just the steps. Bringing groups will be difficult to due to a steep drop inside the cave. Going in small groups is recommended when touring Wade Cave.

Wade Cave is a cave with a subtle moist environment with a high level of moisture perfect for mosquitoes and bats. Mosquitoes and bats are the natural wildlife that inhabit Wade Cave. The moist environment is a subtle breeding ground ideal for mosquitos among other insects, spiders, flies, and other insects of course. Many insects inhabit Wade Cave as insects inhabit and compromise a huge portion of natural wildlife in the caves of Texas. The caves of Goat Cave Karst Preserve Park are no exception however.

“Upon entering Wade Cave, I felt a sense of moisture the first 20 seconds I was down there. You can feel a sense of moisture down in that particular cave. The moist environment is a subtle breeding ground for mosquitos. I had noticed mosquitos had been swarming over me while I was 20 feet-30 feet into Wade Cave.” said Michael Mixerr.

Apparently Balcones Canyon Preserves is contracting construction of steps into Wade Cave. A staircase with rails is going to be installed sometime in 2017. Construction began August 2017. Rails have been secured around the perimeter of the Wade Cave entrance. Yellow caution tape has been placed. During construction, contractors found out that Wade Cave connects to Goat Cave and Maple Run Cave inside Goat Cave Karst Preserve Park.

A hydrogeological study of Goat Cave, Maple Run Cave, and Wade Cave is anticipated to be completed in 2017.

Pleasant Hill School deemed to be the oldest school in Austin, Texas.

Many historians, news reporters, journalists, writers, and Austin ISD staff can agree that Pleasant Hill School (Pleasant Elementary Hill School) is the oldest school in Austin, Texas. In fact, Pleasant Hill School is one of the oldest public schools in Austin, Texas next to Pease School (Pease Elementary School), Eanes School (Eanes Elementary School), and Austin High School. The Pleasant Hill School is/was both a negro school and a white school.


History of Pleasant Hill School began in 1858 at Onion Creek Lodge #220 (Onion Creek Masonic Lodge #220) as Red Cedar School and later Union School. The Masons discussed the issue of opening their own lodge. The Masons petitioned for their own lodge in 1858. Pleasant Hill School first began inside a small one-room log cabin built from red cedar which was conceived from Bastrop County.

In those days, Pleasant Hill School was a K-12 school teaching 1st grade through 10th grade operating as a 1-10 school. 11th grade was added sometime during the 20th century. From 1858-1935 is when Pleasant Hill School operated in the Onion Creek Lodge.

The log cabin later destroyed by Indians in the fall of 1859. Everything was salvaged by Indians with the building being beyond repair. The building burned. The result of this fire was believed to have been antics by local school children. Exact details as to how the Pleasant Hill School burnt down is still a mystery to this day.

A new building was required to be built. Native white limestone was quarried in from Oak Hill. The stone lodge building was completed in 1860. First floor of the Onion Creek Lodge was used by the Pleasant Hill School and the second floor was used to hold religious services by the Masons, Presbyterians, Baptists, and Methodists by alternating on Sundays. The Masons leased their lodge building to various religious groups and religious organizations over the years.

The Union School House changed name to Pleasant Hill School in 1869. The Mason’s assumed full ownership of the entire building the same year. 1869 was a year that brought forth a lot of changes for the Onion Creek Masonic Lodge and Pleasant Hill School.

Extra additional space was added at a cost of $440 dollars in 1870. 1870 is when more changes were brought forth.


Extra additional space was added at a cost of $770 dollars in 1908. The 1908-1909 school semester saw an increase in enrollment. Austin Public Schools (Austin ISD) began overseeing administrative duties for Pleasant Hill School during this time. 1st grade through 9th grade were taught here. Pleasant Hill School was a 1-9 school. School never went past 10th grade.

In the 1934-1935 school semester, Pleasant Hill School had 28 students. The average daily attendance was 15 students daily. There was one teacher for 28 students. The cost per year was $435. One teacher taught 1st grade through 9th grade for 120 days.

First floor of the Onion Creek Lodge was used by the Pleasant Hill School to educate students until 1935 when the present school building was built and opened. 1935 is when Pleasant Hill moved into a new and improved school building a mile north on Circle S Road. For the school semesters of 1935-1936 and 1936-1937 is when Pleasant Hill School became a 1-9 school teaching 1st grade through 9th grade. After finishing 9th grade, students attended Austin High School in town.

1956 is when Austin ISD took full control over Pleasant Hill School and the Pleasant Hill School District by incorporating and annexing the property around the school. The Pleasant Hill School District lasted from 1953 to 1956. It was never really powerful and did not last long due to the city of Austin annexing that area in 1956. Lifespan and duration of Pleasant Hill School District was short. Pleasant Hill School integrated in 1956.


By 1960 Pleasant Hill School was a known negro school. Despite integration, a majority of the student population was African American. Much of Southeast Austin had a large black population by 1960. Pleasant Hill School was no exception. 1960 is the same year Austin ISD added Kindergarden to the Pleasant Hill School and that is when Pleasant Hill School became a K-9 school.

By 1975, Pleasant Hill School became Pleasant Hill Elementary School and was no longer a 1-9 school that taught grades 1st through 9th as the school had in the past. Pleasant Hill School reformed and was restructured into an elementary school which would become Pleasant Hill Elementary School that grades Kindergarden through 6th.


By 1985 during the 1985-1986 school year, Pleasant Hill School is no longer a negro school or an all-white school. Hispanic students and families had been moving into the area compromising more than 50% of the student population.

By 1989, Hispanic students compromised 50%-65% of the student population for Pleasant Hill Elementary School. A majority of students at this school were Hispanic as of that year.

In May 1992, the Pleasant Hill Elementary School playground was renovated in honor of former kindergarten teacher Jo Ann Hinte through a fund-raising campaign. The school's playground roof was a mere inconvenience.


As of 2017, Pleasant Hill School is the oldest free public school in Texas and is the oldest school in Austin overall. Today the early Pleasant Hill School and school building still stands which is now Onion Creek Masonic Lodge #220.

Hispanic students compromise 85% of the student population for Pleasant Hill Elementary School. A majority of students at this school that are Hispanic come from a Mexican background/ancestry. Hispanic students compromise a majority student population for Pleasant Hill Elementary School as of this time currently.

Coker School history found to be dating back to pre-Civil War era.

The North East ISD (NEISD) 50th Anniversary Newsletter cites “Coker School was in operation prior to the Civil War”. Past records indicate that Coker School clearly existed before 1861.

Early settlers in San Antonio, Texas founded and organized Coker School in 1841. Coker School was never located in a permanent location prior to 1861. According to the NEISD 50th Anniversary Newsletter, “In the early days, school was taught in different parts of the community in order to equalize the distance children had to travel to get to school. “ In 1861 is when Coker School received one-room log cabin that would serve as a school building.

Coker School started out as a co-ed public school that fees were paid by tuition. Parents paid a two dollar tuition to cover the teacher's salary. Students bought their own books. In 1861 is when Coker School became the Coker Common School. Gradually more families moved into the Coker community.

Clarksville School in Austin, Texas long forgotten revisited.

The history of Clarksville School and Clarksville School itself have been long forgotten. Clarksville School has faded away with time away from people’s minds. Clarksville School is one of Austin’s many forgotten institutions from decades ago. Most never really heard or seen the former Clarksville School. Clarksville School was one of the many schools historians never wrote a book about or news stations have either covered.

Clarksville School was an elementary school for African-American students from 1881 to 1964. The Clarksville School was at the location of 1811 West 11th Street, Austin, Texas, US 78703. Clarksville School was zoned to Austin Public Schools (now Austin ISD) during its time of operation.

Basic instruction such as home economics, spelling, history, and literature (reading course) were taught and provided. Spelling was one of the most highly important subjects taught at this school next to their reading courses.



Clarksville School was built as a one-room schoolhouse as a log cabin in 1881 at the location of 1811 West 11th Street in Austin, Texas. The log cabin was built from cedar trees grown in the area. The Clarksville School was a negro school established by Austin Public Schools school board. African American children were taught here.

Clarksville School taught Grades 1st through 7th. From 1881 to 1886 is when Clarksville School conducted classes inside a log cabin. The log cabin school was demolished in 1886. In 1886 the Clarksville School had an enrollment of 27 students.

From 1886 to 1889, Clarksville School conducted classes at the AME Church on 11th Street. Classes were held temporarily in the AME Church for a short period of time. AME Church leased classroom space to Austin Public Schools at the time for Clarksville School and Wheatville School (Wheatville Elementary School).

In 1889, a new log cabin building built from cedar trees grown in the area was constructed. Clarksville School students then moved into the new building in the same year. By 1889, Clarksville School taught Grades 1st through 7th. In 1896 the Clarksville School had an enrollment of 47 students.


In 1900 during the 1900-1901 school year, only grades 1st through 6th were taught at Clarksville School. Students who wanted to continue their junior high school education and high school education were transferred to Kealing Junior High School (now Kealing Middle School) and Anderson High School in East Austin. Some pupils were transferred to Campbell School (now Campbell Elementary School).

The 1900-1901 school year saw an increase of student enrollment at Clarksville School. School improvements to the building and other structures were made during the 1900-1901 school year. Clarksville School operated as a one-room elementary school then.


Clarksville School was the site of the Clarksville Colored School controversy in 1916. One of the earliest public expressions of this sentiment was the Clarksville Colored School controversy in 1916.

A group of white homeowners from the Enfield neighborhood banded together in opposition of the planned construction for a "Colored" elementary school in Clarksville which would become Clarksville Colored School. Clarksville began to shift and the Values of land in the Clarksville neighborhood began to rise in the year of 1916. A number of West Austin's Anglo (white) residents began to voice their opinions that the presence of the African American Clarksville community would devalue their land.

A year prior, the Austin Public Schools school board voted to set aside some money to finance construction for the Clarksville Colored School and the “colored” West Austin Elementary School (West Austin School) that educated African-American students and Hispanic students. West Austin Elementary School served the rapidly expanding Mexican-American population in the area.

Clarksville Colored School was built because of the largest concentration blacks in West Austin in the Clarksville neighborhood. Austin Public Schools reasoned that the new elementary school for African-Americans that lived in West Austin be built in the Clarksville neighborhood.

White West Austin residents opposed the construction of the new elementary school in the Clarksville neighborhood because they reasoned that it would encourage blacks to remain in Clarksville. White West Austin residents thought it best that the school be built in East Austin where the majority of black Austinites lived and where the black high school was located.

In May 1916, the school board voted to allow for the school's construction. The old Clarksville School log cabin was demolished. A wood-frame dwelling that had previously occupied the site was remodeled and enlarged to include 6 classrooms at a cost of about $1,500 as stated in a 1916 news article from the Austin American-Statesman newspaper. The new Clarksville School was built as a red brick building. 1916 is when Clarksville School became Clarksville Colored School. Expansion was never really needed because enrollment was at a flat rate.


In 1917 is when the new Clarksville School was built as a red brick building. The school conducted education was not in one room as before. School was conducted in 7 classrooms this time around. Expansion was never really needed because enrollment was at a flat rate.

According to the history article TSHA wrote about the Clarksville neighborhood titled CLARKSVILLE, TX (TRAVIS COUNTY), “In 1918 the Austin school board closed the Clarksville school”

Apparently Austin Public Schools closed down Clarksville School in 1918. Whether or not the school would be temporarily or permanently closed is unknown. How long the school was closed is undetermined. Clarksville children still attended elementary school at West Austin School (West Austin Elementary School). Junior high school students and senior high school students from the neighborhood attended school at Kealing Junior High School and Anderson High School.


From the 1920s to the 1940s, student population never went past 70 pupils. Usually enrollment stayed above 60 or 62. Enrollment was usually at a flat rate most of the time. The student population was 70 in 1940.


Because of the 1954 court ruling of Brown vs the Board of Education that determined that racial segregation in public schools was unconstitutional, Clarksville School closed in 1964 and the children were bussed to the formerly all white Matthews School (Matthews Elementary School). The school building was reported to be in dilapidated condition in 1964. For the 1964-1965 school year, the former Clarksville School building sat in a dilapidated condition almost beyond repair it seems while still extant of course.

The Clarksville School building was moved to O. Henry Junior High School (now O. Henry Middle School) in 1965. The Clarksville School building now serves as an added on addition to O. Henry Middle School now serving as a cafeteria.

The former Clarksville School campus was converted into a park called Clarksville Park in 1966. A pool and basketball court were installed. Playground equipment was brought in by Austin Parks & Recreation. A volleyball court was built next to the basketball courts. Clarksville Park was established for $50,000 dollars.


Today the cement pavilions where Clarksville School campus one stood is now basketball courts. A volleyball court has been since built next to the basketball courts. More improvements have been made to Clarksville Park as of 2016.

All that remains of the Clarksville School are the cement pavilions. Today the Clarksville School legacy lives on as Clarksville Park.Clarksville School was located at the location of 1811 West 11th Street, Austin, Texas, US 78703.

Monday, October 9, 2017

SH 45 construction in Southwest Austin expected to face delays until 2019 revisited.

The ongoing SH 45 construction in Southwest Austin is expected to be facing delays until 2019 to budget cuts enacted by the Texas State Legislature. The set completion date of the SH 45 (State Highway 45) remains the same as the SH 45 in Southwest Austin will open to the public in 2019. By 2019, construction will have been completed and the highway will be functional by then. Going both directions westbound and eastbound, SH 45 will merge regular lanes on Mopac Highway (Loop 1).

Construction on SH 45 alongside Mopac has been rather moving at a sluggish pace. Progress remains slow as usual. Rain weather from previous months in 2017 have delayed construction for SH 45. Mainly it was the rain weather from May delayed construction the most. Other factors have delayed construction for SH 45.

Various acres of land property have been purchased from several landowners in Southwest Austin by imminent domain enacted by City of Austin and TXDOT over the course 20 years. Several landowners had complained 2 decades earlier about how there will be too much traffic and noise complaints if there were to be a highway in Southwest Austin separating the neighborhoods of Circle C, Meridian, and Esquel apart from each other.

The southwest portion SH 45 is going to be connected to FM 1626 less than 2 miles north of the small town of Hays, Texas. SH 45 is expected to connect to I 35 and the southeast portion of SH 45. The latest SH 45 is expected be completed by the year 2019. SH 45 is a west-east highway in Austin, Texas.

History of Thomaston School in Thomaston, Texas long forgotten.

History of Thomaston School began with Thomaston Public School in 1874 with James H. Moore as the teacher. The Thomaston School building was built as a white one-room school house in the town of Thomaston, Texas.

James H. Moore was the first teacher to have educated students and held classes at Thomaston School. James H. Moore taught school there from the latter end of the 19th century to the fledgling 20th century. Mr. James H. Moore taught here until he retired. Mrs. Elmer Luddeke was one of the early teachers of the Thomaston School.

Professor J. W. Carroll was the first principal for the Thomaston School. His daughter, Miss Edna Carroll, taught classes at Thomaston School. Professor J. W. Carroll ran the school on a 9 month school schedule as students had to help their families grow crops during harvest season.

A news article dating back to Saturday, September 18, 1880 in The Cuero Star verifies and claims the caption under the headlines of “Thomaston School Commences Oct. 1, 1880.”. So at some unverifiable point between the years of 1874 and 1880, Thomaston School stopped operating.

The Thomaston School building was also used for church services where Sunday school was held until a church building was built in the year of 1886. Reverend Z. B. Graves held church services inside the Thomaston School building.

1894 is when a new two-room school was built. Thomaston School employed 2 teachers after the year of 1894. From thereon, Thomaston School operated on a 9 month school schedule. Enrollment was as high as 72 students at times. A well was installed on the property in the year of 1903. Thomaston Public School eventually became Thomaston School and later Thomaston Elementary School.

Thomaston Elementary School taught students from 1st grade to 8th grade. After 8th grade, students were transferred into town in Cuero for high school education where students attended Cuero High School in Cuero Independent School District (Cuero ISD). Finances were tight for the small school.


Thomaston School was not a district school until 1906. Thomaston School (Thomaston Elementary School) was not a district school until the 1906-1907 school year in October of 1906. It was very odd for school to start in October as most schools started on the month of September.

A news article dating back to Monday, June 4, 1906 written for San Antonio Daily Express verified that Professor J. W. Carroll was re-elected princpal of the Thomaston School with his daughter, Miss Edna Carroll as the assistant principal. She also served as both assistant principal and teacher.

However, a news article dating back to Wednesday, September 12, 1906 in the San Antonio Daily Express verifies that the Thomaston School and Thomas School District were created in the small town of Thomaston, Texas located inside Dewitt County on the date of September 10, 1906. Thomaston School was a primary school that primary grades which was 1st grade to 8th grade. A news article dating back to Wednesday, September 12, 1906 in the San Antonio Daily Express verified the school opened with the headlines being “Thomaston School opens.”

So that means another “Thomaston School” was opened. This particular “Thomaston School” was opened as the “Thomaston Primary School” and that the town of Thomaston first organized its own school district called Thomas School District on the most likely date of September 8, 1906 prior to Thomas Primary School opening on September 10, 1906. Thomaston School was a primary school that primary grades which was 1st grade to 8th grade. After 8th grade, students were transferred into town in Cuero for high school education where students attended Cuero High School in Cuero ISD.

Thomaston Primary School opened at 10 AM in the morning of Monday, September 10, 1906 with Professor J. W. Carroll as the principal and Miss Jessie Tartar and Miss Edna Carroll both as the teachers teaching grades 1 through 8. Miss Jessie Tartar and Miss Edna Carroll were the first teachers to have taught at Thomaston Primary School.

Professor J. W. Carroll was the first principal for the Thomaston Primary School as well as Thomaston School District. Professor J. W. Carroll and his daughter, Miss Edna Carroll, had both worked for Thomas School District when the school district was first organized.

Thomaston School (Thomaston Primary School) was built on a 5-room plan instead of being built as a one room schoolhouse as most schools located on the rural countryside were at that time in the United States. The Thomaston Primary School building was built as a one story schoolhouse which was painted white.

Thomaston Primary School had a music room with a piano installed on the date the school opened. The school had a library with a nice collection of books added and donated from nearby communities. Grades 1st through 4th were taught in one room and grades 5th through 8th in another room.


The Thomas School District opened 4 schools (as time went alongside) which were the following.: Thomaston Primary School, Thomaston Public School, Thomaston Elementary School, Thomaston White School, and Thomaston Negro School. All of which were most likely K-8 schools that taught 1st grade through 8th grade. After 8th grade, students from these schools were transferred into town in Cuero for high school education. Students attended Cuero ISD schools for high school.

Of course this school and several other Thomaston Schools were opened during the height of segregation when segregation was law of the land in Texas, the West, and the South. So white students attended white school and African American students attended negro schools at that time. No Mexican Schools were found on any maps of Thomaston, Texas. So it is possible that Hispanic students attended the white schools and negro schools.


At some point after 1920 is when Thomaston Primary School downsized from a K-8 school to a K-7 school teaching 1st grade through 7th grade. After 7th grade students would attend school in Cuero. After 1920, Thomaston School only taught 1st grade through 7th grade. School stopped after 8th grade.

Thomaston, Texas failed to maintain its prosperity as a railroad town as US Highway 87 along with a series of other county highways improved and cars made transportation easier. Passenger service for the towns railroad was discontinued in November 1950.

A news article from The Cuero Record on the date of Friday, September 16, 1955 verifies that Miss Murphree and Mr. Bill Milligan were in charge of Thomaston School. So Miss Murphree and Mr. Bill Milligan were the last faculty members of Thomaston School Board members to have been in charge of Thomaston School. Miss Murphree taught school at Thomaston School for 14 years and retired after 29 years of teachers.


Sometime during the 1956-1957 school year is when Thomaston School and Thomaston School District consolidated into Cuero Independent School District. Thomaston School and Thomas School District closed down after a lack of enrollment and lack of funding. Thomaston School District could no longer operate on property taxes, income taxes, or wealth taxes. So Thomaston School District consolidated into Cuero Independent School District (Cuero ISD) where students living Thomaston were sent to complete their education whether it be elementary school education and/or high school education.

Staff member Mrs. Jerry Mauer wrote a news article about the history of Thomaston School and Cuero ISD schools along a series of rural schools in Dewitt County in The Cuero Record newspaper dating to Sunday, March 24, 1957.

Mrs. Jerry Mauer explains “Pupils taught in the Thomaston School received an excellent basic education and were able to enter accredited high schools.” Mrs. Jerry Mauer verified that students from Thomaston now attend Cuero Independent School District schools.


Today no remains or traces of Thomaston School or any of the 4 Thomaston Schools that the Thomaston School District had operated from 1874 to 1956 can be found. The school buildings have been demolished, purchased by private land owners, or vacant on someones farm land in the countryside.

Not much is known about the Thomaston School and not much else can found or researched about this school either. All school records, property records, land deeds, energy bills, building easements, and school board meeting minutes have either been misplaced, lost, shredded, burned, or relocated. Not much is known about the Thomaston School or Thomaston School District either.

History of Mixerr Reviews explained by Michael Mixerr.

Mixerr Reviews is an independent news blog from Austin, Texas, US that often strays away from mainstream news and mainstream media. Mixerr Reviews talks about news that the underground scene cares about. In other words, Mixerr Reviews is basically a news blog.

Michael Mixerr started doing his overviews in October 2011. As many media news outlets, sources, and newspapers influenced him to do so. In him doing so, Michael Mixerr matured his writing style for Mixerr Reviews into a more organized well laid out newspaper format.

At first Mixerr Reviews was sort of a mail order only newspaper though as some thought it would be. It was through email only at one point. Mixerr Reviews was only available to those who knew Michael Mixerr on a personal level and the only way you could get it was through him. Meaning that Mixerr Reviews was available in Austin, Texas, US only. But in September 2012 is when Michael Mixerr made Mixerr Reviews available to the whole world through the Internet and not just locally in Austin only.

Mixerr Reviews was originally intended to be a music news blog. But Michael Mixerr wanted Mixerr Reviews to be a indie news blog. As times changed, so did Mixerr Reviews and all the other reviews changed in formatting to along with time. He has matured overtime. The reviews are useful sources of information to many people around the world. There is no propaganda allowed on Mixerr Reviews.

Mixerr Reviews/Mixerr Reviews Blogspot ATXN mission is being a local business while being a well known independent news organization that covers many news topics that corporate news media organizations won't debate on and is too afraid to discuss while they are on the air during live broadcast. Being descriptive and accurate is one of Mixerr Reviews priorities. Mixerr Reviews talks about topics no news organization would ever cover, discuss, or debate on.

History of University Junior High School in Austin, Texas not forgotten.

Many Austinites of today never knew a University Junior High School ever existed. Most question the existence of this school. It has been almost long forgotten despite being located on the internationally acclaimed University of Texas at Austin campus. University Junior High School opened in September 1933 and operated until June 3rd, 1967 when the school closed. Students at this school were taught and had received secondary education training.


Building a new junior high school was first brought to discussion in the year of 1932. University Junior High School was the proposed school to be built as the new junior high school for Austin Public Schools. Much space was needed for Austin Public Schools in terms of enrollment for students receiving secondary education. So University Junior High School would provide much needed space for Austin Public Schools growing secondary education students.

Funding was scarce. Especially during the Great Depression! So Austin Public Schools turned to UT for financial aid because there was not enough funding for the school district to operate this particular junior high school at the time. So an agreement and a joint contract between University of Texas and Austin Public Schools was made.

University of Texas and Austin Public Schools came up with a written contract that was a joint contract. The agreement that was reached stipulated that the University of Texas would provide the site and building at a cost between $300,000 to $400,000 dollars while the Austin Public Schools selected and paid the regular teaching staff and half the salary for the principal. The University of Texas at Austin funded the construction This proposed school was used as a tool for the University of Texas Education Department staff to observe and explore educational theories.

Austin’s only junior high (Allan Junior High School) was already becoming increasingly overcrowded. Allan Junior High School was extremely overcrowded by 142% way over capacity. University Junior High School was the answer and solution to the problems Austin Public Schools was facing. University Junior High School was built to serve as a secondary school operating on from a joint contract between the University of Texas (UT Austin) and Austin Public Schools (now Austin Independent School District bka Austin ISD).

University Junior High School was built as a Spanish Renaissance style structure that was 2 stories tall and had a basement. The cafeteria was located in the basement. (That is what made this school so unique from the other junior high schools in Austin.) Labs were built using the amphitheater plan. Eagles was the school mascot.

September 1933 is when University Junior High School opened with an enrollment of 831 within its first year. The 1933-1934 school year was the first school year University Junior High School operated on. 6th grade through 8th grade were taught at University Junior High School. That is what made this school so unique from the other junior high schools in Austin. Junior high schools did not use the “6-8 middle school” model as most middle schools and junior high schools of today use in some school district across the state of Texas. (9th grade was added later on.)


During the 1930s, University Junior High School was dubbed as a “model junior high school” by the The WPA Guide to Texas: The Lone Star State. University Junior High School was dubbed as a “model junior high school” for not only Texas but Austin as well.

Of course this junior high school was opened during the height of segregation when segregation was law of the land in Texas. So only white students were admitted. African American students were not permitted to attended University Junior High School at that time.

Later on in 1938, University Junior High School shifted from a “6-8 middle school model” to a “7-9 junior high school model” which taught 7th grade through 9th grade. From thereon out, 7th grade through 9th grade was taught at University Junior High School. 1938 is the last year 6th grade students would ever attend this junior high school. After 1938, 6th grade students would either attend elementary school (as that was the norm of the time) or be transferred to another junior high school.


Sometimes 10th grade students from Austin High School would be transferred to University Junior High School to relieve overcrowding during the 1940s. This school zoning practice was done due to overcrowding. What exact grades would be assigned at this school always shifted around to relieve and accommodate overcrowding in other Austin ISD schools of the time.

University Junior High School became overcrowded by 1942. It was almost overpopulated at the time. Austin Public Schools held board meetings and discussions to build another junior high school. However plans to build another junior high school were halted by World War II. Lack of funding is what also halted plans to build another junior high school for Austin Public Schools. This junior high school was almost overpopulated at the time.

In 1949, school buses served only those students in the 7th grade from the Govalle School School district to University Junior High School and only those in the 5th and 6th grades from St. Elmo School District to Fulmore Junior High School.

School bus service to Austin High School, Austin Senior High School, Allan High School, and Allan Junior High School was eliminated along with service for junior high school students and senior high school students for the following school districts: Govalle School District, St. Elmo School District, Rosedale School District, and Esperanza Common School District. School bus service for Negro students continued in operation on the same schedule used that year.


Sometime in the 1950s is when University Junior High School became a 6-9 school teaching 6th grade through 9th grade. Which was unusual because most junior high schools at the time did not operate on a “6-9 model” or a  “6-9 middle school model”. That is what made this school unique from the other junior high schools in Austin. From thereon out, 6th grade through 9th grade was taught at University Junior High School.

Sometime in the 1950s is when a portion of the University Junior High School building became University Junior High School with 10th grade through 12th grade being taught there. This practice would last until 1967 when the school closed.

Enrollment decreased in 1953 due to the opening of Baker Junior High School and O. Henry Junior High School relieving student load. The opening of the 2 junior high schools relieved overcrowding by nearly 200%! University Junior High School becomes UJH.


The 1960s is when University Junior High School became integrated. University Junior High School became fully integrated during the 1965-1966 school year. African American students are finally permitted to attend University Junior High School and so are Hispanic students.

Prior to 1965, University Junior High School was an all-white school. University Junior High School led desegregation for Austin ISD schools. It was a struggle for Austin to desegregate its schools. But University Junior High School desegregated successfully. Other Austin ISD schools desegregated slowly.


On some evening in 1967, the UJH school band performed the songs from the South Pacific film which helped promote racial sensitivity. The theatrical production South Pacific had the theme of racial sensitivity. "Bali Ha’i” was the band's favorite. A mystical tune.

June 3rd, 1967 is when University Junior High School closed. University Junior High School closed down because UT needed the space to accommodate campus expansion for the growing population of the time. The property belonged to UT from the beginning anyway. Students already attending this school were transferred over to the new Martin Junior High School better known now as Martin Middle School. The University Junior High School building became an annex for the UT school.

In 1967, Martin Junior High School (now Martin Middle School) was opened to replace University Junior High School. Martin Junior High School was Austin ISD’s first fully integrated school serving a diverse array of all races including African American students and Hispanic students. Not only was Martin Junior High School Austin ISD’s first fully integrated school, it was Austin ISD’s first fully integrated middle school/junior high school.


University Junior High School is now owned by the University of Texas operating as the School of Social Work. The school building remains intact at its original location. Location for University Junior High School was 1925 San Jacinto Boulevard, Austin, Texas, US 78712. The school is now a historical landmark.